ITU in a fast evolving ICT world

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Enabling a low carbon future: the role of ITU and ICTs to address climate change

2010 Social Forum - October 6 th

, 2010

Jose Maria Diaz Batanero jose.batanero@itu.int

www.itu.int/climate

International

Telecommunication

Union

A snapshot of ITU

International

Telecommunication

Union

Committed to Connecting the World

Telecommunications have evolved notably since the invention of the telegraph …

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Committed to Connecting the World

Today, the use of Information and Communication

Technologies (ICTs) is the key to access to the information society

Real-time

Information

Libraries

On-line public services

Personal communication

Entertainment

Media

Databases

Social media

Social and professional networks

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Committed to Connecting the World

To the extend that access to ICTs is already considered a basic human right

Article 19 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights:

"Everyone has the right to freedom of opinion and expression. this right

includes freedom to hold opinions without interference and to seek, receive and impart information and ideas through any media and regardless of

frontiers.“ (UN, 1997)

Reference to Article 19 in the World Summit of the Information Society

“Everyone has a right to freedom of opinion and expression; right includes freedom to hold opinions without interference and to seek, receive and impart information and ideas through any media and regardless of frontiers. Communication is a fundamental social process, a basic human

need and the foundation of all social organization.” (WSIS -2003/2005)

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1865

Committed to Connecting the World

ITU has assisted this evolution since 1865 …

2015

Technical standards

Satellite orbits

Policies and regulations

Management of spectrum

ICT development

… throughout the constant ( and fast ) evolution of Information and

Communication Technologies (ICTs)

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Committed to Connecting the World

ITU is the UN specialized agency that promotes global collaboration for a connected world

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The role of ICTs to address climate change

International

Telecommunication

Union

Committed to Connecting the World

ICTs play a double role in climate change

On the one hand they are part of the problem…

ICTs contribute 2-2.5 % of GHG, according to some estimates

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Committed to Connecting the World

(And adoption of ICTs is growing at a very fast rate)

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Committed to Connecting the World

(not to mention the problem of eWaste)

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Committed to Connecting the World

But ICTs are also part of the solution, as they are a transformational tool that can deeply change several industries, sectors and activities

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Committed to Connecting the World

The use of ICTs by new sectors can accelerate innovation, improve access to basic services and create a new model of (sustainable) development

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Committed to Connecting the World

ICTs can support the key areas of the

Bali Action Plan

Shared vision

Mitigation of climate change

Adaptation Technology development and transfer

Science and data monitoring

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How ITU is promoting the use of ICTs to address climate change

(a few examples)

International

Telecommunication

Union

Committed to Connecting the World

Work in mitigation (1)

Reduction of energy consumption by ICT equipment through new standards;

E.g. The promotion of Next Generation Networks

(reducing power consumption by up to 40%)

Better use of spectrum to reduce energy consumption of wireless devices.

Advancing on new standards to promote reduction of emissions by other sectors

Smart grids and smart buildings

Intelligent transport systems

Remote working technologies

Sensor-based networks

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Committed to Connecting the World

Work in mitigation (2)

Promoting new regulations to encourage the industry to focus on energy efficiency and the use of renewable energy sources.

(the importance of adopting a common methodology to measure results)

Over 40 organizations from the whole sector (public sector and industry) participate in the ITU group to develop a methodology for measuring ICT carbon footprint

Without, it will be impossible to provide meaningful comparisons

Helps to establish the business case for the industry to go green

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Committed to Connecting the World

Addressing e-waste

Engagement of industry and policy makers in promoting recycling and reduction e-waste, lifecycle analysis

E.g. Universal mobile charger (ITU-T

Recommendation L.1000)

Promoting of policies for the correct management of ICT equipment throughout its lifecycle

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Committed to Connecting the World

Adaptation

Support to get telecoms up and running after disasters

Recent examples Pakistan, Haiti and

Chile

E-Environment Toolkit will help countries to assess the contribution that ICTs can make to reduce GHG emissions.

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Committed to Connecting the World

Data Monitoring

As the steward of the global framework for spectrum and satellite orbits, ITU:

Ensures availability of radio-frequency spectrum and satellite orbits for climate monitoring and climate change prediction

Develops international treaty level standards to ensure non-interference operation of systems involved in climate monitoring;

Carries out studies (through ITU-R Study Groups) for development of new wireless technologies to increase use of remote sensors;

Assists administrations in implementing radio systems by analyzing compatibility between new and existing systems

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Committed to Connecting the World

Technology transfer

Within the WSIS process ITU has built a global online community to exchange best practices in the use of ICTs to promote sustainable development;

Focus in project stocktaking;

Open to multi-stakeholders (government, academia, private sector, NGOs, etc.)

Related topics:

E-agriculture

E-environment

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A final call for action

International

Telecommunication

Union

Committed to Connecting the World

ICTs are at the foundation of a Green Economy

ICTs play a key role as an enabling technology to monitor climate change and reduce GHG emissions: we need to

define ICTs as a basic utility

that should be included in national development plans and

encourage industrial sectors to adopt ICTs

to reduce their carbon footprint.

Open and global standards lower the cost of access to technologies and increase the “network effect”: we must

encourage the industry to build on open standards

that use energy efficiency as a key technical factor.

The benefits of ICTs go beyond access to information, they extend access to basic services and strengthen democracy and human rights: we need to engage all relevant actors (governments, citizens, NGOs and business) to work together to

provide universal access to ICTs

.

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Committed to Connecting the World

Next key event

5 th

Symposium on ICTs and the Environment & Climate

Change

(2-3 November 2010, Cairo, Egypt)

Topics to be discussed will include: adaptation to climate change, e-waste, cost-effective ICT technologies, methodology of environmental impact assessment of ICT and financing of climate change solutions.

Outcome: The symposium will issue the “Cairo Road Map”, a set of recommendations for action in relation to ICTs, the Environment and

Climate Change.

Registration open for both on-site and remote participation

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Enabling a low carbon future: the role of ITU and ICTs to address climate change

2010 Social Forum - October 6 th

, 2010

Jose Maria Diaz Batanero jose.batanero@itu.int

www.itu.int/climate

International

Telecommunication

Union

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