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ZAMBOANGA-CITY

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Zamboanga City
Strategic Development Plan
By: Agabao, Joyce, Delos Ama, M., Labaupa, M.
A project in Tour 281 | Tourism Strategies | University of the Philippines Asian Institute of Tourism | Graduate Diploma
in Tourism Development and Management May 27, 2019
monika labaupa
[Date]
[Course title]
TABLE OF CONTENTS
...................................................................................................................................................................... 0
INTRODUCTION ............................................................................................................................................. 2
A.
BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE OF THE STUDY ................................................................................ 2
B.
ABOUT THE DESTINATION ................................................................................................................ 2
C.
ORGANIZATION OF THE REPORT ...................................................................................................... 6
SITUATIONAL ASSESSMENT .......................................................................................................................... 7
A.
GLOBAL AND INTERNATIONAL TRENDS ............................................................................................ 7
A.
NATIONAL TRENDS.......................................................................................................................... 10
B.
CURRENT TOURISM SITUATION IN THE REGION ............................................................................ 12
A.
TOURISM ATTRACITON SITES.......................................................................................................... 15
B.
TOURISM ACTIVITIES....................................................................................................................... 15
C.
OTHER TOURISM ENTERPRISES....................................................................................................... 16
D.
TOURISM INSTITUTIONS ................................................................................................................. 17
E.
TOURiSM DEMAND ......................................................................................................................... 17
ANALYSIS ..................................................................................................................................................... 22
A.
TOURISM CIRCUIT MAPPING .......................................................................................................... 22
B.
MARKET ANALYSIS .......................................................................................................................... 26
C.
KEY ISSUES AND CONSTRAINTS....................................................................................................... 27
TOURISM STRATEGY ................................................................................................................................... 29
A.
zamboanga city tourism GOALS AND OBJECTIVES.......................................................................... 29
B.
STRATEGIC TOURISM DEVELOPMENT FRAMEWORK...................................................................... 29
C.
TOURISM DEVELOPMENT STRATEGIES ........................................................................................... 31
References .................................................................................................................................................. 33
Agabao, J., Delos Ama, M. and Labaupa, M. 2019
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INTRODUCTION
A. BACKGROUND AND OBJEC TIVE OF THE STUDY
This study evaluates the current situation of the tourism in Zamboanga City which leads to the
construction of tourism strategies of the city. The objective of this study is to develop a strategic
tourism development framework for Zamboanga City. Also, this is only a class requirement and
the aforementioned strategic framework is an unofficial strategy for the City of Zamboanga.
The strategic tourism development framework created in this paper will not be used officially by
the Local Government Unit of Zamboanga City, it will only be used for academic purposes. The
proponents used secondary data with no direct inputs or communication with the LGU of
Zamboanga City.
B. ABOUT THE DESTINATION
Basic Info
Figure 1 Official Seal of Zamboanga City
Zamboanga City, also known as Ciudad de Zamboanga, is a 1st class highly urbanized city in
Zamboanga Peninsula Region. It is the commercial, industrial, financial, and educational center
of the region. Its current Mayor is Ma. Isabelle G. Climaco. The city is known as the “The City of
Flowers” and “Sardines Capital of the Philippines”. Moreover, the Port of Zamboanga and the
Zamboanga International Airport served as the main gateway of the region to many destinations
in the Philippines and Southeast Asia. Zamboanga City is also known as the melting pot of culture
and cuisine because of its geographic location. The Santa Cruz Pink Sand Beach along with the
famous Eleven Islands is the most well-known attractions of the city. Because of its diverse
culture and enchanting tourist attractions “Zoom in Zamboanga” or “Asia’s Latin City” became
the tourism brand of the city.
Agabao, J., Delos Ama, M. and Labaupa, M. 2019
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The city is divided in to two congressional
districts with a total of 98 barangays. The two
districts are delineated by Veterans Avenue.
District 1 is composed of 36 barangays on the
west coast while District 2 is composed of 61
barangays on the east coast. The 98 barangays
are further classified into urban (30) and rural
(68) barangays. Zamboanga City is an
independent, chartered city but is grouped with
the province of Zamboanga del Sur for statistical
purposes.
Figure 2 Map of Zamboanga Peninsula
Figure 3 Map of the Philippines
Agabao, J., Delos Ama, M. and Labaupa, M. 2019
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Zamboanga City is the commercial and industrial center of the Zamboanga Peninsula Region
which lies between the Moro Gulf (part of the Celebes Sea) and the Sulu Sea in the South of the
Philippines.
Zamboanga City is accessible thru:
By air: There are daily flights to from Manila to
Zambaonga City International Airport by
Philippine Airlines and Cebu Pacific. There are
also regular flights to Zamboanga City via
Cagayan de Oro and Davao City by Cebu Pacific.
By sea: 2GO ferries have one ferry a week
sailing to/from Manila to Zamboanga City via
Dipolog and Dumaguete. Aleson Shipping lines
has a ferry going to and from Sandakan,
Malaysia. Also, the Port of Zamboanga is an
international port of entry. It has a scheduled
passenger ferry going to and from Sandakan,
Malaysia. Several shipping lines also offer
regular trips from and to Jolo (Sulu), Bongao
(Tawi-Tawi) and Isabela City (Basilan).
Figure 5 Manila to Zamboanga City by air transportation.
Figure 4 Manila to Zamboanga City by land and sea
transportation
Agabao, J., Delos Ama, M. and Labaupa, M. 2019
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Physical Features
It is the 3rd largest city by land area in the Philippines with a total land area of 148,338.49
hectares. The territorial jurisdiction of the city includes the islands of big and small Sta. Cruz,
Tictabon, Sacol, Manalipa, Tumalutap, Vitali, as well as other numerous islands. The total land
area of city is combined of 142,099.99 hectares or 1,420.99 square kilometers land area of the
city with the area of about 25 other islands within the territorial jurisdiction of the city — which
have an aggregate area of 6,248.5 hectares as verified by the Office of the City Engineer.
Climate. Zamboanga City features a tropical wet and dry climate under the Köppen climate
classification (Aw). Zamboanga City enjoys a location that is free from the typhoon belt area.
March to May is hot and dry, with temperature at 22 degrees Celsius. June to October is rainy.
November to February is cool, with temperatures ranging from 22 degrees Celsius to 28 degrees
Celsius. Average humidity year-round is 77%.
Socio-Economic Profile
Zamboanga City is the 6th most populous in the Philippines and the 2nd most populous in
Mindanao after Davao City. According to the 2015 census, it has a population of 861,799 people.
Roman Catholicism remains the predominant religion in the city which comprises the 60% of the
city's population. Zamboanga City was the first to establish its own Catholic diocese in Mindanao
(now the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Zamboanga). Muslims have also been an integral part
of Zamboanga, comprising 35% of the city's population.
The ancestors of the present inhabitants of the city are said to also have migrated to other areas
in the Southwestern Mindanao. Due to migration, several other ethnicities have a visible
presence in the city such as the Samal, Yakan, Tausug and Badjao peoples.
Chavacano, a Spanish-based creole language, is the native language of inhabitants living around
the city and the nearby island of Basilan. Aside from Chavacano, English is also understood.
Tausug and Cebuano are also spoken, mostly by migrants to the city. Subanon is mainly spoken
by Subanons living in the city.
Zamboanga is noted as the Sardines Capital of the Philippines because 8 out of 11 sardines
companies in the country are operating in the city. The canning factories are converged in the
west coast of Zamboanga. Sardine fishing and processing account for about 70 percent of the
city’s economy. Situated at the western tip of the Mindanao mainland, Zamboanga is a natural
docking point for vessels traversing the rich fishing grounds of the Zamboanga peninsula and the
Sulu archipelago.
Zamboanga’s principal exports also include processed fruit, coconut-based products, shell and
rubber manufactures, and wooden furniture. The city is also a center for Moro brass ware and
bronze ware and a collecting point for shells, which, if not exported, are used mainly for local
button manufacture.
Agabao, J., Delos Ama, M. and Labaupa, M. 2019
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Brief History
Zamboanga City was founded in the late 12th or early 13th century as a settlement by the
Subanen people. Zamboanga Peninsula was also the homelands of the ancestors of the Yakan,
the Balanguingui, and other closely related Sama-Bajau peoples. The area was inhabited by the
Subanen people and was the site of trade among the Chinese, Malays and different native ethnic
groups around the area. The city used to be known as Samboangan in historical records.
Samboangan is a Sinama term for "mooring place", from the root word samboang ("mooring
pole"). The name was later Hispanicized and named as Zamboanga.
The Philippine Commonwealth Act No. 39 of 1936 signed by President Manuel L. Quezon on
October 12, 1936 in Malacañang Palace created and established Zamboanga as a chartered city.
It has been known variously as "El Orgullo de Mindanao" (The Pride of Mindanao), nicknamed
the "City of Flowers," and affectionately called by Zamboangueños as "Zamboanga Hermosa" Chavacano/Spanish for "Beautiful Zamboanga." Zamboanga City was formerly a part of the
Commonwealth Era Moro Province of Mindanao. Its ancient inhabitants were vassals of the
Sultanate of Sulu and North Borneo.
Zamboanga City brings its best foot forward during the popular Fiesta Pilar, celebrated in honor
of the city's patron saint, La Nuestra Senora del Pilar de Zaragoza Our Lady of the Pillar of
Zaragoza, Spain. A statue honoring the saint is prominently embossed above the façade on the
eastern wall of the meter-thick walled fort called El Real Fuerza de Nuestra Señora del Pilar de
Zaragoza. This Spanish military fort was built on June 23, 1635, by the Spanish Jesuit priest Fr.
Melchor de Vera in defense against pirates and slave raiders. Zamboanga City is one of the oldest
cities in the country and is the most Hispanized.
Moreover, Día de Zamboanga (Day of Zamboanga) is celebrated every February 26 it was the day
when Zamboanga was declared as a chartered city under the Commonwealth Government.
C. ORGANIZATION OF THE REPORT
This paper is organized into five chapters. After this introductory chapter, Chapter Two provides
the situation assessment of the tourism of Zamboanga City; this includes the global and
international trends, national trends, and the current situation of tourism in the city. Analysis of
the issues and problems that the tourism of the City of Zamboanga is facing is discussed in the
Chapter Three. Lastly, the suggested tourism strategies will be presented in Chapter Four. This
study is delimited by the online resources about Zamboanga City and Zamboanga Peninsula
Region.
Agabao, J., Delos Ama, M. and Labaupa, M. 2019
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SITUATIONAL ASSESSMENT
A.
GLOBAL AND INTERNATI ONAL TRENDS
World @ A Glance (Emmer, 2018)
 Economist are predicting softening of the US Economy
 According to the Conference Board the global economy will grow 3.1% in 2019 and GNP
growth will slow in key markets such as Europe (1.9%) and Japan (0.9%). U.S. companies
will not only struggle with exports to China but in mature economies around the world.
 US – China relations will remain shaky
 The Technology of the future will be 5G, be ready to go virtual reality
 Bots will revolutionize customer service
 E Commerce grows at a torrid pace
 Business will continue to feel the pain of the fill employment and higher labor costs
World Tourism @ A Glance (Kutschera, 2018)
 Last minute bookings are increasing – 39% of the sample group booked 1 to 3 hours
before arrival but advance booking is preferred over multi day tour.
 Tourists are visiting more new destinations and requesting new experiences.
 Ecological and educational tours are in demand and so are SKIP THE LINE tours.
 Travellers are enjoying local experiences with history and culture; demand for adventure
remains high
Asian Tourism @ A Glance (Alampay, 2019)
 82% of Asian international trips are holiday trips
• 23% of holiday trips to sun-and-beach destinations
• Holiday trips to city-destinations grew by 9%
• Multi-destination tours declined slightly
 Changing profile of the Chinese outbound market
• Millennials now comprise 60% of market
• More than 50% are independent travelers
• Gradual increase in international travelers from 2nd- and 3rd-tier cities (mostly
package tourists)
More About Asian Travel Tourism Market (Check-in Asia, 2017)
 China’s tourism juggernaut is transforming the travel sector from top to bottom and not
because of the 145M outbound travelers and 4.8 billion domestic trips this year.
 Emerging India. The UNWTO predicted that by 2020, Indian travelers will total 50M.
 In SEA, Malaysia, Thailand and Indonesia local tourists take advantage of competitive LCC
sectors to enjoy long weekends and holidays. South Korea increased domestic travel from
35-38M between 2011 and 2015. Airbnb went into partnership with All Nippon Airways
and Peach Aviation to promote domestic travel in Japan
 Diversity of Destinations, there is opportunity in the shifting demographics. China, India
and SEA are obvious choice for destination marketers.
Agabao, J., Delos Ama, M. and Labaupa, M. 2019
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Global Tourism in Numbers
 International tourist arrivals have grown from 25 million globally in 1950 to 669 million in
2000 and reached 1 billion in 2012. In 2017, international tourist arrivals grew by a
remarkable 7 percent, recording a total of 1.3 billion. 2018 is expected to post an ave.
growth of 4 to 5% which is higher than the 3.8% growth projected by UNWTO (Horwarth
HTL, 2018).
 Global trends show that the future of tourism is shifting to Asia with the future BIG
markets coming from this region. With the Experiential Trend this part of the country can
offer more (UNWTO, 2018).
 Data below is saying 55% of tourists travels to for recreation. Asia came second in arrivals
generating 25% of the total world traveler’s arrival next to Europe only.
 South-East Asia enjoyed the highest growth of all Asian subregions, with an additional
nine million international tourists in 2017 (UNWTO, 2018).
 Current trend of travelers that are expected to grow in the coming years are solo travel,
eco travel, bleisure that is becoming millennial in nature and local experience tours. These
market segments open opportunities for SEA destinations (Revfine, ND).
 The large majority of international travel takes place within travellers’ own regions
(intraregional tourism). It was posted that 4 out of 5 tourists travel within their region
(UNWTO, 2018).
Figure 6 Source: World Tourism Organization
Agabao, J., Delos Ama, M. and Labaupa, M. 2019
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Figure 7 Source: World Tourism Organization
The trend is going towards Asia, The Chinese and the Indian Market present huge growth potential in
terms of tourist receipts, Asia needs to be market ready. Technology has bridged the gap between
continents, so distance is simply relative to time that people have or to their disposable income. Global
Tourism is robust, and travel is no longer a status quo for the rich and famous, it has become accessible
and everyone have equal opportunity for all tourism products because of that the industry has become
highly competitive. There is a need for niche targeting for service providers to ensure quality of service
and product. Lastly, don’t forget to look inwards, local market contributes highly to the tourism industry.
Agabao, J., Delos Ama, M. and Labaupa, M. 2019
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A.
NATIONAL TRENDS
Philippines Political, Economic, Social and/or Technological Drivers of Change

Strong economic growth continues in the Philippines. Strong performer over the years.
Sound policies and a favorable global economic environment have delivered robust
growth, low inflation, and a sustainable debt path (IMF, 2018).
 In 2017, the Philippines was among the top three growth performers in the East Asia
region. Only Vietnam and China performed better. The Philippines growth performance
slightly weakened in 2017 to 6.7 percent year-on-year from 6.9 percent in 2016 (The
World Bank, 2018).
 Philippine Foreign Policy for security prospects in the country, Defense Secretary Delfin
N. Lorenzana said President Rodrigo R. Duterte pursues an independent foreign policy
that will allow the Philippines continue to deepen its security ties with the United States,
but at the same time forge closer relations with China, and other regional powers like
India and Russia. “Engaging more partners does not mean we are letting go of old friends,”
he said (Aguinaldo, 2018).
 PEACE AND ORDER. It’s better to think of "safe” in relative terms. There is an active travel
warning for the Philippines, but only for some regions. Most other parts of the nation are
generally considered as safe as other places in Southeast Asia. Having said that The Global
Peace Index, compiled by the Institute for Economics and Peace, is a measure of the
relative peacefulness of 162 nations worldwide (representing more than 99% of the
world’s population). The Index measures peace based on 22 qualitative and quantitative
indicators including ongoing domestic and international conflict; societal safety and
security (including crime rates); and militarization. For the 2018 study, the Philippines
ranked 137 out of 163 countries (Folger, 2018).
Agabao, J., Delos Ama, M. and Labaupa, M. 2019
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Philippine Tourism Outlook
 There is a 7.9% increase in tourist arrivals for Q1 of 2019.
 South Korea remains the top source market with 519,584 tourist arrivals compared to last
year’s 477,087.
 Chinese market ranking second with 463,804 tourists, 24.87 percent higher than the
previous year’s tally of 371,429.
 3rd is United States, registering 293,780 visitors, up by 3.10 percent from last year.
 Completing the top 12 markets for the three-month period are: Japan, 177,769; Taiwan,
77,908; Australia, 73,147; Canada, 72,352; United Kingdom, 53,402; Singapore, 39,484;
Malaysia, 37,651; India, 36,275; and Germany, 33,725 ( (Rocamora, PH tourist arrivals up
by 7.59% in Q1 2019, 2019)
 Taiwanese with the highest posted increase while Indian market (one of the big markets
to watch out for) posted a growth of 1.52%. currently in the 13TH spot.
 DOT Sec. Puyat said the DOT remains committed with its objective to establish the
Philippines as a "quality destination" in the region, To ensure that we get these done, the
DOT is implementing a convergence approach where the Department works in
partnership with other national government agencies (Rocamora, PH tourist arrivals up
by 7.59% in Q1 2019, 2019).
 The govt is also encouraging tourism stakeholders to embrace gender responsive
industry.
 There is also a focus on manpower development, DOT Sec. Puyat in another article was
quoted to say “DOT will continue to empower Filipino tourism workers in partnership with
the Technical Education and Skills Development Authority (TESDA) and the Tourism
Industry Board Foundation Inc. (TIBFI) (Rocamora, PHs Sustainable Tourism Invests in
Destinations, People: DOT, 2019).
Philippines Tourism Trends
 DYI is still popular with the internet access the is available now, small groups prefer to
plan and arrange for their own trips.
 Rehab is becoming a new buzzword in the local tourism industry after the Boracay closure,
local travelers believes that sustainable is the way to go.
 Camping and glamping is slowly generating followers.
 Farm Tourism is a thing.
 Is Pilgrimage a possibility of the Phil. Tourism? The verdict is still out for this at this time.
Agabao, J., Delos Ama, M. and Labaupa, M. 2019
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B.
CURRENT TOURISM SITUATION IN THE REGION
Overview Of the physical and geographical characteristics of the province
Region 9, also known as the Zamboanga Peninsula Region lies at the Southernmost portion of the
Philippine archipelago. Located at the western tip of the island of Mindanao, Zamboanga
Peninsula is strategically situated in close proximity to Sabah, Malaysia, Brunei Darussalam and
Indonesia. Known as Philippines’ gateway to the Brunei-Indonesia-Malaysia-Philippines East
ASEAN Growth Area or BIMP-EAGA (Dept. Trade and Industry, ND).
The region's topography is relatively rugged. About 51% are hilly; some having steeped slopes
and within the elevation range of 100 to more than 1,000 meters above sea level. In terms of
land classification, about 51 per cent is considered alienable and disposable and the remaining
49 per cent is classified as forest land. Almost 60,000 hectares of land that can be developed for
planting crops still remain idle, while around 310,000 hectares of coconut land can be utilized for
multi-cropping and pasture purposes (Dept. Trade and Industry, ND).
Nature also endowed it with so much natural attractions such as white sand beaches, spectacular
waterfalls, dive spots, caves for spelunking, marine sanctuaries and awesome coral formations,
among others (Dept. Trade and Industry, ND).
Overview of the regional and provincial economy
The gross regional domestic product (GRDP) grew 6.3 percent, amounting to approximately
Php197.4-billion in 2018. The economic growth in 2017 has been noted to be only 2.4 percent.
This growth represents figures in 1) agriculture, hunting, forestry and fishing, 2) industry, and 3)
services. The bulk coming from service sector and service sector comprises of transportation,
storage and communication, trade and repair of motor vehicles, motorcycles, personal and
household goods, financial intermediation, real estate, renting and business activities, public
administration and defense, compulsory social security and other services (Sanchez, 2019).
Employment rates also posted positive growth for the city, some indicators of a healthy economy.
Regional tourism performance
In the last five years before the dip in 2017 due to insurgency issues in Zamboanga that required
the government to declare Martial Law tourist arrival in Region 9 has been slowly but positively
Agabao, J., Delos Ama, M. and Labaupa, M. 2019
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REGION 9 Arrivals
1 096 952
561 086
608 812
increased. What should be note
though is that 76% of the arrivals are
in Zamboanga City, Dipolog and
Dapitan.
653 812
370 860
330056
228405
49228
32903
2012
7837
6835
2013
12
051
7 785
2014
12
859
9 080
2015
Philippine Residents
13
11 267
046
2016
4
3 812
612
2017
Non Residents
16 400
830
15
2018
OFWs
The Current Environment for Tourism in the City
Overview of the city economy
Zamboanga City is also dubbed as the Sardines Capital of the Philippines, for 9 out of 12 sardine
companies in the country are produced here it exports an estimated 16M worth of Sardines.
Located on the tip portion of Zamboanga Peninsula, it has become the docking port of sea vessels.
Zamboanga City together with Cebu and Southern Luzon produces seaweeds. Further,
Zamboanga was also one of three Special Economic Zones outside of Luzon.
The Department of Tourism has selected Zamboanga City as a flagship tourism destination in
Zamboanga Peninsula.
Access to the destination
How to get to Zamboanga City
Zamboanga City is pretty much accessible from major cities in the Philippines. Daily flights to and
from Manila, Cebu and Davao are available.
Ferry services from Manila, Cebu and even Sandakan, Malaysia are available on a weekly basis.
Zamboanga City can also be reached by land travel. Buses from Cagayan de Oro City, Dipolog,
Pagadian and Ozamis have multiple daily trips. The most common transportation out of
Zamboanga Airport is by jeepney or tricycle. If you know where you are going, just get out of the
main gate and take a jeepney from there and if you prefer to take a tricycle, drivers normally ask
for a fixed / contracted rate.
The most common modes of transportation within the city are jeepneys and tricycles. You can
also rent a van if you are in a group so you can easily move in and out of the city.
Agabao, J., Delos Ama, M. and Labaupa, M. 2019
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Ceres and Rural Transit operate from Zamboanga City Bus Terminal to other parts of Mindanao
and even in the Visayas.
Agabao, J., Delos Ama, M. and Labaupa, M. 2019
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A.
TOURISM ATTRACITON SITES
Zamboanga City
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B.
Sta. Cruz Island
Fort Pilar Shrine and Museum
Paseo del Mar
Zamboanga City Hall
Rizal Park
Metropolitan Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception
Pasonanca Natural Park
Plaza Pershing
Merloquet Falls
Pandilusan Island
Rio Hondo Village
Limpapa Bridge
Victoria Pader Cave
Dulian Falls
Dulian View Deck
Caragasan Beach
El Museo de Zamboanga
Climaco Freedom Park
Parola de Labuan
Pitas Island
Nancy Falls
Yakan Weaving Village
La Vista del Mar
Tetuan Church
Taluksangay Mosque and Village
TOURISM ACTIVITIES
Zamboanga City Tourism may be considered in its infant stages, most of its clusters are available for day
tours only and no formal infrastructure are in place but all them have been listed and are currently part
of different Tourism Products being offered by Tourism Operators in Zamboanga Peninsula as a whole.
There is huge growth potential for these sites for intraregional tourism.
Cluster 1 = Sun and Beach Tourism – the island is well known to be the only island in the Philippines with
Pink Sand. One of the major attractions of the Peninsula. There is no formal lodging available at the
island and currently offered only as a day tour destination.
Cluster 2 = Cultural Tourism – the sites in this cluster offers a peek in the rich historical and cultural
experiences of the both the Malay and Spanish influences in Zamboanga City.
Agabao, J., Delos Ama, M. and Labaupa, M. 2019
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Cluster 3 = Cultural / Educational / Leisure and Entertainment Tourism. Highlight of cluster is the Yakan
Village, Yakan are the indigenous people of nearby Basilan Island, and their woven designs are
characterized by bright colours and geometric designs.
Cluster 4 = Cultural / Natural Tourism – the sites in this cluster offers a wide variety of activities for the
nature lovers.
Cluster 5 & 6 = Sun and Beach Tourism. Pitas Island Beach for adventure-seekers. Within the area are 11
islands other with equally crystal-clear waters. Motorized boats are available for island hopping. Enjoy
snorkeling or just swimming in its clear waters.
Cluster 7 and 8 = Nature Tourism. Enjoy a road trip and see the rustic scenery that abounds Zamboanga.
C.
OTHER TOURISM ENTERP RISES
There are 6 travel agencies and 1 tourist transport operator which was accredited by DOT in
Zamboanga City namely:
- Air Savings Travel and Tours
- Emerald Travel and Tours
- Four Bro's and I Events and Travel
- Happy Campers Tour and Leisure
- iTravel Tourist Lane
- Terrene Tours and Travel
- Asia's Latin City Transport Services Corp.
There are also available community guides, local guides, and eco guides in Pasay Drive, San Roque
and Rosa Village, Pasonanca in Zamboanga City.
Hotels and Resorts have been a place for events and conventions in Zamboanga City, however
the most well-known and DOT accredited MICE establishment in the city is the Marcian Business
Center and Palacio Del Sur.
Moreover, there are a lot of restaurants available in the city but only 14 are DOT accredited. Such
restaurants offer local and international cuisines. Likewise, the famous local cuisines in the city
are: knickerbocker, satti, lokot-lokot, pianono from tsokolate, chicalang, sulu/tausug native
cuisines, and curacha in alavar sauce. The Sulu/Tusug Native Cuisines or collectively called
“Bangbang Sug” is available in Dennis Coffee Garden and Bay Tal Mal, while the Curacha in Alavar
Sauce is available in Alavar Seafood Restaurant. Local cuisines are more famous than
international cuisines, nevertheless Harley’s Food + Craft Beer is one of the well-known
restaurants that serves Asian Halal food with a pub serving an array of local craft beer from
Mindanao.
Agabao, J., Delos Ama, M. and Labaupa, M. 2019
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Shopping centers are also available in the city such as malls like SM MindPro and KCC Mall de
Zamboanga, and souvenir and specialty shops like the Canelar Barter Trade Center, Angie's Yakan
Handloom Weaving, Dela Cruz Pearls and Fine Jewelries Corp., and Mang Isto Chili Garlic Sauce.
D.
TOURISM INSTITUTIONS
Tourism Offices
Zamboanga City Tourism Office
Department of Tourism Information Center and Regional Office (Zamboanga City)
Regional Director, Myra Paz Valderrosa-Abubakar
Tourism-Related Associations
Hotel and Restaurant Association of Zamboanga City (HRAZC)
Asosacion de Guia Turistico del Zamboanga (Tour Guides Association of Zamboanga)
Academic Institutions
Pillar College and Universidad de Zamboanga offers tourism courses in the city. Moreover,
tourism and hospitality courses are offered in some of the senior high school in
Zamboanga City as well as TESDA training institutions.
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Last 2017, a 10-day Tourism Industry Skills Program jointly undertaken by the tourism
stakeholders and the Department of Tourism (DOT) was conducted.
E. TOURISM DEMAND
Trends in Visitor Arrivals
Visitor arrivals increase in Zamboanga City because of the Sta. Cruz Pink Island along with the
Eleven Islands. Also, Zamboanga City is one of the major hosts of seminars, conventions and
events in Zamboanga Peninsula and Mindanao, that is why one of the tourism trends in the city
is MICE.
Market Profile and Segmentation
According to the 2018 Annual Report of the Department of Tourism – Zamboanga Peninsula, the
greatest number of visitor arrivals are Filipinos with a number of 489,739. Moreover, next to
Filipinos are Asian tourists mostly from East Asia and Southeast Asia. There are less than 2,000
Tourists from America, Europe, and Australia and the Pacific.
Agabao, J., Delos Ama, M. and Labaupa, M. 2019
17
Table 1 Visitor Arrivals for 2018 Source: DOT Zamboanga Peninsula Annual Report (2018)
Country of Residence
No. of Arrivals
Country of Residence
No. of Arrivals
Philippines
489,739
Canada
275
Indonesia
1,118
USA
766
Malaysia
1,535
Belgium
11
Singapore
136
France
54
Thailand
131
Germany
68
Vietnam
63
Luxembourg
5
China
1,419
Netherlands
2
Hong Kong
131
Switzerland
16
Japan
329
United Kingdom
82
Korea
1,260
Italy
8
Taiwan
55
Australia
280
India
341
New Zealand
58
Saudi Arabia
743
Total of Guest Arrivals
513,995
Table 2 Occupancy Rate and Length of Stay for 2018 Source: DOT Zamboanga Peninsula Annual Report (2018)
NO. OF ROOMS OCCUPIED
105,892
NO. OF ROOMS AVAILABLE
11,736
TOTAL GUEST NIGHTS
233,672
AVERAGE OCCUPANCY RATE
30%
AVERAGE LENGTH OF STAY
2.2
Most tourists go to Zamboanga City because of the leisure activities and MICE. The city being the
industrial center and economic zone of the region, most of the seminars and other events are
held here, which it attracts visitors who are attending this kind of events. Likewise, leisure tourists
come to Zamboanga City because the famous Sta. Cruz Pink Sand Beach and the other enchanting
islands with its crystal clear water, island hopping, and other water activities.
Agabao, J., Delos Ama, M. and Labaupa, M. 2019
18
Destination marketing activities of the city
Figure 8 Zamboanga City Tourism Ad Campaign 1 Source: Blog Folio of Ced Zabala
Zamboanga City launches its new advertising campaign at the 24th Philippine Travel Mart at the
SMX Convention Center in Pasay City last September 2013. This ad campaign was used to invite
visitors and locals alike to zoom in again and take a closer look at the many reasons why people
love Zamboanga and why many calls it their home. This new campaign helps Zamboangueños to
share a piece of Zamboanga that they truly love. This ad campaign also tells the visitors to Zoom
In to its diversity. Also, using the hashtag #ZoomInZamboanga in their Instagram photos,
Facebook status and tweets, and that tells them what makes Zamboanga be their next
destination.
The Zamboanga City Tourism Office promotes the tourism of the city in various ways. For one,
they use social media such as their Facebook page ‘Zoom In: Zamboanga City’ as a platform to
advertise the events and attractions in the city. They also created a Vlog competition for locals
as well as tourists to promote the tourism of the city. The city tourism office also joins the
Philippine Travel Mart (PTM) and other travel conventions to let people know more about
Zamboanga City and make it their next destination. Other promotional activities include video ad
campaign thru YouTube, posters, blogs, brochures and other promotional materials.
Agabao, J., Delos Ama, M. and Labaupa, M. 2019
19
Figure 9 Zamboanga City Tourism Facebook Page
Figure 10 Vlog Competition Poster
Agabao, J., Delos Ama, M. and Labaupa, M. 2019
20
Figure 11 City Tourism Brochure
Agabao, J., Delos Ama, M. and Labaupa, M. 2019
21
ANALYSIS
A. TOURISM CIRCUIT MAPPING
Figure 12 Proposed Zamboanga City Tourism Clusters
There are seven (7) proposed tourism clusters for Zamboanga City Cluster 1 is the Grande Santa
Crus Island Cluster; Cluster 2 or the Zamboanga Poblacion; Cluster 3 or the Yakan Area Cluster;
Cluster 4 or the Ecotourism Cluster; Cluster 5 or the Dulian Cluster; Cluster 6 of the Pitas Island
Cluster and; Cluster 7 or the Limpapa Bridge or the Parola de Labuan Cluster.
Agabao, J., Delos Ama, M. and Labaupa, M. 2019
22
Figure 13 Cluster 1 Grande Santa Cruz Island Cluster 1 is the Grande Santa Crus Island Cluster is four kilometers away from the mainland and
6 kilometers away from the Airport. It is also about 16 kilometers away from the Island of Basilan. It is composed of two attractions, the
Grande Santa Cruz Island and the Little Sant Cruz Island or islet.
Figure 14 Cluster 2 or the Zamboanga Poblacion Cluster. Cluster 2 or the Zamboanga Poblacion Cluster, is also the city’s tourism center. This
is where the main gateway of the city and one of the major gateways of the Zamboanga Peninsula is situated, the Zamboanga International
Airport. Another gateway which the Port of Zamboanga is is also located within this cluster. This is also were most of the tourist attractions
in Zamboanga City is concentrated such as the Fort Pilar Shrine, Paseo Del Mark, Plaza Pershing, National Museum and Rio Hondo. The city’s
tourism office as well as the DOT regional office is located here. There are about 6 accommodation establishments located in this cluster.
Agabao, J., Delos Ama, M. and Labaupa, M. 2019
23
Figure 15 Cluster 3 or the Yakan Area Cluster Cluster 3 or the Yakan Area Cluster seats along the southern coastal road of the city. The highlight
of this cluster is the Yakan Village, the Caragsan Beach and some modest beach front resorts.
Figure 5 Cluster 4 or the Ecotourism Cluster. This cluster comprises most of the city’s ecotourism sites such as the Pasonanca Park, AbongAbong Park, Mt. Pulong Bato, Muruk Bike and Joggers Haven and the Dulian View Deck. This is also were one of the biggest and high-end hotel
and convention is location the Astoria Hotel and Convention Center. This cluster is approximately 4 to 6 kilometers away from gateway and
the town center.
Agabao, J., Delos Ama, M. and Labaupa, M. 2019
24
Figure 16 Cluster 5 or Pitas Island Cluster is one of the city’s less developed areas. It comprises one potential attraction, which is the Pitas
Island and one accommodation establishment. It is approximately 30 kilometers away from gateway and town center. North of this circuit
are a few more less known white sand beached island such as the Bisaya – Bisaya beach and the Baong Island Beach.
Figure 17 Cluster 6 or the Dulian Falls Circuit is comprised of two ecotourism sites, the Dulian Falls and the Merloquet Falls. There are no
accommodation establishment in this area, and it is approximately 30 and 50 kilometers away from the town center.
Agabao, J., Delos Ama, M. and Labaupa, M. 2019
25
Figure 18 Cluster 7 is comprised of 2 more potential attractions, the Parola de Labuan and the Limpapa Bridge. It is approximately 30 to 35
kilometers away from the town center and gateway.
B. MARKET ANALYSIS
Market segmentation and targeting
Foreign and future visitor arrivals. Key Market Source are the Top Foreign Markets Koreans,
Chinese and Europeans. OFWs and Domestic Tourists.
Agabao, J., Delos Ama, M. and Labaupa, M. 2019
26
C. KEY ISSUES AND CONSTRAINTS
I. COMPARATIVE & COMPETITIVE STRENGTHS AND OPPORTUNITIES OF ZAMBOANGA CITY AS A
TOURIST DESTINATION
The Strengths






Zamboanga is a city of rich Hispanic culture.
Tourism is one of the contributor’s economic growth in the city and region
Zamboanga International Airport as sole international point of entry in the region
Improved road quality
Attractions has seen the increased share of the tourism pie
Inadequate local transportation system
The Opportunities




Government gearing up the region to become the country’s Southern Gateway for Muslim
Countries in Asia and Middle East, New Zealand and Australian Bloc
Vigorous public spending and stronger partnerships with private sector are being forged
to promote and develop existing and potential tourist destinations and cultural events
Implementation of more road projects leading to tourism destinations and industries
through DOT-DPWH TRIPC
The Government is pushing modernization, rehabilitation and improvement of airport
and seaport
II. KEY ISSUES AND CONSTRAINTS AFFECTIVE TOURISM IN ZAMBOANGA CITY
The major key issue for tourism in Zamboanga City is the relatively low tourism activity,
compared to other provinces in the Zamboanga Peninsula despite the abundance of its
tourist attractions and presence of an international airport due to the following factors:








Minimal tourism investments
Unfavorable business climate
Lack of skilled workers. There is a mismatch between supply and demand of needed
tourism industry worker.
Resources with potential for tourism are given less priority for tourism development.
Lack of modern equipment and facilities in airports and seaports
Inadequate local transportation system
Lack of marketing projects to promote positive news features about Zamboanga City
Volatile peace order situation in the region/neighboring areas;
Agabao, J., Delos Ama, M. and Labaupa, M. 2019
27


Overuse of natural resources as sources of livelihood (i.e kaingin, illegal settlements
in watersheds, destructive fishing methods and mining activities)
The mining activities is considered as a threat to the tourism resources and the natural
resources in general of Zamboanga City;
Agabao, J., Delos Ama, M. and Labaupa, M. 2019
28
TOURISM STRATEGY
A. ZAMBOANGA CITY TOURI SM GOALS AND OBJECTIVES
Increase the Tourism Activity in
Zamboanga City
To increase Tourism Investments,
encouraging small and medium
scale enterprises to diversify
economic activities
To improve
overall
business
environment
and provide
investment
incentives
To Provide
training and
livelihood
assistance
for
displaced
and
underemplo
yed workers
To
Strengthen
peace
building and
conflict
transformation
capabilities
of actors
and
institutions
To give high priority on tourism
development and look at it as a
strong and sustainable economic
driver for the city
To upgrade
the airport
and seaport
facilities to
meet
internationa
l standards
To
implement
more road
projects and
upgrade
seaports
and seaport
facilities for
safe and
efficient
transport of
goods and
services
Pursue a city
or regional
marketing
program to
promote the
area as a
source of
quality and
competitive
tourism
products and
services to
enhance the
area’s positive
international
image
Promote
ecotourism
in the area
B. STRATEGIC TOURISM DEVELOPMENT FRAMEWORK
OBJECTIVE
SUCCESS
INDICATORS
STRATEGIES
TIMELINE
GOAL 1: To increase Tourism
Investments, encouraging small
and medium scale enterprises to
diversify economic activities
number of new
tourism
enterprises in the
city
Promote Small and Medium Scale
Industries to diversify economic
activities in the rural areas
Year 3
Objective 1. To improve overall
business environment and provide
investment incentives
New investment
policy
Simplify and rationalize the system to
improve the business environment
Year 1
Objective 2. To Provide training
and livelihood assistance for
Agabao, J., Delos Ama, M. and Labaupa, M. 2019
Number of
trained
employees in
Create a holistic investment package
for tourism investors
Conduct skills training for tourism
workers and unemployed
Year 1
29
displaced and underemployed
workers
tourism sector
and trained
Number of
employed in
tourism induries
Conduct of livelihood Assistance
Projects/ Trainings for various sectoral
groups
Objective 3. To Strengthen peace
building and conflict
transformation capabilities of
actors and institutions
new
policies/program
on tourism safety
and security
Implement a vigilant program
especially among tourism workers and
host communities through training and
incentive programs and incentive
programs that should deter
unscrupulous activities that can
threaten safety and security
Year 2
Goal 2. To give high priority on
tourism development and look at it
as a strong and sustainable
economic driver for the city
Number of tour
packages and
promotion
activities
Sustain a more focused and aggressive
promotion campaign to expand
existing and emerging market
Year 2
Objective 4. To upgrade the airport
and seaport facilities to meet
international standards
Improved
facilities
Seek public and private partnership to
improve local transportation, airport
and seaport facilities, manpower
training, and product development
Year 5
Objective 5. To implement more
road projects and upgrade seaports
and seaport facilities for safe and
efficient transport of goods and
services and Develop roll on-roll-off
(RoRo)
Improved access
to tourism sites
Implementation of road projects
leading to leading to tourism
attractions and industries
Year 4
Objective 6. Pursue a city or
regional marketing program to
promote the area as a source of
quality and competitive tourism
products and services to enhance
the area’s positive international
image
Number of visitor
arrivals
There shall also be continuous
promotion of products to culturebased markets, i.e. halal.
Year 2
Objective 7. To Promote
ecotourism in the area
Number of tour
packages
incorporating
ecotourism
Agabao, J., Delos Ama, M. and Labaupa, M. 2019
Identify and develop new tourism
products conduct of Market
Opportunity Mapping, Inbound
Business Matching, and Offshore
Business Matching activities.
Maximize tourism potentials and
responding to critical infrastructure
and environmental concerns to reduce
degradation i.e ecotourism products
Year 3
30
No physical
damage or
alteration to
particular
biodiversity
C. TOURISM DEVELOPMENT STRATEGIES
ACTION PLAN
OBJECTIVE
TIMEFRAME
FOR
DEVELOPMENT
PROGRAMS AND
PROJECTS
RESOURCE
NEEDED
RESPONSIBLE
AGENCY
Objective 1. To improve
overall business
environment and
provide investment
incentives
Year 3 to 5
Formulation of Tourism
Investment Code for
Zamboanga City
Fund for research,
committee
meetings, and
writeshops
Sangguniang
Panglungsod,
Planning
Division,
Tourism
Office,
stakeholders
Objective 2. To Provide
training and livelihood
assistance for displaced
and underemployed
workers
Year 1
Tourism Skills Training for
tourism workers, OSY,
unemployed, etc.
Fund for training
provider and
resource
speakers, various
training needs
DOT, DTI,
MSWDO, LGU,
stakeholders
Fund for training
provider and
resource
speakers, various
training needs
PNP, DOT,
LGU,
Stakeholders
Fund for Site
visits, workshops,
familiarization
tours, various
promotional and
marketing
activities
LGU, DOT,
private tour
operators and
attraction
operators,
media outlets
Livelihood Assistance
Project
Livelihood trainings
Objective 3. To
Strengthen peace
building and conflict
transformation
capabilities of actors
and institutions
Year 2
Goal 2. To give high
priority on tourism
development and look
at it as a strong and
sustainable economic
driver for the city
Year 2
Objective 4. To upgrade
the airport and seaport
Year 5
Formulation of Tourism
Safety and Security Plan
Conduct of capacity
buildings for tourism
workers
Development of tour
packages
Tourism promotion and
marketing campaign
Agabao, J., Delos Ama, M. and Labaupa, M. 2019
Lobby for the
improvement and
Sangguniang
Panlungsod,
31
facilities to meet
international standards
development of airport,
seaport, etc.
LGU, DOT,
DOTC, etc.
Sangguniang
Panlungsod,
LGU, DOT,
DOTC, etc.
Objective 5. To
implement more road
projects and upgrade
seaports and seaport
facilities for safe and
efficient transport of
goods and services and
Develop roll on-roll-off
(RoRo)
Year 4
Lobby for the funding of
road projects and seaport
facilities
Objective 6. Pursue a
city or regional
marketing program to
promote the area as a
source of quality and
competitive tourism
products and services to
enhance the area’s
positive international
image
Year 2
Tourism mapping
Objective 7. To
Promote ecotourism in
the area
Year 3
Product development
workshops with operators
Marketing and
promotional campaign
Ecotourism sites mapping
Ecotourism product
development workshops
with operators
Fund for Site
visits, workshops,
familiarization
tours, various
promotional and
marketing
activities
LGU, DOT,
private tour
operators and
attraction
operators,
media outlets
Fund for Site
visits, workshops,
familiarization
tours, various
promotional and
marketing
activities
LGU, DOT,
DENR, private
tour operators
and attraction
operators,
media outlets
Marketing and
promotional campaign
Agabao, J., Delos Ama, M. and Labaupa, M. 2019
32
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Alampay, R. (2019). Global & National Tourism Trends. Quezon City, Philippines.
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https://www.check-in.asia/10-trending-takeaways-asian-tourism/
Dept. Trade and Industry. (ND). Profile of Region 9. Retrieved from Dept. Trade and Industry:
https://www.dti.gov.ph/regions/region9/r9-profile-of-region
Emmer, M. (2018, December 14). 19 Trends That Will Shape The World In 2019. Retrieved from Forbes:
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34
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