Oberon Enclosure Finder

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Introduction to Oberon Products
Wireless LAN infrastructure, Workspace telecom enclosures,
AV equipment enclosures and mounting solutions
Growth in Global Mobile Data
from Cisco VNI Mobile forecast
Oberon Value Proposition
• Unique products designed by people with field
experience, not commoditized
• Products serving significant growth areas
-
Wi-Fi
DAS and Small Cell
Zone enclosures for structured cabling and PON
Multimedia A/V
• Solutions geared for the enterprise
-
Hospitals
Higher education and k-12
Retail and hospitality
Government
Service providers
Oberon Value Proposition
•
Recognized product category leader
• Registered Cisco Technology Partner
• Aruba Networks Ecosystem Partner
• These two vendors alone account for
~90% of the enterprise Wi-Fi market
• Look for these opportunities !
•
Others include: Aerohive,
Meraki, Ruckus, Ubiquiti
Oberon Product Offering
Ceiling and wall mounted enclosures provide the following
• Code Compliance (put non-plenum
rated gear into the “plenum”)
• Industry specific standards compliance
(healthcare, retail, government, etc.)
• Convenience
• Security
• Aesthetics
• Wireless signal performance
• Network Architecture: Fiber to the enclosure, structured cabling, etc.
Oberon product offering
Use Oberon enclosures to secure and protect the following
equipment, in the workspace or where it is needed:
• Wireless (Wi-Fi) Access Points
(WAPs)
• Other wireless gear
(DAS, Small Cell, Pico cell, etc.)
• Edge and workgroup switch
• Zone cabling components
(consolidation point)
• Passive Optical Network
(PON) components
• A/V equipment
Opportunities- Hospitals
• Virtually ALL hospitals have a Wi-Fi network
• Wi-Fi is MISSION CRITICAL in hospitals for numerous applications
• WAPS are typically clipped onto ceiling grids. If you go into
virtually any hospital you will see WAPs clipped onto the ceiling grid
This “default” installation method is no longer acceptable in
hospitals for the following reasons:
• Controlling the spread of Airborne Infectious Disease
• Infection Control Risk Assessment (ICRA)
• Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA)
• Code Compliance
• TIA-1179 recommends special considerations for cabling and wireless in
Hospitals
• Aesthetics
Opportunities – Hospitals
Airborne Infectious Disease
WAP installation “default” in hospitals- clip it on the ceiling
grid, and poke the data cable through the ceiling. These
ceiling gaps are a big problem in the unique hospital
environment for these reasons:
• Dust and spores which cause infections can spread from above
ceiling
• Desired differential pressure relationships “leak” through these
openings
• The fire rating integrity of the ceiling system is compromised
• The ceiling system as a smoke barrier is compromised
Opportunities – Hospitals
Airborne Infectious Disease
Gap in the ceiling
Gap in the ceiling
Gap in the ceiling
Gap in the ceiling
Opportunities – Hospitals
Airborne Infectious Disease
•
Why is dust and fungal spores from above the ceiling a problem?
•
According to a Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) research
article, it is estimated that in 2002 there were 1.7 million Hospital Acquired
Infections (HAIs) in the U.S. This resulted in an estimated 99,000 deaths
•
Airborne Infectious Diseases are contributors to HAIs
•
Airborne Infectious Disease may be comprised of mold and fungal spores,
water nuclei, and bacteria on particulates
•
The space above ceilings (“plenum”) and behind walls is a reservoir for
airborne infectious diseases
•
Medicaid and other payers will not reimburse hospitals for patients
readmitted with HAIs
Opportunities – Hospitals
Airborne Infectious Disease
-
Install WAP in an approved enclosure
Eliminate gaps in ceiling tile
Protect patients from airborne infectious disease
Preserve fire rating of ceiling system (enclosures are UL listed
and designed for ceiling installation)
Preserve the smoke barrier of the ceiling system
Oberon model 1059-00
Opportunities–Hospitals
ICRA
-
Hospitals have policies and procedures to mitigate Airborne
Infectious Disease. One of these is Infection Control Risk
Assessment (ICRA) procedures. ICRA will restrict access to the
above ceiling space
-
Oberon’s enclosures create an effective dust barrier to the space
above. By mounting the WAP in a ceiling enclosure, the WAP may
be serviced without opening the above ceiling space
“Tent Cart”
with HEPA Fan
Oberon model 1052-00
Opportunities–Hospitals
HIPAA
The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) is
intended to protect confidential patient information, and includes
this paragraph (below) on physical safeguards to protect electronic
information systems.
§ 164.310 Physical safeguards. A covered entity must, in
accordance with 164.306: (a)(1) Standard: Facility access
controls. Implement policies and procedures to limit
physical access to its electronic information systems and
the facility or facilities in which they are housed, while
ensuring that properly authorized access is allowed.
Oberon enclosures are lockable and satisfy the requirements for HIPAA
Opportunities–HospitalsCode Compliance
-
Hospitals strictly adhere to national electric code
-
Enclosure should be UL listed and suited for installation in
the ceilings
-
Oberon enclosures have a special UL “Ceiling Mounted ITC
Equipment” label, acceptable in ALL jurisdictions.
Oberon model 1077-AP225
Opportunities – Hospitals
TIA -1179 Healthcare Facility Telecommunications
Cabling Standard
• TIA-1179 Healthcare Facility Telecommunications Infrastructure
Standard states that “Adding or changing horizontal cabling could result in a net
decrease in care being provided, jeopardizing infection control measures or
compromising life safety measures”.
• Furthermore TIA-1179 indicates that “Infection control requirements
(ICR) could have a serious impact on the times and conditions for
cabling installation, moves, adds and changes, as well as restrictions to
removing ceiling tiles, wall penetrations and access to unoccupied
spaces” .
• Consideration of the expense of removing or even lifting ceiling tiles suggests
that healthcare facilities management will carefully consider how wireless access
points are installed, maintained, and secured in healthcare facilities. Securing
WAPs in ceiling enclosures provides a clear path to reducing ceiling tile
penetrations and simplified ICRA procedure compliance.
Opportunities–Hospitals
Aesthetics
-
Aesthetics is typically very important in Hospitals!
-
The ceiling enclosure is an enormous improvement in appearance
over WAPs clipped to ceiling grid
-
Oberon’s ceiling enclosures use a textured powder coat which
matches most ceiling tile, providing the best appearance.
Model 1064-00
Locking Ceiling Mount for Cisco APs
Model 1057-00
Universal Enclosure, Non-metallic dome
Opportunities- K-12, Higher Ed
• Virtually ALL universities, colleges, and schools have a Wi-Fi network
• Wi-Fi is MISSION CRITICAL in most of these institutions. Wi-Fi is used for
teaching and instruction
• WAPS are typically clipped onto ceiling grids or mounted exposed on
the wall. Go into virtually any school and you will see exposed WAPs
• This “default” installation method is no longer acceptable in schools
for the following reasons:
- Unsecured WAPs may be stolen, vandalized, accidentally damaged, disconnected, or
moved (Unauthorized MACs)
- Unavailability of the Wi-Fi network causes unacceptable disruption in programming
- Building construction and aesthetics will challenge “default” installation methods
-TIA– 4966 wireless in education recommends higher density WAP installations in
classrooms, auditoriums, and stadiums
Opportunities- K-12, Higher Ed
•
WAP Installation “default”- Clip it on the ceiling grid, mount exposed on the wall,
set on a book shelf, etc. You will see this in virtually all schools!
Opportunities – K-12, Higher Ed
Classroom and Administration
-
The ceiling is an ideal location to secure Wi-Fi WAPS, projectors,
and multimedia gateways such as Apple TV in every classroom
-
Oberon’s products have been used by many leading districts,
colleges, and universities.
Model 1075
Locking ceiling mount for Wi-Fi access
points and Apple TV
Model 1074
Locking ceiling mount for multimedia
projector, A/V equipment and Apple TV
Opportunities – K-12, Higher Ed
Residence Halls
-
Typical block wall and hard ceiling construction
-
Access points should be mounted in horizontal orientation for best
antenna coverage
-
Oberon has mounting solutions for WAPs in residence halls
Model 1015
Locking, non-metallic, surface mount
lock box for Wi-Fi access points
Model 1011
Right Angle wall bracket for Wi-Fi
access points
Opportunities – K-12, Higher Ed
Libraries, Museums, and Heritage buildings
-
In many facilities, aesthetics is paramount
-
Oberon has mounting solutions and enclosures which can be
recessed into drywall or hard ceilings and walls
Model 1076
Model 1076- Recess Wall Mount with Non-metallic dome
Opportunities – K-12, Higher Ed
Large classrooms, Auditoriums and Stadiums
-
TIA 4966 Telecommunications Infrastructure for Educational
Buildings and Spaces recommends a WAP density of one WAP for
every 25 Occupants (see chart)
-
The only practical place to mount WAPs is under seating
-
WAP should be protected from weather, spills, and physical abuse
Model 1020 Compact NEMA4 enclosure
Facility
Occupancy
Number of APs
1-25
1
26-50
2
51-75
3
76-100
4
101-125
5
126-200
9
201-300
14
301-400
18
401-500
21
TIA 4966 Specified WAP density
Opportunities-Retail & Hospitality
• Virtually ALL retail environments, including restaurants, have a
Wi-Fi network
• Wi-Fi is used for point of sale applications, order processing, inventory,
internal applications, Guest Wi-Fi and location, and is becoming
MISSION CRITICAL
• WAPS are typically clipped onto ceiling grids, mounted exposed on the
wall, concealed in counters, or locked away in telecom rooms.
• These “default” installation methods are no loner acceptable in retail
locations for the following reasons:
- High profile security breaches (compromised credit card numbers) have been attributed to
unsecured wireless networks
- Unsecured WAPs may be stolen, vandalized, accidentally damaged, disconnected,
or moved (Unauthorized MACs). Unsecured cables may be tapped.
- Unavailability of the Wi-Fi network causes unacceptable disruption to operations and guests
Opportunities-Retail & Hospitality
Payment Card Industry (PCI) standard
• The Payment Card Industry (PCI) trade association has security
standards which apply to any retailer accepting credit cards
•The Payment Card Industry Data Security Standard (PCIDSS) requirement 9.1.3 states that the operator must
“Restrict physical access to wireless access points, gateways,
and handheld devices”
• Placing WAPs behind counters or above ceiling tiles does not
adequately “restrict physical access” protect the WAP
• These standards apply even if the retailer does not process credit
cards wirelessly!
Opportunities-Retail & Hospitality
Growth in Retail Wi-Fi
• Significant concerns remain in retail about Wi-Fi security. Oberon
enclosures address the physical security part
•WAPs should not be “hidden” above ceiling tiles, behind counters, or
in telecom rooms. This degrades WAP performance, and is not
necessarily secure
• A poorly deployed Wi-Fi network, which is not “physically secured”, is
no longer acceptable
• Facebook Wi-Fi will significantly increase Wi-Fi presence in all retail
locations
Opportunities-Retail & Hospitality
Hotel Wi-Fi
• Aesthetics is important in hotels
• Oberon has solutions to secure, protect, and beautify WAPs in
hallways, lobbies, restaurants, and guest rooms
Model 1065
Paintable vanity cover for WAPs
Attractive ceiling mounts for WAPS
Opportunities-Service Providers
Cellular and wireless
• Service Provider (SP) networks will be comprised of Heterogenous networks
in the future. “Het-Nets” are Wi-Fi, macro cellular, DAS, small cell networks
combined
• All of these components are MISSION CRITICAL revenue generators for
the Service Provider
• Het-Nets are commonly installed in public spaces such as malls, stadiums,
outdoor venues, and public buildings
•The “default” installation methods are not acceptable for revenue generating
service providers:
- Unsecured WAPs may be stolen, vandalized, accidentally damaged, disconnected,
or moved (unauthorized MACs)
- Unavailability of the Wi-Fi network causes unacceptable disruption of services
Opportunities-Service Providers
Cellular and wireless
• Contractors and Integrators need assistance in improving the appearance,
integrity, performance and physical security of the their installations.
Opportunities–Service Providers
Stadium and Public Venue
-
DAS, small cell, and service provider Wi-Fi networks are
emerging in many public and now private commercial
spaces. This equipment needs to be secured and protected
Model 1020
Outdoor NEMA 4 enclosure for Wi-Fi
under seat installation
Model 1024
Outdoor NEMA 4 enclosure for service
provider Wi-Fi
OpportunitiesFederal & State Government, Dept. of Defense
• Many government facilities now engage a Wi-Fi network
• Wi-Fi and cabling in these facilities requires an extra measure
of security
• In Federal Government – Directive 8100.2 mandates
FIPS 140-2 Compliance, wherein FIPS 140-2 paragraph 4.5
requires “physical security mechanisms” to be applied
to wireless networks
Model 1068
Locking Ceiling mount for WAPS
Opportunities – Zone Enclosures
Commercial, Enterprise, Campus office spaces
•
Ceiling Zone enclosures for passive and low power equipment
(consolidation point, pre-terminated copper and fiber cabling, patch
panels, PON splitters, etc.)
•
Place non-plenum rated equipment in the ceiling in Oberon enclosure!
Model 1074-04-ANT7
Zone enclosure for passive, low voltage, and PON equipment
Opportunities – Zone Enclosures
Commercial, Enterprise, Campus office spaces
•
Ceiling Zone enclosures for active equipment (workgroup and edge
switches, UPS, A/V and PON equipment, DAS and small cell wireless
gear.
•
Place non-plenum rated equipment in the ceiling in Oberon enclosure!
Model 1074-04-VENT
Zone enclosure with ventilated door for active equipment
Opportunities – Zone Enclosures
Commercial, Enterprise, Campus office spaces
•
Non-metallic surface mount lock box for wireless and networking
equipment
•
Large enough for cable modem, wireless router, network attached
storage, WAPs, Antennas, power strip, etc
Model 1016
Surface mount lock box for larger wireless components
Opportunities- Code Compliance
National Electric Code Compliance
-
Oberon enclosures have a special UL “Ceiling Mounted ITC
Equipment” label, acceptable in ALL jurisdictions
-
Oberon enclosures have fire stop grommets for cable egress,
large enough for (2) CAT 6A cables
UL Label for ceiling mounted ITC
equipment
Fire stop Grommet
Opportunities- Code Compliance
National Electric Code Compliance
•
Oberon’s ceiling zone enclosures have fire stopped openings large
enough for pre-terminated “Plug and Play” cabling connectors
Fire stopped openings large enough for pre-terminated cabling
Opportunities- Code Compliance
National Electric Code Compliance
•
Non-Plenum rated equipment (both passive and active) can be
secured in Oberon ceiling zone enclosures
Model 1074-04-ANT7
Zone enclosure for passive or low
voltage equipment (consolidation
point, etc.)
Model 1074-04-VENT
Zone enclosure with highly ventilated
door for active equipment
Opportunities – Code Compliance
Indoor NEMA 4 enclosures for public safety wireless
Model 1058-08-WA-B
NEMA 4 wall enclosure, non-metallic dome
Model 1058-08-ANT4-F
NEMA 4 Ceiling enclosure, external antennas
Opportunities- Standards Compliance
Cabling for Wireless
• TIA TSB -162A Telecommunications Cabling Guidelines for
Wireless Access Points recommends CAT6A cabling to each Wi-Fi WAP
• Recent survey in higher education shows approximately 50% of
designers are installing or planning for TWO CAT6A cables to each WAP,
for data throughput, power, or additional devices
• TIA TSB -162 recommends that the WAP not be connected directly to the
horizontal cabling. Rather, use a telecommunications outlet and patch cord
in the enclosure
Opportunities- CES
Consulting Engineers and Specifiers
• ARCAT 3D and BIM Models available for free on-line
• Customer prints, renderings, and images available on Oberon website
Future Upgrade
Protect installation investment. Change to new solution by simply swapping out door!
Aruba WAP in door
Non-metallic door
Door with Antennas
Cisco WAP in door
Oberon and Distribution
• Oberon’s products allow contractors to add value in areas
where, otherwise, they might not:
- Up-sell an enclosure in a cabling for wireless project
- Sell an enclosure where WAPS are specified
- add knowledge and fluency to contractor skill set
• Easy to Position
• Margins on Oberon product are “very good”
• Custom designs available
Oberon Representatives
Please visit http://www.oberonwireless.com/manufacturers-reps.php for
comprehensive list of manufacturers representatives
Similar Products
• Terrawave/Tessco
- Some of the terrawave products are Oberon “knockoffs”
- Oberon’s products have a more attractive finish
-Chatsworth, Wiremold, and Panduit have a limited
offering of wireless enclosures
- Oberon Product Cross Reference available for all
Oberon Programs
• Price protection with project registration
- Contact Oberon customer service, request, and fill in, Project Price
Protection Request Form
- Generally applies to projects with overall purchase of >$20k
•
Evaluation Unit program
- Permits end customer to evaluate sample products for 30
days free of charge
• Use the on-line Oberon Enclosure Finder to become an instant expert.
Match your customer’s wireless solution (Cisco, Aruba Networks, etc. )
to a recommended Oberon enclosure. See enclosure finder at
www.oberonwireless.com
QUESTIONS- Note: more than
one response may be correct
• Why do hospitals use the ceiling enclosure
for WAPS
A)
For Heath information portability and accountability act (HIPAA)
compliance
B) To protect patients from Airborne Infectious Disease which can
spread from above the ceiling
C) Aesthetics
D) To preserve the fire and smoke barrier integrity of the ceiling
QUESTIONS- Note: more than
one response may be correct
• Oberon’s ceiling mounted WAP enclosures can
help protect patients from airborne infectious
disease in a hospital by
A) Disinfecting surfaces
B) Creating a dust resistant barrier between the patient area and the space
above the ceiling
C) Eliminating the gaps in ceiling tiles for data cables to the WAP
D) Reducing leakage of the desired differential pressure required in select
patient areas
QUESTIONS- Note: more than
one response may be correct
• Health Information Portability and Accountability
Act (HIPAA) requires that hospitals
A)
Implement policies and procedures to limit physical access to its electronic
information systems and the facility or facilities in which they are housed,
while ensuring that properly authorized access is allowed
B) Hospitals remove their Wi-Fi
C) Not lift ceiling tiles to install WAPs
D) Place WAPS where they cant be seen
QUESTIONS- Note: more than
one response may be correct
• A hospital’s Infection Control Risk Assessment
(ICRA) Procedure may restrict
A)
Removing ceiling tiles, wall penetrations and access to unoccupied
spaces
B) Exposure of patients to WAPs
C) Wireless performance
D) Location of patients
QUESTIONS- Note: more than
one response may be correct
• Universities need to physically secure their
wireless infrastructure for the following
reasons
A)
For Heath information portability and accountability act (HIPAA)
compliance
B) The wireless network is mission critical for teaching, instruction,
and programming
C) Aesthetics
D) NCAA compliance
QUESTIONS- Note: more than
one response may be correct
• Residence halls in Universities create a
particular challenge for installing wireless
networks because
A) Students don’t like wi-fi
B) Residence halls often have block walls and hard ceilings,
requiring surface mounting of the WAP
C) Physically unsecured WAPS may be vandalized, damaged,
disconnected or moved
D) Wireless signal propagation is poor through block walls, requiring
high WAP density
QUESTIONS- Note: more than
one response may be correct
• National Electric Code permits non-plenum
rated equipment to be mounted above the
ceiling if
A)
B)
C)
D)
Equipment is never permitted above ceiling
it is not flammable
the equipment is in a metal, UL listed enclosure
it is wireless
QUESTIONS- Note: more than
one response may be correct
• What is the industry standard that requires
retail institutions to restrict access to their
WAPS
A) Payment Card Industry Digital Security Standard (PCI-DSS)
B) HIPAA
C) National Electric Code
D) TIA TSB -162A Telecommunications Cabling Guidelines for
Wireless Access Points
QUESTIONS- Note: more than
one response may be correct
•
TIA 4966 Telecommunications Infrastructure for
Educational Buildings and Spaces recommends
a WAP density of one WAP for every
A)
B)
C)
D)
10 occupants
25 occupants
100 occupants
It depends on the application
QUESTIONS- Note: more than
one response may be correct
An existing Oberon customer with installed enclosures
can migrate to a new wireless solution by
A)
B)
Removing and replacing enclosure altogether
Replacing the door on the installed enclosure and replacing with a new
door suited to the new WAP, leaving enclosure in place
QUESTIONS- Note: more than
one response may be correct
•
An effective way to achieve high density Wi-Fi
deployments in stadiums and auditoriums where
there are a lot of occupants is to mount WAPs
A)
B)
C)
D)
Above the ceiling in ceiling enclosure
Under the floor in floor box
Under the seating in a NEMA 4 (water tight) enclosure
On the walls in a lock box
QUESTIONS- Note: more than
one response may be correct
The best way to find a matching enclosure for a
customers WAP is to
1st) determine the customers WAP vendor (Cisco,
Aruba networks, etc. )
2nd determine the installation requirement (indoor,
outdoor, in-ceiling etc.)
3rd:
A)
B)
C)
D)
Use the Oberon on-line enclosure finder to find matching enclosure
Surf the Web
Call Oberon customer service
Ask customer what they are willing to spend on enclosures
THANK YOU!
CONTACT INFORMATION
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