Demographics in Canada Power Point

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Demographics in
Canada
• Demographics – The study of population statistics
• Birth Rate – number of births per 1000 people in a population
• Death Rate – number of death rates per 1000 people in a
population
• In Canada our birth rate is 11.1 births per 1,000 people in a
population and our death rate is 7.74 deaths per 1,000 people
in a population.
• If the birth rate is higher than the death rate, a population
increases naturally. If the death rate is higher than the birth
rate, a population will decrease naturally.
• Fertility Rates – number of live births for every woman age 1545.
• The fertility rate in Canada is much lower than many African
countries. Why would this be?
• Infant Mortality Rate – number of deaths for every 1000
births.
• The infant mortality rate is much higher in many African
countries than Canada. Why would this be?
• Migration – when people leave one place for another
• Immigration – moving to a foreign country as a place of
permanent residence
• Emigration – leaving one country for another
• Net migration – comparing the number of people immigrating
to a country to the number of people emigrating to another
country.
• Population density – the number of people in a measured
area.
• Population distribution – the pattern of population in an area.
• Review: What is the difference between Immigration and
Emigration?
• Do you think that in Canada we have a higher rate of
Immigration or Emigration?
• What happens when a country experiences a very high
Emigration rate? What are some factors that might contribute
to a high rate of Emigration?
• What happens when a country experiences a high Immigration
rate? What are some factors that might contribute to many
people Immigrating to a country?
• Population Distribution in Canada
• After looking at the pie graph on the previous slide, why do
you think that Canada’s population is distributed the way that
it is?
• Alberta, British Columbia, Quebec and Ontario make up the
majority of Canada’s population. Why do you think these
provinces have such a large population? What factors would
contribute to people moving there from other provinces?
• The Yukon, Northwest Territories, Nunavut and Prince Edward
Island each make up less than 1% of Canada’s population. Why
do you think this is so?
• Can you think of any reasons why people born in these
provinces or territories might move away to another
province?
• Factors influencing Population Patterns and Distribution
• Economic factors play a huge role in people deciding where to
live or where to move. Factors such as:
• Enterprise and Economy
• Industry increasing/decreasing
• Family reasons
Largest Cities in Canada
Rank
City name
Province
Pop.
Rank
City name
Province
1
Toronto
Ontario
2,615,060
2
Montreal
Quebec
3
Calgary
4
Pop.
11
Quebec City
Quebec
516,622
1,649,519
12
Surrey
British
Columbia
468,251
Alberta
1,096,833
13
Laval
Quebec
401,553
Ottawa
Ontario
883,391
14
Halifax
Nova Scotia
390,096
5
Edmonton
Alberta
812,201
15
London
Ontario
366,151
6
Mississauga
Ontario
713,443
16
Markham
Ontario
301,709
7
Winnipeg
Manitoba
663,617
17
Vaughan
Ontario
288,301
8
Vancouver
British
Columbia
603,502
18
Gatineau
Quebec
265,349
9
Brampton
Ontario
523,911
19
Longueuil
Quebec
231,409
10
Hamilton
Ontario
519,949
20
Saskatoon
Saskatchewan
222,
189
• Review: Name as many of the ten largest cities in Canada as
you can, as shown on the last slide.
• What are some possible reasons that these cities are so large?
• As more people move to these places, what happens to the
cities? Is it usually a good thing or a bad thing to have many
people moving to a particular city?
• Another factor that contributes to the study of demographics
in Canada is age.
• Median age: A number that summarizes the age distribution
of a population.
• Statistics Canada performs regular studies to find out the
median age of people living in different provinces.
• Take a guess: What do you think the median age in Canada is?
• What do you think the median age in New Brunswick is? Do
you think it is higher or lower than the median age in Canada.
Median Age in Canada: 40.6 years
• male: 39.6 years
• female: 41.5 years
Median age by province and territory, 2011 Census
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Nova Scotia: 43.7
Newfoundland and Labrador: 44.0
New Brunswick:43.7
Quebec: 41.9
British Columbia: 41.9
Prince Edward Island: 42.8
Ontario: 40.4
Saskatchewan: 38.2
Yukon: 39.1
Manitoba: 38.4
Alberta: 36.5
Northwest Territories: 32.3
Nunavut: 24.1
• After looking at the median age of Canadians living in different
provinces, what did you notice? Did anything surprise you?
• You may have noticed that the median age of females is
higher than the median age of males. Why do you think this
is?
• You may have also noticed that the median age of people
living in Nunavut is significantly lower than any other province
or territory in Canada. Why do you think this is so?
Population Growth Rates in the last 5 years
Rank
Province or Territory
% Change
1
Ontario
5.7
2
Quebec
4.7
3
Alberta
10.8
4
British Columbia
7.0
5
Saskatchewan
6.7
6
Manitoba
5.2
7
New Brunswick
2.9
8
Newfoundland and Labrador
1.8
9
Nova Scotia
0.9
10
Prince Edward Island
3.2
11
Yukon
11.6
12
Nunavut
8.3
13
Northwest Territories
0.0
Total
Canada
5.9
• You may have noticed that some provinces have had
significant increases in population over the last 5 years.
• Nunavut, The Yukon, and Alberta were the three provinces or
territories that increased the most. Why do you think each of
these provinces or territories would experience such a
significant increase?
• Newfoundland and Labrador, Northwest Territories and Nova
Scotia experienced the lowest amount of growth over the last
5 years. Why do you think this is?
What did you learn?
• Name at least one interesting thing you learned from this
presentation.
• Did anything you heard today surprise you?
• Was there any facts you saw today that you already knew?
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