Teach Like a Champ Book Study

advertisement

Book Study: Teach Like A Champion Chapter 1 By: Shane Hubbard

High Expectations are not easily defined.

High expectations are very subjective.

High expectations are extremely necessary with the introduction of the STAAR exam.

We always hear about having high expectations for students, but we are rarely shown what that actually looks like in a classroom setting.

Setting High Academic Expectations

5

Techniques:

No Opt Out Right is Right Stretch It Format Matters Without Apology

No Opt Out

• • • Maintaining the expectation that it’s not okay not to try Addresses the student who is using ‘I don’t know’ as an excuse to be left alone Addresses the student who is honestly trying to get the answer but doesn’t know it

The Key Idea to No Opt Out

A sequence that begins with a student unable to anwer the question should end with the student answering that question as often as possible.

What it Looks Like 4 Ways to Do It

• • • • You provide the answer; the student repeats the answer.

Another student provides the answer; the initial student repeats the answer.

You provide a cue; your student uses it to find the answer.

Another student provides a cue; the intial student uses it to find the answer.

4 Ways to do Right is Right

• • • • Hold out for all the way: make sure students completely answer the question correctly.

Answer the Question: make sure students are answering the actual question you asked.

Right Answer, Right Time: make sure students are not jumping ahead of your questions.

Use Technical Vocabulary: make sure students use technical vocabulary in thier answers.

Ask how or why Ask for another way to answer Ask for a better word Ask for evidence Ask students to integrate a related skill Ask students to apply the same skill in a new setting

Format Matters

• • • Use Format Matters to prepare your students to succeed by requiring complete sentences and proficient grammar every chance you get.

Grammatical Format: correct slang, syntax usage, and grammar Complete Sentence Format: students must use complete sentences Audible Format: make sure everyone can hear VOICE

Chapter 2 Planning That Ensures Academic Achievement

5 Planning Techniques: 1. Begin With the End 2. 4 Ms 3. Post It 4. Shortest Path 5. Double Plan

4 Ms

• • • • Manageable: an effective objective should be of a size and scope that can be taught in a single lesson Measurable: an effective objective should be written so that your success in achieving it can be measured, ideally by the end of class period Made First: an effective objective should be designed to guide the activity, not to justify how a chosen activity meets one of several viable purposes Most Important: an effective objective should focus on what is most important on the path to college and nothing else

What is Wrong With These Example Objectives?

Students will be able to add and subtract fractions with like and unlike denominators.

Students will be able to appreciate various forms of poetry, including sonnets and lyric poetry.

Students will view scenes from the film version of The Crucible.

Students will construct a poster to celebrate Martin Luther King Jr. Day.

What is Wrong With These Example Objectives?

Students will be able to add and subtract fractions with like and unlike denominators.

Not manageable

Students will be able to appreciate various forms of poetry, including sonnets and lyric poetry.

Not measurable

Students will view scenes from the film version of The Crucible.

Not made first

Students will construct a poster to celebrate Martin Luther King Jr. Day.

Not most important

Examples of Good Objectives

Recognize and list the literary devices found in Twilight. Identify and describe polygons using the language of Geometry.

Understand the basic structure of the atom.

Identify the contributions of Kim Kardashian to the nation as a whole.

Write the objective in a visible location every day.

Write it in the same place every day so that students can easily recognize it.

Point out the objective every day to the students and go over it.

Double Plan

Chapter 3: Structuring and DeliveringYour Lessons 5 Step Processof I/We/You: This process helps to relinquish the responsiblity of learning from the teacher to the student.

I.

II.

I I do.

We I do; you help III. We You do; I help IV. You You do V.

You You do, and do, and do

Download