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The Hume Workforce Development
Committee
Hume Regional Development Australia
Transport & Logistics Labour Market Snapshot
Workforce Planning Australia | December 2012
© Workforce Planning Australia - www.workforceplanning.com.au
Transport & Logistics Industry
The Transport and Logistics industry encompasses the organisations that carry out “the
movement of goods and people from an origin to a destination.”
The Transport & Logistics
Industry Skills Council breaks
the industry down into 6 key
sectors:
Logistics &
Warehousing
Road
Transport
Ports
Transport &
Logistics
Maritime
Aviation
Rail
Source: Transport & Logistics Industry Skills Council, Environmental Scan 2011
2|
National Industry
Overview
Industry Employment
The Transport & Logistics industry is the 9th largest industry in Australia employing
573,845 people (5.1% of the total workforce) accross the six sectors.
Industry Employment Level February 2012
Source: ABS Labour Force Survey, February 2012 data.
4|
Historical Employment Growth
•
Over the last decade, employment in the industry has shown growth with an average
annual growth rate of 2.3 per cent.
•
Employment experienced a decline in 2010 which in part is attributable to the outbreak
of the Global Financial Crisis.
Employment Level ('000) - February 1992 to February 2010
Source: ABS Labour Force Survey cat. no. 6291.0.55.003 (DEEWR trend data)
5|
Employment variability
•
While long term job growth in the industry has been strong, annual employment
changes have historically been variable.
•
The industry is highly cyclical and activity in the wider economy translates to the
industry as movements in both raw materials and consumer goods contract or expand.
Employment Level (line RHS) and Annual Change ('000) - year to February 2010
Source: ABS Labour Force Survey cat. no. 6291.0.55.003 (DEEWR trend data)
6|
Projected Employment Growth
•
Employment declined by 6.8% in 2010 (partly attributable to the GFC)
•
Over the period 2010-15 employment is projected to grow at 2.2% (DEEWR forecast
2.3%) which is comparatively stronger to an all industries projection of 1.8%.
•
Forecast employment growth (2010-15) will equate to around 67,000 new jobs)
Projected Employment Growth (% pa) - to February 2010 (and 5 years to 2014-15 (projected)
Source: ABS Labour Force Survey cat. no. 6291.0.55.003 (DEEWR trend data); DEEWR projections to 2014-15
7|
Main employing occupations
•
Truck Drivers dominate employment in the industry. Other common occupations for
employees include Couriers and Postal Deliverers, Automobile Drivers, Bus and Coach
Drivers, and Store persons.
Figure 21: Top 20 Employing Occupations (‘000) - 2009
Source: ABS Labour Force Survey cat. no. 6291.0.55.003 (DEEWR trend data, four quarter average)
8|
Workforce Development Challenges
There are several workforce development challenges facing the Transport and
Logistics Industry.
New &
Emerging
Technologies
A cleaner
environment
Workforce
demographics
Competition
for workers
Regulatory
reform
Growth
Diversity
Transport
&
Logistics
Source: Transport & Logistics Industry Skills Council, Environmental Scan 2011
9|
Vocational
Education &
Training
reform
Workforce Development Challenges
Diversity
―
The industry is characterised by immense diversity in occupations, workforce development needs,
business types and sizes, and locations.
Growth
―
The industry is expected to show strong growth over the next 20 years, challenging its capacity to
attract, retain and develop workers.
Workforce Demographics
―
The industry is faced with an ageing workforce. The latest figures released by DEEWR show that nearly
half of all workers in the industry are aged 45 years and over, compared with the average of 38.5% for
all industries.
New and Emerging technologies
―
Technological developments call for higher-order skills in the workforce. Adaptability will be particularly
important, as workers will need to cope with an industry that is constantly changing.
Source: Transport & Logistics Industry Skills Council, Environmental Scan 2011
10 |
Workforce Development Challenges
A Cleaner Environment
―
New ‘green’ jobs will emerge over time as a result of a low-carbon economy and advances in fuel
sources and infrastructure. Many of these roles will require investment in training at a workforce level
to ensure employees are appropriately skilled.
Competition for workers
―
Competition from the resources industry is a challenge for the Industry. Many transport and logistics
skills are easily transferable. Workers are being drawn away by higher-paid jobs in resources.
Competition is expected to intensify with feedback from industry suggesting that skills shortages across
sectors are likely to increase.
Regulatory Reform
―
Industry has found it difficult to keep up with regulatory requirements accross jurisdictions. Reforms
are underway across the various sectors to reduce the compliance burden carried by industry. The
workforce skill set needs to be able to respond quickly to address the impact of reforms.
Vocational Education and Training (VET) Reforms
―
Several VET reforms are underway, focused on a renewed role for industry and new funding models
that aim to leverage industry investment in workforce development.
Source: Transport & Logistics Industry Skills Council, Environmental Scan 2011
11 |
National skills in demand
Sector
Occupations in Skill Demand
Logistics
Management, Road
Transporting &
Warehousing
• Transport and Logistics Trainers/Assessor
(including Driver Instructor/Trainer)
• Truck Drivers: Local Delivery Driver (M/R –
H/R licence) B Double Driver/General
Freight (particularly interstate driver)
Aviation
•
•
•
•
Maritime
• Deck Hand/General Purpose Hand/
Integrated Rating
• Deck Officer
Rail
•
•
•
•
Aeroplane Pilot
Ground Crewman Aircraft Support
Aircraft Load Controller
Aircraft Baggage Handler/Ground Crew
Train Driver
Signalling Technician
Railway Track Worker
Team Leader Infrastructure
Source: Transport & Logistics Industry Skills Council, Environmental Scan 2012
12 |
•
•
•
•
•
•
Dangerous Goods Driver
Transport/Logistics Manager
Transport/Logistics Supervisor/Scheduler
Bus Driver
Warehouse Manager
Storeperson
• Flying Instructor (Aeroplane and Helicopter)
• Trainer/Assessor
• Aircraft Maintenance Engineers
• Marine Engineer
• Ship’s Captain/Ship’s Master
• Maritime Trainer/Assessor
•
•
•
•
•
Track Patroller / Inspector
Rail Trainer /Assessor
Guard / Conductor
Overhead Wiring Technician
Civil Specialist
Note: Red text indicates occupation included as part of
this labour market analysis
Hume region
General description of the
Transport system in Hume
•
The transport system is vital to the economy and viability of industries in the Hume
Region.
•
Drivers of growth of the Hume Transport system over the next 25 years include:
―
Population Growth: The population of the four Hume sub regions is expected to grow from
300,000 to 400,000 people.
―
Increased freight movement: Movement will increase to a projected 58 million tonnes
annually, with the Hume Freeway freight task projected to grow by 50% over the next 20 years.
―
Increased visitor numbers: Visitors to the region are projected to rise well above the current
2.5 million that come to the region each year.
•
The road system network (shown in following slide) will need to mature through
upgrades and improvements to infrastructure and service links traversing east-west
and north-south across the Hume Region. These links will provide mobility within the
region and to locations outside of the region and will support a strong, robust network
of connected settlements.
•
The future growth and success of the transport and logistics industry in Hume is
largely dependent on the advancement of transport infrastructure.
Source: Hume Strategy for Sustainable Communities 2010-2012, Skills Vic 2010
14 |
Road and Rail System Network
Source: Hume Strategy for Sustainable Communities 2010-2012, Skills Vic 2010
15 |
Employment in Transport, Postal &
Warehousing by LGA
2006 Census vs. 2011 Census data
Moira
465 (2006)
464 (2011)
G Shepparton
1,048 (2006)
1,092 (2011)
Indigo
268 (2006)
311 (2011)
Wangaratta
413(2006)
496(2011)
Murrindindi
239(2006)
224(2011)
Mansfield
179 (2006)
133 (2011)
Alpine
152 (2006)
194 (2011)
Source: ABS Census Data 2006 and ABS Census Data 2011. This table has been prepared using data generated by the ABS TableBuilder.
16 |
Towong
108(2006)
109 (2011)
Benalla
206 (2006)
255 (2011)
Strathbogie
235 (2006)
222 (2011)
Mitchell
1,001 (2006)
1,125 (2011)
Wodonga
654 (2006)
812 (2011)
Total Industry
4,968 (2006)
5,437 (2011)
9%
Hume Region Boundary
Sub-region Boundary
Local Government Area
(LGA) Boundary
Employment growth projections in
Hume
•
According to Monash projections employment is expected to grow and level out over
the period to 2015.
•
Average annual growth rate is calculated at 4%.
3
2.5
2
1.5
Employment levels
1
0.5
0
2010-1
2011-2
2012-3
2013-4
2014-5
2015-6
Usage is restricted to the Department of Education & Early Childhood Development and third parties undertaking work on behalf of Skills Victoria.
Source: Monash Centre of Policy Studies, 2011
17 |
Occupations
•
The top employing occupations in the region are as follows:
Transport (Top 10 occupations by employment level Hume)
ANZOG Code
Occupation
Employment (2011-12)
7331
Truck Drivers
2.24041
5612
Couriers & Postal Deliverers (Delivery Driver)
0.62048
7312
Bus & Coach Drivers
0.40552
7213
Forklift Drivers
0.34351
1494
Transport Services Managers
0.33596
7411
Store persons
0.33194
7311
Automobile Drivers
0.29521
6211
Sales Assistants (General)
0.20364
7313
Train & Tram Drivers
0.17735
1336
Supply & Distrib. Managers (Warehouse Admin)
0.15232
Note: Red text indicates occupation included as part of this labour market analysis
Usage is restricted to the Department of Education & Early Childhood Development and third parties undertaking work on behalf of Skills Victoria .
Source: Monash Centre of Policy Studies, 2011
18 |
Occupation growth
•
Monash projections show growth in all transport and logistics occupations.
•
Strongest growth is expected in the truck driver occupation.
Supply & Distrib. Managers
Train & Tram Drivers
Sales Assistants (General)
Automobile Drivers
Storepersons
2010-1
Forklift Drivers
2014-5
Transport Services Managers
Bus & Coach Drivers
Couriers & Postal Deliverers
Truck Drivers
0
0.5
1
1.5
2
2.5
Usage is restricted to the Department of Education & Early Childhood Development and third parties undertaking work on behalf of Skills Victoria.
Source: Monash Centre of Policy Studies, 2011
19 |
Industry Education attainment
levels
•
VET education enrolment data shows an increase in course enrolments for the
industry. Growth is being driven by the Cert IV, III, I level qualifications
Diploma
Certificate IV
2008
Certificate III
2011
Certificate II
Certificate I
0
200
400
600
Source: Data prepared 9 March 2012, Market Analysis team, Skills Victoria.
20 |
800
1000
1200
1400
Age profile of enrolments
•
Across all industry occupations there has been the greatest growth in VET course
enrolments from the 15-19 and 20-24 year old age groups.
500
450
400
350
300
250
2008
200
2011
150
100
50
0
15 to 19
20 to 24
25 to 29
30 to 34
35 to 39
40 to 44
45 to 49
Source: Data prepared 9 March 2012, Market Analysis team, Skills Victoria.
21 |
50 to 54
55 to 59
60 to 64
65 and
over
Diversity of Enrolments
•
The diversity of enrolments has increased in the industry within Hume.
•
The strongest growth can be seen in the proportion of CALD enrolments.
6%
5%
4%
2008
3%
2011
2%
1%
0%
Disabled
Indigenous
Source: Data prepared 9 March 2012, Market Analysis team, Skills Victoria.
22 |
CALD
Transport, Postal and Warehousing VET
Education Data
Truck Driver (General)
Storeperson
Delivery Driver
Warehouse Administrator
© Workforce Planning Australia - www.workforceplanning.com.au
Truck Driver (General)
Truck Driver VET Course Enrolments
•
Truck Driver enrolments in VET courses have decreased in Hume from 2008-2011.
•
Decreases can be seen in both VET courses for the occupation.
Certificate IV in Transport and
Logistics (Road Transport)
2008
2011
Certificate III in Transport and
Logistics (Road Transport)
0
100 200 300 400 500 600 700
Note: A representative from the Industry Skills Council explained that a decrease in
enrolments may be attributable to a change in the training package. An additional factor is
that due to the nature of the job, drivers are time poor and limited in study capacity.
(03/04/2012)
Source: Data prepared 9 March 2012, Market Analysis team, Skills Victoria.
25 |
Truck Driver Age Profile of VET
Enrolments
•
The age profile of truck drivers enrolled in VET courses has remained consistent to the
drop in total enrolment numbers for the period.
•
Enrolments are generally spread across age groups with small increases in the 35-39,
40-44 and 45-49 groups.
120
100
80
2008
60
2011
40
20
0
15 to 19
20 to 24
25 to 29
30 to 34
35 to 39
40 to 44
Source: Data prepared 9 March 2012, Market Analysis team, Skills Victoria.
26 |
45 to 49
50 to 54
55 to 59
60 & over
Diversity of Truck Driver VET
Enrolments
•
Despite a decrease in total enrolment numbers, there has been an increase in
indigenous and CALD enrolments over the period 2008-2011.
•
The total number of disabled students has decreased however this is seen to be in
alignment with total decrease in VET enrolment numbers for the occupation.
6%
5%
4%
2008
3%
2011
2%
1%
0%
Disabled
Indigenous
Source: Data prepared 9 March 2012, Market Analysis team, Skills Victoria.
27 |
CALD
Delivery Driver
VET Course Enrolments
•
There has been a decrease in Delivery Driver enrolments from 2008-2011.
•
A change in course titles is likely to have skewed data on course enrolments.
Certificate III in Driving Operations
2008
Certificate II in Transport and Logistics (Road Transport)
2011
Certificate II in Driving Operations
0
100 200 300 400 500 600 700 800 900 1000
Source: Data prepared 9 March 2012, Market Analysis team, Skills Victoria.
29 |
VET Enrolments Age Profile
•
The age profile trend of delivery driver enrolments has generally remained consistent
relative to the decrease in total enrolment numbers for the period.
140
120
100
80
2008
2011
60
40
20
0
15 to 19
20 to 24
25 to 29
30 to 34
35 to 39
40 to 44
Source: Data prepared 9 March 2012, Market Analysis team, Skills Victoria.
30 |
45 to 49
50 to 54
55 to 59
60 & Over
Diversity of VET Enrolments
•
Despite a decrease in total enrolment numbers the proportion of indigenous and CALD
enrolments has increased.
•
Disabled enrolments have decreased.
5%
5%
4%
4%
3%
2008
3%
2011
2%
2%
1%
1%
0%
Disabled
Indigenous
Source: Data prepared 9 March 2012, Market Analysis team, Skills Victoria.
31 |
CALD
Storeperson
Storeperson VET Course Enrolments
•
Store person enrolments in VET courses have increased in Hume from 2008-2011.
•
This growth is being observed in the cert II Transport & Logistics qualification course.
•
Cert III enrolment numbers have dropped relative to the total increase in course
enrolment numbers.
Certificate III in Transport and Logistics (Warehousing and
Storage)
2008
2011
Certificate II in Transport and Logistics (Warehousing and
Storage)
0
100
200
Source: Data prepared 9 March 2012, Market Analysis team, Skills Victoria.
33 |
300
400
500
600
700
800
Store person Age Profile of VET
Enrolments
•
The age profile trend of store person enrolments has generally remained consistent
relative to the total increase in course enrolment numbers for the period.
•
Enrolments have seen significant growth in the 15-19, 19-24 and 25-29 age groups.
250
200
150
2008
2011
100
50
0
15 to 19
20 to 24
25 to 29
30 to 34
35 to 39
40 to 44
Source: Data prepared 9 March 2012, Market Analysis team, Skills Victoria.
34 |
45 to 49
50 to 54
55 to 59
60 & over
Diversity of Store person VET
Enrolments
•
Relative to the increase in store person enrolment numbers all categories of disabled,
indigenous and CALD enrolments has increased.
9%
8%
7%
6%
5%
2008
4%
2011
3%
2%
1%
0%
Disabled
Indigenous
Source: Data prepared 9 March 2012, Market Analysis team, Skills Victoria.
35 |
CALD
Warehouse
Administrator
VET Course Enrolments
•
There has been a significant increase in warehouse administrator enrolments for the
period 2008-20122.
•
This growth is primarily attributed to increased enrolments in the certificate IV in
Transport & Distribution (Warehousing & Storage) course.
Certificate IV in Transport and Distribution (Warehousing
and Storage)
2008
Certificate IV in Warehousing Operations
2011
Certificate IV in Logistics and Supply Chain Principles
0
100
200
Source: Data prepared 9 March 2012, Market Analysis team, Skills Victoria.
37 |
300
400
500
600
700
VET Enrolments Age Profile
The majority of warehouse administrators are in the 20-24 age group.
•
140
120
100
80
2008
2011
60
40
20
0
15 to 19
20 to 24
25 to 29
30 to 34
35 to 39
40 to 44
Source: Data prepared 9 March 2012, Market Analysis team, Skills Victoria.
38 |
45 to 49
50 to 54
55 to 59
60 & over
Diversity of VET Enrolments
•
Diversity of VET enrolments has increased relative to overall growth however there has
been a small decrease in CALD enrolments.
6%
5%
4%
2008
3%
2011
2%
1%
0%
Disabled
Indigenous
Source: Data prepared 9 March 2012, Market Analysis team, Skills Victoria.
39 |
CALD
Future direction
What this means?
41 |
1.
Population Growth, increased freight movement and visitor numbers will place
increased pressure on the Hume transport system and logistics industry.
2.
Employment in the Hume industry is expected grow faster than the national
average with an average annual growth rate of 4% to 2016. (National industry
growth forecast of 2.2%)
3.
Truck drivers are projected to show the strongest occupational growth with an
average annual growth rate to 2016 forecast at 5.9%. It should be noted that there is a
shortage of truck drivers nationally and this poses risk to the Hume industry.
4.
Overall industry enrolments in VET courses have increased (most notable in the
Cert I, III and IV qualification levels)
5.
The strongest growth in industry enrolments has come from the 15-19 and 2024 age groups. This suggests any current youth attraction strategies in place are
effective.
6.
The diversity of enrolments has increased across all focus occupations of the labour
market scan including number of disabled, indigenous and CALD students from 2008 to
2011. This suggests any current diversity strategies in place to increase enrolments
from these groups are effective.
What this means?
•
42 |
There is a high percentage of Warehouse Administrator and Store person VET
enrolments in the 15-19 and 20-24 age groups. Truck and Delivery Driver occupations
have an older age profile. A potential explanation for this may be that youth are
following a pathway in the industry where they start in operational /
administrative positions and transition to driver roles later in their career. Another
factor may be the insurance implications and cost for employers of training /
employing young drivers in these occupations.
Questions
1.
What is driving growth stronger then the national average in the Hume Transport &
Logistics industry? Have all factors been considered?
2.
Is there a strategy to attract, recruit and retain truck drivers in the industry?
3.
What has driven the increase in VET course enrolments over 2006-2012?
o
o
o
43 |
Growth in youth age groups of 15-19 and 20-24?
Increase in diversity of enrolments? WELL Program etc.?
Decrease in driver VET enrolments against this trend? Changes to training package /
occupational requirements?
4.
Are youth following a pathway in the industry? Starting in operational / administrative
positions and transitioning to driver roles?
5.
What factors are inhibiting youth age groups in the driver occupations? E.g. Insurance,
cost, training etc.?
6.
What are the lessons learnt that are applicable in other industries?
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