BA Social Anthropology Single Honours Degree

advertisement
BA Social Anthropology Single Honours Degree
Level 1 Fifth and Sixth Module Choices
2013-14
Subject
Module Title
Module Code
Semester
Drama
Drama 1 – Performance Analysis
Drama 2 – Classical Theatre
DRA1001
DRA1002
(with DRA1001)
1
2
English
English in Transition
Introduction to English Language
English in Context
ENG1001
ENL1001
ENG1002
(with ENG1001)
1
1
2
Film Studies
Introduction to Film Studies 1
Introduction to Film Studies 2
FLM1001
FLM1002
(with FLM1001)
1
2
French
French Language 1
French Language 2
FRH1001
FRH1002
(with FRH1001)
FRH1011
FRH1012
(with FRH1011)
1
2
Beginners French 1
Beginners French 2
FRH1021
FRH1022
(with FRH1021)
1
2
History
Irish Studies 11: The Modern History, Politics, Sociology and
Anthropology of Northern Ireland
IRS1002
2
Irish and Celtic
Irish Language 1
Irish Language 2
1
2
Celtic Mythology
CEL1001
CEL1002
(with CEL1001)
CEL1033
Social Policy
Finding Out About Social Policy
SPY1001
2
Sociology
Understanding Society
The Sociological Imagination
SOC1001
SOC1002
1
2
Spanish
Hispanic Studies 1
Hispanic Studies 2
SPA1001
SPA1002
(with SPA1001)
1
2
Intermediate Spanish 1
Intermediate Spanish 2
SPA1011
SPA1012
(with SPA1011)
1
2
Beginners Spanish 1
Beginners Spanish 2
SPA1021
SPA1022
(with SPA1021)
1
2
Intermediate French 1
Intermediate French 2
1
2
1
BA Social Anthropology Single Honours Degree
Level 1 Fifth and Sixth Module Descriptions
2013-14
DRAMA
Drama 1 – Performance Analysis
DRA1001
Semester 1
This module aims to introduce students to theatre as a particular form of live performance event and to introduce
students to theoretical, historical and practical approaches to theatre studies.
Drama 2 – Classical Theatre
DRA1002
Semester 2
This module will deal with Western theatre history from Ancient Greece to the medieval period. This module
will explore the origin of Western theatre in the civic and religious festivals of Ancient Greece; the philosophy
and practice of Greek Tragedy; the form and function of Greek comedy; the Roman development of tragedy
and comedy; and the emergence of medieval drama. A variety of aesthetic and interpretive approaches will be
deployed as will different methodologies used by theatre historians.
ENGLISH
English in Transition
(for students with A Level English Grade B or above)
ENG1001
Semester 1
The module is envisaged as introducing students to literary interpretation as conceived by English studies at
university level. It aims to provide students with critical skills and technical vocabulary necessary to study poetry
and prose for the rest of their degree. The module focuses on a small selection of texts designed to help
students make the transition from the critical strategies used at A-level to those of academic English. In turn,
the two sections of the module include contributions from the Heaney Centre and creative writing colleagues
and the mode of assessment will allow for reflective development of writing skills through resubmission of
formative writing for summative assessment.
Introduction to English Language
(for students with A Level English Grade B or above)
ENL1001
Semester 1
This module offers a broad introduction to key topics in English language and it lays the foundations for the
systematic analysis of the language in all its diversity. Among the topics covered are: common beliefs about
“good” and “bad” language, aspects of accent and dialect, and issues to do with language and power. The
course also explores children’s acquisition of language and examines the connections between language and
education. Other important areas of inquiry are social, situational and geographical variation in language, with
particular emphasis placed on the history and development of the English language across the centuries.
English in Context
(for students with A Level English Grade B or above)
ENG1002
Semester 2
This module examines a broad sample of recent fiction. In doing so, it raises a set of general questions: 1)
whose contemporary experience does this literature address? 2) what economic or political factors lead to a
shared sense of the contemporary? 3) how does modern fiction relate to these broader social forces? The
module has a three-part structure. Section 1 examines the sociology of contemporary taste; it focuses on the
institutions and practices that shape aesthetic judgement. Section 2 analyses literary treatments of
contemporary political issues and examines the suitability of literature as a vehicle for political reflection. The
final section of the module explores the ways in which recent fiction has raised questions about the nature and
function of religion in the modern world.
FILM STUDIES
Introduction to Film Studies 1
FLM1001
Semester 1
The module will introduce students to the principles of film form, narrative, styles and methodologies of film
criticism. It will concentrate on American and British cinema and the examples drawn from these two very
different cinematic industries will help increase and broaden knowledge of film and cinema, audiences and
industries.
Introduction to Film Studies 2
FLM1002
Semester 2
This module aims to provide you with knowledge and understanding of European cinema and throughout
emphasis is placed on relating its forms, structures, and contexts to a broader history of cinema, and film culture.
The module also explores relations between a range of European films and Hollywood cinema, particularly in
relation to the ways in which European film-makers have rejected and revered the dominance of Hollywood's
narrative aesthetic and industrial practices. The module will consolidate and develop upon work covered in
FLM1001.
FRENCH
French Language 1
(for students with A Level French Grade B or above)
FRH1001
Semester 1
A comprehensive consolidation and development of French language competence: translation, grammar,
comprehension, creative writing, oral (conversation, discussion and presentation skills). The material used in
all language classes will also broaden knowledge of contemporary issues in France and the French-speaking
world. This module also includes Business French or Le Francais Juridique (Law students only) and develops
skills in computer assisted language learning.
French Language 2
(for students with A Level French Grade B or above)
FRH1002
(with FRH1001)
Semester 2
An enlargement and enhancement of French language competence: translation, grammar, comprehension,
creative writing, oral (conversation, discussion and presentation skills). The material used in all language
classes will also broaden knowledge of contemporary issues in France and the French-speaking world. This
module also includes Business French or Le Francais Juridique (Law students only) and develops skills in
computer assisted language learning.
Intermediate French 1
(for students with AS Level French Grade B or above)
FRH1011
Semester 1
See French Language A with additional intensive language tuition in oral and written French.
Intermediate French 2
(for students with AS Level French Grade B or above)
FRH1012
(with FRH1011)
Semester 2
See French Language B with additional intensive language tuition in oral and written French.
Beginners French 1
(GSCE Grade B or above in foreign language)
FRH1021
Semester 1
This is an intensive language-learning course that aims to bring students with little or no prior knowledge of
French a basic grounding in the written and spoken language equivalent to post-GSCE standard. All students
are introduced to the core elements of French grammar and language use, including an hour with a native
speaker to develop spoken language skills.
Beginners French 2
(GSCE Grade B or above in foreign language)
FRH1022
(with FRH1021)
Semester 2
This is a continuation of Beginners’ French 1 which is designed to give students a solid grounding in French
written and spoken language to beyond A level standard. All students continue to focus on the core elements
of French grammar and language use, including translation, conversation, reading and comprehension skills.
HISTORY
Irish Studies 11: The Modern History, Politics, Sociology and
Anthropology of Northern Ireland
IRS1002
2
This module will cover the modern history of Ireland 1800-1920; the politics of Ireland (north and south) 19202002; aspects of the social anthropology of Ireland, including issues of parades and symbols in Northern Ireland.
IRISH AND CELTIC STUDIES
Irish Language 1
(for students with A Level Irish Grade B or above)
CEL1001
Semester 1
Comprehensive consolidation and advancement of Irish language competence in the domains of both written
and spoken Irish. Emphasis is placed on oral skills, textual analysis, comprehension and grammar. The
medium of instruction is Irish.
Irish Language 2
(for students with A Level Irish Grade B or above)
CEL1002
(with CEL1001)
2
Further advancement of the key language skills gained in semester 1 (CEL1001). The medium of instruction is
Irish.
Celtic Mythology
CEL1033
1
This module will explore the evidence for the religion and beliefs of the Celtic-speaking peoples from the earliest
times. We will examine early Irish texts dealing with native gods and the Otherworld, and we will explore literary
archaeological and inscriptional evidence from Britain and the Continent for parallels among other Celticspeaking peoples. We will also investigate the supernatural aspect of early Irish sacral kingship and mythical
representations of Irish society, as well as the nature of goddesses and their connection with war and landscape.
SOCIAL POLICY
Finding out about Social Policy
SPY1001
Semester 2
Finding out about Social Policy provides an introduction to UK social policy. It looks at different perspectives,
themes, issues and debates in the field of social policy. It begins by identifying key ways of defining and
theorising social policy, and looks at the historical foundations and development of social policy in Britain and
Northern Ireland. It then moves on to look at current developments and trends in six substantive areas of social
policy: social security, the labour market, education, health, personal social services and housing.
SOCIOLOGY
Understanding Society
SOC1001
Semester 1
This module offers a general introduction to the discipline of sociology for those with no experience of studying
sociology before. Its primary objective is to initiate students to sociological thinking. Sociology does not rely on
our subjective experience and general ideas commonly shared within the society (beliefs, customs, traditions,
values, norms); its critical way of thinking and its methods allow us to discover aspects of social life that most
people are unaware of. This will be done through a diversity of topics such as social class, suicide, race, gender,
disability, globalisation, violence and other social phenomena. The module will provide a background for those
intending to study sociology in the second and third years, but also acts as a stand-alone sociology course for
those who do not intend to study it further.
The Sociological Imagination
SOC1002
Semester 2
This module introduces students to landmark sociological studies of power and inequality. The focus is on the
practice of sociological analysis of divisions and institutions such as gender, class, race, ethnicity, health, the
family, marriage, work and the media.
SPANISH
Hispanic Studies
(for students with A Level Spanish Grade B or above)
SPA1001
Semester 1
Classes focus on developing spoken and written Spanish language skills. Language work is based on a broad
range of texts relating to culture, literature and society in Spain and the Americas. Students develop a deeper
understanding of language, composition and grammar (translation, comprehension, essay writing), as well as
advancing spoken language ability with native speakers. This module includes an hour of ‘Applied language
skills’ in Business Spanish or Spanish for Law (Law students only) and includes computer assisted language
learning.
Hispanic Studies 2
(for students with A Level Spanish Grade B or above)
SPA1002
(with SPA1001)
Semester 2
Classes focus on continued development of spoken and written Spanish language skills. Language work is
based on a broad range of texts relating to culture, literature and society in Spain and the Americas. Students
develop a deeper understanding of language, composition and grammar (translation, comprehension, report
writing), as well as advancing spoken language ability with native speakers. This module includes an hour of
‘Applied language skills’ in Business Spanish or Spanish for Law (Law students only) and includes computer
assisted language learning.
Intermediate Spanish 1
(for students with AS Level Spanish Grade B or above)
SPA1011
Semester 1
See Hispanic Studies 1 description. AS level students follow the Hispanic Studies 1 course but also receive
extra support in their language learning.
Intermediate Spanish 2
(for students with AS Level Spanish Grade B or above)
SPA1012
(with SPA1011)
Semester 2
See Hispanic Studies 2 description. AS level students follow the Hispanic Studies 2 course but also receive
extra support in their language learning.
Beginners Spanish 1
(GSCE Grade B or above in foreign language)
SPA1021
Semester 1
This is an intensive language-learning course that aims to bring students to ‘A’ level standard in a year. All
students are introduced to the core elements of Spanish grammar and language use, including an hour with a
native speaker to develop spoken language skills. A core textbook is used that teaches language skills through
introduction to elements of Spanish and Latin American culture and history and includes elements of computer
assisted language learning and visual media.
Beginners Spanish 2
(GSCE Grade B or above in foreign language)
SPA1022
(with SPA1021)
Semester 2
This module builds upon the semester 1 language-learning course. All students are introduced to the core
elements of Spanish grammar and language use, including an hour with a native speaker to develop spoken
language skills. A core textbook is used that teaches language skills through introduction to elements of
Spanish and Latin American culture and history and includes elements of computer assisted language learning
and visual media.
Download
Related flashcards

Typography

27 cards

Letters (message)

23 cards

Letters (message)

33 cards

Paper

24 cards

Stationery

19 cards

Create Flashcards