Knowledge Sharing

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Knowledge Sharing, Learning
at the Point of Need, and
Learning Asset Integration
Breakout Session # 312
Larry Floyd
July 19, 2010
3:45 - 5:00pm
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1
Purpose & Agenda
Purpose
Overview of Knowledge Sharing and
Learning Asset Integration
Agenda





What is Knowledge Sharing?
What is a Community of Practice?
Community Building Process
Questions to Consider
Overview of DAU’s Knowledge Management
System and Its Integration of Learning Assets
2
DAU Mission
Provide a global learning environment to support a mission-ready
Defense Acquisition Workforce that develops, delivers, and
sustains effective and affordable warfighting capabilities.
Impact acquisition
excellence through:
 Acquisition certification
and leadership training
 Mission assistance to
acquisition
organizations
 Online knowledgesharing resources
 Continuous learning
assets
 Strategic workforce
planning
Located with our Customers
Region
Location
Workforce
Capital/Northeast
Fort Belvoir, VA
31,566
Mid-Atlantic
California, MD
23,110
Midwest
Kettering, OH
18,604
South
Huntsville, AL
28,360
West
San Diego, CA
25,465
We are part of the community, not just a place to take
classes.
Knowledge Management
is about…

Solving known problems with known
solutions
 Sharing & transferring the right know-how
 Applying good practices and key learnings
 Building relationships and trust
 Making it easy to find the right people who
know
 Leveraging your organizations collective
intellect
The Big Picture
Knowledge resides with people
 Knowledge loss via:
 Downsizing
 Retirement
 Mergers/Acquisitions
 People movement - job changes –
teams disband
= knowledge lost
Community of Practice
Communities of practice are groups of people who share a
concern, a set of problems, or a passion about a topic, and who
deepen their knowledge and expertise in this area by interacting
on an ongoing basis.
- Cultivating Communities of Practice: A Guide to Managing Knowledge
Etienne Wenger, William Snyder, Richard A. McDermott
Communities of practice are groups of people who come together
to share and to learn from one another face-to-face and virtually.
They are held together by a common interest in a body of
knowledge and are driven by a desire and need to share
problems, experiences, insights, templates, tools, and best
practices.
- APQC’s Best-Practice Report,
Successfully Implementing Knowledge Management (APQC, 2000).
7
Types of Communities
Subject Matter Expert Richard McDermott identified four
primary strategic intents for communities:
 Helping – provide a forum for community
members to help each other solve everyday work
problems
 Best Practice – develop and disseminate best
practices, guidelines, and procedures for their
members to use
 Knowledge Stewarding – organize, manage, and
steward a body of knowledge from which members
can draw
 Innovation – create breakthrough ideas,
knowledge, and practices
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Community Identity
What is the community’s purpose?
 How does the community support the
corporate mission, goals or business
objectives?
 How does the community add value?
 How does it determine it is adding value?
 Who has a stake in the community success?

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Value Proposition

What benefit does the community provide
to the organization?
 What issues/problems resonate with the
business leaders?
 Is there a sense of urgency linked to the
work of the community?
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Critical Success Factors –
measures of effectiveness

Reduction in hours needed to solve problems
 Decrease learning curve
 Decrease rework and prevent reinvention
 Increase innovative/breakthrough ideas
 Avoidance of costly mistakes
 Improved speed of response
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Approach

Identify a formal organizational advocate for the
community and champions to legitimize the
activities of the community
 Establish Core Working Group (10-15) to drive
establishment of the community
 Gather and document community
requirements/needs – knowledge audit, conduct
requirements focus groups, surveys
 Aggregate community requirements and target
areas of opportunity – quick wins
 Marry effort to availability of resources and develop
timeline
 Address most critical needs of the community first
Introduction to Acquisition Community
Connection (ACC)
What is the ACC?
Acquisition Community Connection
https://acc.dau.mil
-ACC is a nest of collaborative
spaces created through
partnerships w/Services,
Agencies, and Industry to support
growth beyond internal resources
and leverages one tool in a cost
effective way
-Shared infrastructure reduces
cost for DoD
-Available 24/7
-Much of the content is available
even w/o login
-Provides central location for
workforce to access related
knowledge
-Creates conditions that foster
collaboration across
organizational boundaries – end
result is that individuals begin to
recognize the value of knowledge
sharing
Acquisition Community
Connection (ACC)
Communities are
aligned to AT&L
functional areas and
business processes
• Facilitate workplace effectiveness
• Promote career-long learning
• Available 24/7– when and where you want
Contracting
Community
https://acc.dau.mil/cm
-One of the cornerstone CoPs in the
ACC (started in 2001)
--Significant partnering with Federal
Government
-Process & Mission areas provide
structure for CoP and have
contributed to improved focus in DAU
Courses
-Tightly integrated with DAU course
material (and was first CoP to share
actual course material as contributions
on the ACC)
Contingency
Contracting
https://acc.dau.mil/contingency
-Grew out of need identified by
small group of members from Air
Force (Workspace to SIA to CoP)
-Contingency Community now has
more than 2,400 members
--Supports both open content and
restricted After Action Reports for
deploying Service Members to
share lessons learned/prepare
them deployment
ACC Statistics
ACC Stats
• 99,565 members
• ~2000 new members/month
• ~7 million page views/month
• ~200,000 visits/month
• 46 Communities & SIAs
•
https://acc.dau.mil
700+ Workspaces
Learning Asset
Integration
Informal vs Formal Learning
Is this true: 80 % of learning takes place
on the job (and not in a class)?
Informal = 80%
Formal = 20%
Informal:
the degree which the
learner has control
of both the objective
and the means.
Formal:
the degree which the
institution has control
of both the objective
and the means.
“Learning in the Workplace”, Marsick and Watkins, 1990.
…with
Filling the formal
learning gaps with
comprehensive
learning assets
Formal
& Informal
Learning
AAP Q&A
Guidance
Classroom Materials
Tools
Policies BestWebcasts
Templates
Practices La Videos Browseable
DL/CL courseware
Lessons
learned
w Audios
Communities of Practice
Handbooks
Gaming Scenarios
s
Simulations
Regulations
Guidebooks
Formal Courses
Providing a Constant Support Presence in DoD Acquisition Careers
Need an Architecture to Integrate
Learning
Knowledge Sharing
DAP - Online Portal to Big A
and HCI knowledge
ACC - DoD's online
collaborative communities
Virtual Library – Online
connection to DAU research
collection
Training Courses
Classroom & online
DAWIA Core, Core Plus, &
Executive
Continuous Learning
CL Modules - Online, selfpaced modules learning
modules
Conferences - PEO /
SYSCOM, Business
Managers, DAU Acquisition
Community Symposium
Mission Assistance
Consulting - Helping
organizations solve complex
acquisition problems
Targeted Training - Tailored
organizational training
Rapid Deployment Training On-site and online training on
the latest AT&L policies
Formal and informal learning at the point of need
AKMS Systems and Tools
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Defense Acquisition Portal (DAP)
Defense Acquisition Portal (DAP)
DAP Quick Links
Contracting Career Gateway
Contracting Career Gateway
Contracting Community of Practice
ACQuipedia
ACQuipedia
Career Gateway Highlights
Career Gateway
Certification Guide
Career Gateway
Continuous Learning
Career Gateway
Enroll in a Course
Career Gateway
DAU Ask A Professor
Career Gateway
Director’s Blog
Director’s Blog
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Learning at the Point of Need?
It’s not about classroom or
web, it’s about selecting
the right delivery medium.
Learning at the Point of
Need is about giving the
learner more control!
Formal and Informal Learning
must be integrated!
Q&A
Questions?
Backup Slides
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Questions to Consider

What are the most urgent clusters of problems?
 What outcomes do we want to improve within and
across agencies?
 What is in it for me?
 What focus do we want to start with?


Where are low-hanging fruits with visible impact?
What knowledge to share:
 What knowledge do we have? What kind of knowledge? Who
has it? Who needs it?

What knowledge to develop:
 What knowledge are we missing?
Questions to Consider

What knowledge to document:

What documents, tools, and other artifacts do
we need?

Opportunities for mutual help and thinking
 Who are the key players?


Is everyone here? Who else should be? What
types of members? Where is expertise?
What would make members want to engage
actively?

How to make the community energizing and
activities useful?