health literacy - Camden Coalition of Healthcare Providers

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Camden Coalition of
Camden Coalition of
Healthcare
Providers
Healthcare
Providers
Health Literacy Workshop:
Practical Applications for Health Coaches
Amy Henderson Riley, M.A., C.H.E.S.
Senior Health Data Research Assistant
www.camdenhealth.org
Objectives
•
•
•
•
•
Introductions
What is health literacy?
Why is health literacy important?
How can we apply these concepts?
Q&A
About Me:
•Research Assistant @ CCHP
for Hotspotting Toolkit
•Master’s in Health
Education (Columbia
University)
•Certified Health Education
Specialist (CHES)
Previous employment:
•NYC Dept. of Health
•US Dept. of Health and
Human Services
•Ghana Health and
Education Initiative (NGO)
GHEI Handwashing Program
SUGAR-SWEETENED BEVERAGES
SUGAR-SWEETENED BEVERAGES (SSBs)
IT’S NOT YOUR FAULT
SSBs are beverages containing sweeteners that are added
during processing such as non-diet sodas, sports drinks,
energy drinks, fruit drinks, powdered drinks, and flavored
drinks.1
Sugar Sweetened Beverages are Everywhere
A recent study found that 95% of drug stores sell junk food.11
The availability of fresh and healthy foods is decreasing.12
The Sugar You May Be Drinking2
LEARN TO READ NUTRITION LABELS (ex. Soda)13
Start at the top of the label.
There are often multiple
servings in one container.
Scan the label to estimate
number of calories in the
entire package.
A 12 oz Soda Can may
contain 10 teaspoons of sugar
A 20 oz Soda Bottle may
contain 17 teaspoons of sugar
Sweeteners Come By Many Names
Brown sugar
Corn Sweetener
Corn Syrup
Dextrose
Fruit juice concentrates
Glucose
High-fructose corn syrup
Honey
Invert sugar
3
Lactose
Maltose
Malt syrup
Molasses
Raw sugar
Sucrose
Sugar
Syrup
SSB FACTS
American adults now drink 190 calories per day from SSBs.
Children ages 6-19 consume 300 calories per day from SSBs,
most of which are consumed in the home.4
SSBs in NYC
In low-income neighborhoods, 15% of adults drink 2 or more
SSBs per day and 44% drink 1 or more SSBs compared with
other neighborhoods.5 Individuals in these neighborhoods
are also more likely to be affected by heart disease, cancer,
diabetes, obesity and overweight, and are more likely to die
younger.6
Excess Calories
Unused calories may lead to weight gain. Two thirds of adults
and one third of children are now overweight or obese.7
Health Costs
SSBs are linked with weight gain and obesity. Drinking 1 SSB
a day for a year could cost you over $400 and could cause
you to gain 10 pounds.8 Other health problems include
diabetes, anxiety, withdrawal, poor-quality or reduced sleep,
and tooth decay.9
Financial Costs
Obesity costs $1,723 a year per person.10 This affects
everyone indirectly with increased health care spending. By
reducing your SSB intake could directly save your family
hundreds of dollars.
Look for the “Sugar” line
under “Carbohydrates.”
This will tell you if the
product is an SSB.
Confirm this by searching
for sweeteners in the
ingredients list. Ingredients
are listed in descending
order of weight (most to
least).
7 STEPS FOR HEALTHY HYDRATION14
1. Drink Plenty of Water
It’s the best thirst quencher without sugars or calories.
NYC Tap Water is considered the nation’s safest and
freshest! Take advantage of our free and delicious water
by carrying a reusable container.
Try seltzer if you want fizz.
Add a splash of fresh lemon or lime for flavor.
Discover the health benefits of herbal teas.
2. Choose Fat-Free or 1% Milk
It’s packed with nutrients with fewer calories and less
fat.
Almost everyone over age 2 should drink fat-free or 1%
instead of whole milk.
Try low-fat soymilk in light or unflavored.
3. Switch from Juice to Whole Fruit (100% juice)
Fruit juice is full of calories.
Whole fruit has fewer calories and has fiber, which helps
keep you healthy and feel full.
4. Skip Sports Drinks and “Energy” Drinks
Sports drinks are high in caffeine and low in nutrients.
Energy drinks are the same but also full of caffeine.
5. Watch Out for Coffee, Tea Drinks, and Shakes
Many of these popular drinks are full of calories.
6. Downsize!
If you do have a SSB, order it in small” instead of
“large.”
Add seltzer or water to juice to cut calories and make it
last longer.
7. Be a Healthy Role Model for Your Family’s Well-Being
Inspire your loved ones to lead healthy lives.
• NYC Dept of
Health “one
pager”
• Can you
understand this
document?
• Do you think your
patients could
understand this
document?
2-minute Intro video
• Poem from a Mental Health
conference
• http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R
3tJ-MXqPmk
What is Health Literacy?
Definition:
“the degree to which individuals have
the capacity to obtain, process, and
understand basic health information
and services needed to make
appropriate health decisions”
- Healthy People 2020
Literacy Across Health
Interactions
• Written materials:
- Brochures
- Forms
- Prescription labels
- Signs
• Oral instructions:
- Doctors, nurses, health coaches
Why is health literacy important?
CCHP patients:
•Multiple chronic diseases
•Multiple prescriptions
•Older population, difficulties with activities of daily
living/limited physical activity
•Socio-economic status
•Education-level, reading level
•Learning disabilities
•Mental illness
•Chronic Pain
•Low self-efficacy
•English as a second language (or 3rd…)
Where do we begin?
• Start with respect/meet patients where
they are (what does this mean in terms
health literacy?)
Concepts of Adult Learning
• Adult learners are the experts on themselves.
• Adult learners have vast experiences that we can
use to implement tailored messages.
• Adult learners know how they learn best.
Application #1: Plain Language
• Plain language is using clear writing
without unnecessary words or
explanations
• Plain language is not “dumbing down”
messages
Characteristics of Plain Language
• Active voice (ex: “We called your
doctor,” instead of, “The physician’s
office was called.”
• Less than a dozen words per sentence
• No words over 3 syllables
• 30% white space
• Same concepts for Spanish
documents
Exercise: Assess Plain Language
•
-
Review a CCHP document for:
Active vs. passive voice
Number of words per sentence
Number of syllables per word
White space
Exercise: Assess Reading Level
• SMOG (Simple Measure of
Gobbledygook) Readability Index
• Review a document -- How many
words with more than 3 syllables in 30
sentences?
Application #2: Use More Visuals
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•
•
•
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Culturally respectful materials
Be careful of colors
Use more Visuals
Visuals include touch
Pictures on your contact information
Exercise: Add Visuals
• Review a CCHP document for:
-
Count number of pictures or diagrams
Are the pictures simple to understand?
Is there a clear background with no text?
Are there areas where a picture or diagram could
be included?
- Is there an area to be “filled in” either by health
coach or patient?
- Is the material culturally appropriate?
- How can you “guide” this document for the
patient”?
Application #3: Teach Back
• “Please tell me in your own words what
I have just said/explained to you.”
• Example: Teaching a patient about
their prescriptions by filling one pill day
in the container (i.e. Monday) and
letting the patient fill the rest of the
week
Exercise: Incorporate Teach
Back Technique
• Brainstorm 3 ways you can incorporate
“teach back” with your patients
• Share with the group
Application #4: Active Listening
•
•
•
•
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Being silent
Ask open-ended questions
Paraphrase – is that right?
Empathizing
Supporting
Motivational Interviewing Techniques
Exercise: Practice Active
Listening
• Write down one way you can
incorporate active listening into your
patient interactions and how this
affects health literacy
Additional Information
• CDC Health Literacy:
http://www.cdc.gov/healthliteracy/
• HRSA Health Literacy:
http://www.hrsa.gov/publichealth/healthliteracy/
• Harvard Health Literacy Studies
https://www.hsph.harvard.edu/healthliteracy/
Q&A
THANK YOU
[email protected]
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