Division II Awards and Benefits and Organized Competition

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Division II Awards and Benefits
and Organized Competition
Amanda Conklin and
Abbie Renaker
Learning Objectives
 Recall of basic application of Division II awards
and benefits and delayed enrollment legislation.
 Demonstrate an increased level of comfort
educating colleagues, PSAs and SAs about
basic awards and benefits and delayed
enrollment legislation.
 Apply enhanced knowledge of waiver process to
future organized competition waiver
applications.
Outline

Extra benefits.

Common violations of awards and benefits legislation.



Delayed enrollment and organized competition.
NCAA Division II Committee for Legislative Relief
waivers.
Committee for Legislative Relief guidelines.

New amateurism legislation.

Questions.
Secondary Violations Reported in 2011
• Total secondary violations reported by Division
II institutions: 877.
• Secondary Violations by Bylaw:
▫
NCAA Bylaw 13 (recruiting): 277.
▫
Bylaw 14 (eligibility): 168.
▫
Bylaw 16 (awards and benefits): 165.
Extra Benefits
•
Provided to student-athlete, relative or friend.
•
From an institutional employee or a booster.
•
Not expressly authorized by the legislation.
•
Not a violation if the same benefit is generally available.
Bylaw 16.02.3
Common Violations - Expenses for
Competition
•
•
Expenses for competition:
•
Prior to receiving final academic or amateurism
certification.
•
While enrolled less than full time.
Commonly involve:
•
Nonrecruited student-athletes.
•
Student-athletes with a final amateurism certification in another
sport.
•
Ineligible student-athlete serving as team manager.
Expenses for Competition
• Must be eligible to represent the institution in
competition.
• If serving a year in residence, may not receive
travel expenses for competition by serving as
team manager.
Bylaw 16.8.1.2 and August 5, 1987, staff interpretation
Common Violations - Housing
• Loan or cash to cover off-campus housing
expenses.
• Housesitting for a coach.
• Overnight lodging in coach’s home.
Bylaws16.5.1 and 16.5.2
Housing
• Loans to student-athlete are impermissible.
• Complimentary lodging in an institutional staff
member’s home is not permissible.
Bylaws16.5.1 and 16.5.2
Common Violations - Transportation
• Booster providing ineligible student-athletes
with transportation to view away-from-home
institutional contests.
• Booster providing student-athlete transportation
to the airport.
• Use of a coach’s car.
Bylaw 16.11.2.3
Transportation
• A student-athlete may not be provided with
transportation that is not generally available to
the institution’s students.
• An institutional employee or representative of
athletics interest is not permitted to provide a
student-athlete use of an automobile.
Bylaw 16.11.2.3
Common Violations – General Extra
Benefit
•
•
Use of book scholarship money:
•
to buy impermissible supplies or textbooks that are
not required; or
•
to buy textbooks and supplies for other studentathletes.
Book scholarship funds are limited to the actual
cost of required course-related books and supplies.
Bylaws 16.11.2.1 and 15.2.3
Delayed Enrollment Legislation

An individual who does not enroll full time in a
collegiate institution in the regular term that begins
immediately after a one-year period following high
school graduation shall:
 Use one season of competition for each consecutive 12month period after the one-year period; and
 Serve an academic year in residence.
Bylaw 14.2.4.2
Organized Competition
 Competition is scheduled in advance;
 Official score is kept;
 Individual or team standings or statistics;
Bylaw 14.2.4.2.1.2
Organized Competition, cont.
 Official timer or game officials used;
 Admission is charged;
 Teams are regularly formed or rosters
predetermined;
Bylaw 14.2.4.2.1.2
Organized Competition, cont.
 Team uniforms are used;
 Individual or team is privately sponsored; or
 Competition is directly or indirectly
sponsored, promoted or administered by an
individual, organization or agency.
Bylaw 14.2.4.2.1.2
Ease of Burden
 Notification of organized competition moving
to the NCAA Eligibility Center beginning
August 1, 2012.
 Noncontroversial legislative change (NCAA
Proposal No. NC-2013-3).
 Recommendation emerged for the NCAA DII
Legislation Committee’s ease of burden
review.
Bylaw 14.2.4.2.3
Committee for Legislative Relief Waivers
 Over 100 waivers of delayed enrollment
legislation processed since April 2010.
 International PSAs.
 Submitted through AMA Online.
Committee for Legislative Relief Waiver Process
Individual registers with
the NCAA Eligibility
Center
NCAA Eligibility Center
renders an amateurism
certification decision
indicating that PSA has
triggered penalties due
to delayed enrollment.
DII Institution submits
legislative relief waiver of
Bylaw 14.2.4.2 through
AMA Online
Committee for
Legislative Relief
approves or denies
appeal of staff decision
If staff denies legislative
relief waiver, DII
institution may appeal
staff decision to
Committee for
Legislative Relief
Staff approves or denies
legislative relief waiver
Committee for Legislative Relief Guidelines Analysis
 Circumstances outside of SA’s control?
 Duration of time impacting SA’s ability to enroll.
 What circumstances have changed?
 First opportunity to enroll.
Committee for Legislative Relief Guidelines
 Minimal amount of competition.
 Two contests/dates of competition or
10 percent or less than the contests or
dates of competition limits.
 Actual or averaging method.
Committee for Legislative Relief Guidelines
 Caliber of competition.
 Early high school graduation.
 Extenuating circumstances outside SA’s
control (e.g., medical hardship, natural
disasters, war, extreme financial difficulties).
Committee for Legislative Relief Guidelines
 Diversion from normal academic path.
 Review of home educational system.
 Circumstances that caused diversion.
Committee for Legislative Relief Guidelines
 Misinformation/lack of information – transfers.

Must be provided by academic authority.

SA could have met requirements.

Documentation.

Eligibility at any DII institution.
Committee for Legislative Relief Guidelines
 Extenuating circumstances within SA’s control.

Lack of knowledge.

Failure to enroll due to academic deficiencies,
disciplinary reasons or incarceration.

Misinformation/lack of information during recruitment
process.
Committee for Legislative Relief
Waivers – Common Questions
• When did PSA graduate high school?
• Reasons for delayed enrollment?
• When (date) do fall classes begin at applicant
institution?
Committee for Legislative Relief Waivers–
Common Questions, Cont.
• How much competition?
• Was PSA recruited?
• Did PSA receive incorrect information
from an institution?
Case Study
 Maggie is a soccer player from Ireland.
 Graduated from high school June 2010.
 Maggie’s grandmother passed away March
2012.
 Participated in 15 soccer contests during fall
2011 club season – low-caliber competition.
Case Study, cont.
 SAT score not high enough to be a qualifier for
2011 fall term.
 Could not afford to attend college without athletics
aid.
 Recruitment began April 2012.
 Initial enrollment August 2012.
 Unaware of organized competition legislation.
Staff Analysis
 Participation in more than the minimal
contest thresholds.
 Circumstances surrounding delay do not
warrant relief.
Staff Analysis
 SA triggered rule prior to recruitment and
grandmother’s death.
 Lack of knowledge does not warrant relief.
 Staff recommendation: denied – intent of the
legislation and Committee for Legislative Relief
guidelines.
Financial Donations and Advertising and Sponsorship
of NCAA Championships – Professional Sports
Organizations
•
Professional sports organization may serve as a financial
sponsor of an intercollegiate competition event, but may not
be publically identified as a sponsor.
•
Applies to institutions, conferences and the NCAA.
NCAA Proposal No. 2012-1; Bylaws 12.6.1.2; 12.6.1.4 and 12.6.1.5
Financial Donations and Advertising and Sponsorship
of NCAA Championships – Professional Sports
Organizations – Example
A minor league baseball team may financially sponsor a regularseason baseball contest between two Division II institutions.
•
May not be identified sponsor of the contest.
•
May provide the use of the minor league ballpark at a
reduced rate.
•
May agree to split ticket revenue as part of the financial
contract.
Proposal No. 2012-1; Bylaws 12.6.1.2; 12.6.1.4 and 12.6.1.5
Financial Donations and Advertising and Sponsorship
of NCAA Championships – Professional Sports
Organizations – Example
The Baltimore Ravens may be a financial sponsor of the NCAA
Division II Women's Lacrosse Championship that is held at M&T
Bank Stadium.
•
May not be identified as sponsor.
•
May distribute information to season-ticket holders.
•
May provide advertising during all events (e.g., concerts,
games) at no charge to the NCAA, host institution or local
organizing committee.
Proposal No. 2012-1; Bylaws 12.6.1.2; 12.6.1.4 and 12.6.1.5
Financial Donations and Advertising and Sponsorship
of NCAA Championships – Professional Sports
Organizations
•
Professional sports organizations may serve as a financial
sponsor of ancillary event and may be publically identified as
a sponsor.
•
Applies to institutions, conferences and the NCAA.
Proposal No. 2012-1; Bylaws 12.6.1.2; 12.6.1.4 and 12.6.1.5
Financial Donations and Advertising and Sponsorship
of NCAA Championships – Professional Sports
Organizations- Example
An NFL team may financially sponsor and also be identified
as a sponsor for a fan event at a Division II athletics event
(e.g., Pittsburgh Steelers Fan Festival).
Proposal No. 2012-1; Bylaws 12.6.1.2; 12.6.1.4 and 12.6.1.5
Financial Donations and Advertising and Sponsorship
of NCAA Championships – Professional Sports
Organizations- Example
An NBA team may sponsor and be identified as a sponsor of
the three-on-three basketball tournament that occurs in
conjunction with the NCAA Division II Women's Basketball
Championship.
Proposal No. 2012-1; Bylaws 12.6.1.2; 12.6.1.4 and 12.6.1.5
Financial Donations and Advertising and Sponsorship
of NCAA Championships – Professional Sports
Organizations
•
Half time is not considered ancillary.
•
Pre-game and post-game events and promotions would be
considered ancillary.
•
Professional sports organizations may not use the name or
likeness of a student-athlete to promote events.
Proposal No. 2012-1; Bylaws 12.6.1.2; 12.6.1.4 and 12.6.1.5
Amateurism and Eligibility – Elimination of Eligibility
Form to Certify International Student-athletes
•
Eliminated the International Student-Athlete Certification
Form.
•
All SAs enrolling in a Division I or Division II institution
on or after August 1, 2012, must complete a “gap time”
form.
Proposal No. 2012-2; Bylaws 14.1.6 and 12.1.1.1.2.1
Amanda Conklin
[email protected]
Abbie Renaker
[email protected]
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