MPT Presentation

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The Multistate Performance
Test (MPT)
MPT Basics
• The performance test/longer essay aspect of the Bar
• Administered the first day of the bar exam (on the last
Tuesday before the last Wednesday in February and the last
Tuesday before the last Wednesday in July each year)
• “The MPT is designed to test the examinee’s ability to use
fundamental lawyering skills in a realistic situation. Each
test evaluates an examinee’s ability to complete a task that a
beginning lawyer should be able to accomplish.”
MPT Jurisdictions
•
Alabama
•
Maine
•
Oregon
•
Alaska
•
Maryland
•
Rhode Island
•
Arizona
•
Minnesota
•
South Dakota
•
Arkansas
•
Mississippi
•
Tennessee
•
Colorado
•
Missouri
•
Texas
•
Connecticut (February 2014) •
Montana
•
Utah
•
Delaware
•
Nebraska
•
Vermont
•
District of Columbia
•
Nevada
•
Washington (July 2013)
•
Georgia
•
New Hampshire
•
West Virginia
•
Hawaii
•
New Mexico
•
Wisconsin
•
Idaho
•
New York
•
Wyoming (July 2013)
•
Illinois
•
North Dakota
•
Iowa
•
Ohio
The MPT Test
• The NCBE offers 2, 90-minute MPT items per administration. A
jurisdiction may select to use one or both items as part of its exam. UBE
jurisdictions use both MPTs.
• The MPT is a closed universe test. Everything you need to complete the
task is given to you.
• The materials for each MPT include a FILE and a LIBRARY:
• The FILE: consists of source documents containing all the facts of the
case—the specific assignment is described here in a memorandum
(may include: transcript of interviews, client documents, contracts,
newspaper articles, medical records, police reports, lawyer’s notes, etc.)
• The LIBRARY: may contain cases, statutes regulations or rules that
may or may not be relevant and useful in completing the assigned
lawyering task (all necessary substantive law included here)
MPT Skills Being Tested
•
Problem Solving: identify and diagnose the problem, generate alternative solutions,
develop and implement a plan.
•
Legal Analysis and Reasoning: identify and formulate legal issues, identify relevant
legal rules, formulate relevant theories, evaluate theories, criticize and synthesize
arguments.
•
Factual Analysis: identify relevant facts, plan a factual investigation, organize facts,
evaluate the information gathered and whether more is needed.
•
Communication: assess perspective of recipient, organize and express ideas clearly
and logically.
•
Organization and Management of a Legal Task: allocate time and resources
efficiently, complete tasks within time constraint.
•
Recognizing and Resolving Ethical Dilemmas: recognize ethical standards,
recognize and resolve ethical dilemmas.
MPT Timing and Strategy
Strategy
•
STEP 1: Read the Supervising
Attorney’s Memo and Outline
•
STEP 2: Read the File and
Update the Outline
•
STEP 3: Read the Library and
Update the Outline
•
STEP 4: Complete the Outline
•
STEP 5: Write the Requested
Assignment
Timing
• Spend 45 minutes on
STEP 1 - STEP 4
• Spend 45 minutes
actually writing
The MPT Test Product
• Examinees might be asked to complete any of the following:
• A memorandum to a supervising attorney
• A letter to a client
• A persuasive brief or memorandum
• A statement of facts
• A contract provision or analysis of a contract provision
• A will or analysis of a will
• A proposal for settlement or agreement
• A discovery plan
• A witness examination plan
• A counseling plan
• A closing argument
Past MPT Work Product
A Memorandum
MEMORANDUM
To: Nevada State Bar
From: Examinee
RE: State of Franklin v. Soper
Date: May 15, 2013
INTRODUCTION
(Two or three sentences setting out the task you’ll complete and briefly stating your
conclusions. Introduce legal authority as well)
DISCUSSION
(Divide this section into two or three sections, following the directions in the task memo. Each
section will have a topic heading using law and facts—usually stated as a conclusion)
CONCLUSION
(Summarize what you have accomplished and reinforce conclusions)
A Persuasive Brief
Franklin District Court
Franklin v. Soper
STATEMENT OF JURISDICTIONAL BASIS
(state which court the action is before and show how requirements for
jurisdiction have been established)
STATEMENT OF FACTS
(use the facts to persuade the court that they support your client’s position)
ARGUMENT
(use headings that clearly summarize the reasons the court should adopt your
position and follow the CREAC format)
CONCLUSION
A Letter to a Client
May 15, 2013
John Jones
Jones and Whittier
5 West Irving Park
Chicago, Illinois 60613
Dear Mr. Jones,
The first sentence/paragraph should introduce the sender and explain the purpose of the
letter.
Each section of the letter may have a heading.
The conclusion usually suggests the need for further action.
Your Truly,
2013 Bar Examinee
Analysis of a Contract, Will or
Trust
•
Introduction
• Explain the nature of your assignment
• Identify client goals
• Explain any other assumptions you have made about the nature of the assignment
•
Clause-by-Clause Analysis
• Proceed through the document clause by clause
• Do not mention acceptable clauses, only unaccaptable ones that need more
explanation or modified language
• Expressly state the wording that needs modification and explain why changes are
needed
• Always suggest specific language to improve the document
• References to the File and Library should be included to support your revisions
• Identify technical problems
A Proposal for Settlement or
Agreement
•
Introduction
• Identify the purpose of the agreement in light of client’s goals.
• Use a disclaimer (see notes)
•
Parties
• Identify parties entering the proposal (including address or other definitive identification provided)
•
Body of Proposal or Agreement
• Use WHEREAS clauses to set out the context of the settlement and the relevant facts
• Include an acknowledgement of the consideration clause
• The part of the agreement containing substance should begin, “NOW, THEREFORE:” followed by:
• Conditions precedent
• Conditions subsequent
• Actual points of the agreement
• Identification of governing law
Signatures
• Provide spaces and indicate whether they need to be witnessed or notarized
•
•
Dismissal of Action
• Indicate the event or events that must occur before plaintiff will agree to voluntarily dismiss the complaint with
prejudice
A Discovery Plan
• Introduction
• Briefly identify how the discovery plan will be organized
• Use elements of the crime/cause of action, principles of law, anticipated
defenses, or legal theory to guide your organization
• Body
• Divide into section under each count charged in the complaint
• Be specific as to names and locations
• For each factual proposition identify the individuals that should be
subject to discovery and the discovery methods that will be used
• Do not include in your plan information the File suggests is already in
your possession
• The cases and statutes will help you understand what facts you need to
prove the elements of the crime
A Witness Examination Plan
A witness examination plan may be organized by topic or by
witness.
• Example of organization by Topic
• State Topic
• State Questions to be Asked
• State Objections Anticipated
• State Response
• State Likely Ruling on Objections
Closing Argument
• Introduction
• Thank the jury for their time and attention during the trial
• Body: organize around the jury instructions
• State clearly the ultimate fact jurors must fin in order for you to prevail
• Organize the evidence in support of the ultimate facts
• Incorporate relevant legal principles or jury instructions into your
argument
• Discuss the sufficiency of evidence and credibility of witnesses
• Draw reasonable inferences from the evidence to support your position
• Anticipate opposing counsel’s arguments
• Refer to policy considerations that may help your position
• Never hold back any argument (you don’t have a rebuttal on the MPT)
Sample MPT
Question
90 minutes allotted
Download
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