Haiti`s Road to Democracy 1700s – 1800s

advertisement
Chapter 15
Section 2
Haiti
A Struggle for Democracy
Haiti’s Road to Democracy
1700s – 1800s
The French imported slaves to work on
their plantations.
However, slaves began to
revolt in the 1790s.
Toussaint
L’Ouverture
helped to end
slavery in 1801,
and bring about
Haiti’s
independence.
With independence, Haiti
expelled the French from Haiti, in
1804.
People of Haiti are a mix of African
slaves and European ancestry and are
known as Creole. Creole also refers
to the language spoken in Haiti, which
is both French and African languages.
Haiti’s Road to Democracy
1957 – 1987
There were a series of brutal
dictatorships which began in 1957,
with Papa Doc.
There was hope that the
dictatorships would come to
an end when Papa Doc was
removed in 1986. However,
harsh dictatorships continued!
Haiti’s Road to Democracy
1988 – 1991
Jean-Bertrand
Aristide was
elected
president, in
1990. However,
Haitian military
took control of
the government,
in 1991.
Because of the military
takeover, many of Aristide’s
supporters to flee Haiti. They
were known as refugees.
Haiti’s Road to Democracy
1992 – 2002
Jean-Bertrand
Aristide
returned to
Haiti in 1994,
to restore a
democratic
government.
Aristide was elected president in
2001, but the election results
were challenged.
Democracy was threatened in 2002
when the economy faltered and
President Aristide was asked to
resign.
Reviewing Key Terms
Jean-Bertrand
Aristide was first
elected Haitian
president in 1990
and most recently,
in 2001.
A refugee is a
person who escapes
his/her homeland to
escape persecution
or find personal
safety.
A person of mixed African
and European descent is
known as a Creole. It
can also mean the
Haitian language, mixing
French and African
languages.
Download
Related flashcards

Ethnic groups in Sudan

32 cards

Ethnic groups in Syria

18 cards

S.H.I.E.L.D. agents

75 cards

Ethnic groups in Sudan

32 cards

Create Flashcards