Writing - NISPLAN

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Session 2
“Clarifying the difference”
Workshop:
“D” Grade and “C” Grade
Exemplar Scripts
Exemplar Scripts
• Personal Writing:
–“C” Standard Response
• What are the characteristics of a “C”
grade in writing?
Exemplar Scripts
• Personal Writing:
–“D” Standard Response
• What are the characteristics of a
“D” grade in writing?
Exemplar Scripts
• Reading Multi-modal Texts:
–“C” Standard Response
• What are the characteristics of a
“C” grade in reading?
Exemplar Scripts
• Reading Multi-modal Texts:
–“D” Standard Response
• What are the characteristics of a
“D” grade in reading?
Exemplar Scripts
• Functional Writing:
–“C” Standard Response
• What are the characteristics of a “C”
grade in writing?
Exemplar Scripts
• Functional Writing:
–“D” Standard Response
• What are the characteristics of a
“D” grade in writing?
Exemplar Scripts
• Reading Non-fiction Texts:
–“C” Standard Response
• What are the characteristics of a
“C” grade in reading?
Exemplar Scripts
• Reading Non-fiction Texts:
–“D” Standard Response
• What are the characteristics of a
“D” grade in reading?
Writing: “C” Candidates
• Begin to engage and sustain readers
• Use a style that suits audience and
purpose
• Liveliness
• Evidence of structure
• A good grasp of paragraphing
Writing: “C” Candidates
• Paragraphs linked – use of discourse
markers/connectives to enhance organisation
• Use sentence variety
• Clear selection of vocabulary for effect
• Selection of detail to describe
• Range of rhetorical devices used
• Control and accuracy of language used
• Basic punctuation is correct and routinely
used
Writing: “D” Candidates
• Write in sentences that read like they speak –
a bit too long and too often with ideas joined
by ‘and’ and ‘but’ or ‘so’
• Use the first word that comes into their head
rather than rejecting it and fishing around in
their head for a more precise or unusual one
• Aren’t vivid enough: they don’t help the
reader to see, hear and smell the things they
describe
Writing: “D” Candidates
• Use commas to join sentences – instead of full
stops between sentences
• Use certain words too often: ‘I’/ ‘was/were’/
‘it’
• Start too many sentences with ‘Then’/ ‘There
are’/ ‘It was’/ ‘I am’
• Lack variety in sentence structure
• Are a bit predictable
• Often run out of time
Reading: “C” Candidates
• Structured and organised response
• On task from start to finish
• Focus on bullet points
– Words and phrases/structure/facts and
opinion
• Use Point/ Explain/ Evidence – the whole way
• Precision of focus and explanation
• Analysis ranges through the text/s
• Provide a range of examples
• An evaluative approach
• Don’t report
Reading: “D” Candidates
• “Feature spot” - say WHAT is happening in the
text but don’t say enough about HOW it is
written.
• Make general statements about language and
pres. devices
• Attempt to analyse but analysis tends to be
straight-forward
• Don’t comment enough on language
(structure, sentences, words)
Reading: “D” Candidates
• Don’t provide examples/evidence
• They use quotes from the text that are too
long
• Sometimes use PEE – but not sustained
throughout
• Evidence of reporting
• Not always focused on task
• Often run out of time
Session 4
Teaching Strategies:
Moving from D to C
Starter Activity
http://resources.woodlandsjunior.kent.sch.uk/maths/co
untdown/
Some
Teaching Strategies!!
Hard work!!!
What schools are doing?
1.
2.
3.
4.
After school classes
Lunch-time classes
Cancelled study leave
Bring back students during study leave
to do workshops on English
5. KS3 SoW as prep for GCSE
6. Signature teacher
Reading
Guided Reading
• A small group of ‘D’ students (up to max. 6 students)
• Once a week for 15 to 20 minutes (or once every two
weeks) on aspects of reading when the rest of the class
are doing independent work
–
–
–
–
exemplar scripts
past papers
multimodal texts
non-fiction texts, etc
• Because of the limited time you may only work on one or
two aspects of a text or part of a text.
“Feature Spotting”
• Do not “feature spot”!!!
• “The writer uses alliteration.” - this is not enough to get
you a “C” grade
• “The writer uses alliteration. So the reader's attention is
drawn to these words.” – still not enough to get you a “C”
grade
• You need to explain why these particular words are singled
out for attention. What's special about these words? Why
these words and not some other words?
2 most important words
• Now for the TOP Tip: I want you to hear the
following two most important words in your
head:
So What?
• “The writer uses alliteration.” So what?
• “The writer uses alliteration. So the reader's
attention is drawn to these words.” So what?
• The writer uses alliteration to emphasize the
words 'perverse', 'painful' and 'pointless'. By
highlighting the idea that experiments on
animals are 'perverse' the writer is suggesting
to the reader that there is actually something
morally wrong with what the experimenters
are doing …
• The writer uses the alliteration “luscious
lemons”. The word “luscious” is emphasised
and suggests the lemons have a pleasingly rich
and delicious taste.
• The pictures help show the reader what is
being written about. If you want people
to complain about animal testing, it helps
to show images of the animals. They
have shown them looking as if they are
suffering, to create a sense of pity in the
reader. They have contrasted this with
pictures of the animals roaming free, to
suggest what life is supposed to be like
for these animals.
Writing
Making pupils write, who do not
like to write, write more, will
not make them write better!!!!
Guided Writing
• A small group of ‘D’ students (up to max. 6 students)
• Once a week for 15 to 20 minutes (or once every two weeks) on
aspects of writing when the rest of the class are doing independent
work
– exemplar scripts
– past papers
– descriptive writing
– introductions
– conclusions
– structure
– developing an argument, etc
– spelling, punctuation and grammar
• You might only focus on one (or two) aspects of writing.
• You might focus on a piece of writing completed by a pupil in the
group as a resource to use with the rest of the group.
A sequence for teaching writing
1. Establish clear aims
2. Provide examples
3. Explore the features
4. Define the conventions
5. Demonstrate how it is written
6. Compose together
7. Scaffold first attempts
8. Independent writing
9. Draw out key learning
10.Review
The Writing Process
Talk and Writing
Talk encourages children to generate and
rehearse appropriate language as they work
collaboratively to plan, draft and improve their
writing.
•
•
•
•
before writing
during writing
after writing
in whole-class and in group/ guided sessions
Spelling Test!!
Answers
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
desiccate
ecstasy
millennium
dumbbell
separate
necessary
peddler/pedlar
minuscule/miniscule
address
accommodate
irresistible
liaison
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
21.
22.
23.
24.
harass
definitely
occurrence
embarrass
pronunciation
independent
questionnaire
weird
broccoli
referring
recommend
cemetery
Spelling Strategy
Activity
There are 3 easy
ways to improve
your spelling
Demystify Spelling
1. What words look like
2. What words sound like
3. Connections
See
Be-lie-ve
Bu-sin-ess
Se-para-te
Envi-ron-ment
Hear
Govern+ment
Feb-RU-ary
Happen+ed
Sur+prise
Interesting
Connections
necessary
rhythm
because
sep-a-rat-e
www.freerice.com
Video Starter
Website
www.literacyshed.com
Student Self-Evaluation
• To achieve a Grade ‘C’ the students will need
to be confident in all the aspects reading and
writing identified in the survey.
• Green/Orange/Red Code – help the ‘D’
students identify and then focus on areas of
weakness
• Tips on how to improve
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