Learning Objective: After exploring figurative

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Learning Objective: After
exploring figurative language
scholars will identify and
analyze the effects of F.L. in a
variety of texts.
Do Now: Look back at "Jabberwocky". In your
notes - answer the following:
1. what does the son do to the Jabberwock in
stanza 5?
2. What is the central idea of this poem?
3. Why do you think we chose this poem to begin
our poetry unit?
Poetry
• According to Jacqueline Woodson, it is not
“some secret language meant to confuse
people.”
• Expressive form of writing
• Can have rules or not have rules!
• Uses many examples of figurative
language
Figurative Language
– Language that doesn’t mean
exactly what you say
– May help you make
connections by triggering a
visual or other sensory
memory
Types of Figurative Language
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Simile
Metaphor
Personification
Repetition
Onomatopoeia
Rhyme
Alliteration
Simile
• A simile is a figurative language
technique where a comparison
is made using like or as.
– Why? Provides the audience with an image
to help them understand what the author is getting
at.
Examples of similes:
• She is like a rainy day.
• He is as busy as a bee.
• They are like two peas in a pod.
I am hungry as a horse.
You run like a rabbit.
She is happy as a clam.
He is sneaky as a snake.
Metaphor
A poetic comparison that does not use
the words like or as.
- Why? It provides the audience with a
clearer picture of an abstract concept
Examples of metaphors:
She is a graceful swan.
He is a golden god.
They are honey from the honeycomb.
7
The girl was a fish in the water.
The clown was a feather floating away.
Personification
A figure of speech in which
inanimate objects or
abstractions (things that are
not human) are given human
qualities or are represented
as possessing human form.
Joyet
2004
9
The flowers danced in the wind.
The friendly gates welcomed us.
The Earth coughed and choked in all of the pollution.
Repetition
When a word, phrase, line or
stanza is repeated over the
course of a poem.
Poets do this to show the
importance of that idea.
For example: First and Last
stanza of “Jabberwocky”
11
Onomatopoeia
• Words that are sounds
• Why?
– Authors use onomatopoeia to catch our
attention
– They also use it to appeal to our sense of
hearing.
Rhyme Scheme
When ending sounds are alike
Cat, bat, mat, sat
Once there was a man named Luke who always
sat in bed to puke
Can be found
At the end of every line (AABB)
At the end of every other line (ABCB)
Random
Within a line (The black cat sat in a hat)
13
Alliteration
• When the initial sound in a series of words
is repeated
– Sally sells seashells
– Why did Warren wash his Wooble?
– Used to make language more interested and
musical
Group Practice
• Each group of detectives will be assigned
one type of figurative language.
• Your task is to find the evidence in the
poems and record your answers in the
detective notebook (use the chart!)
The poems can be found on the following
pages:
615, 619, 620, 625, 630, 631, 635, 636-637,
644-645
Share
• Share your detective findings with the
class.
• Take notes on what you hear.
How do Each of these Effect
the poems?
• Let’s go back into the poems and see how
each type of figurative language makes
the poem unique, interesting, different, etc.
Download
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