here - Mrs. Knighten-Miller`s AP English

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Patrick Henry
Speech to the Virginia Convention
Biography
 The life of Patrick Henry
 The most celebrated orator of the American Revolution
 He originally tried being both a storekeeper and a farmer,
but failing at both he became a lawyer and was admitted to
the VA bar in 1760.
 He was twice governor of VA
 1765: Helped repel the Stamp Act.
 Gave leadership in the House, and lead to the Dec. of
Independence with Thomas Jefferson, and others.
 Elected to Louisa Co VA House of Burgesses in 1765.
 Remembered mainly for his famous speech before a meeting
of the VA assembly in Richmond on March 23, 1775. He
called on the colonists to arm themselves with the words:
"Give me liberty, or give me death". He was a strong
advocate of states rights.
http://encarta.msn.com/media_461526458_761553475_-1_1/Patrick_Henry.html
Charged Words
 Charged words are words with strong
connotations beyond their literal meaning that
are likely to produce an emotional response.
 Tyranny (evokes a feeling of fear, suggests living in
a state of terror)
 Liberty (suggests an ideal life characterized by
freedom)
 Justice (can be associated with freedom and
equality)
 Honor (evokes a sense of morality and dignity)
Oratory
 A form of public speaking
 A qualified speaker
 Contents of speech for emphasis include:





Rhetorical questions
Restatement
Repetition
Parallelism
Exclamation
Rhetorical question
 Rhetorical question/questions are the
questions the speaker asks the audience.
However, the audience internalizes the
answer. Nothing is answered orally.
 “Are you men or what?”
Restatement
 Restatement is stating the same idea in
different words
Repetition
 Repetition is repeating the exact same
words over again.
Parallelism
 Parallelism refers to the repeated use of
phrases, clauses, or sentences that are
similar in structure or meaning. Writers
use this technique to emphasize
important ideas, create rhythm, and
make their writing more forceful and
direct.
 Example: “Give me liberty or give me death!”
Exclamation
 Also used in some speeches is the use of
the exclamation (or highly emotional or
provocative statements)
Allusion
 We are apt to
…listen to the
song of that siren,
till she transforms
us into beasts.”
 Odyssey, Books
10 and 12
Allusion
 “Are we disposed to
be of the number of
those, who having
eyes, see not, and
having ears, hear
not, the things which
we so nearly concern
their temporal
salvation.”
 Ezekiel 12:2
Allusion
 Suffer not
yourselves to be
betrayed with a
kiss.”
 Listen to the song
of that siren…
 Having ears, hear
not…
 Luke 22:47-48
 Mythological
 Biblical
Persuasion
 Attempts to convince readers to accept a
specific view point about an issue to take
a particular action.
 Uses a combination of logical and
emotional appeals
Appeals
 Logical Appeal (logos) - uses a chain of
reasoning (facts) to establish the validity
of a proposed argument (either specific
to general or general to specific)
 Emotional Appeal (pathos) - seeks to stir
the reader’s feelings; it relies on charged
words ad symbols that evoke sympathy
or distaste.
Logical examples
 “And judging by the past, I wish to know
what the British government has done…
to justify the hope of these gentlemen
speak of.”
 “They tell us… that we are unable to fight
fight so strong an enemy. But when shall
we be stronger?”
Emotional Appeals
 They [the large armies and navies] are sent to put us in
the chains the British government has been making for
us.”
 “We shall not fight our battles alone. God, who rules
the fates of nations, will send us help.” Also authority
appeal
 “I know not what course others may take; but as for
me, give me liberty, or give me death!”
ASSIGNMENT:
 Write out examples of the following devices in
Patrick Henry’s “Speech to the Virginia
Convention:”
 1) Rhetorical Questions
 2) Restatement
 3) Repetition
 4) Parallelism
 5) Exclamation
 6) Logical Appeal
 7) Emotional Appeal
Appeals
 Appeal to Authority - uses the audience’s
respect for another person who shares
the view of the author
Understanding Parallelism
 Faulty Parallelism
“For my own part, what ever anguish of spirit it
my cost, I am willing to know the whole truth:
to know the worst and I will provide for it.”
 Effective Parallelism
“For my own part, whatever anguish of spirit it
may cost, I am willing to know the whole
truth; to know the worst, and to provide for it.
Identifying Parallel Structure
 Directions: Write each of these sentences and circle the parallel elements.

Are we disposed to be of the number of those who having eyes
see not, and having ears hear not?
 Ask yourself how this gracious reception of our petition
comports with those warlike preparations which cover our
waters and darken our land.
 They are meant for us; they can be meant for no other.
 Our petitions have been slighted; our remonstrances have
produced additional violence and insult; our supplications have
been disregarded.
Identifying Parallel Structure
(continued)
 Directions: Circle the parallel elements in each of the following sentences.
 If we wish to be free, if we mean to preserve inviolate those
inestimable privileges. . .,if we mean not basely to abandon the
noble struggle in which we have been so long engaged…,we
must fight!
Revising Sentences for
Parallel Structure
 Directions: Rewrite the following sentence so that all elements are
parallel.
 Patrick Henry stirred the colonists to action
through emotional appeals to patriotism, by
threatening loss of freedom, and by logically
arguing about Britain’s goals.
Revising Sentences for
Parallel Structure
 Directions: Rewrite the following sentence so that all elements are parallel.
 Compromise, arguing, and making petitions are
not workable solutions to Henry.
Revising Sentences for
Parallel Structure
 Directions: Rewrite the following sentences so that all elements are
parallel.
 Patrick Henry boldly and with much drama
urged armed resistance to England.
Revising Sentences for
Parallel Structure
 Directions: Rewrite the following sentences so that all elements are
parallel.
 His speech is not only remembered for its
stirring words but is also valuable as a slice of
history.
Understanding Persuasive
Techniques
 Directions: Identify the following passages as logical
argument or emotional appeal.
 “I know not what course other may take; but as for me,
give me liberty or give me
death.”__________________________
 “Our petitions have been slighted; our remonstrances
have produced additional violence and insult; our
supplications have been disregarded; and we have
been spurned with contempt from the foot of the throne!
In vain, after these things, may we indulge the fond
hope of peace and reconciliation.”________________
Understanding Persuasive
Techniques
 Directions: Identify the following passage as logical
argument or emotional appeal.
 “Besides, sir, we shall not fight our battles alone.
There is a just God who presides over the destinies of
nations and who will raise up friends to fight our battles
for us. The battle, sir, is not to the strong alone; it is to
the vigilant, the active, the brave.” ________________
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