Secondary Presentation - Oregon Department of Education

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Session 1: Welcome and
Introduction
Session 1 Objectives
• Understand purpose of the project and the
training
• Understand the requirements for use of
secure materials
• Develop foundational knowledge about the
assessment continuum, the Smarter Balanced
Assessment System, and Universal Design for
Learning
Building Educator Assessment Literacy –
Introduction to the Project
Purpose of This Training
• Learn about Smarter Balanced performance tasks, how they
assess college and career readiness, and where they fit into the
assessment continuum.
• Use Smarter Balanced scoring tools and processes to analyze
student work and develop a deeper understanding of the
Smarter Balanced performance tasks and the instructional shifts
of the Common Core State Standards.
• Plan for all students to learn the skills and content necessary to
gain mastery on the Common Core State Standards and to
demonstrate that mastery on the Smarter Balanced
performance tasks.
Security Considerations
Smarter Balanced and the California Department of Education have generously
granted access to Smarter Balanced performance task materials and student
responses from the spring 2014 Field Test for the purposes of this project.
•
These secure materials are for use only by project participants during the course of
training events.
•
All participants must sign a non-disclosure agreement (NDA).
•
Secure materials may not be used or disclosed in any other way or shared with any
other individual and may not be publicly displayed, published, or announced.
•
Secure materials may not be retained in any form after the project training events are
complete.
•
The copying, reproduction, or distribution of restricted-access materials (including
screenshots) is strictly prohibited. Cell phones or electronic devices cannot be used
during sessions that use secure materials.
•
In face-to-face events, printed restricted-access materials will be packaged separately,
logged upon distribution, checked back in before departure each day, and securely
destroyed.
Note-Taking Guide
Separate handout
• Session titles and objectives
• Topics or activities
• Space to write your comments and questions
Getting to Know You . . .
1. Choose one word to describe your impressions of the
Smarter Balanced Assessment System.
• Write your word/phrase on a sticky note (Color #1).
2. Choose one word to describe your experience
implementing the Common Core State Standards.
• Write your word/phrase on a sticky note (Color #2).
3. When you’ve finished your sticky notes, discuss in pairs:
• What has changed in your own instruction with the
transition to the new standards?
Four Corners
Go to the corner that you know the most about:
1. Common Core instructional shifts
2. Smarter Balanced in general
3. Smarter Balanced claims, targets, and rubrics
4. Smarter Balanced performance tasks
Getting to Know You . . .
Pair-Share
Turn to someone in your corner and share:
• Why did you pick this corner?
• What do you know about this topic?
The Smarter Balanced
Assessment System
Why Performance Tasks?
READ: “Role of Smarter Balanced Performance
Tasks” (Handout 1.1 in your booklet).
DO: Mark 2–3 most important words and/or
phrases in the handout (highlight, underline, or
circle).
Key Phrases
• Interaction with varied, rich stimuli
• Engages students in a scenario
– Solve a problem
– Create a product with a specific purpose
• Application of knowledge and skills
• Integration . . . across multiple standards
• Assesses what selected- and constructed-response
items cannot
Reflect . . .
Based on your analysis of the “Role of Smarter Balanced
Performance Tasks” document, why is Smarter Balanced
using performance tasks in its summative assessments?
The Short Answer . . .
College and Career
Readiness
The Role of UDL in Smarter Balanced
Summative Assessments and Our Own
Classroom Instruction
Transition to Content Group Breakouts
Session 2
Hand-Scoring Cycle I
Session 2 Objectives
• Experience a Smarter Balanced performance task
from the perspective of a student.
• Understand alignment with Smarter Balanced Claims
and CCSS Standards for Mathematical Practice.
• Understand and use Scoring Guides to score student
responses to hand-scored items within the task.
Norms for Participation
• We will help to create a collegial and productive atmosphere.
• We will be fully present by attending closely to the materials
provided, and by being aware of behaviors that affect the
engagement of others.
• When working with secure materials, we will honor the trust placed
in us to follow the necessary protocols.
• We will keep confidential all discussions, comments and
deliberations related to the secure content of this training.
21
Session 2: Hand-Scoring Cycle I
Talent Show
Classroom Activity
Grade 6
Session 2: Hand-Scoring Cycle I
Classroom Activity
Discussion:
• What is talent?
• What are examples of talent?
• What is a talent show?
• What technical equipment might you need for
a talent show?
Session 2: Hand-Scoring Cycle I
Classroom Activity
Discussion (continued):
What technical equipment might you need for a
talent show?
• Microphones
• Spotlight
• Disco ball
• Costumes
Session 2: Hand-Scoring Cycle I
Classroom Activity
You are now ready to complete the Talent Show
performance task!
Session 2: Hand-Scoring Cycle I
Individually Complete
Performance Task:
Talent Show
(20 minutes)
Session 2: Hand-Scoring Cycle I
Initial Reactions
At your table, discuss your experience with the task.
• What did you notice?
• What questions arose?
• What surprised you?
Session 2: Hand-Scoring Cycle I
Let’s Unpack This Task
•
•
•
•
Identify the math and anticipate issues
Understand the Smarter Balanced Claims
Alignment of the task
Reflect on the purpose of Smarter Balanced
performance tasks
Session 2: Hand-Scoring Cycle I
Identifying the Mathematics
and Anticipating Issues
• What do students need to know and be able to
do to accomplish the task?
• What do you expect students to struggle with in
this task?
Use Handout 2.1 to make some notes.
Session 2: Hand-Scoring Cycle I
Aligning the Task
• Which of the CCSS Standards for Mathematical
Practice are engaged in this task?
• Which of the Smarter Balanced Claims are
assessed by this task?
Session 2: Hand-Scoring Cycle I
Standards for Mathematical Practice
1. Make sense of problems and persevere in solving them.
2. Reason abstractly and quantitatively.
3. Construct viable arguments and critique the reasoning of
others.
4. Model with mathematics.
5. Use appropriate tools strategically.
6. Attend to precision.
7. Look for and make use of structure.
8. Look for and express regularity in repeated reasoning.
Session 2: Hand-Scoring Cycle I
What Constitutes a Claim?
•
Claims are broad statements of an assessment
system’s learning outcomes.
•
A claim is a statement of what students know and
can do, based on the evidence they produce.
•
Each Smarter Balanced Claim has multiple
assessment targets—defined by content standards—
to specify within the broader sense of the claim.
Session 2: Hand-Scoring Cycle I
Overall Smarter Balanced Claims
Grades 3–8
Students can demonstrate progress toward
college and career readiness in mathematics.
Grade 11
Students can demonstrate college and career
readiness in mathematics.
Session 2: Hand-Scoring Cycle I
Claim 1: Concepts and
Procedures
• Students can explain and apply mathematical concepts and
carry out mathematical procedures with precision and
fluency.
Claim 2: Problem Solving
• Students can frame and solve a range of complex problems in
pure and applied mathematics.
Claim 3: Communicating
Reasoning
• Students can clearly and precisely construct viable arguments
to support their own reasoning and to critique the reasoning
of others.
Claim 4: Data Analysis
and Modeling
• Students can analyze complex, real-world scenarios and can
use mathematical models to interpret and solve problems.
Session 2: Hand-Scoring Cycle I
Claim 1: Concepts and
Procedures
Claim 2: Problem Solving
Claim 3: Communicating
Reasoning
Claim 4: Data Analysis and
Modeling
Evidence of Claim 1 shows that students
can “do math.”
Evidence of Claims 2, 3, and 4 shows that
students can apply mathematics to novel
situations, think and reason
mathematically, and use math to analyze
empirical situations, understand
situations better, and improve decisions.
Session 2: Hand-Scoring Cycle I
Alignment Activity
Use the card handouts to indicate:
1. Which of the CCSS Standards for
Mathematical Practice are engaged in this
task?
2. Which of the Smarter Balanced Claims are
assessed by this task?
Session 2: Hand-Scoring Cycle I
Purpose of Performance Tasks
Reflect on the purpose of Smarter Balanced
performance tasks.
• What is being assessed in the performance task that
is different/beyond the content standards?
Session 2: Hand-Scoring Cycle I
Let’s look at how students
handled this task.
Session 2: Hand-Scoring Cycle I
Overview of Session
Getting to Know the Task
Scoring Items
Complete Classroom Activity
Sort student responses to item 3
Review and discuss Scoring Guide
for item 3
Score student responses to item 3
Compare and discuss scores for
item 3
Repeat the steps of scoring with
items 4 and 6
Complete performance task
Initial reactions to the task
Identify the mathematics and
anticipate the issues
Aligning the Task
Align task to Standards for
Mathematical Practice and Smarter
Balanced Claims
Debriefing the Task
Session 2: Hand-Scoring Cycle I
Analyzing Student Work
Keep an eye out for:
• Common errors/misconceptions
• Successful approaches
• Examples of good explanations
Make notes as needed on Handout 2.3
Session 2: Hand-Scoring Cycle I
Initial Sort: Student Responses to Item 3
Low
Middle
High
Session 2: Hand-Scoring Cycle I
Dependencies Among Items
Item 1 Response
Item 2 Response
Item 3 Response
Item 4 Response
Item 5 Response
Item 6 Response
If the reasoning is correct on item 4,
but there is a follow-through error from item 3,
award full credit.
Session 2: Hand-Scoring Cycle I
Review and discuss
Scoring Guide for item 3.
Note: The response in item 3 is used in subsequent items.
Session 2: Hand-Scoring Cycle I
Individually score student responses to item 3.
When finished, please quietly record notes on the
Analyzing Student Work Handout.
Session 2: Hand-Scoring Cycle I
Compare scores for item 3.
Discuss discrepancies.
Session 2: Hand-Scoring Cycle I
Overview of Session
Getting to Know the Task
Scoring Items
Complete Classroom Activity
Sort student responses to item 3
Review and discuss Scoring Guide
for item 3
Score student responses to item 3
Compare and discuss scores for
item 3
Repeat the steps of scoring with
items 4 and 6
Complete performance task
Initial reactions to the task
Identify the mathematics and
anticipate the issues
Aligning the Task
Align task to Standards for
Mathematical Practice and Smarter
Balanced Claims
Debriefing the Task
Session 2: Hand-Scoring Cycle I
Review and discuss
Scoring Guide for item 4.
Note: The response on item 4 may depend on the
response on item 3.
Session 2: Hand-Scoring Cycle I
Individually score student responses to
item 4.
Session 2: Hand-Scoring Cycle I
Compare scores for item 4.
Discuss discrepancies.
Session 2: Hand-Scoring Cycle I
Initial Sort: Student Responses to Item 6
Low
Middle
High
Session 2: Hand-Scoring Cycle I
Review and discuss
Scoring Guide for item 6.
Note: The response on item 6 may depend on the
responses on item 3 and item 5.
Session 2: Hand-Scoring Cycle I
Individually score student responses to
item 6.
Session 2: Hand-Scoring Cycle I
Compare scores for item 6.
Discuss discrepancies.
Session 2: Hand-Scoring Cycle I
Overview of Session
Getting to Know the Task
Scoring Items
Complete Classroom Activity
Sort student responses to item 3
Review and discuss Scoring Guide
for item 3
Score student responses to item 3
Compare and discuss scores for
item 3
Repeat the steps of scoring with
items 4 and 6
Complete performance task
Initial reactions to the task
Identify the mathematics and
anticipate the issues
Aligning the Task
Align task to Standards for
Mathematical Practice and Smarter
Balanced Claims
Debriefing the Task
Session 2: Hand-Scoring Cycle I
Analyzing Student Work
What did you learn from analyzing responses to this task?
• Common errors/misconceptions
• Successful approaches
• Examples of good explanations
What were you unable to determine about students’
understanding and skill from the responses reviewed?
Session 2: Hand-Scoring Cycle I
Questions to consider over lunch:
1. What are potential barriers for special
populations in handling this task?
2. If the responses you reviewed had been
from your own students, where would you
want to go in your own instruction?
Collect Secure Materials
Session 3
Instructional Implications Part I
Moving from Summative Context to Curriculum-Embedded Context
Objectives for Session 3
• Begin to think about the instructional implications of
Smarter Balanced performance tasks.
• Consider the role of Universal Design for Learning in
the context of your own curriculum and instruction.
Session 3: Instructional Implications Part I
Reflection questions from before lunch:
1. What are potential barriers for special
populations in handling this task?
2. If the responses you reviewed had been from
your own students, where would you want to
go in your own instruction?
Session 3: Instructional Implications Part I
Framing Question
What kinds of learning experiences or tasks do
you think students need to support their success
on Smarter Balanced performance tasks?
Session 3: Instructional Implications Part I
Poster Activity
• Review any relevant notes you took on Handouts 2.1 and 2.3
during the first hand-scoring cycle, to generate some initial
ideas on your own.
• Begin to collect and record any shared ideas on poster paper in
your groups.
• You will have opportunities to expand and refine this list
throughout these two days.
Session 3: Instructional Implications Part I
Activity: Planning with UDL
Reflect on instructional strategies that support
the three UDL principles on Handout 3.1.
• Which of these could be used in planning the
kinds of learning experiences that you have
started to identify in your group?
Session 4
Hand-Scoring Cycle II
Secondary Math
Objectives for Session 4
• Experience a Smarter Balanced performance
task from the perspective of a student.
• Understand and use Scoring Guides to score
student responses to hand-scored items
within the task.
Norms for Participation
• We will help to create a collegial and productive atmosphere.
• We will be fully present by attending closely to the materials
provided, and by being aware of behaviors that affect the
engagement of others.
• When working with secure materials, we will honor the trust placed
in us to follow the necessary protocols.
• We will keep confidential all discussions, comments and
deliberations related to the secure content of this training.
66
Session 4: Hand-Scoring Cycle II—Secondary
Choose the Better Baseball Player
Classroom Activity
Grade 8
Session 4: Hand-Scoring Cycle II—Secondary
Classroom Activity
Discussion questions for how to play baseball:
• Who can explain how baseball is played?
• What is a run and a home run?
• What is an error?
• How does an error affect a team’s score?
• What makes a good baseball player?
Session 4: Hand-Scoring Cycle II—Secondary
Session 4: Hand-Scoring Cycle II—Secondary
Classroom Activity (continued)
Discussion questions for attending a baseball game:
• Professional teams play in stadiums. Who can
describe the different seats in a stadium (bleachers,
main box seats, reserve seats)?
• What are single-game tickets and season tickets?
Session 4: Hand-Scoring Cycle II—Secondary
Session 4: Hand-Scoring Cycle II—Secondary
Classroom Activity
Vocabulary
Baseball fan
Run, homerun, error
Home game, season tickets
Seating sections: box, reserve, bleacher
Session 4: Hand-Scoring Cycle II—Secondary
Classroom Activity
You are now ready to complete the performance
task!
Session 4: Hand-Scoring Cycle II—Secondary
Individually Complete
Performance Task:
Choose the Better Baseball Player
(20 minutes)
Session 4: Hand-Scoring Cycle II—Secondary
Initial Reactions
At your table, discuss your experience with the
task.
• What did you notice?
• What questions arose?
• What surprised you?
Session 4: Hand-Scoring Cycle II—Secondary
Identifying the Mathematics
and Anticipating Issues
• What do students need to know and be able to
do to accomplish the task?
• What do you expect students to struggle with in
this task?
Use Handout 4.1 to make some notes.
Session 4: Hand-Scoring Cycle II—Secondary
Overview of Session
Getting to Know the Task
Scoring Items
Complete Classroom Activity
Sort student responses to item 4
Review and discuss Scoring Guide
for item 4
Score student responses to item 4
Compare and discuss scores for
item 4
Repeat the steps of scoring with
item 6
Complete performance task
Initial reactions to the task
Identify the mathematics and
anticipate the issues
Debriefing the Task
Session 4: Hand-Scoring Cycle II—Secondary
Analyzing Student Work
Keep an eye out for:
• Common errors/misconceptions
• Successful approaches
• Examples of good explanations
Make notes as needed on Handout 4.2
Session 4: Hand-Scoring Cycle II—Secondary
Initial Sort: Student Responses to Item 4
Low
Middle
High
Session 4: Hand-Scoring Cycle II—Secondary
Review and discuss
Scoring Guide for item 4.
Session 4: Hand-Scoring Cycle II—Secondary
Individually score student responses to item 4.
When finished, please quietly record notes on the
Analyzing Student Work Handout.
Session 4: Hand-Scoring Cycle II—Secondary
Compare scores for item 4.
Discuss discrepancies.
Session 4: Hand-Scoring Cycle II—Secondary
Overview of Session
Getting to Know the Task
Scoring Items
Complete Classroom Activity
Sort student responses to item 4
Review and discuss Scoring Guide
for item 4
Score student responses to item 4
Compare and discuss scores for
item 4
Repeat the steps of scoring with
item 6
Complete performance task
Initial reactions to the task
Identify the mathematics and
anticipate the issues
Debriefing the Task
Session 4: Hand-Scoring Cycle II—Secondary
Initial Sort: Student Responses to Item 6
Low
Middle
High
Session 4: Hand-Scoring Cycle II—Secondary
Review and discuss
Scoring Guide for item 6.
Session 4: Hand-Scoring Cycle II—Secondary
Individually score student responses to
item 6.
Session 4: Hand-Scoring Cycle II—Secondary
Compare scores for item 6.
Discuss discrepancies.
Session 4: Hand-Scoring Cycle II—Secondary
Overview of Session
Getting to Know the Task
Scoring Items
Complete Classroom Activity
Sort student responses to item 4
Review and discuss Scoring Guide
for item 4
Score student responses to item 4
Compare and discuss scores for
item 4
Repeat the steps of scoring with
item 6
Complete performance task
Initial reactions to the task
Identify the mathematics and
anticipate the issues
Debriefing the Task
Session 4: Hand-Scoring Cycle II—Secondary
Analyzing Student Work
What can we learn from analyzing responses to
this task?
• Common errors/misconceptions
• Successful approaches
• Examples of good explanations
Session 4: Hand-Scoring Cycle II—Secondary
Closing questions:
• What were you unable to determine about
students’ understanding and skill from the
responses reviewed?
• If the responses you reviewed had been from your
own students, how might they inform your own
instructional practice?
Exit Slip for Day 1
Reflect on the kinds of evidence of understanding
generated by the Smarter Balanced performance
tasks you have reviewed so far:
How is this different from, and/or similar to,
evidence your own students are accustomed
to producing?
Respond with a comment or two on an index card.
Collect Secure Materials
Welcome Back!
Session 5
Instructional Implications Part II
Curriculum-Embedded Context
Objectives for Session 5
• Reflect on the expectations for students in the
Smarter Balanced performance tasks, based on the
two hand-scoring cycles completed so far.
• Understand accessibility tools and accommodations
within the Smarter Balanced summative system.
• Continue to identify the kinds of learning
experiences and tasks that students need.
Session 5: Instructional Implications Part II
Video: UDL and the Smarter
Balanced Assessment System
[Launch Video]
Session 5: Instructional Implications Part II
Based on your experiences so far with the Smarter
Balanced performance tasks, and your review of student
work on these tasks, consider:
What kinds of learning experiences or tasks do students
need in order to meet the demands of these kinds of
tasks?
Review any relevant notes you took on Handouts 2.1, 2.3,
4.1, and 4.2 during the first and second hand-scoring
cycles, to generate some ideas on your own.
Session 5: Instructional Implications Part II
Poster Activity
With your table group, use your poster paper to build
your list of shared ideas about the kinds of learning
experiences and tasks that will help students meet the
demands of these kinds of tasks.
Session 5: Instructional Implications Part II
Share Ideas
Take a few minutes to look at the posters around the
room.
Think again about how the Universal Design for
Learning principles would be helpful in planning for
the kinds of experiences being identified.
Session 6
Hand-Scoring Cycle III
Elementary Math
Objectives for Session 6
• Experience a Smarter Balanced performance
task from the perspective of a student.
• Understand and use Scoring Guides to score
student responses to hand-scored items
within the task.
Norms for Participation
• We will help to create a collegial and productive atmosphere.
• We will be fully present by attending closely to the materials
provided, and by being aware of behaviors that affect the
engagement of others.
• When working with secure materials, we will honor the trust placed
in us to follow the necessary protocols.
• We will keep confidential all discussions, comments and
deliberations related to the secure content of this training.
102
Session 6: Hand-Scoring Cycle III—Secondary
Teen Driving Restrictions
Classroom Activity
Grade 11
Session 6: Hand-Scoring Cycle III—Secondary
Classroom Activity
Discussion:
• Who has a driver’s license?
• What are the age requirements?
• What is a learner’s permit?
• What steps are needed before receiving a
driver’s license?
• Why are these steps required?
Session 6: Hand-Scoring Cycle III—Secondary
Classroom Activity
Discussion (continued):
A state might have restrictions on teens driving.
Example: no driving from 11 p.m. to 6 a.m.
unless for school or work.
Other examples?
Session 4: Hand-Scoring Cycle II—Elementary
Classroom Activity
You are now ready to complete the performance
task!
Session 6: Hand-Scoring Cycle III—Secondary
Individually Complete
Performance Task:
Teen Driving Restrictions
(20 minutes)
Session 6: Hand-Scoring Cycle III—Secondary
Initial Reactions
At your table, discuss your experience with the task.
• What did you notice?
• What questions arose?
• What surprised you?
Session 6: Hand-Scoring Cycle III—Secondary
Identifying the Mathematics
and Anticipating Issues
• What do students need to know and be able to
do to accomplish the task?
• What do you expect students to struggle with in
this task?
Use Handout 6.1 to make some notes.
Session 6: Hand-Scoring Cycle III—Secondary
Overview of Session
Getting to Know the Task
Scoring Items
Complete Classroom Activity
Sort student responses to item 3
Review and discuss Scoring Guide
for item 3
Score student responses to item 3
Compare and discuss scores for
item 3
Repeat the steps of scoring with
item 6
Complete performance task
Initial reactions to the task
Identify the mathematics and
anticipate the issues
Debriefing the Task
Session 6: Hand-Scoring Cycle III—Secondary
Analyzing Student Work
Keep an eye out for:
• Common errors/misconceptions
• Successful approaches
• Examples of good explanations
Make notes as needed on Handout 6.2
Session 6: Hand-Scoring Cycle III—Secondary
Initial Sort: Student Responses to Item 3
Low
Middle
High
Session 6: Hand-Scoring Cycle III—Secondary
Review and discuss
Scoring Guide for item 3.
Session 6: Hand-Scoring Cycle III—Secondary
Individually score student responses to item 3.
When finished, please quietly record notes on the
Analyzing Student Work Handout.
Session 6: Hand-Scoring Cycle III—Secondary
Compare scores for item 3.
Discuss discrepancies.
Session 6: Hand-Scoring Cycle III—Secondary
Overview of Session
Getting to Know the Task
Scoring Items
Complete Classroom Activity
Sort student responses to item 3
Review and discuss Scoring Guide
for item 3
Score student responses to item 3
Compare and discuss scores for
item 3
Repeat the steps of scoring with
item 6
Complete performance task
Initial reactions to the task
Identify the mathematics and
anticipate the issues
Debriefing the Task
Session 6: Hand-Scoring Cycle III—Secondary
Initial Sort: Student Responses to Item 6
Low
Middle
High
Session 6: Hand-Scoring Cycle III—Secondary
Review and discuss
Scoring Guide for item 6.
Note: The response on item 6 may depend on the response on item 4.
Session 6: Hand-Scoring Cycle III—Secondary
Individually score student responses to item 6.
Session 6: Hand-Scoring Cycle III—Secondary
Compare scores for item 6.
Discuss discrepancies.
Session 6: Hand-Scoring Cycle III—Secondary
Overview of Session
Getting to Know the Task
Scoring Items
Complete Classroom Activity
Sort student responses to item 3
Review and discuss Scoring Guide
for item 3
Score student responses to item 3
Compare and discuss scores for
item 3
Repeat the steps of scoring with
item 6
Complete performance task
Initial reactions to the task
Identify the mathematics and
anticipate the issues
Debriefing the Task
Session 6: Hand-Scoring Cycle III—Secondary
Analyzing Student Work
What can we learn from analyzing responses to
this task?
• Common errors/misconceptions
• Successful approaches
• Examples of good expectations
Session 6: Hand-Scoring Cycle III—Secondary
Closing questions:
• What were you unable to determine about
students’ understanding and skill from the
responses reviewed?
• If the responses you reviewed had been from your
own students, how might they inform your own
instructional practice?
Collect Secure Materials
Session 7
Instructional Implications Part III
Shifting Again from Summative Context to
Curriculum-Embedded Context
Objectives for Session 7
• Consolidate ideas about needed learning
experiences based on Hand-Scoring Cycle III.
• Revisit the role of Universal Design for
Learning in planning the kinds of learning
experiences and tasks we want for our
students.
Session 7: Instructional Implications Part III
We think students need experiences working on tasks that:
a.
Are set in a sustained, real-world, age-appropriate context with a driving
goal (e.g., planting a garden)
b.
Require students to coordinate across multiple data sources
c.
Require students to make choices and decisions
d.
Require students to analyze others' thinking (e.g., identify an error in
someone's solution to a problem; compare approaches to a problem)
e.
Ask students to explain/express ideas, processes, and problem-solving
strategies in written form, with opportunities for feedback and revision
f.
Provide opportunities for self-correction (working on one part of the task
prompts students to revisit and rethink their work on a prior part)
g.
Result in a specific product for a well-defined audience (e.g., policy
recommendation to city council, brochure for visitors)
Session 7: Instructional Implications Part III
Activity
• Capture your own list of needed learning
experiences on Handout 7.1, and make some notes
about incorporating UDL in planning for these
experiences.
• Jot down some of the activities you currently use—
or want to start using—in your own classroom to
support the kinds of learning experiences you think
students need.
Session 7: Instructional Implications Part III
Share Ideas
Take a few minutes to look at the posters around
the room.
Think again about how the Universal Design for
Learning principles would be helpful in planning for
the kinds of experiences being identified.
Session 8
Curriculum-Embedded
Performance
Assessment
Going Deeper into Curriculum-Embedded Context
Objectives for Session 8
• Understand the value of performance assessment as
a way of formatively assessing knowledge and skills
needed for success on Smarter Balanced
performance tasks.
• Analyze and reflect on different versions of a
performance task.
• Experience a formative assessment cycle with a
performance task.
Session 8: Curriculum-Embedded Performance Assessment
Framing Question
How can we use performance tasks to
formatively assess what students are learning
in our classrooms . . .
. . . in other words, to formatively assess our
own instruction?
Session 8: Curriculum-Embedded Performance Assessment
Using performance tasks to formatively assess
learning (and teaching)
Overview of Session
• First, we will reflect on two draft versions of a performance
task developed by a former teacher and author of Smarter
Balanced performance tasks.
• Then, we will enact a cycle of formative assessment using a
performance task.
Session 8: Curriculum-Embedded Performance Assessment
About the Task: Owning a Pet
• Two versions in draft form
• Written by a former teacher who is one of the authors of
Smarter Balanced performance tasks for grades 3–11
• Scaffolded version is structured like a Smarter Balanced
performance task
• Open-ended version illustrates how a structured task can be
opened and extended into a curriculum-embedded project
Session 8: Curriculum-Embedded Performance Assessment
Reflection on the two versions of Owning a Pet
•
•
•
•
What does each version of the task give students an
opportunity to show?
How does each task incorporate the Mathematical Practices
and a variety of skills?
How might the student learning experiences vary between
the two tasks?
Why is it important to incorporate a variety of tasks, with
varying levels of scaffolding, into the curriculum?
Session 8: Curriculum-Embedded Performance Assessment
Instructional Considerations for Each Version of Owning a Pet
Scaffolded Version of Owning a Pet
Open-Ended Version of Owning a Pet
• Time consideration:
• Time consideration:
• Classroom routines needed for this
type of task:
• Classroom routines needed for this
type of task:
• Possible student supports for this
type of task:
• Possible student supports for this
type of task:
• What evidence is gained using this
type of task?
• What evidence is gained using this
type of task?
Session 8: Curriculum-Embedded Performance Assessment
Do a Performance Task
Session 8: Curriculum-Embedded Performance Assessment
About the Task: Wrap the Mummy
• Could be a one-day or multi-day task
• Math content from a range of grade levels can be activated
in solving the problem
• Think about the Smarter Balanced Claims and CCSS
Standards for Mathematical Practice that you might assess
with this task
Session 8: Curriculum-Embedded Performance Assessment
Wrap the Mummy
Part 1: Will one roll of toilet paper be enough to wrap one person?
•
Say how you know.
•
Write down questions and assumptions
Part 2: Write down instructions for fellow students.
•
Make it easy for them to figure out how much toilet paper
they will need.
•
Instructions should allow for different numbers of guests,
and for guests of different ages.
Session 8: Curriculum-Embedded Performance Assessment
Give feedback on responses to the task.
• Review and provide feedback for one response to the task.
• In pairs, discuss ideas for feedback with a partner.
• Clarify differences and similarities among your ideas for feedback,
and write draft feedback comments/questions.
• Share draft feedback with your table group and agree on the most
effective feedback comment/question.
• Provide feedback to the authors of the response.
• Authors revise/refine based on the feedback.
• Report out on themes for effective feedback.
Session 8: Curriculum-Embedded Performance Assessment
Reflect on giving effective feedback.
•
What makes feedback effective?
•
What makes feedback on students’ writing in mathematics
classes effective?
•
Discuss with your table group and be prepared to share out
with the whole group.
Session 8: Curriculum-Embedded Performance Assessment
Elements of Effective Feedback
Element
Description
Actionable
Effective feedback is concrete, specific, and useful; it provides actionable information.
User-friendly
Even if feedback is specific and accurate in the eyes of experts, it is not of much value if
the user cannot understand it or is overwhelmed by it.
Timely
We should ensure that students get timely feedback and opportunities to use it while
the attempt and effects are still fresh in their minds.
Ongoing
Adjusting our performance depends on not only receiving feedback but also having
opportunities to use it.
Consistent
Feedback must be consistent. Teachers need to look at student work together, becoming
more consistent over time and formalizing their judgments in highly descriptive rubrics
supported by anchor products and performances. If we want student-to-student
feedback to be helpful, students have to be trained in the same way as teachers, using
the same materials.
Source: Wiggins, 1998
Session 9
Wrap-Up and Look Ahead
Objectives for Session 9
• Raise awareness about recommended
resources.
• Learn about the virtual learning component
of this training.
• Share feedback on the training.
Session 9: Wrap-Up and Look Ahead
Sharing Resources
Take a few minutes to say something about any
resource(s) you recommend. There is a handout for
notes on recommended resources, in case that is
useful.
Then, work together to organize a plan to share
resources going forward.
Session 9: Wrap-Up and Look Ahead
Recommended Resources:
Performance Task Specifications:
– http://www.smarterbalanced.org/wordpress/wpcontent/uploads/2012/05/TaskItemSpecifications/PerformanceTasks/P
erformanceTasksSpecifications.pdf
Accessibility Guide for Classroom Activities:
– http://sbac.portal.airast.org/wpcontent/uploads/2014/03/Accessibility-Guide-for-Classroom-ActivitiesFinal.pdf
Classroom Activity Administration Guidelines:
– http://sbac.portal.airast.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/03/ClassroomActivity-and-Performance-Task-Administration-Guidelines.pdf
Session 9: Wrap-Up and Look Ahead
Virtual Learning Orientation
Session 9: Wrap-Up and Look Ahead
Virtual Learning
• 5-week online course/community
• Learn curriculum-embedded performance
assessment strategies
• Watch interactive video cases of teacher
experiences
• Use performance assessment in the classroom,
reflect and discuss experiences with colleagues
• Look for an email invitation soon!
THANK YOU!
Please complete the Post-Training Survey
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