Introduction to Buddhism Quiz (Office document, 1087kB)

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A. Incas
B. Aryans
C. Harappans
• The religious landscape of ancient India was shaped by the
ideology of the Aryans, a nomadic group who travelled into
India around the beginning of the second millennium BCE.
• The teachings of the social group known as brahmanas are
found within texts such as the Ṛg Veda and Upaniṣads. These
contain teachings, philosophies and ritual guides.
• Incas are ancient Peruvians
• Harappans are part of the ancient Indus Valley Civilization
which pre-date the arrival of the Aryans.
Next Question
• The religious landscape of ancient India was shaped by the
ideology of the Aryans, a nomadic group who travelled into
India around the beginning of the second millennium BCE.
• The teachings of the social group known as brahmanas are
found within texts such as the Ṛg Veda and Upaniṣads. These
contain teachings, philosophies and ritual guides.
• Incas are ancient Peruvians
• Harappans are part of the ancient Indus Valley Civilization
which pre-date the arrival of the Aryans.
Next Question
A. 500- 400 BCE
B. 800- 700 BCE
C. 600- 500 BCE
• The dates that the Buddha lived are not agreed upon, but
generally placed around 400-500 BCE.
• This is a estimation of when the Buddha lived. A number
of sources from ancient India, Sri Lanka and the
surrounding areas have been used to try and get the
most accurate date. The dates are not agreed upon by all
scholars.
Next Question
• The dates that the Buddha lived are not agreed upon, but
generally placed around 400-500 BCE.
• This is a estimation of when the Buddha lived. A number
of sources from ancient India, Sri Lanka and the
surrounding areas have been used to try and get the
most accurate date. The dates are not agreed upon by all
scholars.
Next Question
A. Suffering (duḥkha)
B. Cessation (nirodha)
C. Origin (samudaya)
The second Noble Truth is Origin.
1. Suffering (duḥkha/dukkha): all that is unenlightened is
marked by this.
2. Origin (samudaya): the origin of dukkha lies in craving
(tṛṣṇā/ taṇhā). The unenlightened crave sensuals pleasures,
things that they do not have and the removal of things that
they do not want.
3. Cessation (nirodha): the cessation of dukkha, will come
through the cessation of ignorant thought and action. In other
words, the only cure for dukkha is nirvāṇa/ nibbāna.
4. Way (mārga/ magga): the path to enlightenment is outlined in
in the eightfold path
Next Question
The second Noble Truth is Origin.
1. Suffering (duḥkha/dukkha): all that is unenlightened is
marked by this.
2. Origin (samudaya): the origin of dukkha lies in craving
(tṛṣṇā/ taṇhā). The unenlightened crave sensuals pleasures,
things that they do not have and the removal of things that
they do not want.
3. Cessation (nirodha): the cessation of dukkha, will come
through the cessation of ignorant thought and action. In other
words, the only cure for dukkha is nirvāṇa/ nibbāna.
4. Way (mārga/ magga): the path to enlightenment is outlined in
in the eightfold path
Next Question
True
False
• Saṃsāra is not a place, instead it is the type of existence
experienced by all unenlightened beings.
• Saṃsāric existence is conditioned by three marks:
impermanence (anitya/ anicca), not-Self (anātman/
anattā), and dis-ease (duḥkha/dukkha).
• As there is no permanence there is no stability. Saṃsāric
existence is in a constant state of flux and change.
Next Question
• Saṃsāra is not a place, instead it is the type of existence
experienced by all unenlightened beings.
• Saṃsāric existence is conditioned by three marks:
impermanence (anitya/ anicca), not-Self (anātman/
anattā), and dis-ease (duḥkha/dukkha).
• As there is no permanence there is no stability. Saṃsāric
existence is in a constant state of flux and change.
Next Question
A. Dependent Origination
B. Skilful Means
C. Doctrine of the Elders
• Buddhism offers a system of causation known as
Dependent Origination (pratītyasamutpadā/
paṭiccasmuppāda). This system of thought maintains that
everything has been caused into existence. Nothing has
been created ex nihilo.
• Skilful means is a translation of upāyakauśalya.
• Doctrine of the Elders is a translation of Theravāda
Next Question
• Buddhism offers a system of causation known as
Dependent Origination (pratītyasamutpadā/
paṭiccasmuppāda). This system of thought maintains that
everything has been caused into existence. Nothing has
been created ex nihilo.
• Skilful means is a translation of upāyakauśalya.
• Doctrine of the Elders is a translation of Theravāda
Next Question
True
False
• The Buddha had attained enlightenment during his
lifetime, he did not die nor did he vanish. Despite being
enlightened he still had to receive the results of previous
karmic actions. It should be remembered that one
enlightened the Buddha was not producing any karma.
• Nirvāṇa/nibbana, as with saṃsāra, is not a place. Instead
it is a form of existence which is free from the conditions
of saṃsāra.
Next Question
• The Buddha had attained enlightenment during his
lifetime, he did not die nor did he vanish. Despite being
enlightened he still had to receive the results of previous
karmic actions. It should be remembered that one
enlightened the Buddha was not producing any karma.
• Nirvāṇa/nibbana, as with saṃsāra, is not a place. Instead
it is a form of existence which is free from the conditions
of saṃsāra.
Next Question
A. Vinaya
B. Nikayas
C. Abhidharma
• The Buddha ordained monks (bhikkhus) and nuns
(bhikkhunis) during his lifetime and there were was the
creation of the Vinaya, a text outlining the rules of the
monastic community.
• The Nikayas are the collection of suttas found in the Pali
Canon.
• The Abhidharma is also found within the Pali Canon and
is a collection of descriptions of Buddhist doctrines.
Next Question
• The Buddha ordained monks (bhikkhus) and nuns
(bhikkhunis) during his lifetime and there were was the
creation of the Vinaya, a text outlining the rules of the
monastic community.
• The Nikayas are the collection of suttas found in the Pali
Canon.
• The Abhidharma is also found within the Pali Canon and
is a collection of descriptions of Buddhist doctrines.
Next Question
True
False
• In Buddhist thought karma has a causative nature. The
actions that are intentionally performed by the individual
will have a particular karmic result. Well-intentioned good
deeds will result in a pleasant and favourable karmic
result whilst malicious and hurtful misdeeds will result in
a poor and unfavourable karmic result.
• Karma does not always have immediate results, but can
take many lifetimes to have an effect.
Next Question
• In Buddhist thought karma has a causative nature. The
actions that are intentionally performed by the individual
will have a particular karmic result. Well-intentioned good
deeds will result in a pleasant and favourable karmic
result whilst malicious and hurtful misdeeds will result in
a poor and unfavourable karmic result.
• Karma does not always have immediate results, but can
take many lifetimes to have an effect.
Next Question
A. A child, an old person, a mad person and a
brahmin
B. A couple, an ill person, an old person and a
corpse
C. An old person, an ill person, a corpse and an
ascetic
• Siddhārtha (the Bodhisattva) rides with his charioteer and
sees an old man, a sick man, a corpse and an ascetic.
Upon seeing this he decides to leave his home and
become an ascetic.
• When he was young it was predicted that Siddhārtha
could have one of two destinies: he could become a
great ‘wheel turning’ king (cakravartin/cakkavattin) or a
buddha. He was hidden from all unpleasant things by his
father who wanted him to become a king.
Next Question
• Siddhārtha (the Bodhisattva) rides with his charioteer and
sees an old man, a sick man, a corpse and an ascetic.
Upon seeing this he decides to leave his home and
become an ascetic.
• When he was young it was predicted that Siddhārtha
could have one of two destinies: he could become a
great ‘wheel turning’ king (cakravartin/cakkavattin) or a
buddha. He was hidden from all unpleasant things by his
father who wanted him to become a king.
Next Question
True
False
• The different approaches towards the Buddha’s teaching
can be split into two different parties: Mainstream
Buddhism and Mahāyāna Buddhism.
• Mainstream Buddhist schools include: Sarvāstivāda,
Sautrāntika, Theravāda, Pudgalavāda, and
Mahāsāṃghika.
• In modern Buddhism the only surviving mainstream
school is Theravāda Buddhism.
• Mahāyāna schools include: Zen/Chan, Pure Land,
Shingon, Tendai, Nichiren, and Tibetan Buddhism.
• The different approaches towards the Buddha’s teaching
can be split into two different parties: Mainstream
Buddhism and Mahāyāna Buddhism.
• Mainstream Buddhist schools include: Sarvāstivāda,
Sautrāntika, Theravāda, Pudgalavāda, and
Mahāsāṃghika.
• In modern Buddhism the only surviving mainstream
school is Theravāda Buddhism.
• Mahāyāna schools include: Zen/Chan, Pure Land,
Shingon, Tendai, Nichiren, and Tibetan Buddhism.
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