Purposes of Assessment in RTI

advertisement
Purposes of Assessment
Knappa School District
4/19/10
Purposes of Assessment
1. Screening
2. Progress Monitoring
3. Diagnostic
The Importance of data
Screening
Good Screening Tools
Screening Tools are
designed to:
1. Compare all students to the
same grade-level standard
2. Be efficient, standardized,
reliable, and valid
3. Accurately identify those who
are on track to meet grade
level expectations, and those
who will need more support
4. Evaluate the quality of your
schoolwide instructional
system
Screening tools are NOT
designed to:
1. Identify specific instructional
levels for individual students
2. Take a large amount of
instructional time and vary
between classrooms
3. Identify WHY some students
will need more support
4. Evaluate individual teachers
1. Compare all students to the
same grade-level standard
ALL students are assessed against the grade
level-standard at least 3 times a year,
regardless of instructional level
"If you don't know where you are going, you
will wind up somewhere else.“
~ Yogi Berra
2. Be efficient, standardized,
reliable, and valid
“Curriculum Based Measures (CBM) are usually
composed of a set of standard directions, a timing
device, set of materials, scoring rules, standards for
judging performance, and record form or charts.”
These are also called General Outcome Measures
(GOM)
Essential Features of CBM Tools
• Robust indicator of academic health
• Brief and easy to administer
• Can be administered frequently
• Must have multiple, equivalent forms
(If the metric isn’t the same, the data are meaningless)
• Must be sensitive to growth
What are Screening Tools?
Screening Tools
•
•
•
•
DIBELS
Oral Reading Fluency
Maze
EasyCBM
Not Screening Tools
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Quick Phonics Screener
QRI-IV
DRA2
Running Records
Report cards
Meeting OAKS standards
Core curriculum weekly tests
on skills that are learned
OAKS
• Passing OAKS 3rd grade (204)
places a child in the 17th
percentile
• Passing 3rd grade is not
enough.
• By 5th grade, if these students
stay at the same percentile
they will fail OAKS
• By 10th grade, if these students
stay at the same percentile
they will fail OAKS
• This student will score a 236
and pass at the 37th percentile
Based on 2008-2009 ODE percentiles
Reading CBM: DIBELS
Dynamic Indicators of Basic Early Literacy Skills
Reading CBM: DIBELS
Dynamic Indicators of Basic Early Literacy Skills
Grade Levels K-2
Time to
administer
1-2 minute per measure
Skills
measured
Phonemic awareness, Phonics
Strengths
Free
Quick and easy to administer
Highly predictive of later reading
Research-based benchmarks
Weaknesses
Limited to early literacy skills
Can only give to 1 student at a time
Reading CBM: ORF
Oral Reading Fluency
Reading CBM: ORF
Oral Reading Fluency
Grade Levels 1-6 (DIBELS)
Time to
administer
1 minute per passage
Skills
measured
Oral reading fluency and accuracy
Strengths
Free
Quick and easy to administer
Highly predictive of later reading
Research-based benchmarks
Indicator of reading comprehension
Weaknesses
Can only give to 1 student at a time
Not a comprehensive comprehension measure
Oral reading fluency and
comprehension activity
• Find a partner. One person will be the Test
Administrator, paper A. The other will be
the Test Taker, paper B.
• Read your directions to yourself. Test
Administrator, give the test and score.
• Test Taker, read the passage aloud and be
prepared to answer questions.
Oral reading fluency and
comprehension activity
Oral Reading Errors per Page at Different Levels of Accuracy
95%
98%
99%
The Secret Life of Bees
18.5
7.4
3.6
My Brother Sam is Dead
15
6
3
The Magic School Bus
6
2.4
1.2
Why Use Fluency Measures for
Screening?
• Oral Reading Fluency and Accuracy in reading
connected text is one of the best indicators of overall
reading comprehension (Fuchs, Fuchs, Hosp, &
Jenkins, 2001)
• Always examine fluency AND accuracy
• Students MUST be accurate with any skill before they
are fluent.
Oral reading fluency (ORF) does not tell you everything about a
student’s reading skill, but a child who cannot read fluently
and accurately cannot fully comprehend written text and will
need additional support.
Fluency Non-Example
Reading CBM:
Maze
Grade Levels 1 – 8 (AIMSWEB) 3-6 (DIBELS)
Time to
administer
3-5 minutes
Skills
measured
Reading Comprehension
Strengths
Free (if using DIBELS)
Quick and easy to administer
Can administer to groups of students
Indicator of reading comprehension
Weaknesses
Time consuming to score
Only a “surface” comprehension measure
Students make less growth than on ORF
3. Accurately identify those who are on track
and those who will need more support
We must identify struggling students, BEFORE they fall too
far behind
Good, Simmons, & Smith (1998)
4. Evaluate the quality of your
schoolwide instructional system
• Are 80% of your students proficient?
• Are 80% of students reaching
benchmarks and “on track” for next
goal?
If not, then the core curriculum needs
to be addressed
Improving Your Core
90 min reading
block structure
Fidelity
Explicit, systematic,
feedback, application
Professional
Development
What does your screening data
look like?
?
Talk to your neighbor about…
• 1 thing you already knew
• 1 thing that was new to you
• 1 unanswered question you
still have
Progress Monitoring
Progress Monitoring Tools
Brief &
Easy
Sensitive
to growth
Frequent
Equivalent
forms
What are Progress Monitoring Tools?
Progress Monitoring Tools
•
•
•
•
DIBELS
Oral Reading Fluency
Maze
EasyCBM
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Not Progress Monitoring
Tools
Quick Phonics Screener
QRI-IV
DRA2
Running Records
Report cards
Meeting OAKS standards
Core curriculum weekly
tests on skills that are
learned
Where are we?
What is our goal?
What course should we follow?
How are we doing?
Our Goal
Desired
Course
We are
Here
Actual
Course
Progress Monitoring:
The GPS for Educators!
Purpose of Progress
Monitoring
Answers the question(s):
Are the children learning?
How can we tell?
Are they making enough progress?
Can we remove some of our supports?
Do we need to change or intensify our supports?
How often do you progress
monitor students?
Determined by district decision rules and
level of need
• Best practice recommendations:
– Intensive: 1x per week
– Strategic: 1x or 2x per month
How do we know if a student is making
adequate progress?
Correct words per Minute
60
50
Decision Rules
40
30
20
10
Dec.
Scores
Jan.
Scores
Feb.
Scores
March
Scores
April
Scores
May
Scores
June
Scores
Questions to Consider
• How many data points below the line
before you make a change in
instruction/intervention?
• What do you change?
– Group size?
– Time?
– Curriculum?
– Other factors?
Progress Monitoring
Phonics for Reading
27
31
30
35
25
32
34
38
We do not use progress
monitoring data to…
…select specific short-term instructional goals
…take a lot of time away from instruction
…diagnose educational problems
…assign grades to students
…evaluate teachers
Progress Monitoring data tell us WHEN a
change is needed
Progress Monitoring data does not
necessarily tell us WHAT change is needed
Talk to your neighbor about…
• 1 thing you already knew
• 1 thing that was new to you
• 1 unanswered question you
still have
Diagnostic
Answer the question…
Why?
Diagnostic assessments may
include:
• In curriculum assessments:
– Quick Phonics Screener (in Triumphs)
– Weekly assessment data
– Unit and Benchmark assessment data
• Survey Level Assessments
• Error Analysis or Running Records
• Any formal or informal assessment that
answers the question:
– Why is the student having a problem?
Treasures Weekly Assessments
Weekly Assessment
Weekly Leveled Assessment
Treasures Weekly Assessments
Organizing Weekly
Assessment Data
U3 W1
Voc
Poss
GB
TD
BS
GH
BD
EL
LB
SS
PR
YS
KD
TC
MK
JA
CK
JC
PH
DP
JW
QI
BF
FB
Avg
Skill
U3 W2
Read Comp Const Resp
Voc
U3 W3
Read Comp Const Resp
Voc
U3 W4
Read Comp Const Resp
Voc
U3 W5
Read Comp Const Resp
Voc
Read Comp Const Resp
total correct
Percent
3
2
2
3
2
2
3
2
2
3
2
2
3
2
2
35
#/35 = %
3
1
2
2
1
2
2
1
2
1
2
2
3
2
2
28
80%
3
1
2
2
2
2
3
2
2
2
2
1
2
2
2
30
86%
2
1
2
2
2
1
3
2
2
2
2
1
22
79%
AB
3
2
1
2
1
2
2
2
2
3
2
0
3
1
2
28
80%
3
1
1
3
2
2
3
2
1
2
2
1
3
1
2
29
83%
3
0
1
2
1
2
2
2
2
2
1
2
2
2
2
26
74%
0
1
0
0
1
0
2
2
2
3
1
0
1
1
1
15
43%
3
0
2
AB
2
1
1
AB
1
0
1
11
52%
3
2
2
2
1
2
2
1
2
0
1
2
2
2
2
26
74%
3
2
1
3
0
1
3
2
1
2
2
2
3
2
1
28
80%
3
1
1
0
1
2
2
2
0
3
2
1
2
0
0
20
57%
3
0
0
2
2
2
AB
0
1
0
1
2
2
15
54%
3
2
0
3
2
2
3
2
2
3
1
1
1
1
2
28
80%
3
2
1
3
1
2
2
0
1
3
2
2
AB
22
79%
3
2
2
3
2
0
3
2
1
3
2
2
2
0
0
27
77%
1
1
0
2
2
0
3
2
1
1
2
0
1
2
2
20
57%
3
2
2
AB
3
2
1
3
2
1
3
2
1
25
89%
3
1
2
1
2
2
2
1
1
2
0
2
2
2
2
25
71%
3
2
2
3
2
2
3
2
2
3
2
2
3
2
2
35
100%
3
1
2
3
1
2
3
2
1
3
1
1
3
0
2
28
80%
3
2
1
2
2
2
1
0
2
2
2
1
3
1
2
26
74%
3
0
1
3
2
0
AB
2
1
2
2
2
1
19
68%
2.8
1.2
1.2
2.2
1.5
1.6
2.2
1.6
1.3
2.1
1.4
1.5
24.2
74%
Make Inferences
Plot and Setting
2.4
1.6
Cause and Effect
1.4
Make Inferences
Sequence
Diagnostic Assessment Questions
“Why is the student not performing at the
expected level?”
“What is the student’s instructional need?”
We do not use diagnostic data…
…for all students
…to monitor progress towards a long-term goal
…to compare students to each other
Talk to your neighbor about…
• 1 thing you already knew
• 1 thing that was new to you
• 1 unanswered question you
still have
Final Questions/Comments
Jon Potter
[email protected]
(503) 431-4149
Download
Related flashcards

Pediatrics

67 cards

Neonatology

54 cards

Pediatrics

86 cards

Pediatricians

20 cards

Create Flashcards