Module B Powerpoint 3

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Blackpool Explorer Scouts
Module B – Taking the Lead
Module B Objectives
To have the confidence to undertake a leadership role within your chosen
section.
To be able to run programme activities as appropriate to your role.
To recognise and understand the different leadership styles, and when each
should be used.
To know your personal preferred style of leadership.
To recognise the effect of different styles of leadership on an activity.
To understand the process of evaluation, the need for it, and implement it
as necessary.
Ice-breaker
Using the pens and paper provided, I want you to organise yourself into
appropriately sized tutor groups, each of which should be balanced in terms of
age, gender and ability etc and record them on the paper.
Styles of Leadership?
There are roughly five style of leadership these are
Formal/Directive
Informal/Supportive
Passive
Democratic/Team
Based
Organiser
Informal / Supportive
Using this style, the young people you are leading may not be aware that
that is indeed what you are doing. Being there to help and support is a
form of leadership.
Formal / Directive?
This is a style that you would most associate with leading – the regimental
sergeant major, giving firm and clear instructions.
Democratic / Team Based
This style involves leading a discussion and including everyone in the final
decision.
Passive
This is the most subtle form of leadership. It involves knowing when to let
go and let your youngsters take the lead. It is used when there is no risk to
their safety involved and gives them the opportunity to make their own
decisions.
Organiser
This is a planning style as much as a leadership style. You take
responsibility for getting things organised in such a way that the outcome
that you desire is achieved.
So which one….?
This is the secret!
You need to master when and where it is appropriate to use each style of
leadership.
For example, while an informal/supportive role might be useful at a Beaver Scout
Colony meeting, the same approach probably shouldn’t be used when a casualty
is waiting for someone to go and fetch help!
So what are you like – Which Simpson will you be?
Its your test now…….
Which Simpsons Character are you aligned
with?
JP Bundle
Take the Test
You have to select one letter from each of 4 pairs of opposing
personality type indicators
This will result in a 4 letter code
The code will be cross matched to one of 16 Simpsons characters with
whom your personality is most closely aligned
The first pair – Direction of your Energy Force
E
or
You prefer to direct your
energy to deal with
people, things,
situations.
I
You prefer to direct your
energy to study ideas,
information,
explanations or
beliefs.
The second pair – Information Processing
S
or
You prefer to deal with
facts, what you know,
to have clarity, a
realist in the here &
now – for you the
force is a tool - a
fission screwdriver
N
You prefer to deal with
ideas, look into the
unknown, to generate
new possibilities or to
anticipate what isn't
obvious, you seek the
nature of the force
The third pair – Making Decisions
T
You prefer to decide on
the basis of logic,
using an analytic and
detached approach.
or
F
You prefer to decide
using values and/or
personal beliefs,
letting
The fourth pair – Organising your Life
J
or
You prefer your life to
be planned in a stable
and organised way
P
You prefer to go with
the flow, to maintain
flexibility and respond
to events
You Should have a 4 letter code e.g. ENTP - Find your
Simpson character in the next 4 slides
Protectors (SJ)
Type
ESTJ
Chief Wigam
ESFJ
Ned Flanders
ISTJ
Principal Skinner
ISFJ
Marge Simpson
Character
Strength
Enthusiastic people who
are driven to fulfil their
obligations and duties.
They are committed to
relationships which they
consider to be lifelong &
unalterable – Good in a
tight spot
Warm hearted individuals
who highly value their
relationships. Customer
focused with the ability to
bring out the best of people.
Honour their
commitments, Able to
take constructive
criticism well
Warm, friendly and
affirming by nature,
Excellent
organizational
capabilities
Weakness
Tendency to always
needing to be in charge
and maybe controlling of
friends & colleagues.
Can be self-sacrificing and
may not pay enough
attention to their own needs
Tendency to believe
that they're always
right, Their value for
structure may seem
rigid to others
Extreme dislike of
conflict and criticism, ,
Unlikely to express
their needs, which
may cause pent-up
frustrations
ESTJ - Overseer
ESFJ - Supporter
ISTJ - Examiner
ISFJ - Defender
Creators (CP)
ESTP
Bart
ESFP
Homer
Strength
They love action and
always seem to be doing
something. Clear-headed
when dealing with
emergencies. Enjoy
lavishing loved ones with
big gifts. good to have on
your side, corporate suit
Generous & will go out
of their way to help a
colleagues. Live for the
moment & know how to
make the most of each
moment.
Usually self-confident, are
not threatened by conflict
or criticism
Flexible and laid-back,
usually willing to defer
to their mates, Warm,
friendly and affirming
by nature
Weakness
Get bored easily. Enjoys
lavishing loved ones with
big gifts
Can take conflict
personally. Resist
relationships that require
them to function on a
high intuitive or thinking
level
They thrive on action and
excitement, and may stir
things up to create it
Extreme dislike of
conflict and criticism,
Tendency to hold back
their thoughts and
feelings, unless drawn
out
ESTP - The Persuader
ESFP - The Entertainer
ISTP - The Craftsman
ISFP - The Artist
Type
ISTP
Sideshow Bob
ISFP
Smithers
Character
Intellectuals (NT)
Type
ENTJ
Krusty the Clown
ENTP
Kent Brockman
INTJ
Mr Burns
INTP
Prof Frink
Enjoys lively intellectual
conversations welcoming such
interactions as a
learning opportunity
Laid back and can get
along with almost all
other types of people.
Enjoy dicussing &
debating theories and
concepts that interests
them.
Not threatened by conflict
or criticism, Able to leave
relationships which
should be ended,
Approach things which
interest them very
enthusiastically, Richly
imaginative and creative
Can be direct &
confrontational
Can initiate arguments
because they enjoy the
debate.
May be insensitive at
times,
Tendency to be unwilling
or unable to accept blame
Tend to be suspicious
and distrusting of
others, Tend to "blow
off" conflict situations by
ignoring them, or else
they "blow up" in heated
anger
ENTJ - The Chief
ENTP - The Originator
INTJ - The Strategist
INTP - The Engineer
Character
Strength
Weakness
Visionaries (CF)
Type
ENFJ
Apu
ENFP
Barney Grumble
INFJ
Lisa Simpson
INFP
Ralph Wigam
See the best in people
and likely to bring out the
best in people. Put a lot
of effort into making
thing work out between
people
Have very high
expectations for
themselves and others
(both a strength and
weakness) , Sensitive and
concerned for others'
feelings
Have Driven to meet
other's needs, Strive for
"win-win" situations
Extreme dislike of conflict
and criticism
May tend to be shy and
reserved , Perfectionist
tendencies may cause
them to not give
themselves enough
credit
INFJ - The Confidant
INFP - The Dreamer
Character
Strength
Warm sociable people
who are keenly in tune
with other’s feeling &
perspectives
Weakness
Well defined value
systems can make them
inflexible in some areas
ENFJ - The Mentor
ENFP - The Advocate
What is personality?
A person’s preferred style of behaviour
We are “creatures of habit”
So, tend to be consistent over time and situations
If behaviour or personality wasn’t reliable, there’d be no point in
measuring it
One measurement systems is the Myer Briggs Type Indicator –
similar to the one just performed
Myers-Briggs Type Indicator
What the MBTI is:
• Measure of our dominant preferences for taking in information
and making decisions
• May not be polarised clearly between scales
• So, you can be “a little of both”
• No profile is better or worse than another
• Helps explain our working style preferences
• Based on the theory of Carl Jung
What the MBTI isn’t:
• A measure of abilities – it’s not a test
• No right or wrong answers
• Tool is an ‘indicator’ – you can agree or disagree
The Scale
Extraversion (E)
Sensing (S)
Thinking (T)
Judging (J)
Introversion (I)
Intuition (N)
Feeling (F)
Perceiving (P)
UK Population
ISTJ
13.7%
ISFJ
12.7%
INFJ
1.7%
INTJ
1.4%
ISTP
6.4%
ISFP
6.1%
INFP
3.2%
INTP
2.4%
ESTP
5.8%
ESFP
8.7%
ENFP
6.3%
ENTP
2.8%
ESTJ
10.4%
ESFJ
12.6%
ENFJ
2.8%
ENTJ
2.9%
What was I????
Strength
Weakness
Enjoys lively
intellectual
conversations welcoming such
interactions as a
learning opportunity
Can be direct &
confrontational
Now that’s what I call…..leadership?
Case Study 1
You are taking a group of Cub Scouts to winter camp.
There are two Sixes, with six cubs in each. In total there
are eight boys and four girls. Two of the boys are 10, two
nice and four eight. Two of the girls are eight, one is nine
and one 10. The weather is typically British – drizzly and
cold (this is a winter camp after all!). You need teach the
Cub Scouts how to put up a patrol tent. This is because
they need somewhere to sleep!
Formal/Directive
Case Study 2
You are helping to run a Patrol forum. There are eight
members of the Patrol. Two are female. The Patrol Leader,
Sam, is very good at activities and sports, but can’t really
be bothered running the Patrol forum. He’ll make the
decisions anyway won’t he?
The Assistant Patrol Leader is called Anne. She has lots of
good ideas, which she communicates well in a one-to-one
situation, but is very quiet in these meetings. Of the other
six members, four do not play an active role in these
forums.
Joe and Shilpa are 11, and have only just joined the Troop.
They are quiet and somewhat intimidated by the older
Scouts. Mark and Tom are 12 and 13 respectively. They
both seem bored by the programme offered at the moment.
Tom has talked about leaving the Troop, and Mark looks up
to him. Make sure that everyone’s opinion is heard at this
meeting of the Patrol forum.
Democratic
Case Study 3
A Beaver Scout, Chitin, trips in the hall. He falls awkwardly
and puts his hand through a glass window. There is glass
on the floor. The injured Beaver Scout is bleeding heavily.
Some of the other Beaver Scouts are crying. Some are
investigating the broken window. Take control of the
situation.
Formal/Directive
Case Study 4
You are explaining a new game to a group of 20 Beaver
Scouts. One boy, Ross, cannot see the point in the game
and makes this abundantly clear. His behaviour becomes
more and more disruptive. He starts kicking a football round
the hall and some of the other Beavers join in. The game
cannot start until the Beavers understand it, and this is a
vital part of the evenings programme. Make sure that the
Beavers understand and enjoy the game.
Formal/Directive
Case Study 5
You are having a cook-out on the playing field outside your
meeting place. The wind is blowing hard and one Six
cannot light its fire. The other Sixes have no such problems
and are preparing to cook. Each Six gets points for this
exercise, so you must be careful not to actually complete
the task for them. Help the Cub Scouts start their fire and
get cooking.
Informal/Supportive
So what do Leaders do anyway?
What do you think are your personal strengths?
What do you think you can bring to any activity or project?
Do you think you have any gaps?
What are your previous or current leaders like?
If you think about it, you already know a great deal about leadership. As a Beaver
Scout, Cub Scout or Scout you will have come into regular contact with adult leaders,
who also have differing styles of leadership. Who are these leaders and what do they do
and how do they do it? In what situation? What makes one style better than another?
You don’t have to pick me…….
The Good, the Bad and the……
Good Leaders:
Generate ideas.
Plan.
Encourage.
Help people learn.
ask “Did it work?”, “Why?”, “Would we
change anything?”
Let people know when they have done
a good job.
Ask for help.
Are team players.
Learn by experience
Work inside the rules.
Give positive feedback.
Know their Scouts.
Know their Scouts strengths and
weaknesses.
Take Time.
Bad Leaders:
Impose.
Try to do everything themselves
Don’t listen to others.
Stick to programmes no matter
what.
Use rules as an excuse not to do
things.
Do not learn by experience and
from mistakes.
Now what?
You have 5 minutes to devise a plan in order to pass an object of my
choice, around a circle, without using your hands! The object must pass
directly from one person to the next person without touching the floor until
it returns to the beginning!
How did it go? Did it work? Didn’t it work? Why?
What styles of leadership went on during this exercise?
What was the most appropriate style of leadership and did you use it?
Module B Objectives – Did we achieve them?
To have the confidence to undertake a leadership role within your chosen
section.
To be able to run programme activities as appropriate to your role.
To recognise and understand the different leadership styles, and when each
should be used.
To know your personal preferred style of leadership.
To recognise the effect of different styles of leadership on an activity.
To understand the process of evaluation, the need for it, and implement it
as necessary.
That’s it – Your Done
Hope you weren’t too bored ;)
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