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CCNA Routing and Switching:
Scaling Networks
Instructor Lab Manual
This document is exclusive property of Cisco Systems, Inc. Permission is granted
to print and copy this document for non-commercial distribution and exclusive
use by instructors in the CCNA 5RXWLQJDQG6ZLWFKLQJ6FDOLQJ1HWZRUNV course
as part of an official Cisco Networking Academy Program.
Network by Design (Instructor Version)
Instructor Note: Red font color or Gray highlights indicate text that appears in the instructor copy only.
Objective
Explain the need to design a hierarchical network that is scalable.
Instructor Note: This activity can be completed by individuals or groups of two students. It can then be shared with
another individual, group, class, or the instructor.
Scenario
Your employer is opening a new, branch office.
You have been reassigned to the site as the network administrator where your job will be to design and maintain
the new branch network.
The network administrators at the other branches used the Cisco three-layer hierarchical model when designing
their networks. You decide to use the same approach.
To get an idea of what using the hierarchical model can do to enhance the design process, you research the
topic.
Resources

World Wide Web access

Word processing software
Directions
Step 1: Use the Internet to find information and take notes about the Cisco three-layer
hierarchical model. The site should include information about the:
a. Access layer
b. Distribution layer
c.
Core layer
Step 2: In your research, make sure to include:
a. A simple definition of each hierarchical layer
b. Three concise facts about each layer
c.
Network device capabilities needed at each layer
d. A detailed graphic that shows a full, three-layer hierarchical model design
Step 3: Create a simple table to organize and share your research with another student, group,
the class, or instructor.
Suggested Activity Example Solution: (information based on The Cisco Three-Layered
Hierarchical Model and LAN Design)
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 1 of 3
Network by Design
Access Layer
Definition
Facts
Network Device
Features
This hierarchical layer connects local clients to the network. It is sometimes called the
desktop layer.
At this level:

Network equipment works with the distribution and core layers to send and
receive transmissions from clients and users.

Collision domains are created using switches.

Switches can be configured to filter MAC addresses and share bandwidth.

Port security

VLANs functionality

Fast Ethernet/Gigabit Ethernet transmissions

Power over Ethernet (PoE)

Link aggregation

Quality of service (QoS)
Distribution Layer
Definition
Facts
Network Device
Features
This hierarchical layer provides policy-based, decision-making network connectivity to
the access layer below it and the core layer above it.
At this level:

Firewalls and access lists can be placed.

Link aggregation can occur.

Broadcast and multicast domain boundaries are created.

Layer 3 support

High forwarding rate

Gigabit Ethernet/10 Gigabit Ethernet

Redundant components

Security policies/access control lists

Link aggregation

Quality of service (QoS)
Core Layer
Definition
Facts
This hierarchical layer is the backbone of the network. It includes high-powered routers
and switches that use high-speed cabling, such as fiber optics. The main function of this
layer is reliable delivery of network packets.
At this level:

All other layers of the hierarchical design model are supported.
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 2 of 3
Network by Design
Network Device
Features

Load balancing is desired as an integral service.

Efficient, fast, reliable data paths ensure fast network transmissions.

Layer 3 support

Very high forwarding rate

Gigabit Ethernet/10 Gigabit Ethernet

Redundant components

Link aggregation

Quality of service (QoS)
Three-Layer
Hierarchical
Design Graphic
Identify elements of the model that map to IT-related content:

Network design

Cisco three-layer hierarchical model

Access layer

Distribution layer

Core layer
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 3 of 3
Lab – Selecting Switching Hardware (Instructor Version)
Instructor Note: Red font color or Gray highlights indicate text that appears in the instructor copy only.
Objectives
Part 1: Explore Cisco Switch Products
Part 2: Select an Access Layer Switch
Part 3: Select a Distribution/Core Layer Switch
Background / Scenario
As a Network Engineer, you are part of a team that selects appropriate devices for your network. You need to
consider the network requirements for the company as they migrate to a converged network. This converged
network supports voice over IP (VoIP), video streaming, and expansion of the company to support a larger
customer base.
For a small- to medium-sized company, Cisco hierarchical network design suggests only using a two-tier LAN
design. This design consists of an access layer and a collapsed core/distribution layer. Network switches
come in different form factors, and with various features and functions. When selecting a switch, the team
must choose between fixed configuration or modular configuration, and stackable or non-stackable switches.
Based on a given set of requirements, you will identify the Cisco switch models and features to support the
requirements. The scope of this lab will limit the switch models to campus LAN only.
Required Resources
PC with Internet access
Part 1: Explore Cisco Switch Products
In Part 1, you will navigate the Cisco website and explore available switch products.
Step 1: Navigate the Cisco website.
At www.cisco.com, a list of available products and information about these products is available.
a. From the home page, click Products & Services > Switches.
Step 2: Explore switch products.
In the Feature Products section, a list of different categories of switches is displayed. In this lab, you will
explore the campus LAN switches. You can click different links to gather information about the different switch
models. On this page, the information is organized in different ways. You can view all available switches by
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 1 of 5
Lab – Selecting Switching Hardware
clicking View All Switches. If you click Compare Series, the switches are organized by types: modular vs.
fixed configuration.
a. Click the heading Campus LAN – Core and Distribution Switches.
List a few models and some of features in the table below.
Model
Catalyst 4500-X
Catalyst 4500E
Uplink Speed
8 x 10 GE (hot
swap module)
1G or 10G
Number of
Ports/Speed
Other Features
Up to 40 1G/10G ports
hot swappable power
supplies, cooling fans and
network modules, 1 RU,
QoS, Fixed configuration
Up to 196 1G ports and
up to 100 10G ports
PoE+, hot swappable power
supplies, cooling fans and
network modules, Modular
configuration
b. Click the heading Campus LAN – Access Switches.
List a few models and some of features in the table below.
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 2 of 5
Lab – Selecting Switching Hardware
Model
Catalyst 2960
Catalyst 3560-X
and 3750-X
c.
Uplink Speed
2x1GE uplink
4x1GE or 10GE
uplink ports
(optional)
Number of
Ports/Speed
Other Features
8, 24, and 48 FE ports
PoE+, advanced QoS, ratelimiting, ACLs, IPv6,
multicast, Fixed
configuration
12, 24, and 48 FE/GE
ports
QoS, PoE+, hot swappable
power supplies, cooling fans
and network modules,
StackPower and StackWise,
Fixed configuration
Click the heading Campus LAN – Compact Switches.
List a few models and some of features in the table below.
Model
Catalyst 3560-C
Catalyst 2960-C
Uplink Speed
2x1GE uplink
2x1GE uplink
Number of Ports/Speed
Other Features
8-12 FE/GE ports
Collocate with users,
PoE+, Fixed configuration
8-12 FE/GE ports
Collocate with users, PoE
/ PoE pass-through, Fixed
configuration
Part 2: Select an Access Layer Switch
The main function of an access layer switch is to provide network access to end user devices. This switch
connects to the core/distribution layer switches. Access switches are usually located in the intermediate
distribution frame (IDF). An IDF is mainly used for managing and interconnecting the telecommunications
cables between end user devices and a main distribution frame (MDF). There are typically multiple IDFs with
uplinks to a single centralized MDF.
An access switch should have the following capabilities: low cost per switch port, high port density, scalable
uplinks to higher layers, and user access functions and resiliency. In Part 2, you will select an access switch
based on the requirements set by the company. You have reviewed and become familiar with Cisco switch
product line.
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 3 of 5
Lab – Selecting Switching Hardware
a. Company A requires a replacement access switch in the wiring closet. The company requires the switch
to support VoIP and multicast, accommodate future growth of users and increased bandwidth usage. The
switch must support a minimum of 35 current users and have a high-speed uplink. List a few of models
that meet those requirements.
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
Answers will vary. 2960-S or 3560-X with 48 port capacity and at least two 1G/10G uplinks
b. Company B would like to extend services to a conference room on an as-needed basis. The switch will be
placed on the conference room table, and switch security is a priority.
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
Answers will vary. A Compact LAN switch such as the 2960-C
Part 3: Select a Distribution/Core Layer Switch
The distribution/core switch is the backbone of the network for the company. A reliable network core is of
paramount importance for the function of the company. A network backbone switch provides both adequate
capacity for current and future traffic requirements and resilience in the event of failure. They also require high
throughput, high availability, and advanced quality of service (QoS). These switches usually reside in the
main wiring closet (MDF) along with high speed servers, routers, and the termination point of your ISP.
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 4 of 5
Lab – Selecting Switching Hardware
a. Company C will replace a backbone switch in the next budget cycle. The switch must provide redundancy
features to minimize possible downtime in the event that an internal component fails. What features can
accommodate these requirements for the replacement switch?
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
Answers will vary. Hotswappable power supplies, cooling fans and network modules, redundant power
supplies, StackWise and StackPower
b. Which Cisco Catalyst switches would you recommend?
____________________________________________________________________________________
Answers will vary.3750-X, 4500-X, 4500-E
c.
As Company C grows, high speed, such as 10 GB Ethernet, up to 8 uplink ports, and a modular
configuration for the switch will become necessary. Which switch models would meet the requirement?
____________________________________________________________________________________
Answers will vary. 4500, 6500
Reflection
What other factors should be considered during the selection process aside from network requirements and
costs?
_______________________________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________________
Space/form factor, power consumption, modular upgrade, longevity of switch, IOS features for the switch
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 5 of 5
Layered Network Design Simulation (Instructor Version)
Instructor Note: Red font color or Gray highlights indicate text that appears in the instructor copy only.
Objective
Explain the need to design a hierarchical network that is scalable.
Instructor Note: This activity is can be completed by individual students or groups of two students. It can then be
shared with another individual, group, class, or the instructor.
Scenario
As the network administrator for a very small network, you want to prepare a simulated-network presentation for
your branch manager to explain how the network currently operates.
The small network includes the following equipment:

One 2911 series router

One 3560 switch

One 2960 switch

Four user workstations (PCs or laptops)

One printer
For further instructions on how to complete this activity, open the accompanying PDF.
Resources

Packet Tracer software
Directions
Step 1: Create a simple network topology using Packet Tracer software. Place the devices at
the appropriate levels of the Cisco three-layer hierarchical model design. Include:
a.
One 2911 series router
b.
One 3560 switch
c.
One 2960 switch
d.
Four user workstations (PCs or laptops)
e.
One printer
Step 2: Using Packet Tracer’s drawing tool and indicate the hierarchical layers with different
color coding and labels:
a.
Access Layer
b.
Distribution Layer
c.
Core Layer
© 2014 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 1 of 5
Layered Network Design Simulation
Step 3: Configure the network and user devices. Check for end-to-end connectivity.
Step 4: Share your configuration and hierarchical network design Packet Tracer file with
another student, group, the class, or the instructor.
Suggested Activity Example Solution:
Instructor Note: In the Packet Tracer simulation, a 2911 Series router is used in the Core Layer of the
network. Normally, a higher-capacity router, such as the Cisco 3800 series routers, would be used at the
Core Layer. Please make students aware of this fact as they work through the activity.
2960 Fixed Switch Configuration:
Cisco_2960_Switch# show running-configuration
version 12.2
no service timestamps log datetime msec
no service timestamps debug datetime msec
no service password-encryption
!
hostname "Cisco 2960 Switch"
!
spanning-tree mode pvst
!
interface FastEthernet0/1
!
(output omitted)
!
© 2014 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 2 of 5
Layered Network Design Simulation
interface GigabitEthernet1/1
!
interface GigabitEthernet1/2
!
interface Vlan1
ip address 192.168.10.2 255.255.255.0
shutdown
!
ip default-gateway 192.168.10.1
!
!
line con 0
!
line vty 0 4
no login
line vty 5 15
no login
!
!
End
3560 Switch Configuration
Cisco_3560_Switch# show running-configuration
version 12.2
no service timestamps log datetime msec
no service timestamps debug datetime msec
no service password-encryption
!
hostname "Cisco 3560 Switch"
!
ip routing
!
spanning-tree mode pvst
!
interface FastEthernet0/1
no switchport
ip address 10.11.48.2 255.255.255.252
duplex auto
speed auto
!
interface FastEthernet0/2
!
<output omitted)
!
interface GigabitEthernet0/1
no switchport
ip address 192.168.10.1 255.255.255.0
© 2014 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 3 of 5
Layered Network Design Simulation
duplex auto
speed auto
!
interface GigabitEthernet0/2
no switchport
ip address 192.168.11.1 255.255.255.0
duplex auto
speed auto
!
interface Vlan1
no ip address
shutdown
!
router rip
version 2
network 10.0.0.0
network 192.168.10.0
network 192.168.11.0
no auto-summary
!
ip classless
!
line con 0
!
line aux 0
!
line vty 0 4
login
line vty 5 15
no login
!
End
2911 Router Configuration
2911_Series_Router# show running-configuration
version 15.1
no service timestamps log datetime msec
no service timestamps debug datetime msec
no service password-encryption
!
hostname "2911 Series Router"
!
license udi pid CISCO2911/K9 sn FTX15248II7
!
spanning-tree mode pvst
!
interface Loopback0
ip address 1.1.1.1 255.255.255.252
© 2014 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 4 of 5
Layered Network Design Simulation
!
interface GigabitEthernet0/0
ip address 10.11.48.1 255.255.255.252
duplex auto
speed auto
!
<output omitted>
!
router rip
version 2
network 10.0.0.0
network 1.0.0.0
no auto-summary
!
ip classless
!
line con 0
!
line aux 0
!
line vty 0 4
login
!
end
Identify elements of the model that map to IT-related content:

Network Design

Cisco Three-Layer Hierarchical Model

Access Layer

Distribution Layer

Core Layer

Network Configuration

Network device show running-configuration command
© 2014 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 5 of 5
Stormy Traffic (Instructor Version)
Instructor Note: Red font color or Gray highlights indicate text that appears in the instructor copy only.
Objective
Explain the purpose of the Spanning Tree Protocol (STP) in a switched LAN environment with redundant switch
links.
Instructor Notes:

Spanning Tree Protocol (STP) and its variations are the focus of this chapter. This modeling activity is
designed to help students realize that a switched network can be shaped using STP or its variations.

This activity can be completed individually, in small groups, or as a class.
Scenario
It is your first day on the job as a network administrator for a small- to medium-sized business. The previous
network administrator left suddenly after a network upgrade took place for the business.
During the upgrade, a new switch was added. Since the upgrade, many employees complain that they are having
trouble accessing the Internet and servers on your network. In fact, most of them cannot access the network at
all. Your corporate manager asks you to immediately research what could be causing these connectivity problems
and delays.
So you take a look at the equipment operating on your network at your main distribution facility in the building.
You notice that the network topology seems to be visually correct and that cables have been connected correctly,
routers and switches are powered on and operational, and switches are connected together to provide backup or
redundancy.
However, one thing you do notice is that all of your switches’ status lights are constantly blinking at a very fast
pace to the point that they almost appear solid. You think you have found the problem with the connectivity issues
your employees are experiencing.
Use the Internet to research STP. As you research, take notes and describe:

Broadcast storm

Switching loops

The purpose of STP

Variations of STP
Complete the reflection questions that accompany the PDF file for this activity. Save your work and be prepared
to share your answers with the class.
Resources

Internet access to the World Wide Web
Reflection
1. What is a definition of a broadcast storm? How does a broadcast storm develop?
_______________________________________________________________________________________
A broadcast storm develops when switches forward traffic out of all ports while looking for a destination for the
traffic. It develops when switches continuously forward traffic between themselves without time to block interfaces
on the switches to create one good path to the destination.
2. What is a definition of a switching loop? What causes a switching loop?
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 1 of 2
Stormy Traffic
_______________________________________________________________________________________
A switching loop forms when redundancy is present on switches and the paths formed create a circle of delivery.
Packets travel endlessly along the redundant paths, particularly with multicast and broadcast traffic. This causes a
myriad of traffic on the network, causing hosts to have problems accessing the network.
3. How can you mitigate broadcast storms and switching loops caused by introducing redundant switches to
your network?
_______________________________________________________________________________________
Implement STP or one of its variations. Create VLANs to limit broadcast domains. Check physical connections to
make sure that cabling is correct so that switches are not perpetuating broadcasts and routing loops within your
network.
4. What is the IEEE standard for STP and some other STP variations, as mentioned in the hyperlinks provided?
_______________________________________________________________________________________
802.1D (STP), 802.1W (RSTP), and 802.1I (MST)
5. In answer to this scenario, what would be your first step (after visually checking your network) to correcting
the described network problem?
_______________________________________________________________________________________
Three answers would be appropriate for this question.

A network protocol analyzer could be used to check and map network traffic, thus identifying what kind of
network problem is present.

Removing the new switch and its cables to isolate the problem might be a troubleshooting step.

Checking each switch to make sure that STP is operational is another possible troubleshooting step.
Identify elements of the model that map to IT-related content:

Spanning Tree Protocol (STP)

Broadcast storms

Switching loops

IEEE STP standards (802.1D, 802.1S, 802.1I)
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 2 of 2
Lab – Building a Switched Network with Redundant Links
(Instructor Version)
Instructor Note: Red font color or Gray highlights indicate text that appears in the instructor copy only.
Topology
Addressing Table
Device
Interface
IP Address
Subnet Mask
S1
VLAN 1
192.168.1.1
255.255.255.0
S2
VLAN 1
192.168.1.2
255.255.255.0
S3
VLAN 1
192.168.1.3
255.255.255.0
Objectives
Part 1: Build the Network and Configure Basic Device Settings
Part 2: Determine the Root Bridge
Part 3: Observe STP Port Selection Based on Port Cost
Part 4: Observe STP Port Selection Based on Port Priority
Background / Scenario
Redundancy increases the availability of devices in the network topology by protecting the network from a
single point of failure. Redundancy in a switched network is accomplished through the use of multiple
switches or multiple links between switches. When physical redundancy is introduced into a network design,
loops and duplicate frames can occur.
The Spanning Tree Protocol (STP) was developed as a Layer 2 loop-avoidance mechanism for redundant
links in a switched network. STP ensures that there is only one logical path between all destinations on the
network by intentionally blocking redundant paths that could cause a loop.
In this lab, you will use the show spanning-tree command to observe the STP election process of the root
bridge. You will also observe the port selection process based on cost and priority.
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 1 of 18
Lab – Building a Switched Network with Redundant Links
Note: The switches used are Cisco Catalyst 2960s with Cisco IOS Release 15.0(2) (lanbasek9 image). Other
switches and Cisco IOS versions can be used. Depending on the model and Cisco IOS version, the
commands available and output produced might vary from what is shown in the labs.
Note: Make sure that the switches have been erased and have no startup configurations. If you are unsure,
contact your instructor.
Instructor Note: Refer to the Instructor Lab Manual for the procedures to initialize and reload devices.
Required Resources

3 Switches (Cisco 2960 with Cisco IOS Release 15.0(2) lanbasek9 image or comparable)

Console cables to configure the Cisco IOS devices via the console ports

Ethernet cables as shown in the topology
Part 1: Build the Network and Configure Basic Device Settings
In Part 1, you will set up the network topology and configure basic settings on the switches.
Step 1: Cable the network as shown in the topology.
Attach the devices as shown in the topology diagram, and cable as necessary.
Step 2: Initialize and reload the switches as necessary.
Step 3: Configure basic settings for each switch.
a. Disable DNS lookup.
b. Configure the device name as shown in the topology.
c.
Assign class as the encrypted privileged EXEC mode password.
d. Assign cisco as the console and vty passwords and enable login for console and vty lines.
e. Configure logging synchronous for the console line.
f.
Configure a message of the day (MOTD) banner to warn users that unauthorized access is prohibited.
g. Configure the IP address listed in the Addressing Table for VLAN 1 on all switches.
h. Copy the running configuration to the startup configuration.
Step 4: Test connectivity.
Verify that the switches can ping one another.
Can S1 ping S2?
_________ Yes
Can S1 ping S3?
_________ Yes
Can S2 ping S3?
_________ Yes
Troubleshoot until you are able to answer yes to all questions.
Part 2: Determine the Root Bridge
Every spanning-tree instance (switched LAN or broadcast domain) has a switch designated as the root
bridge. The root bridge serves as a reference point for all spanning-tree calculations to determine which
redundant paths to block.
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 2 of 18
Lab – Building a Switched Network with Redundant Links
An election process determines which switch becomes the root bridge. The switch with the lowest bridge
identifier (BID) becomes the root bridge. The BID is made up of a bridge priority value, an extended system
ID, and the MAC address of the switch. The priority value can range from 0 to 65,535, in increments of 4,096,
with a default value of 32,768.
Step 1: Deactivate all ports on the switches.
S1(config)# interface range f0/1-24, g0/1-2
S1(config-if-range)# shutdown
S1(config-if-range)# end
S2(config)# interface range f0/1-24, g0/1-2
S2(config-if-range)# shutdown
S2(config-if-range)# end
S3(config)# interface range f0/1-24, g0/1-2
S3(config-if-range)# shutdown
S3(config-if-range)# end
Step 2: Configure connected ports as trunks.
S1(config)# interface range f0/1-4
S1(config-if-range)# switchport mode trunk
S1(config-if-range)# end
S2(config)# interface range f0/1-4
S2(config-if-range)# switchport mode trunk
S2(config-if-range)# end
S3(config)# interface range f0/1-4
S3(config-if-range)# switchport mode trunk
S3(config-if-range)# end
Step 3: Activate ports F0/2 and F0/4 on all switches.
S1(config)# interface range f0/2, f0/4
S1(config-if-range)# no shutdown
S1(config-if-range)# end
S2(config)# interface range f0/2, f0/4
S2(config-if-range)# no shutdown
S2(config-if-range)# end
S3(config)# interface range f0/2, f0/4
S3(config-if-range)# no shutdown
S3(config-if-range)# end
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 3 of 18
Lab – Building a Switched Network with Redundant Links
Step 4: Display spanning tree information.
Issue the show spanning-tree command on all three switches. The Bridge ID Priority is calculated by adding
the priority value and the extended system ID. The extended system ID is always the VLAN number. In the
example below, all three switches have equal Bridge ID Priority values (32769 = 32768 + 1, where default
priority = 32768, VLAN number = 1); therefore, the switch with the lowest MAC address becomes the root
bridge (S2 in the example).
S1# show spanning-tree
VLAN0001
Spanning tree enabled protocol ieee
Root ID
Priority
32769
Address
0cd9.96d2.4000
Cost
19
Port
2 (FastEthernet0/2)
Hello Time
2 sec Max Age 20 sec
Bridge ID
Priority
Address
Hello Time
Aging Time
Interface
------------------Fa0/2
Fa0/4
Role
---Root
Altn
Forward Delay 15 sec
32769 (priority 32768 sys-id-ext 1)
0cd9.96e8.8a00
2 sec Max Age 20 sec Forward Delay 15 sec
300 sec
Sts
--FWD
BLK
Cost
--------19
19
Prio.Nbr
-------128.2
128.4
Type
-------------------------------P2p
P2p
S2# show spanning-tree
VLAN0001
Spanning tree enabled protocol ieee
Root ID
Priority
32769
Address
0cd9.96d2.4000
This bridge is the root
Hello Time
2 sec Max Age 20 sec
Bridge ID
Priority
Address
Hello Time
Aging Time
Interface
------------------Fa0/2
Fa0/4
Role
---Desg
Desg
Forward Delay 15 sec
32769 (priority 32768 sys-id-ext 1)
0cd9.96d2.4000
2 sec Max Age 20 sec Forward Delay 15 sec
300 sec
Sts
--FWD
FWD
Cost
--------19
19
Prio.Nbr
-------128.2
128.4
Type
-------------------------------P2p
P2p
S3# show spanning-tree
VLAN0001
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 4 of 18
Lab – Building a Switched Network with Redundant Links
Spanning tree enabled protocol ieee
Root ID
Priority
32769
Address
0cd9.96d2.4000
Cost
19
Port
2 (FastEthernet0/2)
Hello Time
2 sec Max Age 20 sec
Bridge ID
Priority
Address
Hello Time
Aging Time
Interface
------------------Fa0/2
Fa0/4
Role
---Root
Desg
Forward Delay 15 sec
32769 (priority 32768 sys-id-ext 1)
0cd9.96e8.7400
2 sec Max Age 20 sec Forward Delay 15 sec
300 sec
Sts
--FWD
FWD
Cost
--------19
19
Prio.Nbr
-------128.2
128.4
Type
-------------------------------P2p
P2p
Note: The default STP mode on the 2960 switch is Per VLAN Spanning Tree (PVST).
In the diagram below, record the Role and Status (Sts) of the active ports on each switch in the Topology.
Based on the output from your switches, answer the following questions.
Which switch is the root bridge? ____________ Answers will vary, the above output shows S2 as the root
bridge.
Why did spanning tree select this switch as the root bridge?
_______________________________________________________________________________________
The root bridge was chosen because it had the lowest bridge ID (Priority value + extended system ID (VLAN)
+ MAC address of switch).
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 5 of 18
Lab – Building a Switched Network with Redundant Links
Which ports are the root ports on the switches? _________________________ Answers will vary, the above
output shows S1 – F0/2, and S3 – F0/2.
Which ports are the designated ports on the switches? __________________________ Answers will vary,
the above output shows S2 – F0/2 and F0/4, S3 – F0/4
What port is showing as an alternate port and is currently being blocked? _________________ Answers will
vary, the above output shows S1 – F0/4.
Why did spanning tree select this port as the non-designated (blocked) port?
_______________________________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________________________
The spanning tree algorithm (STA) uses the root bridge as the reference point and then determines which
ports to block based on path cost. If path costs are equal it then compares BIDs. Lower numbers are
preferred. In the output above, the link between S1 and S3 has the highest cost to the root bridge. The path
cost through both switches is the same, so STA selected the path through the switch with the lower BID, and
blocked the port (F0/4) on the switch with the higher BID (S1).
Part 3: Observe STP Port Selection Based on Port Cost
The spanning tree algorithm (STA) uses the root bridge as the reference point and then determines which
ports to block, based on path cost. The port with the lower path cost is preferred. If port costs are equal, then
spanning tree compares BIDs. If the BIDs are equal, then the port priorities are used to break the tie. Lower
values are always preferred. In Part 3, you will change the port cost to control which port is blocked by
spanning tree.
Step 1: Locate the switch with the blocked port.
With the current configuration, only one switch should have a port that is blocked by STP. Issue the show
spanning-tree command on both non-root switches. In the example below, spanning tree is blocking port
F0/4 on the switch with the highest BID (S1).
S1# show spanning-tree
VLAN0001
Spanning tree enabled protocol ieee
Root ID
Priority
32769
Address
0cd9.96d2.4000
Cost
19
Port
2 (FastEthernet0/2)
Hello Time
2 sec Max Age 20 sec
Bridge ID
Priority
Address
Hello Time
Aging Time
Interface
------------------Fa0/2
Fa0/4
Role
---Root
Altn
Forward Delay 15 sec
32769 (priority 32768 sys-id-ext 1)
0cd9.96e8.8a00
2 sec Max Age 20 sec Forward Delay 15 sec
300 sec
Sts
--FWD
BLK
Cost
--------19
19
Prio.Nbr
-------128.2
128.4
Type
-------------------------------P2p
P2p
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 6 of 18
Lab – Building a Switched Network with Redundant Links
S3# show spanning-tree
VLAN0001
Spanning tree enabled protocol ieee
Root ID
Priority
32769
Address
0cd9.96d2.4000
Cost
19
Port
2 (FastEthernet0/2)
Hello Time
2 sec Max Age 20 sec
Bridge ID
Priority
Address
Hello Time
Aging Time
Interface
------------------Fa0/2
Fa0/4
Role
---Root
Desg
Forward Delay 15 sec
32769 (priority 32768 sys-id-ext 1)
0cd9.96e8.7400
2 sec Max Age 20 sec Forward Delay 15 sec
15 sec
Sts
--FWD
FWD
Cost
--------19
19
Prio.Nbr
-------128.2
128.4
Type
-------------------------------P2p
P2p
Note: Root bridge and port selection may differ in your topology.
Step 2: Change port cost.
In addition to the blocked port, the only other active port on this switch is the port designated as the root port.
Lower the cost of this root port to 18 by issuing the spanning-tree cost 18 interface configuration mode
command.
S1(config)# interface f0/2
S1(config-if)# spanning-tree cost 18
Step 3: Observe spanning tree changes.
Re-issue the show spanning-tree command on both non-root switches. Observe that the previously blocked
port (S1 - F0/4) is now a designated port and spanning tree is now blocking a port on the other non-root
switch (S3 - F0/4).
S1# show spanning-tree
VLAN0001
Spanning tree enabled protocol ieee
Root ID
Priority
32769
Address
0cd9.96d2.4000
Cost
18
Port
2 (FastEthernet0/2)
Hello Time
2 sec Max Age 20 sec
Bridge ID
Priority
Address
Hello Time
Aging Time
Forward Delay 15 sec
32769 (priority 32768 sys-id-ext 1)
0cd9.96e8.8a00
2 sec Max Age 20 sec Forward Delay 15 sec
300 sec
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 7 of 18
Lab – Building a Switched Network with Redundant Links
Interface
------------------Fa0/2
Fa0/4
Role
---Root
Desg
Sts
--FWD
FWD
Cost
--------18
19
Prio.Nbr
-------128.2
128.4
Type
-------------------------------P2p
P2p
S3# show spanning-tree
VLAN0001
Spanning tree enabled protocol ieee
Root ID
Priority
32769
Address
0cd9.96d2.4000
Cost
19
Port
2 (FastEthernet0/2)
Hello Time
2 sec Max Age 20 sec
Bridge ID
Priority
Address
Hello Time
Aging Time
Interface
------------------Fa0/2
Fa0/4
Role
---Root
Altn
Forward Delay 15 sec
32769 (priority 32768 sys-id-ext 1)
0cd9.96e8.7400
2 sec Max Age 20 sec Forward Delay 15 sec
300 sec
Sts
--FWD
BLK
Cost
--------19
19
Prio.Nbr
-------128.2
128.4
Type
-------------------------------P2p
P2p
Why did spanning tree change the previously blocked port to a designated port, and block the port that was a
designated port on the other switch?
_______________________________________________________________________________________
STP looks at path cost first. The port with the lower path cost will always be preferred over a port with a
higher path cost.
Step 4: Remove port cost changes.
a. Issue the no spanning-tree cost 18 interface configuration mode command to remove the cost
statement that you created earlier.
S1(config)# interface f0/2
S1(config-if)# no spanning-tree cost 18
b. Re-issue the show spanning-tree command to verify that STP has reset the port on the non-root
switches back to the original port settings. It takes approximately 30 seconds for STP to complete the port
transition process.
Part 4: Observe STP Port Selection Based on Port Priority
If port costs are equal, then spanning tree compares BIDs. If the BIDs are equal, then the port priorities are
used to break the tie. The default port priority value is 128. STP aggregates the port priority with the port
number to break ties. Lower values are always preferred. In Part 4, you will activate redundant paths to each
switch to observe how STP selects a port using the port priority.
a. Activate ports F0/1 and F0/3 on all switches.
S1(config)# interface range f0/1, f0/3
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Page 8 of 18
Lab – Building a Switched Network with Redundant Links
S1(config-if-range)# no shutdown
S1(config-if-range)# end
S2(config)# interface range f0/1, f0/3
S2(config-if-range)# no shutdown
S2(config-if-range)# end
S3(config)# interface range f0/1, f0/3
S3(config-if-range)# no shutdown
S3(config-if-range)# end
b. Wait 30 seconds for STP to complete the port transition process, and then issue the show spanning-tree
command on the non-root switches. Observe that the root port has moved to the lower numbered port
linked to the root switch, and blocked the previous root port.
S1# show spanning-tree
VLAN0001
Spanning tree enabled protocol ieee
Root ID
Priority
32769
Address
0cd9.96d2.4000
Cost
19
Port
1 (FastEthernet0/1)
Hello Time
2 sec Max Age 20 sec
Bridge ID
Priority
Address
Hello Time
Aging Time
Interface
------------------Fa0/1
Fa0/2
Fa0/3
Fa0/4
Role
---Root
Altn
Altn
Altn
Forward Delay 15 sec
32769 (priority 32768 sys-id-ext 1)
0cd9.96e8.8a00
2 sec Max Age 20 sec Forward Delay 15 sec
15 sec
Sts
--FWD
BLK
BLK
BLK
Cost
--------19
19
19
19
Prio.Nbr
-------128.1
128.2
128.3
128.4
Type
-------------------------------P2p
P2p
P2p
P2p
S3# show spanning-tree
VLAN0001
Spanning tree enabled protocol ieee
Root ID
Priority
32769
Address
0cd9.96d2.4000
Cost
19
Port
1 (FastEthernet0/1)
Hello Time
2 sec Max Age 20 sec
Bridge ID
Priority
Address
Hello Time
Forward Delay 15 sec
32769 (priority 32768 sys-id-ext 1)
0cd9.96e8.7400
2 sec Max Age 20 sec Forward Delay 15 sec
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 9 of 18
Lab – Building a Switched Network with Redundant Links
Aging Time
Interface
------------------Fa0/1
Fa0/2
Fa0/3
Fa0/4
Role
---Root
Altn
Desg
Desg
15
sec
Sts
--FWD
BLK
FWD
FWD
Cost
--------19
19
19
19
Prio.Nbr
-------128.1
128.2
128.3
128.4
Type
-------------------------------P2p
P2p
P2p
P2p
What port did STP select as the root port on each non-root switch? _________________________________
Answers will vary, but in the example above S1 – F0/1, and S3 – F0/1.
Why did STP select these ports as the root port on these switches?
_______________________________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________________________
The default port value of the ports is 128; therefore, STP used the port number to break the tie. It selected the
lower port number as the root port, and blocked the higher-numbered port with the redundant path to the root
bridge.
Reflection
1. After a root bridge has been selected, what is the first value STP uses to determine port selection?
_______________________________________________________________________________________
Path cost. It selects the path with the lower accumulated cost.
2. If the first value is equal on the two ports, what is the next value that STP uses to determine port selection?
_______________________________________________________________________________________
BID by selecting the lower value.
3. If both values are equal on the two ports, what is the next value that STP uses to determine port selection?
_______________________________________________________________________________________
An aggregation of the port priority and the port number, the lower value is preferred.
Device Configs - Final
Switch S1
S1# show run
Building configuration...
Current configuration : 1829 bytes
!
version 15.0
no service pad
service timestamps debug datetime msec
service timestamps log datetime msec
no service password-encryption
!
hostname S1
!
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 10 of 18
Lab – Building a Switched Network with Redundant Links
boot-start-marker
boot-end-marker
!
enable secret 4 06YFDUHH61wAE/kLkDq9BGho1QM5EnRtoyr8cHAUg.2
!
no aaa new-model
system mtu routing 1500
!
no ip domain-lookup
!
spanning-tree mode pvst
spanning-tree extend system-id
!
vlan internal allocation policy ascending
!
interface FastEthernet0/1
switchport mode trunk
!
interface FastEthernet0/2
switchport mode trunk
!
interface FastEthernet0/3
switchport mode trunk
!
interface FastEthernet0/4
switchport mode trunk
!
interface FastEthernet0/5
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/6
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/7
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/8
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/9
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/10
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/11
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/12
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 11 of 18
Lab – Building a Switched Network with Redundant Links
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/13
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/14
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/15
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/16
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/17
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/18
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/19
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/20
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/21
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/22
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/23
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/24
shutdown
!
interface GigabitEthernet0/1
shutdown
!
interface GigabitEthernet0/2
shutdown
!
interface Vlan1
ip address 192.168.1.1 255.255.255.0
!
ip http server
ip http secure-server
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Page 12 of 18
Lab – Building a Switched Network with Redundant Links
!
!
banner motd ^C Unauthorized Access is Prohibited! ^C
!
line con 0
password cisco
logging synchronous
login
line vty 0 4
password cisco
login
line vty 5 15
password cisco
login
!
end
Switch S2
S2# show run
Building configuration...
Current configuration : 1827 bytes
!
version 15.0
no service pad
service timestamps debug datetime msec
service timestamps log datetime msec
no service password-encryption
!
hostname S2
!
boot-start-marker
boot-end-marker
!
enable secret 4 06YFDUHH61wAE/kLkDq9BGho1QM5EnRtoyr8cHAUg.2
!
no aaa new-model
system mtu routing 1500
!
no ip domain-lookup
!
spanning-tree mode pvst
spanning-tree extend system-id
!
vlan internal allocation policy ascending
!
interface FastEthernet0/1
switchport mode trunk
!
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 13 of 18
Lab – Building a Switched Network with Redundant Links
interface FastEthernet0/2
switchport mode trunk
!
interface FastEthernet0/3
switchport mode trunk
!
interface FastEthernet0/4
switchport mode trunk
!
interface FastEthernet0/5
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/6
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/7
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/8
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/9
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/10
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/11
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/12
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/13
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/14
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/15
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/16
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/17
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/18
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 14 of 18
Lab – Building a Switched Network with Redundant Links
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/19
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/20
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/21
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/22
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/23
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/24
shutdown
!
interface GigabitEthernet0/1
shutdown
!
interface GigabitEthernet0/2
shutdown
!
interface Vlan1
ip address 192.168.1.2 255.255.255.0
!
ip http server
ip http secure-server
!
banner motd ^C Unauthorized Access is Prohibited! ^C
!
line con 0
password cisco
logging synchronous
login
line vty 0 4
password cisco
login
line vty 5 15
password cisco
login
!
end
Switch S3
S3# show run
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 15 of 18
Lab – Building a Switched Network with Redundant Links
Building configuration...
Current configuration : 1829 bytes
!
version 15.0
no service pad
service timestamps debug datetime msec
service timestamps log datetime msec
no service password-encryption
!
hostname S3
!
boot-start-marker
boot-end-marker
!
enable secret 4 06YFDUHH61wAE/kLkDq9BGho1QM5EnRtoyr8cHAUg.2
!
no aaa new-model
system mtu routing 1500
!
!
no ip domain-lookup
!
spanning-tree mode pvst
spanning-tree extend system-id
!
vlan internal allocation policy ascending
!
interface FastEthernet0/1
switchport mode trunk
!
interface FastEthernet0/2
switchport mode trunk
!
interface FastEthernet0/3
switchport mode trunk
!
interface FastEthernet0/4
switchport mode trunk
!
interface FastEthernet0/5
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/6
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/7
shutdown
!
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 16 of 18
Lab – Building a Switched Network with Redundant Links
interface
shutdown
!
interface
shutdown
!
interface
shutdown
!
interface
shutdown
!
interface
shutdown
!
interface
shutdown
!
interface
shutdown
!
interface
shutdown
!
interface
shutdown
!
interface
shutdown
!
interface
shutdown
!
interface
shutdown
!
interface
shutdown
!
interface
shutdown
!
interface
shutdown
!
interface
shutdown
!
interface
FastEthernet0/8
FastEthernet0/9
FastEthernet0/10
FastEthernet0/11
FastEthernet0/12
FastEthernet0/13
FastEthernet0/14
FastEthernet0/15
FastEthernet0/16
FastEthernet0/17
FastEthernet0/18
FastEthernet0/19
FastEthernet0/20
FastEthernet0/21
FastEthernet0/22
FastEthernet0/23
FastEthernet0/24
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Page 17 of 18
Lab – Building a Switched Network with Redundant Links
shutdown
!
interface GigabitEthernet0/1
shutdown
!
interface GigabitEthernet0/2
shutdown
!
interface Vlan1
ip address 192.168.1.3 255.255.255.0
!
ip http server
ip http secure-server
!
banner motd ^C Unauthorized Access is Prohibited! ^C
!
line con 0
password cisco
logging synchronous
login
line vty 0 4
password cisco
login
line vty 5 15
password cisco
login
!
end
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 18 of 18
Lab – Configuring Rapid PVST+, PortFast, and BPDU Guard
(Instructor Version)
Instructor Note: Red font color or Gray highlights indicate text that appears in the instructor copy only.
Topology
Addressing Table
Device
Interface
IP Address
Subnet Mask
S1
VLAN 99
192.168.1.11
255.255.255.0
S2
VLAN 99
192.168.1.12
255.255.255.0
S3
VLAN 99
192.168.1.13
255.255.255.0
PC-A
NIC
192.168.0.2
255.255.255.0
PC-C
NIC
192.168.0.3
255.255.255.0
VLAN Assignments
VLAN
Name
10
User
99
Management
Objectives
Part 1: Build the Network and Configure Basic Device Settings
Part 2: Configure VLANs, Native VLAN, and Trunks
Part 3: Configure the Root Bridge and Examine PVST+ Convergence
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 1 of 28
Lab – Configuring Rapid PVST+, PortFast, and BPDU Guard
Part 4: Configure Rapid PVST+, PortFast, BPDU Guard, and Examine Convergence
Background / Scenario
The Per-VLAN Spanning Tree (PVST) protocol is Cisco proprietary. Cisco switches default to PVST. Rapid
PVST+ (IEEE 802.1w) is an enhanced version of PVST+ and allows for faster spanning-tree calculations and
convergence in response to Layer 2 topology changes. Rapid PVST+ defines three port states: discarding,
learning, and forwarding, and provides multiple enhancements to optimize network performance.
In this lab, you will configure the primary and secondary root bridge, examine PVST+ convergence, configure
Rapid PVST+ and compare its convergence to PVST+. In addition, you will configure edge ports to transition
immediately to a forwarding state using PortFast and prevent the edge ports from forwarding BDPUs using
BDPU guard.
Note: This lab provides minimal assistance with the actual commands necessary for configuration. However,
the required commands are provided in Appendix A. Test your knowledge by trying to configure the devices
without referring to the appendix.
Note: The switches used with CCNA hands-on labs are Cisco Catalyst 2960s with Cisco IOS Release 15.0(2)
(lanbasek9 image). Other switches and Cisco IOS versions can be used. Depending on the model and Cisco
IOS version, the commands available and output produced might vary from what is shown in the labs.
Note: Make sure that the switches have been erased and have no startup configurations. If you are unsure,
contact your instructor.
Instructor Note: Refer to the Instructor Lab Manual for the procedures to initialize and reload devices.
Required Resources

3 Switches (Cisco 2960 with Cisco IOS Release 15.0(2) lanbasek9 image or comparable)

2 PCs (Windows 7, Vista, or XP with terminal emulation program, such as Tera Term)

Console cables to configure the Cisco IOS devices via the console ports

Ethernet cables as shown in the topology
Part 1: Build the Network and Configure Basic Device Settings
In Part 1, you will set up the network topology and configure basic settings, such as the interface IP
addresses, device access, and passwords.
Step 1: Cable the network as shown in the topology.
Step 2: Configure PC hosts.
Step 3: Initialize and reload the switches as necessary.
Step 4: Configure basic settings for each switch.
a. Disable DNS lookup.
b. Configure the device name as shown in the Topology.
c.
Assign cisco as the console and vty passwords and enable login.
d. Assign class as the encrypted privileged EXEC mode password.
e. Configure logging synchronous to prevent console messages from interrupting command entry.
f.
Shut down all switch ports.
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 2 of 28
Lab – Configuring Rapid PVST+, PortFast, and BPDU Guard
g. Copy the running configuration to startup configuration.
Part 2: Configure VLANs, Native VLAN, and Trunks
In Part 2, you will create VLANs, assign switch ports to VLANs, configure trunk ports, and change the native
VLAN for all switches.
Note: The required commands for Part 2 are provided in Appendix A. Test your knowledge by trying to
configure the VLANs, native VLAN, and trunks without referring to the appendix.
Step 1: Create VLANs.
Use the appropriate commands to create VLANs 10 and 99 on all of the switches. Name VLAN 10 as User
and VLAN 99 as Management.
S1(config)# vlan
S1(config-vlan)#
S1(config-vlan)#
S1(config-vlan)#
10
name User
vlan 99
name Management
S2(config)# vlan
S2(config-vlan)#
S2(config-vlan)#
S2(config-vlan)#
10
name User
vlan 99
name Management
S3(config)# vlan
S3(config-vlan)#
S3(config-vlan)#
S3(config-vlan)#
10
name User
vlan 99
name Management
Step 2: Enable user ports in access mode and assign VLANs.
For S1 F0/6 and S3 F0/18, enable the ports, configure them as access ports, and assign them to VLAN 10.
S1(config)# interface f0/6
S1(config-if)# no shutdown
S1(config-if)# switchport mode access
S1(config-if)# switchport access vlan 10
S3(config)# interface f0/18
S3(config-if)# no shutdown
S3(config-if)# switchport mode access
S3(config-if)# switchport access vlan 10
Step 3: Configure trunk ports and assign to native VLAN 99.
For ports F0/1 and F0/3 on all switches, enable the ports, configure them as trunk ports, and assign them to
native VLAN 99.
S1(config)# interface range f0/1,f0/3
S1(config-if)# no shutdown
S1(config-if)# switchport mode trunk
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 3 of 28
Lab – Configuring Rapid PVST+, PortFast, and BPDU Guard
S1(config-if)# switchport trunk native vlan 99
S2(config)# interface range f0/1,f0/3
S2(config-if)# no shutdown
S2(config-if)# switchport mode trunk
S2(config-if)# switchport trunk native vlan 99
S3(config)# interface range f0/1,f0/3
S3(config-if)# no shutdown
S3(config-if)# switchport mode trunk
S3(config-if)# switchport trunk native vlan 99
Step 4: Configure the management interface on all switches.
Using the Addressing Table, configure the management interface on all switches with the appropriate IP
address.
S1(config)# interface vlan 99
S1(config-if)# ip address 192.168.1.11 255.255.255.0
S2(config)# interface vlan 99
S2(config-if)# ip address 192.168.1.12 255.255.255.0
S3(config)# interface vlan 99
S3(config-if)# ip address 192.168.1.13 255.255.255.0
Step 5: Verify configurations and connectivity.
Use the show vlan brief command on all switches to verify that all VLANs are registered in the VLAN table
and that the correct ports are assigned.
S1# show vlan brief
VLAN Name
Status
Ports
---- -------------------------------- --------- ------------------------------1
default
active
Fa0/2, Fa0/4, Fa0/5, Fa0/7
Fa0/8, Fa0/9, Fa0/10, Fa0/11
Fa0/12, Fa0/13, Fa0/14, Fa0/15
Fa0/16, Fa0/17, Fa0/18, Fa0/19
Fa0/20, Fa0/21, Fa0/22, Fa0/23
Fa0/24, Gi0/1, Gi0/2
10
User
active
Fa0/6
99
Management
active
1002 fddi-default
act/unsup
1003 token-ring-default
act/unsup
1004 fddinet-default
act/unsup
1005 trnet-default
act/unsup
S2# show vlan brief
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 4 of 28
Lab – Configuring Rapid PVST+, PortFast, and BPDU Guard
VLAN Name
Status
Ports
---- -------------------------------- --------- ------------------------------1
default
active
Fa0/2, Fa0/4, Fa0/5, Fa0/6
Fa0/7, Fa0/8, Fa0/9, Fa0/10
Fa0/11, Fa0/12, Fa0/13, Fa0/14
Fa0/15, Fa0/16, Fa0/17, Fa0/18
Fa0/19, Fa0/20, Fa0/21, Fa0/22
Fa0/23, Fa0/24, Gi0/1, Gi0/2
10
User
active
99
Management
active
1002 fddi-default
act/unsup
1003 token-ring-default
act/unsup
1004 fddinet-default
act/unsup
1005 trnet-default
act/unsup
S3# show vlan brief
VLAN Name
Status
Ports
---- -------------------------------- --------- ------------------------------1
default
active
Fa0/2, Fa0/4, Fa0/5, Fa0/6
Fa0/7, Fa0/8, Fa0/9, Fa0/10
Fa0/11, Fa0/12, Fa0/13, Fa0/14
Fa0/15, Fa0/16, Fa0/17, Fa0/19
Fa0/20, Fa0/21, Fa0/22, Fa0/23
Fa0/24, Gi0/1, Gi0/2
10
User
active
Fa0/18
99
Management
active
1002 fddi-default
act/unsup
1003 token-ring-default
act/unsup
1004 fddinet-default
act/unsup
1005 trnet-default
act/unsup
Use the show interfaces trunk command on all switches to verify trunk interfaces.
S1# show interfaces trunk
Port
Fa0/1
Fa0/3
Mode
on
on
Encapsulation
802.1q
802.1q
Status
trunking
trunking
Port
Fa0/1
Fa0/3
Vlans allowed on trunk
1-4094
1-4094
Port
Fa0/1
Fa0/3
Vlans allowed and active in management domain
1,10,99
1,10,99
Port
Vlans in spanning tree forwarding state and not pruned
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Native vlan
99
99
Page 5 of 28
Lab – Configuring Rapid PVST+, PortFast, and BPDU Guard
Fa0/1
Fa0/3
none
1,10,99
S2# show interfaces trunk
Port
Fa0/1
Fa0/3
Mode
on
on
Encapsulation
802.1q
802.1q
Status
trunking
trunking
Native vlan
99
99
Port
Fa0/1
Fa0/3
Vlans allowed on trunk
1-4094
1-4094
Port
Fa0/1
Fa0/3
Vlans allowed and active in management domain
1,10,99
1,10,99
Port
Fa0/1
Fa0/3
Vlans in spanning tree forwarding state and not pruned
1,10,99
1,10,99
S3# show interfaces trunk
Port
Fa0/1
Fa0/3
Mode
on
on
Encapsulation
802.1q
802.1q
Status
trunking
trunking
Native vlan
99
99
Port
Fa0/1
Fa0/3
Vlans allowed on trunk
1-4094
1-4094
Port
Fa0/1
Fa0/3
Vlans allowed and active in management domain
1,10,99
1,10,99
Port
Fa0/1
Fa0/3
Vlans in spanning tree forwarding state and not pruned
1,10,99
1,10,99
Use the show running-config command on all switches to verify all other configurations.
S1# show running-config
Building configuration...
Current configuration : 1857 bytes
!
version 15.0
no service pad
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
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Lab – Configuring Rapid PVST+, PortFast, and BPDU Guard
service timestamps debug datetime msec
service timestamps log datetime msec
no service password-encryption
!
hostname S1
!
boot-start-marker
boot-end-marker
!
enable secret 4 06YFDUHH61wAE/kLkDq9BGho1QM5EnRtoyr8cHAUg.2
!
no aaa new-model
system mtu routing 1500
!
no ip domain-lookup
!
spanning-tree mode pvst
spanning-tree extend system-id
!
vlan internal allocation policy ascending
!
interface FastEthernet0/1
switchport trunk native vlan 99
switchport mode trunk
!
interface FastEthernet0/2
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/3
switchport trunk native vlan 99
switchport mode trunk
!
interface FastEthernet0/4
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/5
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/6
switchport access vlan 10
switchport mode access
!
interface FastEthernet0/7
shutdown
!
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
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Lab – Configuring Rapid PVST+, PortFast, and BPDU Guard
interface
shutdown
!
interface
shutdown
!
interface
shutdown
!
interface
shutdown
!
interface
shutdown
!
interface
shutdown
!
interface
shutdown
!
interface
shutdown
!
interface
shutdown
!
interface
shutdown
!
interface
shutdown
!
interface
shutdown
!
interface
shutdown
!
interface
shutdown
!
interface
shutdown
!
FastEthernet0/8
FastEthernet0/9
FastEthernet0/10
FastEthernet0/11
FastEthernet0/12
FastEthernet0/13
FastEthernet0/14
FastEthernet0/15
FastEthernet0/16
FastEthernet0/17
FastEthernet0/18
FastEthernet0/19
FastEthernet0/20
FastEthernet0/21
FastEthernet0/22
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
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Lab – Configuring Rapid PVST+, PortFast, and BPDU Guard
interface FastEthernet0/23
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/24
shutdown
!
interface GigabitEthernet0/1
shutdown
!
interface GigabitEthernet0/2
shutdown
!
interface Vlan1
no ip address
!
interface Vlan99
ip address 192.168.1.11 255.255.255.0
!
ip http server
ip http secure-server
!
line con 0
password cisco
logging synchronous
login
line vty 0 4
password cisco
login
line vty 5 15
password cisco
login
!
end
What is the default setting for spanning-tree mode on Cisco switches?
_______________________________________________________________________________________
The default spanning-tree mode is PVST+.
Verify connectivity between PC-A and PC-C. Was your ping successful? __________ Yes.
If your ping was unsuccessful, troubleshoot the configurations until the issue is resolved.
Note: It may be necessary to disable the PC firewall to successfully ping between PCs.
Part 3: Configure the Root Bridge and Examine PVST+ Convergence
In Part 3, you will determine the default root in the network, assign the primary and secondary root, and use
the debug command to examine convergence of PVST+.
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 9 of 28
Lab – Configuring Rapid PVST+, PortFast, and BPDU Guard
Note: The required commands for Part 3 are provided in Appendix A. Test your knowledge by trying to
configure the root bridge without referring to the appendix.
Step 1: Determine the current root bridge.
Which command allows a user to determine the spanning-tree status of a Cisco Catalyst switch for all
VLANs? Write the command in the space provided.
_______________________________________________________________________________________
show spanning-tree
Use the command on all three switches to determine the answers to the following questions:
Note: There are three instances of the spanning tree on each switch. The default STP configuration on Cisco
switches is PVST+, which creates a separate spanning tree instance for each VLAN (VLAN 1 and any userconfigured VLANs).
What is the bridge priority of switch S1 for VLAN 1? __________ 32769
What is the bridge priority of switch S2 for VLAN 1? __________ 32769
What is the bridge priority of switch S3 for VLAN 1? __________ 32769
Which switch is the root bridge? __________ Answers will vary. In this configuration, it is switch S3.
Why was this switch elected as the root bridge?
_______________________________________________________________________________________
By default, spanning tree elects the root bridge based on lowest MAC address.
S1# show spanning-tree
VLAN0001
Spanning tree enabled protocol ieee
Root ID
Priority
32769
Address
0cd9.96d2.5100
Cost
19
Port
3 (FastEthernet0/3)
Hello Time
2 sec Max Age 20 sec
Bridge ID
Priority
Address
Hello Time
Aging Time
Interface
------------------Fa0/1
Fa0/3
Role
---Desg
Root
Forward Delay 15 sec
32769 (priority 32768 sys-id-ext 1)
0cd9.96e2.3d80
2 sec Max Age 20 sec Forward Delay 15 sec
300 sec
Sts
--FWD
FWD
Cost
--------19
19
Prio.Nbr
-------128.1
128.3
Type
-------------------------------P2p
P2p
VLAN0010
Spanning tree enabled protocol ieee
Root ID
Priority
32778
Address
0cd9.96d2.5100
Cost
19
Port
3 (FastEthernet0/3)
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 10 of 28
Lab – Configuring Rapid PVST+, PortFast, and BPDU Guard
Hello Time
Bridge ID
Priority
Address
Hello Time
Aging Time
Interface
------------------Fa0/1
Fa0/3
Fa0/6
Role
---Desg
Root
Desg
2 sec
Max Age 20 sec
Forward Delay 15 sec
32778 (priority 32768 sys-id-ext 10)
0cd9.96e2.3d80
2 sec Max Age 20 sec Forward Delay 15 sec
300 sec
Sts
--FWD
FWD
FWD
Cost
--------19
19
19
Prio.Nbr
-------128.1
128.3
128.6
Type
-------------------------------P2p
P2p
P2p
VLAN0099
Spanning tree enabled protocol ieee
Root ID
Priority
32867
Address
0cd9.96d2.5100
Cost
19
Port
3 (FastEthernet0/3)
Hello Time
2 sec Max Age 20 sec
Bridge ID
Priority
Address
Hello Time
Aging Time
Interface
------------------Fa0/1
Fa0/3
Role
---Desg
Root
Forward Delay 15 sec
32867 (priority 32768 sys-id-ext 99)
0cd9.96e2.3d80
2 sec Max Age 20 sec Forward Delay 15 sec
300 sec
Sts
--FWD
FWD
Cost
--------19
19
Prio.Nbr
-------128.1
128.3
Type
-------------------------------P2p
P2p
S2# show spanning-tree
VLAN0001
Spanning tree enabled protocol ieee
Root ID
Priority
32769
Address
0cd9.96d2.5100
Cost
19
Port
3 (FastEthernet0/3)
Hello Time
2 sec Max Age 20 sec
Bridge ID
Priority
Address
Hello Time
Aging Time
Forward Delay 15 sec
32769 (priority 32768 sys-id-ext 1)
0cd9.96e8.6f80
2 sec Max Age 20 sec Forward Delay 15 sec
300 sec
Interface
Role Sts Cost
Prio.Nbr Type
------------------- ---- --- --------- -------- -------------------------------Fa0/1
Altn BLK 19
128.1
P2p
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 11 of 28
Lab – Configuring Rapid PVST+, PortFast, and BPDU Guard
Fa0/3
Root FWD 19
128.3
P2p
VLAN0010
Spanning tree enabled protocol ieee
Root ID
Priority
32778
Address
0cd9.96d2.5100
Cost
19
Port
3 (FastEthernet0/3)
Hello Time
2 sec Max Age 20 sec
Bridge ID
Priority
Address
Hello Time
Aging Time
Interface
------------------Fa0/1
Fa0/3
Role
---Altn
Root
Forward Delay 15 sec
32778 (priority 32768 sys-id-ext 10)
0cd9.96e8.6f80
2 sec Max Age 20 sec Forward Delay 15 sec
300 sec
Sts
--BLK
FWD
Cost
--------19
19
Prio.Nbr
-------128.1
128.3
Type
-------------------------------P2p
P2p
VLAN0099
Spanning tree enabled protocol ieee
Root ID
Priority
32867
Address
0cd9.96d2.5100
Cost
19
Port
3 (FastEthernet0/3)
Hello Time
2 sec Max Age 20 sec
Bridge ID
Priority
Address
Hello Time
Aging Time
Interface
------------------Fa0/1
Fa0/3
Role
---Altn
Root
Forward Delay 15 sec
32867 (priority 32768 sys-id-ext 99)
0cd9.96e8.6f80
2 sec Max Age 20 sec Forward Delay 15 sec
300 sec
Sts
--BLK
FWD
Cost
--------19
19
Prio.Nbr
-------128.1
128.3
Type
-------------------------------P2p
P2p
S3# show spanning-tree
VLAN0001
Spanning tree enabled protocol ieee
Root ID
Priority
32769
Address
0cd9.96d2.5100
This bridge is the root
Hello Time
2 sec Max Age 20 sec
Bridge ID
Priority
Address
Forward Delay 15 sec
32769 (priority 32768 sys-id-ext 1)
0cd9.96d2.5100
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
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Lab – Configuring Rapid PVST+, PortFast, and BPDU Guard
Hello Time
Aging Time
Interface
------------------Fa0/1
Fa0/3
Role
---Desg
Desg
2 sec Max Age 20 sec
300 sec
Sts
--FWD
FWD
Cost
--------19
19
Prio.Nbr
-------128.1
128.3
Forward Delay 15 sec
Type
-------------------------------P2p
P2p
VLAN0010
Spanning tree enabled protocol ieee
Root ID
Priority
32778
Address
0cd9.96d2.5100
This bridge is the root
Hello Time
2 sec Max Age 20 sec
Bridge ID
Priority
Address
Hello Time
Aging Time
Interface
------------------Fa0/1
Fa0/3
Fa0/18
Role
---Desg
Desg
Desg
Forward Delay 15 sec
32778 (priority 32768 sys-id-ext 10)
0cd9.96d2.5100
2 sec Max Age 20 sec Forward Delay 15 sec
300 sec
Sts
--FWD
FWD
FWD
Cost
--------19
19
19
Prio.Nbr
-------128.1
128.3
128.18
Type
-------------------------------P2p
P2p
P2p
VLAN0099
Spanning tree enabled protocol ieee
Root ID
Priority
32867
Address
0cd9.96d2.5100
This bridge is the root
Hello Time
2 sec Max Age 20 sec
Bridge ID
Priority
Address
Hello Time
Aging Time
Interface
------------------Fa0/1
Fa0/3
Role
---Desg
Desg
Forward Delay 15 sec
32867 (priority 32768 sys-id-ext 99)
0cd9.96d2.5100
2 sec Max Age 20 sec Forward Delay 15 sec
300 sec
Sts
--FWD
FWD
Cost
--------19
19
Prio.Nbr
-------128.1
128.3
Type
-------------------------------P2p
P2p
Step 2: Configure a primary and secondary root bridge for all existing VLANs.
Having a root bridge (switch) elected by MAC address may lead to a suboptimal configuration. In this lab, you
will configure switch S2 as the root bridge and S1 as the secondary root bridge.
a. Configure switch S2 to be the primary root bridge for all existing VLANs. Write the command in the space
provided.
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 13 of 28
Lab – Configuring Rapid PVST+, PortFast, and BPDU Guard
____________________________________________________________________________________
S2(config)# spanning-tree vlan 1,10,99 root primary
b. Configure switch S1 to be the secondary root bridge for all existing VLANs. Write the command in the
space provided.
____________________________________________________________________________________
S1(config)# spanning-tree vlan 1,10,99 root secondary
Use the show spanning-tree command to answer the following questions:
What is the bridge priority of S1 for VLAN 1? __________ 28673
What is the bridge priority of S2 for VLAN 1? __________ 24577
Which interface in the network is in a blocking state? _________________________________________
Interface F0/3 on switch S3
S1# show spanning-tree vlan 1
VLAN0001
Spanning tree enabled protocol ieee
Root ID
Priority
24577
Address
0cd9.96d2.4000
Cost
19
Port
1 (FastEthernet0/1)
Hello Time
2 sec Max Age 20 sec
Bridge ID
Priority
Address
Hello Time
Aging Time
Interface
------------------Fa0/1
Fa0/3
Role
---Root
Desg
Forward Delay 15 sec
28673 (priority 28672 sys-id-ext 1)
0cd9.96e8.8a00
2 sec Max Age 20 sec Forward Delay 15 sec
15 sec
Sts
--FWD
FWD
Cost
--------19
19
Prio.Nbr
-------128.1
128.3
Type
-------------------------------P2p
P2p
S2# show spanning-tree vlan 1
VLAN0001
Spanning tree enabled protocol ieee
Root ID
Priority
24577
Address
0cd9.96d2.4000
This bridge is the root
Hello Time
2 sec Max Age 20 sec
Bridge ID
Interface
Priority
Address
Hello Time
Aging Time
Forward Delay 15 sec
24577 (priority 24576 sys-id-ext 1)
0cd9.96d2.4000
2 sec Max Age 20 sec Forward Delay 15 sec
15 sec
Role Sts Cost
Prio.Nbr Type
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Page 14 of 28
Lab – Configuring Rapid PVST+, PortFast, and BPDU Guard
------------------- ---- --- --------- -------- -------------------------------Fa0/1
Desg FWD 19
128.1
P2p
Fa0/3
Desg FWD 19
128.3
P2p
S3# show spanning-tree vlan 1
VLAN0001
Spanning tree enabled protocol ieee
Root ID
Priority
24577
Address
0cd9.96d2.4000
Cost
19
Port
1 (FastEthernet0/1)
Hello Time
2 sec Max Age 20 sec
Bridge ID
Priority
Address
Hello Time
Aging Time
Interface
------------------Fa0/1
Fa0/3
Role
---Root
Altn
Forward Delay 15 sec
32769 (priority 32768 sys-id-ext 1)
0cd9.96e8.7400
2 sec Max Age 20 sec Forward Delay 15 sec
300 sec
Sts
--FWD
BLK
Cost
--------19
19
Prio.Nbr
-------128.1
128.3
Type
-------------------------------P2p
P2p
Step 3: Change the Layer 2 topology and examine convergence.
To examine PVST+ convergence, you will create a Layer 2 topology change while using the debug command
to monitor spanning-tree events.
a. Enter the debug spanning-tree events command in privileged EXEC mode on switch S3.
S3# debug spanning-tree events
Spanning Tree event debugging is on
b. Create a topology change by disabling interface F0/1 on S3.
S3(config)# interface f0/1
S3(config-if)# shutdown
*Mar 1 00:58:56.225:
*Mar 1 00:58:56.225:
*Mar 1 00:58:56.225:
*Mar 1 00:58:56.225:
*Mar 1 00:58:56.225:
*Mar 1 00:58:56.225:
*Mar 1 00:58:56.225:
*Mar 1 00:58:56.225:
*Mar 1 00:58:56.225:
*Mar 1 00:58:56.242:
state to down
*Mar 1 00:58:56.242:
state to down
*Mar 1 00:58:58.214:
administratively down
STP: VLAN0001 new root port Fa0/3, cost 38
STP: VLAN0001 Fa0/3 -> listening
STP[1]: Generating TC trap for port FastEthernet0/1
STP: VLAN0010 new root port Fa0/3, cost 38
STP: VLAN0010 Fa0/3 -> listening
STP[10]: Generating TC trap for port FastEthernet0/1
STP: VLAN0099 new root port Fa0/3, cost 38
STP: VLAN0099 Fa0/3 -> listening
STP[99]: Generating TC trap for port FastEthernet0/1
%LINEPROTO-5-UPDOWN: Line protocol on Interface Vlan1, changed
%LINEPROTO-5-UPDOWN: Line protocol on Interface Vlan99, changed
%LINK-5-CHANGED: Interface FastEthernet0/1, changed state to
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
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Lab – Configuring Rapid PVST+, PortFast, and BPDU Guard
*Mar 1 00:58:58.230:
*Mar 1 00:58:58.230:
*Mar 1 00:58:58.230:
*Mar 1 00:58:59.220:
changed state to down
*Mar 1 00:59:11.233:
*Mar 1 00:59:11.233:
*Mar 1 00:59:11.233:
*Mar 1 00:59:26.240:
*Mar 1 00:59:26.240:
*Mar 1 00:59:26.240:
*Mar 1 00:59:26.240:
*Mar 1 00:59:26.240:
*Mar 1 00:59:26.240:
*Mar 1 00:59:26.240:
*Mar 1 00:59:26.248:
state to up
*Mar 1 00:59:26.248:
state to up
STP: VLAN0001 sent Topology Change
STP: VLAN0010 sent Topology Change
STP: VLAN0099 sent Topology Change
%LINEPROTO-5-UPDOWN: Line protocol
Notice on Fa0/3
Notice on Fa0/3
Notice on Fa0/3
on Interface FastEthernet0/1,
STP: VLAN0001 Fa0/3 -> learning
STP: VLAN0010 Fa0/3 -> learning
STP: VLAN0099 Fa0/3 -> learning
STP[1]: Generating TC trap for port FastEthernet0/3
STP: VLAN0001 Fa0/3 -> forwarding
STP[10]: Generating TC trap for port FastEthernet0/3
STP: VLAN0010 sent Topology Change Notice on Fa0/3
STP: VLAN0010 Fa0/3 -> forwarding
STP[99]: Generating TC trap for port FastEthernet0/3
STP: VLAN0099 Fa0/3 -> forwarding
%LINEPROTO-5-UPDOWN: Line protocol on Interface Vlan1, changed
%LINEPROTO-5-UPDOWN: Line protocol on Interface Vlan99, changed
Note: Before proceeding, use the debug output to verify that all VLANs on F0/3 have reached a
forwarding state then use the command no debug spanning-tree events to stop the debug output.
Through which port states do each VLAN on F0/3 proceed during network convergence?
____________________________________________________________________________________
Listening, learning, and forwarding
Using the time stamp from the first and last STP debug message, calculate the time (to the nearest
second) that it took for the network to converge. Hint: The debug timestamp format is date
hh.mm.ss:msec.
____________________________________________________________________________________
Answers may vary slightly but convergence time should be approximately 30 seconds.
Part 4: Configure Rapid PVST+, PortFast, BPDU Guard, and Examine
Convergence
In Part 4, you will configure Rapid PVST+ on all switches. You will configure PortFast and BPDU guard on all
access ports, and then use the debug command to examine Rapid PVST+ convergence.
Note: The required commands for Part 4 are provided in Appendix A. Test your knowledge by trying to
configure the Rapid PVST+, PortFast, and BPDU guard without referring to the appendix.
Step 1: Configure Rapid PVST+.
a. Configure S1 for Rapid PVST+. Write the command in the space provided.
____________________________________________________________________________________
S1(config)# spanning-tree mode rapid-pvst
b. Configure S2 and S3 for Rapid PVST+.
S2(config)# spanning-tree mode rapid-pvst
S3(config)# spanning-tree mode rapid-pvst
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 16 of 28
Lab – Configuring Rapid PVST+, PortFast, and BPDU Guard
c.
Verify configurations with the show running-config | include spanning-tree mode command.
S1# show running-config | include spanning-tree mode
spanning-tree mode rapid-pvst
S2# show running-config | include spanning-tree mode
spanning-tree mode rapid-pvst
S3# show running-config | include spanning-tree mode
spanning-tree mode rapid-pvst
Step 2: Configure PortFast and BPDU Guard on access ports.
PortFast is a feature of spanning tree that transitions a port immediately to a forwarding state as soon as it is
turned on. This is useful in connecting hosts so that they can start communicating on the VLAN instantly,
rather than waiting on spanning tree. To prevent ports that are configured with PortFast from forwarding
BPDUs, which could change the spanning tree topology, BPDU guard can be enabled. At the receipt of a
BPDU, BPDU guard disables a port configured with PortFast.
a. Configure interface F0/6 on S1 with PortFast. Write the command in the space provided.
____________________________________________________________________________________
S1(config)# interface f0/6
S1(config-if)# spanning-tree portfast
b. Configure interface F0/6 on S1 with BPDU guard. Write the command in the space provided.
____________________________________________________________________________________
S1(config)# interface f0/6
S1(config-if)# spanning-tree bpduguard enable
c.
Globally configure all non-trunking ports on switch S3 with PortFast. Write the command in the space
provided.
____________________________________________________________________________________
S3(config)# spanning-tree portfast default
d. Globally configure all non-trunking PortFast ports on switch S3 with BPDU guard. Write the command in
the space provided.
____________________________________________________________________________________
S3(config)# spanning-tree portfast bpduguard default
Step 3: Examine Rapid PVST+ convergence.
a. Enter the debug spanning-tree events command in privileged EXEC mode on switch S3.
b. Create a topology change by enabling interface F0/1 on switch S3.
S3(config)# interface f0/1
S3(config-if)# no shutdown
*Mar
*Mar
*Mar
*Mar
*Mar
1
1
1
1
1
01:28:34.946:
01:28:37.588:
01:28:37.588:
01:28:37.588:
01:28:37.588:
%LINK-3-UPDOWN: Interface FastEthernet0/1, changed state to up
RSTP(1): initializing port Fa0/1
RSTP(1): Fa0/1 is now designated
RSTP(10): initializing port Fa0/1
RSTP(10): Fa0/1 is now designated
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 17 of 28
Lab – Configuring Rapid PVST+, PortFast, and BPDU Guard
*Mar 1 01:28:37.588:
*Mar 1 01:28:37.588:
*Mar 1 01:28:37.597:
*Mar 1 01:28:37.597:
*Mar 1 01:28:37.597:
*Mar 1 01:28:37.597:
*Mar 1 01:28:37.597:
*Mar 1 01:28:37.597:
*Mar 1 01:28:37.597:
*Mar 1 01:28:37.597:
*Mar 1 01:28:37.597:
*Mar 1 01:28:37.597:
*Mar 1 01:28:37.597:
*Mar 1 01:28:37.597:
*Mar 1 01:28:37.597:
*Mar 1 01:28:37.597:
*Mar 1 01:28:37.605:
*Mar 1 01:28:37.605:
*Mar 1 01:28:37.605:
*Mar 1 01:28:37.605:
*Mar 1 01:28:37.605:
*Mar 1 01:28:37.605:
*Mar 1 01:28:37.605:
*Mar 1 01:28:37.622:
proposal
*Mar 1 01:28:37.622:
proposal
*Mar 1 01:28:37.622:
proposal
*Mar 1 01:28:38.595:
changed state to up
RSTP(99): initializing port Fa0/1
RSTP(99): Fa0/1 is now designated
RSTP(1): transmitting a proposal on Fa0/1
RSTP(10): transmitting a proposal on Fa0/1
RSTP(99): transmitting a proposal on Fa0/1
RSTP(1): updt roles, received superior bpdu on Fa0/1
RSTP(1): Fa0/1 is now root port
RSTP(1): Fa0/3 blocked by re-root
RSTP(1): synced Fa0/1
RSTP(1): Fa0/3 is now alternate
RSTP(10): updt roles, received superior bpdu on Fa0/1
RSTP(10): Fa0/1 is now root port
RSTP(10): Fa0/3 blocked by re-root
RSTP(10): synced Fa0/1
RSTP(10): Fa0/3 is now alternate
RSTP(99): updt roles, received superior bpdu on Fa0/1
RSTP(99): Fa0/1 is now root port
RSTP(99): Fa0/3 blocked by re-root
RSTP(99): synced Fa0/1
RSTP(99): Fa0/3 is now alternate
STP[1]: Generating TC trap for port FastEthernet0/1
STP[10]: Generating TC trap for port FastEthernet0/1
STP[99]: Generating TC trap for port FastEthernet0/1
RSTP(1): transmitting an agreement on Fa0/1 as a response to a
RSTP(10): transmitting an agreement on Fa0/1 as a response to a
RSTP(99): transmitting an agreement on Fa0/1 as a response to a
%LINEPROTO-5-UPDOWN: Line protocol on Interface FastEthernet0/1,
Using the time stamp from the first and last RSTP debug message, calculate the time that it took for the
network to converge.
____________________________________________________________________________________
Answers may vary slightly but convergence time should be under a second.
Reflection
1. What is the main benefit of using Rapid PVST+?
_______________________________________________________________________________________
Rapid PVST+ decreases the time of Layer 2 convergence significantly over PVST+.
2. How does configuring a port with PortFast allow for faster convergence?
_______________________________________________________________________________________
PortFast allows for an access port to immediately transition into a forwarding state which decreases Layer 2
convergence time.
3. What protection does BPDU guard provide?
_______________________________________________________________________________________
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 18 of 28
Lab – Configuring Rapid PVST+, PortFast, and BPDU Guard
BPDU guard protects the STP domain by disabling access ports that receive a BPDU. BPDUs can be used in
a denial of service attack that changes a domain’s root bridge and forces an STP recalculation.
Appendix A – Switch Configuration Commands
Switch S1
S1(config)# vlan 10
S1(config-vlan)# name User
S1(config-vlan)# vlan 99
S1(config-vlan)# name Management
S1(config-vlan)# exit
S1(config)# interface f0/6
S1(config-if)# no shutdown
S1(config-if)# switchport mode access
S1(config-if)# switchport access vlan 10
S1(config-if)# interface f0/1
S1(config-if)# no shutdown
S1(config-if)# switchport mode trunk
S1(config-if)# switchport trunk native vlan 99
S1(config-if)# interface f0/3
S1(config-if)# no shutdown
S1(config-if)# switchport mode trunk
S1(config-if)# switchport trunk native vlan 99
S1(config-if)# interface vlan 99
S1(config-if)# ip address 192.168.1.11 255.255.255.0
S1(config-if)# exit
S1(config)# spanning-tree vlan 1,10,99 root secondary
S1(config)# spanning-tree mode rapid-pvst
S1(config)# interface f0/6
S1(config-if)# spanning-tree portfast
S1(config-if)# spanning-tree bpduguard enable
Switch S2
S2(config)# vlan 10
S2(config-vlan)# name User
S2(config-vlan)# vlan 99
S2(config-vlan)# name Management
S2(config-vlan)# exit
S2(config)# interface f0/1
S2(config-if)# no shutdown
S2(config-if)# switchport mode trunk
S2(config-if)# switchport trunk native vlan 99
S2(config-if)# interface f0/3
S2(config-if)# no shutdown
S2(config-if)# switchport mode trunk
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 19 of 28
Lab – Configuring Rapid PVST+, PortFast, and BPDU Guard
S2(config-if)# switchport trunk native vlan 99
S2(config-if)# interface vlan 99
S2(config-if)# ip address 192.168.1.12 255.255.255.0
S2(config-if)# exit
S2(config)# spanning-tree vlan 1,10,99 root primary
S2(config)# spanning-tree mode rapid-pvst
Switch S3
S3(config)# vlan 10
S3(config-vlan)# name User
S3(config-vlan)# vlan 99
S3(config-vlan)# name Management
S3(config-vlan)# exit
S3(config)# interface f0/18
S3(config-if)# no shutdown
S3(config-if)# switchport mode access
S3(config-if)# switchport access vlan 10
S3(config-if)# spanning-tree portfast
S3(config-if)# spanning-tree bpduguard enable
S3(config-if)# interface f0/1
S3(config-if)# no shutdown
S3(config-if)# switchport mode trunk
S3(config-if)# switchport trunk native vlan 99
S3(config-if)# interface f0/3
S3(config-if)# no shutdown
S3(config-if)# switchport mode trunk
S3(config-if)# switchport trunk native vlan 99
S3(config-if)# interface vlan 99
S3(config-if)# ip address 192.168.1.13 255.255.255.0
S3(config-if)# exit
S3(config)# spanning-tree mode rapid-pvst
Device Configs – Final
Switch S1
S1#show run
Building configuration...
Current configuration : 1963 bytes
!
version 15.0
no service pad
service timestamps debug datetime msec
service timestamps log datetime msec
no service password-encryption
!
hostname S1
!
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Page 20 of 28
Lab – Configuring Rapid PVST+, PortFast, and BPDU Guard
boot-start-marker
boot-end-marker
!
enable secret 4 06YFDUHH61wAE/kLkDq9BGho1QM5EnRtoyr8cHAUg.2
!
no aaa new-model
system mtu routing 1500
!
no ip domain-lookup
!
spanning-tree mode rapid-pvst
spanning-tree extend system-id
spanning-tree vlan 1,10,99 priority 28672
!
vlan internal allocation policy ascending
!
interface FastEthernet0/1
switchport trunk native vlan 99
switchport mode trunk
!
interface FastEthernet0/2
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/3
switchport trunk native vlan 99
switchport mode trunk
!
interface FastEthernet0/4
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/5
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/6
switchport access vlan 10
switchport mode access
spanning-tree portfast
spanning-tree bpduguard enable
!
interface FastEthernet0/7
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/8
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/9
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/10
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/11
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/12
shutdown
!
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 21 of 28
Lab – Configuring Rapid PVST+, PortFast, and BPDU Guard
interface FastEthernet0/13
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/14
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/15
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/16
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/17
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/18
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/19
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/20
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/21
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/22
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/23
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/24
shutdown
!
interface GigabitEthernet0/1
shutdown
!
interface GigabitEthernet0/2
shutdown
!
interface Vlan1
no ip address
!
interface Vlan99
ip address 192.168.1.11 255.255.255.0
!
ip http server
ip http secure-server
!
line con 0
password cisco
logging synchronous
login
line vty 0 4
password cisco
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 22 of 28
Lab – Configuring Rapid PVST+, PortFast, and BPDU Guard
login
line vty 5 15
password cisco
login
!
end
Switch S2
S2#show run
Building configuration...
Current configuration : 1864 bytes
!
version 15.0
no service pad
service timestamps debug datetime msec
service timestamps log datetime msec
no service password-encryption
!
hostname S2
!
boot-start-marker
boot-end-marker
!
enable secret 4 06YFDUHH61wAE/kLkDq9BGho1QM5EnRtoyr8cHAUg.2
!
no aaa new-model
system mtu routing 1500
!
no ip domain-lookup
!
spanning-tree mode rapid-pvst
spanning-tree extend system-id
spanning-tree vlan 1,10,99 priority 24576
!
vlan internal allocation policy ascending
!
interface FastEthernet0/1
switchport trunk native vlan 99
switchport mode trunk
!
interface FastEthernet0/2
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/3
switchport trunk native vlan 99
switchport mode trunk
!
interface FastEthernet0/4
shutdown
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 23 of 28
Lab – Configuring Rapid PVST+, PortFast, and BPDU Guard
!
interface
shutdown
!
interface
shutdown
!
interface
shutdown
!
interface
shutdown
!
interface
shutdown
!
interface
shutdown
!
interface
shutdown
!
interface
shutdown
!
interface
shutdown
!
interface
shutdown
!
interface
shutdown
!
interface
shutdown
!
interface
shutdown
!
interface
shutdown
!
interface
shutdown
!
interface
shutdown
!
FastEthernet0/5
FastEthernet0/6
FastEthernet0/7
FastEthernet0/8
FastEthernet0/9
FastEthernet0/10
FastEthernet0/11
FastEthernet0/12
FastEthernet0/13
FastEthernet0/14
FastEthernet0/15
FastEthernet0/16
FastEthernet0/17
FastEthernet0/18
FastEthernet0/19
FastEthernet0/20
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 24 of 28
Lab – Configuring Rapid PVST+, PortFast, and BPDU Guard
interface FastEthernet0/21
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/22
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/23
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/24
shutdown
!
interface GigabitEthernet0/1
shutdown
!
interface GigabitEthernet0/2
shutdown
!
interface Vlan1
no ip address
!
interface Vlan99
ip address 192.168.1.12 255.255.255.0
!
ip http server
ip http secure-server
!
!
line con 0
password cisco
logging synchronous
login
line vty 0 4
password cisco
login
line vty 5 15
password cisco
login
!
end
Switch S3
S3#show run
Building configuration...
Current configuration : 1935 bytes
!
version 15.0
no service pad
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 25 of 28
Lab – Configuring Rapid PVST+, PortFast, and BPDU Guard
service timestamps debug datetime msec
service timestamps log datetime msec
no service password-encryption
!
hostname S3
!
boot-start-marker
boot-end-marker
!
enable secret 4 06YFDUHH61wAE/kLkDq9BGho1QM5EnRtoyr8cHAUg.2
!
no aaa new-model
system mtu routing 1500
!
no ip domain-lookup
!
spanning-tree mode rapid-pvst
spanning-tree portfast default
spanning-tree portfast bpduguard default
spanning-tree extend system-id
!
vlan internal allocation policy ascending
!
interface FastEthernet0/1
switchport trunk native vlan 99
switchport mode trunk
!
interface FastEthernet0/2
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/3
switchport trunk native vlan 99
switchport mode trunk
!
interface FastEthernet0/4
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/5
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/6
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/7
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/8
shutdown
!
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 26 of 28
Lab – Configuring Rapid PVST+, PortFast, and BPDU Guard
interface FastEthernet0/9
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/10
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/11
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/12
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/13
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/14
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/15
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/16
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/17
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/18
switchport access vlan 10
switchport mode access
!
interface FastEthernet0/19
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/20
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/21
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/22
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/23
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/24
shutdown
!
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 27 of 28
Lab – Configuring Rapid PVST+, PortFast, and BPDU Guard
interface GigabitEthernet0/1
shutdown
!
interface GigabitEthernet0/2
shutdown
!
interface Vlan1
no ip address
!
interface Vlan99
ip address 192.168.1.13 255.255.255.0
!
ip http server
ip http secure-server
!
line con 0
password cisco
logging synchronous
login
line vty 0 4
password cisco
login
line vty 5 15
password cisco
login
!
end
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 28 of 28
Lab – Configuring HSRP and GLBP (Instructor Version)
Instructor Note: Red font color or Gray highlights indicate text that appears in the instructor copy only.
Topology
© 2014 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 1 of 20
Lab – Configuring HSRP and GLBP
Addressing Table
Device
R1
Interface
IP Address
Subnet Mask
Default Gateway
G0/1
192.168.1.1
255.255.255.0
N/A
S0/0/0 (DCE)
10.1.1.1
255.255.255.252
N/A
S0/0/0
10.1.1.2
255.255.255.252
N/A
S0/0/1 (DCE)
10.2.2.2
255.255.255.252
N/A
Lo1
209.165.200.225
255.255.255.224
N/A
G0/1
192.168.1.3
255.255.255.0
N/A
S0/0/1
10.2.2.1
255.255.255.252
N/A
S1
VLAN 1
192.168.1.11
255.255.255.0
192.168.1.1
S3
VLAN 1
192.168.1.13
255.255.255.0
192.168.1.3
PC-A
NIC
192.168.1.31
255.255.255.0
192.168.1.1
PC-C
NIC
192.168.1.33
255.255.255.0
192.168.1.3
R2
R3
Objectives
Part 1: Build the Network and Verify Connectivity
Part 2: Configure First Hop Redundancy using HSRP
Part 3: Configure First Hop Redundancy using GLBP
Background / Scenario
Spanning tree provides loop-free redundancy between switches within your LAN. However, it does not
provide redundant default gateways for end-user devices within your network if one of your routers fails. First
Hop Redundancy Protocols (FHRPs) provide redundant default gateways for end devices with no end-user
configuration necessary.
In this lab, you will configure two FHRPs. In Part 2, you will configure Cisco’s Hot Standby Routing Protocol
(HSRP), and in Part 3 you will configure Cisco’s Gateway Load Balancing Protocol (GLBP).
Note: The routers used with CCNA hands-on labs are Cisco 1941 Integrated Services Routers (ISRs) with
Cisco IOS Release 15.2(4)M3 (universalk9 image). The switches used are Cisco Catalyst 2960s with Cisco
IOS Release 15.0(2) (lanbasek9 image). Other routers, switches, and Cisco IOS versions can be used.
Depending on the model and Cisco IOS version, the commands available and output produced might vary
from what is shown in the labs. Refer to the Router Interface Summary Table at the end of this lab for the
correct interface identifiers.
Note: Make sure that the routers and switches have been erased and have no startup configurations. If you
are unsure, contact your instructor.
Instructor Note: Refer to the Instructor Lab Manual for the procedures to initialize and reload devices.
Required Resources

3 Routers (Cisco 1941 with Cisco IOS Release 15.2(4)M3 universal image or comparable)

2 Switches (Cisco 2960 with Cisco IOS Release 15.0(2) lanbasek9 image or comparable)

2 PCs (Windows 7, Vista, or XP with terminal emulation program, such as Tera Term)
© 2014 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 2 of 20
Lab – Configuring HSRP and GLBP

Console cables to configure the Cisco IOS devices via the console ports

Ethernet and serial cables as shown in the topology
Part 1: Build the Network and Verify Connectivity
In Part 1, you will set up the network topology and configure basic settings, such as the interface IP
addresses, static routing, device access, and passwords.
Step 1: Cable the network as shown in the topology.
Attach the devices as shown in the topology diagram, and cable as necessary.
Step 2: Configure PC hosts.
Step 3: Initialize and reload the routers and switches as necessary.
Step 4: Configure basic settings for each router.
a.
Disable DNS lookup.
b.
Configure the device name as shown in the topology.
c.
Configure IP addresses for the routers as listed in the Addressing Table.
d.
Set clock rate to 128000 for all DCE serial interfaces.
e.
Assign class as the encrypted privileged EXEC mode password.
f.
Assign cisco for the console and vty password and enable login.
g.
Configure logging synchronous to prevent console messages from interrupting command entry.
h.
Copy the running configuration to the startup configuration.
Step 5: Configure basic settings for each switch.
a.
Disable DNS lookup.
b.
Configure the device name as shown in the topology.
c.
Assign class as the encrypted privileged EXEC mode password.
d.
Configure IP addresses for the switches as listed in the Addressing Table.
e.
Configure the default gateway on each switch.
f.
Assign cisco for the console and vty password and enable login.
g.
Configure logging synchronous to prevent console messages from interrupting command entry.
h.
Copy the running configuration to the startup configuration.
Step 6: Verify connectivity between PC-A and PC-C.
Ping from PC-A to PC-C. Were the ping results successful? ________________ Yes
If the pings are not successful, troubleshoot the basic device configurations before continuing.
Note: It may be necessary to disable the PC firewall to successfully ping between PCs.
© 2014 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 3 of 20
Lab – Configuring HSRP and GLBP
Step 7: Configure routing.
a.
Configure OSPF on the routers in area 0 with process ID of 1. Add all the networks, except
209.165.200.224/27 into the OSPF process.
b.
Configure a default route on R2 using Lo1 as the exit interface to 209.165.200.224/27 network.
c.
On R2, use the following commands to redistribute the default route into the OSPF process.
R2(config)# router ospf 1
R2(config-router)# default-information originate
Instructor Note: The command default-information originate will be covered in a later chapter.
Step 8: Verify connectivity.
a.
From PC-A, you should be able to ping every interface on R1, R2, R3, and PC-C. Were all pings
successful? ______________ Yes
If the pings are not successful, troubleshoot the basic device configurations before continuing.
b.
From PC-C, you should be able to ping every interface on R1, R2, R3, and PC-A. Were all pings
successful? ______________ Yes
If the pings are not successful, troubleshoot the basic device configurations before continuing.
Part 2: Configure First Hop Redundancy Using HSRP
Even though the topology has been designed with some redundancy (two routers and two switches on the
same LAN network), both PC-A and PC-C are configured with only one gateway address. PC-A is using R1
and PC-C is using R3. If either of these routers or the interfaces on the routers went down, the PC could lose
its connection to the Internet.
In Part 2, you will test how the network behaves both before and after configuring HSRP. To do this, you will
determine the path that packets take to the loopback address on R2.
Step 1: Determine the path for Internet traffic for PC-A and PC-C.
a.
From a command prompt on PC-A, issue a tracert command to the 209.165.200.225 loopback address
of R2.
C:\ tracert 209.165.200.225
Tracing route to 209.165.200.225 over a maximum of 30 hops
1
2
1 ms
13 ms
1 ms
13 ms
1 ms
13 ms
192.168.1.1
209.165.200.225
Trace complete.
What path did the packets take from PC-A to 209.165.200.225? _________________________________
PC-A to R1 to R2
b.
From a command prompt on PC-C, issue a tracert command to the 209.165.200.225 loopback address
of R2.
What path did the packets take from PC-C to 209.165.200.225? ________________________________
PC-C to R3 to R2
© 2014 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 4 of 20
Lab – Configuring HSRP and GLBP
Step 2: Start a ping session on PC-A, and break the connection between S1 and R1.
a.
From a command prompt on PC-A, issue a ping –t command to the 209.165.200.225 address on R2.
Make sure you leave the command prompt window open.
Note: The pings continue until you press Ctrl+C, or until you close the command prompt window.
C:\ ping –t 209.165.200.225
Pinging 209.165.200.225 with 32 bytes of data:
Reply
Reply
Reply
Reply
Reply
Reply
from
from
from
from
from
from
209.165.200.225:
209.165.200.225:
209.165.200.225:
209.165.200.225:
209.165.200.225:
209.165.200.225:
bytes=32
bytes=32
bytes=32
bytes=32
bytes=32
bytes=32
time=9ms
time=9ms
time=9ms
time=9ms
time=9ms
time=9ms
TTL=254
TTL=254
TTL=254
TTL=254
TTL=254
TTL=254
Reply from 209.165.200.225: bytes=32 time=9ms TTL=254
Reply from 209.165.200.225: bytes=32 time=9ms TTL=254
Reply from 209.165.200.225: bytes=32 time=9ms TTL=254
Reply from 209.165.200.225: bytes=32 time=9ms TTL=254
Reply from 209.165.200.225: bytes=32 time=9ms TTL=254
Reply from 209.165.200.225: bytes=32 time=9ms TTL=254
Reply from 209.165.200.225: bytes=32 time=9ms TTL=254
<output omitted>
b.
As the ping continues, disconnect the Ethernet cable from F0/5 on S1. You can also shut down the S1
F0/5 interface, which creates the same result.
What happened to the ping traffic?
____________________________________________________________________________________
After the cable was disconnected from F0/5 on S1 (or the interface was shut down), pings failed. Sample
output is below.
Request timed out.
Request
Request
Request
<output
c.
timed out.
timed out.
timed out.
omitted>
Repeat Steps 2a and 2b on PC-C and S3. Disconnect cable from F0/5 on S3.
What were your results?
____________________________________________________________________________________
The results were the same as on PC-A. After the Ethernet cable was disconnected from F0/5 on S3, the
pings failed.
d.
Reconnect the Ethernet cables to F0/5 or enable the F0/5 interface on both S1 and S3, respectively. Reissue pings to 209.165.200.225 from both PC-A and PC-C to make sure connectivity is re-established.
Step 3: Configure HSRP on R1 and R3.
In this step, you will configure HSRP and change the default gateway address on PC-A, PC-C, S1, and S2 to
the virtual IP address for HSRP. R1 becomes the active router via configuration of the HSRP priority
command.
a.
Configure HSRP on R1.
© 2014 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 5 of 20
Lab – Configuring HSRP and GLBP
R1(config)# interface g0/1
R1(config-if)# standby 1 ip 192.168.1.254
R1(config-if)# standby 1 priority 150
R1(config-if)# standby 1 preempt
b.
Configure HSRP on R3.
R3(config)# interface g0/1
R3(config-if)# standby 1 ip 192.168.1.254
c.
Verify HSRP by issuing the show standby command on R1 and R3.
R1# show standby
GigabitEthernet0/1 - Group 1
State is Active
1 state change, last state change 00:02:11
Virtual IP address is 192.168.1.254
Active virtual MAC address is 0000.0c07.ac01
Local virtual MAC address is 0000.0c07.ac01 (v1 default)
Hello time 3 sec, hold time 10 sec
Next hello sent in 0.784 secs
Preemption enabled
Active router is local
Standby router is 192.168.1.3, priority 100 (expires in 9.568 sec)
Priority 150 (configured 150)
Group name is "hsrp-Gi0/1-1" (default)
R3# show standby
GigabitEthernet0/1 - Group 1
State is Standby
4 state changes, last state change 00:02:20
Virtual IP address is 192.168.1.254
Active virtual MAC address is 0000.0c07.ac01
Local virtual MAC address is 0000.0c07.ac01 (v1 default)
Hello time 3 sec, hold time 10 sec
Next hello sent in 2.128 secs
Preemption disabled
Active router is 192.168.1.1, priority 150 (expires in 10.592 sec)
Standby router is local
Priority 100 (default 100)
Group name is "hsrp-Gi0/1-1" (default)
Using the output shown above, answer the following questions:
Which router is the active router? _____________________ R1
What is the MAC address for the virtual IP address? ____________________________ 0000.0c07.ac01
What is the IP address and priority of the standby router?
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
IP address is 192.168.1.3 and the priority is 100 (the default which is less than that of R1, the active
router, with a priority of 150).
© 2014 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 6 of 20
Lab – Configuring HSRP and GLBP
d.
Use the show standby brief command on R1 and R3 to view an HSRP status summary. Sample output
is shown below.
R1# show standby brief
P indicates configured to preempt.
|
Interface
Gi0/1
Grp
1
Pri P State
150 P Active
Active
local
Standby
192.168.1.3
Virtual IP
192.168.1.254
R3# show standby brief
P indicates configured to preempt.
|
Interface
Gi0/1
e.
Grp
1
Pri P State
Active
100
Standby 192.168.1.1
Standby
local
Virtual IP
192.168.1.254
Change the default gateway address for PC-A, PC-C, S1, and S3. Which address should you use?
_____________________________________________________________________________ _______
192.168.1.254
f.
Verify the new settings. Issue a ping from both PC-A and PC-C to the loopback address of R2. Are the
pings successful? __________ Yes
Step 4: Start a ping session on PC-A and break the connection between the switch that is
connected to the Active HSRP router (R1).
a.
From a command prompt on PC-A, issue a ping –t command to the 209.165.200.225 address on R2.
Ensure that you leave the command prompt window open.
b.
As the ping continues, disconnect the Ethernet cable from F0/5 on S 1 or shut down the F0/5 interface.
What happened to the ping traffic?
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
A few packets may be dropped while the Standby router takes over. Sample output is shown below:
Reply from 209.165.200.225: bytes=32 time=9ms TTL=254
Request timed out.
Request timed out.
Reply from 209.165.200.225: bytes=32 time=9ms TTL=254
<output Omitted>
Step 5: Verify HSRP settings on R1 and R3.
a.
Issue the show standby brief command on R1 and R3.
Which router is the active router? __________________________________ R3 is now the active router.
b.
Reconnect the cable between the switch and the router or enable interface F0/5.
c.
Disable the HSRP configuration commands on R1 and R3.
R1(config)# interface g0/1
R1(config-if)# no standby 1
© 2014 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 7 of 20
Lab – Configuring HSRP and GLBP
R3(config)# interface g0/1
R3(config-if)# no standby 1
Part 3: Configure First Hop Redundancy Using GLBP
By default, HSRP does NOT do load balancing. The active router always handles all of the traffic, while the
standby router sits unused, unless there is a link failure. This is not an efficient use of resources. GLBP
provides nonstop path redundancy for IP by sharing protocol and MAC addresses between redundant
gateways. GLBP also allows a group of routers to share the load of the default gateway on a LAN.
Configuring GLBP is very similar to HSRP. Load balancing can be done in a variety of ways using GLBP. In
this lab, you will use the round-robin method.
Step 1: Configure GLBP on R1 and R3.
a.
Configure GLBP on R1.
R1(config)# interface
R1(config-if)# glbp 1
R1(config-if)# glbp 1
R1(config-if)# glbp 1
R1(config-if)# glbp 1
b.
g0/1
ip 192.168.1.254
preempt
priority 150
load-balancing round-robin
Configure GLBP on R3.
R3(config)# interface g0/1
R3(config-if)# glbp 1 ip 192.168.1.254
R3(config-if)# glbp 1 load-balancing round-robin
Step 2: Verify GLBP on R1 and R3.
a.
Issue the show glbp brief command on R1 and R3.
R1# show glbp brief
Interface
Gi0/1
Gi0/1
Gi0/1
Grp
1
1
1
Fwd
1
2
Pri
150
-
State
Active
Active
Listen
Address
192.168.1.254
0007.b400.0101
0007.b400.0102
Active router
local
local
192.168.1.3
Standby router
192.168.1.3
-
R3# show glbp brief
Interface
Grp
Fwd Pri State
Address
Active router
Standby router
Gi0/1
Gi0/1
1
1
1
100 Standby
Listen
192.168.1.254
0007.b400.0101
192.168.1.1
192.168.1.1
local
-
Gi0/1
1
2
-
0007.b400.0102
local
-
Active
Step 3: Generate traffic from PC-A and PC-C to the R2 loopback interface.
a.
From a command prompt on PC-A, ping the 209.165.200.225 address of R2.
C:\> ping 209.165.200.225
b.
Issue an arp –a command on PC-A. Which MAC address is used for the 192.168.1.254 address?
____________________________________________________________________________________
Answers will vary due to timing, but the MAC address will be either R1 or R3 GLBP G0/1 interface MAC.
© 2014 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 8 of 20
Lab – Configuring HSRP and GLBP
c.
Generate more traffic to the loopback interface of R2. Issue another arp –a command. Did the MAC
address change for the default gateway address of 192.168.1.254?
____________________________________________________________________________________
Yes. The MAC address changed from R1 to R3 and back. Note: You may need to have students
generate traffic multiple times to see the change.
As you can see, both R1 and R3 play a role in forwarding traffic to the loopback interface of R2. Neither
router remains idle.
Step 4: Start a ping session on PC-A, and break the connection between the switch that is
connected to R1.
a.
From a command prompt on PC-A, issue a ping –t command to the 209.165.200.225 address on R2.
Make sure you leave the command prompt window open.
b.
As the ping continues, disconnect the Ethernet cable from F0/5 on S1 or shut down the F0/5 interface.
What happened to the ping traffic?
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
A few packets are dropped while transitioning to the Standby router. Sample output is shown below.
Reply from 209.165.200.225: bytes=32 time=9ms TTL=254
Request timed out.
Reply from 209.165.200.225: bytes=32 time=18ms TTL=252
Reply from 209.165.200.225: bytes=32 time=18ms TTL=252
Reflection
1.
Why would there be a need for redundancy in a LAN?
_______________________________________________________________________________________
In today’s networks, down time can be a critical issue affecting sales, productivity , and general connectivity
(IP Telephony phones for example).
2.
If you had a choice, which protocol would you implement in your network, HSRP or GLBP? Explain your
choice.
_______________________________________________________________________________________
Answers will vary. HSRP is easier to configure. There are more options with GLBP which can make it
complex to configure.
© 2014 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 9 of 20
Lab – Configuring HSRP and GLBP
Router Interface Summary Table
Router Interface Summary
Router Model
Ethernet Interface #1
Ethernet Interface #2
Serial Interface #1
Serial Interface #2
1800
Fast Ethernet 0/0
(F0/0)
Fast Ethernet 0/1
(F0/1)
Serial 0/0/0 (S0/0/0)
Serial 0/0/1 (S0/0/1)
1900
Gigabit Ethernet 0/0
(G0/0)
Gigabit Ethernet 0/1
(G0/1)
Serial 0/0/0 (S0/0/0)
Serial 0/0/1 (S0/0/1)
2801
Fast Ethernet 0/0
(F0/0)
Fast Ethernet 0/1
(F0/1)
Serial 0/1/0 (S0/1/0)
Serial 0/1/1 (S0/1/1)
2811
Fast Ethernet 0/0
(F0/0)
Fast Ethernet 0/1
(F0/1)
Serial 0/0/0 (S0/0/0)
Serial 0/0/1 (S0/0/1)
2900
Gigabit Ethernet 0/0
(G0/0)
Gigabit Ethernet 0/1
(G0/1)
Serial 0/0/0 (S0/0/0)
Serial 0/0/1 (S0/0/1)
Note: To find out how the router is configured, look at the interfaces to identify the type of router and how many
interfaces the router has. There is no way to effectively list all the combinations of configurations for each router
class. This table includes identifiers for the possible combinations of Ethernet and Serial interfaces in the device.
The table does not include any other type of interface, even though a specific router may contain one. An
example of this might be an ISDN BRI interface. The string in parenthesis is the legal abbreviation that can be
used in Cisco IOS commands to represent the interface.
Device Configs
Router R1 (After Part 3 of this lab)
R1# show run
Building configuration...
Current configuration : 1375 bytes
!
version 15.2
service timestamps debug datetime msec
service timestamps log datetime msec
no service password-encryption
!
hostname R1
!
boot-start-marker
boot-end-marker
enable secret 4 06YFDUHH61wAE/kLkDq9BGho1QM5EnRtoyr8cHAUg.2
!
no aaa new-model
!
no ip domain lookup
ip cef
no ipv6 cef
multilink bundle-name authenticated
© 2014 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 10 of 20
Lab – Configuring HSRP and GLBP
!
interface Embedded-Service-Engine0/0
no ip address
shutdown
!
interface GigabitEthernet0/0
no ip address
shutdown
duplex auto
speed auto
!
interface GigabitEthernet0/1
ip address 192.168.1.1 255.255.255.0
glbp 1 ip 192.168.1.254
glbp 1 priority 150
glbp 1 preempt
duplex auto
speed auto
!
interface Serial0/0/0
ip address 10.1.1.1 255.255.255.252
clock rate 128000
!
interface Serial0/0/1
no ip address
shutdown
!
!
router ospf 1
network 10.1.1.0 0.0.0.3 area 0
network 192.168.1.0 0.0.0.255 area 0
!
ip forward-protocol nd
!
no ip http server
no ip http secure-server
!
!
!
control-plane
!
line con 0
password cisco
logging synchronous
login
line aux 0
line 2
no activation-character
no exec
© 2014 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 11 of 20
Lab – Configuring HSRP and GLBP
transport preferred none
transport input all
transport output pad telnet rlogin lapb-ta mop udptn v120 ssh
stopbits 1
line vty 0 4
password cisco
login
transport input all
!
scheduler allocate 20000 1000
!
end
Router R2
R2# show run
Building configuration...
Current configuration : 1412 bytes
!
version 15.2
service timestamps debug datetime msec
service timestamps log datetime msec
no service password-encryption
!
hostname R2
!
boot-start-marker
boot-end-marker
!
!
enable secret 4 06YFDUHH61wAE/kLkDq9BGho1QM5EnRtoyr8cHAUg.2
!
no aaa new-model
!
no ip domain lookup
ip cef
no ipv6 cef
multilink bundle-name authenticated
!
interface Loopback1
ip address 209.165.200.225 255.255.255.224
!
interface Embedded-Service-Engine0/0
no ip address
shutdown
!
interface GigabitEthernet0/0
no ip address
shutdown
© 2014 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 12 of 20
Lab – Configuring HSRP and GLBP
duplex auto
speed auto
!
interface GigabitEthernet0/1
no ip address
shutdown
duplex auto
speed auto
!
interface Serial0/0/0
ip address 10.1.1.2 255.255.255.252
!
interface Serial0/0/1
ip address 10.2.2.2 255.255.255.252
clock rate 128000
!
!
router ospf 1
network 10.1.1.0 0.0.0.3 area 0
network 10.2.2.0 0.0.0.3 area 0
default-information originate
!
ip forward-protocol nd
!
no ip http server
no ip http secure-server
!
ip route 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 Loopback1
!
!
control-plane
!
!
line con 0
password cisco
logging synchronous
login
line aux 0
line 2
no activation-character
no exec
transport preferred none
transport input all
transport output pad telnet rlogin lapb-ta mop udptn v120 ssh
stopbits 1
line vty 0 4
password cisco
login
transport input all
© 2014 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 13 of 20
Lab – Configuring HSRP and GLBP
!
scheduler allocate 20000 1000
!
end
Router R3 (After Part 3 of this Lab)
R3# show run
Building configuration...
Current configuration : 1319 bytes
!
version 15.2
service timestamps debug datetime msec
service timestamps log datetime msec
no service password-encryption
!
hostname R3
!
boot-start-marker
boot-end-marker
!
!
enable secret 4 06YFDUHH61wAE/kLkDq9BGho1QM5EnRtoyr8cHAUg.2
!
no aaa new-model
!
no ip domain lookup
ip cef
no ipv6 cef
multilink bundle-name authenticated
!
interface Embedded-Service-Engine0/0
no ip address
shutdown
!
interface GigabitEthernet0/0
no ip address
shutdown
duplex auto
speed auto
!
interface GigabitEthernet0/1
ip address 192.168.1.3 255.255.255.0
glbp 1 ip 192.168.1.254
duplex auto
speed auto
!
interface Serial0/0/0
no ip address
© 2014 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 14 of 20
Lab – Configuring HSRP and GLBP
shutdown
clock rate 2000000
!
interface Serial0/0/1
ip address 10.2.2.1 255.255.255.252
!
!
router ospf 1
network 10.2.2.0 0.0.0.3 area 0
network 192.168.1.0 0.0.0.255 area 0
!
ip forward-protocol nd
!
no ip http server
no ip http secure-server
!
!
!
control-plane
!
line con 0
password cisco
logging synchronous
login
line aux 0
line 2
no activation-character
no exec
transport preferred none
transport input all
transport output pad telnet rlogin lapb-ta mop udptn v120 ssh
stopbits 1
line vty 0 4
password cisco
login
transport input all
!
scheduler allocate 20000 1000
!
end
Switch S1
S1# show run
Building configuration...
Current configuration : 3114 bytes
!
version 15.0
no service pad
© 2014 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 15 of 20
Lab – Configuring HSRP and GLBP
service timestamps debug datetime msec
service timestamps log datetime msec
no service password-encryption
!
hostname S1
!
boot-start-marker
boot-end-marker
!
enable secret 4 06YFDUHH61wAE/kLkDq9BGho1QM5EnRtoyr8cHAUg.2
!
no aaa new-model
system mtu routing 1500
!
!
no ip domain-lookup
!
crypto pki trustpoint TP-self-signed-2530377856
enrollment selfsigned
subject-name cn=IOS-Self-Signed-Certificate-2530377856
revocation-check none
rsakeypair TP-self-signed-2530377856
!
!
!1panning-tree mode pvst
spanning-tree extend system-id
!
vlan internal allocation policy ascending
!
!
interface FastEthernet0/1
!
interface FastEthernet0/2
!
interface FastEthernet0/3
!
interface FastEthernet0/4
!
interface FastEthernet0/5
!
interface FastEthernet0/6
!
interface FastEthernet0/7
!
interface FastEthernet0/8
!
interface FastEthernet0/9
!
interface FastEthernet0/10
© 2014 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 16 of 20
Lab – Configuring HSRP and GLBP
!
interface FastEthernet0/11
!
interface FastEthernet0/12
!
interface FastEthernet0/13
!
interface FastEthernet0/14
!
interface FastEthernet0/15
!
interface FastEthernet0/16
!
interface FastEthernet0/17
!
interface FastEthernet0/18
!
interface FastEthernet0/19
!
interface FastEthernet0/20
!
interface FastEthernet0/21
!
interface FastEthernet0/22
!
interface FastEthernet0/23
!
interface FastEthernet0/24
!
interface GigabitEthernet0/1
!
interface GigabitEthernet0/2
!
interface Vlan1
ip address 192.168.1.11 255.255.255.0
!
ip default-gateway 192.168.1.254
ip http server
ip http secure-server
!
line con 0
password cisco
logging synchronous
login
line vty 0 4
password cisco
login
line vty 5 15
password cisco
© 2014 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 17 of 20
Lab – Configuring HSRP and GLBP
login
!
end
Switch S3
S3# show run
Building configuration...
Current configuration : 2974 bytes
!
version 15.0
no service pad
service timestamps debug datetime msec
service timestamps log datetime msec
no service password-encryption
!
hostname S3
!
boot-start-marker
boot-end-marker
!
enable secret 4 06YFDUHH61wAE/kLkDq9BGho1QM5EnRtoyr8cHAUg.2
!
no aaa new-model
system mtu routing 1500
!
!
no ip domain-lookup
!
!
crypto pki trustpoint TP-self-signed-2530358400
enrollment selfsigned
subject-name cn=IOS-Self-Signed-Certificate-2530358400
revocation-check none
rsakeypair TP-self-signed-2530358400
!
!
!
spanning-tree mode pvst
spanning-tree extend system-id
!
vlan internal allocation policy ascending
!
interface FastEthernet0/1
!
interface FastEthernet0/2
!
interface FastEthernet0/3
!
© 2014 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 18 of 20
Lab – Configuring HSRP and GLBP
interface FastEthernet0/4
!
interface FastEthernet0/5
!
interface FastEthernet0/6
!
interface FastEthernet0/7
!
interface FastEthernet0/8
!
interface FastEthernet0/9
!
interface FastEthernet0/10
!
interface FastEthernet0/11
!
interface FastEthernet0/12
!
interface FastEthernet0/13
!
interface FastEthernet0/14
!
interface FastEthernet0/15
!
interface FastEthernet0/16
!
interface FastEthernet0/17
!
interface FastEthernet0/18
!
interface FastEthernet0/19
!
interface FastEthernet0/20
!
interface FastEthernet0/21
!
interface FastEthernet0/22
!
interface FastEthernet0/23
!
interface FastEthernet0/24
!
interface GigabitEthernet0/1
!
interface GigabitEthernet0/2
!
interface Vlan1
ip address 192.168.1.13 255.255.255.0
!
© 2014 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 19 of 20
Lab – Configuring HSRP and GLBP
ip default-gateway 192.168.1.254
ip http server
ip http secure-server
!
!
line con 0
password cisco
logging synchronous
login
line vty 0 4
password cisco
login
line vty 5 15
password cisco
login
!
end
© 2014 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 20 of 20
Documentation Tree (Instructor Version)
Instructor Note: Red font color or Gray highlights indicate text that appears in the instructor copy only.
Objective
Identify common STP configuration issues.
Instructor Note: This activity may be completed individually or in small groups.
Scenario
The employees in your building are having difficulty accessing a web server on the network. You look for the
network documentation that the previous network engineer used before he transitioned to a new job; however,
you cannot find any network documentation whatsoever.
Therefore, you decide create your own network recordkeeping system. You decide to start at the access layer of
your network hierarchy. This is where redundant switches are located, as well as the company servers, printers,
and local hosts.
You create a matrix to record your documentation and include access layer switches on the list. You also decide
to document switch names, ports in use, cabling connections, and root ports, designated ports, and alternate
ports.
For more detailed instructions on how to design your model, use the student PDF that accompanies this activity.
Resources

Packet Tracer software

Word processing software
Directions
Step 1: Create the topology diagram with three redundant switches.
Step 2: Connect host devices to the switches.
Step 3: Create the switch documentation matrix.
a. Name and switch location
b. General switch description
c.
Model, IOS version, and image name
d. Switch serial number
e. MAC address
f.
Ports currently in use
g. Cable connections
h. Root ports
i.
Designated ports, status, and cost
j.
Alternate ports, status, and cost
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 1 of 5
Documentation Tree
Step 4: Use show commands to locate Layer 2 switch information.
a. show version
b. show cdp neighbors detail
c.
show spanning-tree
Instructor – Example Activity Answer
Topology Diagram Example
Documentation Form Example (S1 only)
Switch Name and Location
S1 – Main Distribution Facility
General Switch Description
Access Layer Switch – grants network access for PCs
01-03
Switch Model, IOS Version, and Image Name
WS-C2960-24TT
12.2
C2960-LANBASE-M
Switch Serial Number
FOC1033Z1EY
Switch MAC Address
0050.0F5C.A2D1
Ports in Use
Fa0/2
Fa0/3
Fa0/1
Gi1/1
Gi1/2
Cable Connections
Fa0/2 connected to PC-02
Fa0/3 connected to PC-03
Fa0/1 connected to PC-01
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 2 of 5
Documentation Tree
Gi1/1 connected to S2 Gi1/1
Gi1/2 connected to S3 Gi1/2
Root Port
Gi1/2
Designated Port(s), Status, and Cost
Fa0/1, Forwarding, Cost 19
Fa0/3, Forwarding, Cost 19
Fa0/2, Forwarding, Cost 19
Alternate Port(s), Status, and Cost
(non-designated port) Gi1/1, Blocking, Cost 4
S1# show version
Cisco IOS Software, C2960 Software (C2960-LANBASE-M), Version 12.2(25)FX, RELEASE
SOFTWARE (fc1)
Copyright (c) 1986-2005 by Cisco Systems, Inc.
Compiled Wed 12-Oct-05 22:05 by pt_team
ROM: C2960 Boot Loader (C2960-HBOOT-M) Version 12.2(25r)FX, RELEASE SOFTWARE (fc4)
System returned to ROM by power-on
Cisco WS-C2960-24TT (RC32300) processor (revision C0) with 21039K bytes of memory.
24 FastEthernet/IEEE 802.3 interface(s)
2 Gigabit Ethernet/IEEE 802.3 interface(s)
63488K bytes of flash-simulated
Base ethernet MAC Address
Motherboard assembly number
Power supply part number
Motherboard serial number
Power supply serial number
Model revision number
Motherboard revision number
Model number
System serial number
Top Assembly Part Number
Top Assembly Revision Number
Version ID
CLEI Code Number
Hardware Board Revision Number
Switch
-----*
1
Ports
----26
Model
----WS-C2960-24TT
non-volatile configuration memory.
: 0050.0F5C.A2D1
: 73-9832-06
: 341-0097-02
: FOC103248MJ
: DCA102133JA
: B0
: C0
: WS-C2960-24TT
: FOC1033Z1EY
: 800-26671-02
: B0
: V02
: COM3K00BRA
: 0x01
SW Version
---------12.2
SW Image
---------C2960-LANBASE-M
Configuration register is 0xF
S1#
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 3 of 5
Documentation Tree
S1# show cdp neighbors detail
Device ID: S2
Entry address(es):
Platform: cisco 2960, Capabilities: Switch
Interface: GigabitEthernet1/1, Port ID (outgoing port): GigabitEthernet1/1
Holdtime: 151
Version :
Cisco IOS Software, C2960 Software (C2960-LANBASE-M), Version 12.2(25)FX, RELEASE
SOFTWARE (fc1)
Copyright (c) 1986-2005 by Cisco Systems, Inc.
Compiled Wed 12-Oct-05 22:05 by pt_team
advertisement version: 2
Duplex: full
--------------------------Device ID: S3
Entry address(es):
Platform: cisco 2960, Capabilities: Switch
Interface: GigabitEthernet1/2, Port ID (outgoing port): GigabitEthernet1/2
Holdtime: 151
Version :
Cisco IOS Software, C2960 Software (C2960-LANBASE-M), Version 12.2(25)FX, RELEASE
SOFTWARE (fc1)
Copyright (c) 1986-2005 by Cisco Systems, Inc.
Compiled Wed 12-Oct-05 22:05 by pt_team
advertisement version: 2
Duplex: full
S1#
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 4 of 5
Documentation Tree
S1# show spanning-tree
VLAN0001
Spanning tree enabled protocol ieee
Root ID
Priority
32769
Address
0001.635E.CE64
Cost
4
Port
26(GigabitEthernet1/2)
Hello Time 2 sec Max Age 20 sec Forward Delay 15 sec
Bridge ID
Priority
Address
Hello Time
Aging Time
Interface
---------------Fa0/1
Fa0/3
Fa0/2
Gi1/1
Gi1/2
Role
---Desg
Desg
Desg
Altn
Root
32769 (priority 32768 sys-id-ext 1)
0050.0F5C.A2D1
2 sec Max Age 20 sec Forward Delay 15 sec
20
Sts
--FWD
FWD
FWD
BLK
FWD
Cost
--------19
19
19
4
4
Prio.Nbr
-------128.1
128.3
128.2
128.25
128.26
Type
-------------------------------P2p
P2p
P2p
P2p
P2p
S1#
Identify elements of the model that map to IT-related content:

Designated ports

Root ports

Alternate ports

STP switch commands output

LAN, Access-Layer documentation
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 5 of 5
Imagine This (Instructor Version)
Instructor Note: Red font color or Gray highlights indicate text that appears in the instructor copy only.
Objective
Explain the operation of link aggregation in a switched LAN environment.
Instructor Notes: This activity is introductory in nature and designed to help students envision how switches can
be physically connected to use EtherChannel.
Students can work individually or in very small groups to research the EtherChannel concept and present their
findings briefly to the class.
Scenario
It is the end of the work day. In your small- to medium-sized business, you are trying to explain to the network
engineers about EtherChannel and how it looks when it is physically set up. The network engineers have
difficulties envisioning how two switches could possibly be connected via several links that collectively act as one
channel or connection. Your company is definitely considering implementing an EtherChannel network.
Therefore, you end the meeting with an assignment for the engineers. To prepare for the next day’s meeting, they
are to perform some research and bring to the meeting one graphic representation of an EtherChannel network
connection. They are tasked with explaining how an EtherChannel network operates to the other engineers.
When researching EtherChannel, a good question to search for is “What does EtherChannel look like?” Prepare a
few slides to demonstrate your research that will be presented to the network engineering group. These slides
should provide a solid grasp of how EtherChannels are physically created within a network topology. Your goal is
to ensure that everyone leaving the next meeting will have a good idea as to why they would consider moving to a
network topology using EtherChannel as an option.
Required Resources

Internet connectivity for research

Software program for presentation model
Step 1: Use the Internet to research graphics depicting EtherChannel.
Step 2: Prepare a three-slide presentation to share with the class.
a. The first slide should show a very short, concise definition of a switch-to-switch EtherChannel.
b. The second slide should show a graphic of how a switch-to-switch EtherChannel physical topology would
look if used in a small- to medium-sized business.
c.
The third slide should list three advantages of using EtherChannel.
Instructor Activity Example Resource
Slide 1: Definition
EtherChannel - EtherChannel provides incremental trunk speeds between Fast Ethernet, Gigabit Ethernet, and 10
Gigabit Ethernet. EtherChannel combines multiple Fast Ethernet up to 800 Mbps, Gigabit Ethernet up to 8 Gbps,
and 10 Gigabit Ethernet up to 80 Gbps.
Slide 2: EtherChannel Physical Graphic Example
EtherChannel Physical Image
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 1 of 2
Imagine This
Slide 3: Advantages to using EtherChannel (these will vary per student group):

Flexible choice of bundling physical connections

Scalable bandwidth with resiliency and load sharing across bundled switch links

Can also be used to connect router interfaces and servers
Identify elements of the model that map to IT-related content:

EtherChannel

Physical depiction of EtherChannel

Load balancing

Scalable bandwidth

Trunking
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 2 of 2
Lab – Configuring EtherChannel (Instructor Version)
Instructor Note: Red font color or Gray highlights indicate text that appears in the instructor copy only.
Topology
Addressing Table
Device
Interface
IP Address
Subnet Mask
S1
VLAN 99
192.168.99.11
255.255.255.0
S2
VLAN 99
192.168.99.12
255.255.255.0
S3
VLAN 99
192.168.99.13
255.255.255.0
PC-A
NIC
192.168.10.1
255.255.255.0
PC-B
NIC
192.168.10.2
255.255.255.0
PC-C
NIC
192.168.10.3
255.255.255.0
Objectives
Part 1: Configure Basic Switch Settings
Part 2: Configure PAgP
Part 3: Configure LACP
Background / Scenario
Link aggregation allows the creation of logical links that are comprised of two or more physical links. This
provides increased throughput beyond using only one physical link. Link aggregation also provides
redundancy if one of the links fails.
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 1 of 23
Lab – Configuring EtherChannel
In this lab, you will configure EtherChannel, a form of link aggregation used in switched networks. You will
configure EtherChannel using Port Aggregation Protocol (PAgP) and Link Aggregation Control Protocol
(LACP).
Note: PAgP is a Cisco-proprietary protocol that you can only run on Cisco switches and on switches that are
licensed vendors to support PAgP. LACP is a link aggregation protocol that is defined by IEEE 802.3ad, and it
is not associated with any specific vendor.
LACP allows Cisco switches to manage Ethernet channels between switches that conform to the 802.3ad
protocol. You can configure up to 16 ports to form a channel. Eight of the ports are in active mode and the
other eight are in standby mode. When any of the active ports fail, a standby port becomes active. Standby
mode works only for LACP, not for PAgP.
Note: The switches used with CCNA hands-on labs are Cisco Catalyst 2960s with Cisco IOS Release 15.0(2)
(lanbasek9 image). Other switches and Cisco IOS versions can be used. Depending on the model and Cisco
IOS version, the commands available and output produced might vary from what is shown in the labs.
Note: Make sure that the switches have been erased and have no startup configurations. If you are unsure,
contact your instructor.
Instructor Note: Refer to the Instructor Lab Manual for the procedures to initialize and reload devices.
Required Resources

3 Switches (Cisco 2960 with Cisco IOS Release 15.0(2) lanbasek9 image or comparable)

3 PCs (Windows 7, Vista, or XP with terminal emulation program, such as Tera Term)

Console cables to configure the Cisco IOS devices via the console ports

Ethernet cables as shown in the topology
Part 1: Configure Basic Switch Settings
In Part 1, you will set up the network topology and configure basic settings, such as the interface IP
addresses, device access, and passwords.
Step 1: Cable the network as shown in the topology.
Attach the devices as shown in the topology diagram, and cable as necessary.
Step 2: Initialize and reload the switches.
Step 3: Configure basic settings for each switch.
a. Disable DNS lookup.
b. Configure the device name as displayed in the topology.
c.
Encrypt plain text passwords.
d. Create a MOTD banner warning users that unauthorized access is prohibited.
e. Assign class as the encrypted privileged EXEC mode password.
f.
Assign cisco as the console and vty password and enable login.
g. Configure logging synchronous to prevent console message from interrupting command entry.
h. Shut down all switchports except the ports connected to PCs.
i.
Configure VLAN 99 and name it Management.
j.
Configure VLAN 10 and name it Staff.
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 2 of 23
Lab – Configuring EtherChannel
k.
Configure the switch ports with attached hosts as access ports in VLAN 10.
l.
Assign the IP addresses according to the Addressing Table.
m. Copy the running configuration to startup configuration.
Step 4: Configure the PCs.
Assign IP addresses to the PCs according to the Addressing Table.
Part 2: Configure PAgP
PAgP is a Cisco proprietary protocol for link aggregation. In Part 2, a link between S1 and S3 will be
configured using PAgP.
Step 1: Configure PAgP on S1 and S3.
For a link between S1 and S3, configure the ports on S1 with PAgP desirable mode and the ports on S3 with
PAgP auto mode. Enable the ports after PAgP modes have been configured.
S1(config)# interface range f0/3-4
S1(config-if-range)# channel-group 1 mode desirable
Creating a port-channel interface Port-channel 1
S1(config-if-range)# no shutdown
S3(config)# interface range f0/3-4
S3(config-if-range)# channel-group 1 mode auto
Creating a port-channel interface Port-channel 1
S3(config-if-range)# no shutdown
*Mar 1 00:09:12.792:
*Mar 1 00:09:12.792:
S3(config-if-range)#
*Mar 1 00:09:15.384:
changed state to up
*Mar 1 00:09:16.265:
changed state to up
S3(config-if-range)#
*Mar 1 00:09:16.357:
*Mar 1 00:09:17.364:
changed state to up
*Mar 1 00:09:44.383:
state to up
%LINK-3-UPDOWN: Interface FastEthernet0/3, changed state to up
%LINK-3-UPDOWN: Interface FastEthernet0/4, changed state to up
%LINEPROTO-5-UPDOWN: Line protocol on Interface FastEthernet0/3,
%LINEPROTO-5-UPDOWN: Line protocol on Interface FastEthernet0/4,
%LINK-3-UPDOWN: Interface Port-channel1, changed state to up
%LINEPROTO-5-UPDOWN: Line protocol on Interface Port-channel1,
%LINEPROTO-5-UPDOWN: Line protocol on Interface Vlan1, changed
Step 2: Examine the configuration on the ports.
Currently the F0/3, F0/4, and Po1 (Port-channel1) interfaces on both S1 and S3 are in access operational
mode with the administrative mode in dynamic auto. Verify the configuration using the show run interface
interface-id and show interfaces interface-id switchport commands, respectively. The example
configuration outputs for F0/3 on S1 are as follows:
S1# show run interface f0/3
Building configuration...
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 3 of 23
Lab – Configuring EtherChannel
Current configuration : 103 bytes
!
interface FastEthernet0/3
channel-group 1 mode desirable
S1# show interfaces f0/3 switchport
Name: Fa0/3
Switchport: Enabled
Administrative Mode: dynamic auto
Operational Mode: static access (member of bundle Po1)
Administrative Trunking Encapsulation: dot1q
Operational Trunking Encapsulation: native
Negotiation of Trunking: On
Access Mode VLAN: 1 (default)
Trunking Native Mode VLAN: 1 (default)
Administrative Native VLAN tagging: enabled
Voice VLAN: none
Administrative private-vlan host-association: none
Administrative private-vlan mapping: none
Administrative private-vlan trunk native VLAN: none
Administrative private-vlan trunk Native VLAN tagging: enabled
Administrative private-vlan trunk encapsulation: dot1q
Administrative private-vlan trunk normal VLANs: none
Administrative private-vlan trunk associations: none
Administrative private-vlan trunk mappings: none
Operational private-vlan: none
Trunking VLANs Enabled: ALL
Pruning VLANs Enabled: 2-1001
Capture Mode Disabled
Capture VLANs Allowed: ALL
Protected: false
Unknown unicast blocked: disabled
Unknown multicast blocked: disabled
Appliance trust: none
Step 3: Verify that the ports have been aggregated.
S1# show etherchannel summary
Flags:
D
I
H
R
U
-
down
stand-alone
Hot-standby
Layer3
in use
P - bundled in port-channel
s - suspended
(LACP only)
S - Layer2
f - failed to allocate aggregator
M
u
w
d
-
not in use, minimum links not met
unsuitable for bundling
waiting to be aggregated
default port
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 4 of 23
Lab – Configuring EtherChannel
Number of channel-groups in use: 1
Number of aggregators:
1
Group Port-channel Protocol
Ports
------+-------------+-----------+----------------------------------------------1
Po1(SU)
PAgP
Fa0/3(P)
Fa0/4(P)
S3# show etherchannel summary
Flags:
D
I
H
R
U
-
down
stand-alone
Hot-standby
Layer3
in use
P - bundled in port-channel
s - suspended
(LACP only)
S - Layer2
f - failed to allocate aggregator
M
u
w
d
-
not in use, minimum links not met
unsuitable for bundling
waiting to be aggregated
default port
Number of channel-groups in use: 1
Number of aggregators:
1
Group Port-channel Protocol
Ports
------+-------------+-----------+----------------------------------------------1
Po1(SU)
PAgP
Fa0/3(P)
Fa0/4(P)
What do the flags, SU and P, indicate in the Ethernet summary?
_______________________________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________________________
The flag P indicates that the ports are bundled in a port-channel. The flag S indicates that the port-channel is
a Layer 2 EtherChannel. The U flag indicates that the EtherChannel is in use.
Step 4: Configure trunk ports.
After the ports have been aggregated, commands applied at the port channel interface affect all the links that
were bundled together. Manually configure the Po1 ports on S1 and S3 as trunk ports and assign them to
native VLAN 99.
S1(config)# interface port-channel 1
S1(config-if)# switchport mode trunk
S1(config-if)# switchport trunk native vlan 99
S3(config)# interface port-channel 1
S3(config-if)# switchport mode trunk
S3(config-if)# switchport trunk native vlan 99
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 5 of 23
Lab – Configuring EtherChannel
Step 5: Verify that the ports are configured as trunk ports.
a. Issue the show run interface interface-id commands on S1 and S3. What commands are listed for F0/3
and F0/4 on both switches? Compare the results to the running configuration for the Po1 interface?
Record your observation.
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
switchport trunk native vlan 99
switchport mode trunk
The commands related to trunk configuration are the same. When the trunk commands were applied to
the EtherChannel, the commands also affected the individual links in the bundle.
S1# show run interface po1
Building configuration...
Current configuration : 92 bytes
!
interface Port-channel1
switchport trunk native vlan 99
switchport mode trunk
end
S1# show run interface f0/3
Building configuration...
Current configuration : 126 bytes
!
interface FastEthernet0/3
switchport trunk native vlan 99
switchport mode trunk
channel-group 1 mode desirable
end
b. Issue the show interfaces trunk and show spanning-tree commands on S1 and S3. What trunk port is
listed? What is the native VLAN? What is concluding result from the output?
____________________________________________________________________________________
The trunk port listed is Po1. The native VLAN is 99. After the links are bundled, only the aggregated
interface is listed in some show commands.
From the show spanning-tree output, what is port cost and port priority for the aggregated link?
____________________________________________________________________________________
The port cost for Po1 is 12, and the port priority is 128.
S1# show interfaces trunk
Port
Po1
Mode
on
Encapsulation
802.1q
Port
Po1
Vlans allowed on trunk
1-4094
Status
trunking
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Native vlan
99
Page 6 of 23
Lab – Configuring EtherChannel
Port
Po1
Vlans allowed and active in management domain
1,10,99
Port
Po1
Vlans in spanning tree forwarding state and not pruned
1,10,99
S3# show interfaces trunk
Port
Po1
Mode
on
Encapsulation
802.1q
Status
trunking
Native vlan
99
Port
Po1
Vlans allowed on trunk
1-4094
Port
Po1
Vlans allowed and active in management domain
1,10,99
Port
Po1
Vlans in spanning tree forwarding state and not pruned
1,10,99
S1# show spanning-tree
VLAN0001
Spanning tree enabled protocol ieee
Root ID
Priority
32769
Address
0cd9.96e8.7400
Cost
12
Port
64 (Port-channel1)
Hello Time
2 sec Max Age 20 sec
Bridge ID
Priority
Address
Hello Time
Aging Time
Forward Delay 15 sec
32769 (priority 32768 sys-id-ext 1)
0cd9.96e8.8a00
2 sec Max Age 20 sec Forward Delay 15 sec
300 sec
Interface
Role Sts Cost
Prio.Nbr Type
------------------- ---- --- --------- -------- -------------------------------Po1
Root FWD 12
128.64
P2p
VLAN0010
Spanning tree enabled protocol ieee
Root ID
Priority
32778
Address
0cd9.96e8.7400
Cost
12
Port
64 (Port-channel1)
Hello Time
2 sec Max Age 20 sec
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Forward Delay 15 sec
Page 7 of 23
Lab – Configuring EtherChannel
Bridge ID
Priority
Address
Hello Time
Aging Time
Interface
------------------Fa0/6
Po1
Role
---Desg
Root
32778 (priority 32768 sys-id-ext 10)
0cd9.96e8.8a00
2 sec Max Age 20 sec Forward Delay 15 sec
300 sec
Sts
--FWD
FWD
Cost
--------19
12
Prio.Nbr
-------128.6
128.64
Type
-------------------------------P2p
P2p
VLAN0099
Spanning tree enabled protocol ieee
Root ID
Priority
32867
Address
0cd9.96e8.7400
Cost
12
Port
64 (Port-channel1)
Hello Time
2 sec Max Age 20 sec
Bridge ID
Priority
Address
Hello Time
Aging Time
Forward Delay 15 sec
32867 (priority 32768 sys-id-ext 99)
0cd9.96e8.8a00
2 sec Max Age 20 sec Forward Delay 15 sec
300 sec
Interface
Role Sts Cost
Prio.Nbr Type
------------------- ---- --- --------- -------- -------------------------------Po1
Root FWD 12
128.64
P2p
S3# show spanning-tree
VLAN0001
Spanning tree enabled protocol ieee
Root ID
Priority
32769
Address
0cd9.96e8.7400
This bridge is the root
Hello Time
2 sec Max Age 20 sec
Bridge ID
Priority
Address
Hello Time
Aging Time
Forward Delay 15 sec
32769 (priority 32768 sys-id-ext 1)
0cd9.96e8.7400
2 sec Max Age 20 sec Forward Delay 15 sec
300 sec
Interface
Role Sts Cost
Prio.Nbr Type
------------------- ---- --- --------- -------- -------------------------------Po1
Desg FWD 12
128.64
P2p
VLAN0010
Spanning tree enabled protocol ieee
Root ID
Priority
32778
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 8 of 23
Lab – Configuring EtherChannel
Address
0cd9.96e8.7400
This bridge is the root
Hello Time
2 sec Max Age 20 sec
Bridge ID
Priority
Address
Hello Time
Aging Time
Interface
------------------Fa0/18
Po1
Role
---Desg
Desg
Forward Delay 15 sec
32778 (priority 32768 sys-id-ext 10)
0cd9.96e8.7400
2 sec Max Age 20 sec Forward Delay 15 sec
300 sec
Sts
--FWD
FWD
Cost
--------19
12
Prio.Nbr
-------128.18
128.64
Type
-------------------------------P2p
P2p
VLAN0099
Spanning tree enabled protocol ieee
Root ID
Priority
32867
Address
0cd9.96e8.7400
This bridge is the root
Hello Time
2 sec Max Age 20 sec
Bridge ID
Priority
Address
Hello Time
Aging Time
Forward Delay 15 sec
32867 (priority 32768 sys-id-ext 99)
0cd9.96e8.7400
2 sec Max Age 20 sec Forward Delay 15 sec
300 sec
Interface
Role Sts Cost
Prio.Nbr Type
------------------- ---- --- --------- -------- -------------------------------Po1
Desg FWD 12
128.64
P2p
Part 3: Configure LACP
LACP is an open source protocol for link aggregation developed by the IEEE. In Part 3, the link between S1
and S2, and the link between S2 and S3 will be configured using LACP. Also, the individual links will be
configured as trunks before they are bundled together as EtherChannels.
Step 1: Configure LACP between S1 and S2.
S1(config)# interface range f0/1-2
S1(config-if-range)# switchport mode trunk
S1(config-if-range)# switchport trunk native vlan 99
S1(config-if-range)# channel-group 2 mode active
Creating a port-channel interface Port-channel 2
S1(config-if-range)# no shutdown
S2(config)# interface range f0/1-2
S2(config-if-range)# switchport mode trunk
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 9 of 23
Lab – Configuring EtherChannel
S2(config-if-range)# switchport trunk native vlan 99
S2(config-if-range)# channel-group 2 mode passive
Creating a port-channel interface Port-channel 2
S2(config-if-range)# no shutdown
Step 2: Verify that the ports have been aggregated.
What protocol is Po2 using for link aggregation? Which ports are aggregated to form Po2? Record the
command used to verify.
_______________________________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________________________
Po2 is using LACP and F0/1 and F0/2 are aggregated to form Po2.
S1# show etherchannel summary
Flags:
D
I
H
R
U
-
down
stand-alone
Hot-standby
Layer3
in use
P - bundled in port-channel
s - suspended
(LACP only)
S - Layer2
f - failed to allocate aggregator
M
u
w
d
-
not in use, minimum links not met
unsuitable for bundling
waiting to be aggregated
default port
Number of channel-groups in use: 2
Number of aggregators:
2
Group Port-channel Protocol
Ports
------+-------------+-----------+----------------------------------------------1
Po1(SU)
PAgP
Fa0/3(P)
Fa0/4(P)
2
Po2(SU)
LACP
Fa0/1(P)
Fa0/2(P)
S2# show etherchannel summary
Flags:
D
I
H
R
U
-
down
stand-alone
Hot-standby
Layer3
in use
P - bundled in port-channel
s - suspended
(LACP only)
S - Layer2
f - failed to allocate aggregator
M
u
w
d
-
not in use, minimum links not met
unsuitable for bundling
waiting to be aggregated
default port
Number of channel-groups in use: 1
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 10 of 23
Lab – Configuring EtherChannel
Number of aggregators:
1
Group Port-channel Protocol
Ports
------+-------------+-----------+----------------------------------------------2
Po2(SU)
LACP
Fa0/1(P)
Fa0/2(P)
Step 3: Configure LACP between S2 and S3.
a. Configure the link between S2 and S3 as Po3 and use LACP as the link aggregation protocol.
S2(config)# interface range f0/3-4
S2(config-if-range)# switchport mode trunk
S2(config-if-range)# switchport trunk native vlan 99
S2(config-if-range)# channel-group 3 mode active
Creating a port-channel interface Port-channel 3
S2(config-if-range)# no shutdown
S3(config)# interface range f0/1-2
S3(config-if-range)# switchport mode trunk
S3(config-if-range)# switchport trunk native vlan 99
S3(config-if-range)# channel-group 3 mode passive
Creating a port-channel interface Port-channel 3
S3(config-if-range)# no shutdown
b. Verify that the EtherChannel has formed.
S2# show etherchannel summary
Flags:
D
I
H
R
U
-
down
stand-alone
Hot-standby
Layer3
in use
P - bundled in port-channel
s - suspended
(LACP only)
S - Layer2
f - failed to allocate aggregator
M
u
w
d
-
not in use, minimum links not met
unsuitable for bundling
waiting to be aggregated
default port
Number of channel-groups in use: 2
Number of aggregators:
2
Group Port-channel Protocol
Ports
------+-------------+-----------+----------------------------------------------2
Po2(SU)
LACP
Fa0/1(P)
Fa0/2(P)
3
Po3(SU)
LACP
Fa0/3(P)
Fa0/4(P)
S3# show etherchannel summary
Flags:
D - down
P - bundled in port-channel
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 11 of 23
Lab – Configuring EtherChannel
I
H
R
U
-
stand-alone
Hot-standby
Layer3
in use
s - suspended
(LACP only)
S - Layer2
f - failed to allocate aggregator
M
u
w
d
-
not in use, minimum links not met
unsuitable for bundling
waiting to be aggregated
default port
Number of channel-groups in use: 2
Number of aggregators:
2
Group Port-channel Protocol
Ports
------+-------------+-----------+----------------------------------------------1
Po1(SU)
PAgP
Fa0/3(P)
Fa0/4(P)
3
Po3(SU)
LACP
Fa0/1(P)
Fa0/2(P)
Step 4: Verify end-to-end connectivity.
Verify that all devices can ping each other within the same VLAN. If not, troubleshoot until there is end-to-end
connectivity.
Note: It may be necessary to disable the PC firewall to ping between PCs.
Reflection
What could prevent EtherChannels from forming?
_______________________________________________________________________________________
Configuration mismatch, such as trunk port on one end and access port at the other end, different
aggregation protocols and different port speed/duplex, would prevent the formation of EtherChannel.
Device Configs
Switch S1
S1# show vlan brief
VLAN Name
Status
Ports
---- -------------------------------- --------- ------------------------------1
default
active
Fa0/5, Fa0/7, Fa0/8, Fa0/9
Fa0/10, Fa0/11, Fa0/12, Fa0/13
Fa0/14, Fa0/15, Fa0/16, Fa0/17
Fa0/18, Fa0/19, Fa0/20, Fa0/21
Fa0/22, Fa0/23, Fa0/24, Gi0/1
Gi0/2
10
Staff
active
Fa0/6
99
Management
active
1002 fddi-default
act/unsup
1003 token-ring-default
act/unsup
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Page 12 of 23
Lab – Configuring EtherChannel
1004 fddinet-default
1005 trnet-default
act/unsup
act/unsup
S1# show run
Building configuration...
Current configuration : 2339 bytes
!
version 15.0
no service pad
service timestamps debug datetime msec
service timestamps log datetime msec
service password-encryption
!
hostname S1
!
boot-start-marker
boot-end-marker
!
enable secret 4 06YFDUHH61wAE/kLkDq9BGho1QM5EnRtoyr8cHAUg.2
!
no aaa new-model
system mtu routing 1500
!
!
no ip domain-lookup
!
!
!
!
!
!
!
!
spanning-tree mode pvst
spanning-tree extend system-id
!
vlan internal allocation policy ascending
!
!
!
!
!
!
interface Port-channel1
switchport trunk native vlan 99
switchport mode trunk
!
interface Port-channel2
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Page 13 of 23
Lab – Configuring EtherChannel
switchport trunk native vlan 99
switchport mode trunk
!
interface FastEthernet0/1
switchport trunk native vlan 99
switchport mode trunk
channel-group 2 mode active
!
interface FastEthernet0/2
switchport trunk native vlan 99
switchport mode trunk
channel-group 2 mode active
!
interface FastEthernet0/3
switchport trunk native vlan 99
switchport mode trunk
channel-group 1 mode desirable
!
interface FastEthernet0/4
switchport trunk native vlan 99
switchport mode trunk
channel-group 1 mode desirable
!
interface FastEthernet0/5
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/6
switchport access vlan 10
switchport mode access
!
interface FastEthernet0/7
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/8
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/9
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/10
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/11
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/12
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/13
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 14 of 23
Lab – Configuring EtherChannel
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/14
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/15
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/16
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/17
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/18
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/19
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/20
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/21
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/22
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/23
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/24
shutdown
!
interface GigabitEthernet0/1
shutdown
!
interface GigabitEthernet0/2
shutdown
!
interface Vlan1
no ip address
!
interface Vlan99
ip address 192.168.99.11 255.255.255.0
!
ip http server
ip http secure-server
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 15 of 23
Lab – Configuring EtherChannel
!
!
banner motd ^C
Unauthorized Access Prohibited.^C
!
line con 0
password 7 0822455D0A16
logging synchronous
login
line vty 0 4
password 7 0822455D0A16
login
line vty 5 15
password 7 1511021F0725
login
!
end
Switch S2
S2# show vlan brief
VLAN Name
Status
Ports
---- -------------------------------- --------- ------------------------------1
default
active
Fa0/5, Fa0/6, Fa0/7, Fa0/8
Fa0/9, Fa0/10, Fa0/11, Fa0/12
Fa0/13, Fa0/14, Fa0/15, Fa0/16
Fa0/17, Fa0/19, Fa0/20, Fa0/21
Fa0/22, Fa0/23, Fa0/24, Gi0/1
Gi0/2
10
Staff
active
Fa0/18
99
Management
active
1002 fddi-default
act/unsup
1003 token-ring-default
act/unsup
1004 fddinet-default
act/unsup
1005 trnet-default
act/unsup
S2# show run
Building configuration...
Current configuration : 2333 bytes
!
version 15.0
no service pad
service timestamps debug datetime msec
service timestamps log datetime msec
service password-encryption
!
hostname S2
!
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 16 of 23
Lab – Configuring EtherChannel
boot-start-marker
boot-end-marker
!
enable secret 4 06YFDUHH61wAE/kLkDq9BGho1QM5EnRtoyr8cHAUg.2
!
no aaa new-model
system mtu routing 1500
!
!
no ip domain-lookup
!
!
!
!
!
!
!
!
spanning-tree mode pvst
spanning-tree extend system-id
!
vlan internal allocation policy ascending
!
!
!
!
!
!
interface Port-channel2
switchport trunk native vlan 99
switchport mode trunk
!
interface Port-channel3
switchport trunk native vlan 99
switchport mode trunk
!
interface FastEthernet0/1
switchport trunk native vlan 99
switchport mode trunk
channel-group 2 mode passive
!
interface FastEthernet0/2
switchport trunk native vlan 99
switchport mode trunk
channel-group 2 mode passive
!
interface FastEthernet0/3
switchport trunk native vlan 99
switchport mode trunk
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 17 of 23
Lab – Configuring EtherChannel
channel-group 3 mode active
!
interface FastEthernet0/4
switchport trunk native vlan 99
switchport mode trunk
channel-group 3 mode active
!
interface FastEthernet0/5
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/6
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/7
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/8
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/9
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/10
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/11
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/12
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/13
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/14
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/15
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/16
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/17
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/18
switchport access vlan 10
switchport mode access
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 18 of 23
Lab – Configuring EtherChannel
!
interface FastEthernet0/19
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/20
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/21
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/22
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/23
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/24
shutdown
!
interface GigabitEthernet0/1
shutdown
!
interface GigabitEthernet0/2
shutdown
!
interface Vlan1
no ip address
!
interface Vlan99
ip address 192.168.99.12 255.255.255.0
!
ip http server
ip http secure-server
!
banner motd ^C
Unauthorized Access Prohibited.^C
!
line con 0
password 7 060506324F41
logging synchronous
login
line vty 0 4
password 7 060506324F41
login
line vty 5 15
password 7 121A0C041104
login
!
end
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 19 of 23
Lab – Configuring EtherChannel
Switch S3
S3# show vlan brief
VLAN Name
Status
Ports
---- -------------------------------- --------- ------------------------------1
default
active
Fa0/5, Fa0/6, Fa0/7, Fa0/8
Fa0/9, Fa0/10, Fa0/11, Fa0/12
Fa0/13, Fa0/14, Fa0/15, Fa0/16
Fa0/17, Fa0/19, Fa0/20, Fa0/21
Fa0/22, Fa0/23, Fa0/24, Gi0/1
Gi0/2
10
Staff
active
Fa0/18
99
Management
active
1002 fddi-default
act/unsup
1003 token-ring-default
act/unsup
1004 fddinet-default
act/unsup
1005 trnet-default
act/unsup
S3# show run
Building configuration...
Current configuration : 2331 bytes
!
version 15.0
no service pad
service timestamps debug datetime msec
service timestamps log datetime msec
service password-encryption
!
hostname S3
!
boot-start-marker
boot-end-marker
!
enable secret 4 06YFDUHH61wAE/kLkDq9BGho1QM5EnRtoyr8cHAUg.2
!
no aaa new-model
system mtu routing 1500
!
!
no ip domain-lookup
!
!
!
!
!
!
!
!
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 20 of 23
Lab – Configuring EtherChannel
spanning-tree mode pvst
spanning-tree extend system-id
!
vlan internal allocation policy ascending
!
!
!
!
!
!
interface Port-channel1
switchport trunk native vlan 99
switchport mode trunk
!
interface Port-channel3
switchport trunk native vlan 99
switchport mode trunk
!
interface FastEthernet0/1
switchport trunk native vlan 99
switchport mode trunk
channel-group 3 mode passive
!
interface FastEthernet0/2
switchport trunk native vlan 99
switchport mode trunk
channel-group 3 mode passive
!
interface FastEthernet0/3
switchport trunk native vlan 99
switchport mode trunk
channel-group 1 mode auto
!
interface FastEthernet0/4
switchport trunk native vlan 99
switchport mode trunk
channel-group 1 mode auto
!
interface FastEthernet0/5
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/6
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/7
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/8
shutdown
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 21 of 23
Lab – Configuring EtherChannel
!
interface FastEthernet0/9
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/10
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/11
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/12
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/13
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/14
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/15
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/16
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/17
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/18
switchport access vlan 10
switchport mode access
!
interface FastEthernet0/19
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/20
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/21
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/22
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/23
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/24
shutdown
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 22 of 23
Lab – Configuring EtherChannel
!
interface GigabitEthernet0/1
shutdown
!
interface GigabitEthernet0/2
shutdown
!
interface Vlan1
no ip address
!
interface Vlan99
ip address 192.168.99.13 255.255.255.0
!
ip http server
ip http secure-server
!
!
banner motd ^C
Unauthorized Access Prohibited.^C
!
line con 0
password 7 045802150C2E
logging synchronous
login
line vty 0 4
password 7 110A1016141D
login
line vty 5 15
password 7 070C285F4D06
login
!
end
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 23 of 23
Lab – Troubleshooting EtherChannel (Instructor Version)
Instructor Note: Red font color or Gray highlights indicate text that appears in the instructor copy only.
Topology
Addressing Table
Device
Interface
IP Address
Subnet Mask
S1
VLAN 99
192.168.1.11
255.255.255.0
S2
VLAN 99
192.168.1.12
255.255.255.0
S3
VLAN 99
192.168.1.13
255.255.255.0
PC-A
NIC
192.168.0.2
255.255.255.0
PC-C
NIC
192.168.0.3
255.255.255.0
VLAN Assignments
VLAN
Name
10
User
99
Management
Objectives
Part 1: Build the Network and Load Device Configurations
Part 2: Troubleshoot EtherChannel
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 1 of 25
Lab – Troubleshooting EtherChannel
Background / Scenario
The switches at your company were configured by an inexperienced network administrator. Several errors in
the configuration have resulted in speed and connectivity issues. Your manager has asked you to
troubleshoot and correct the configuration errors and document your work. Using your knowledge of
EtherChannel and standard testing methods, find and correct the errors. Ensure that all of the EtherChannels
use Port Aggregation Protocol (PAgP), and that all hosts are reachable.
Note: The switches used are Cisco Catalyst 2960s with Cisco IOS Release 15.0(2) (lanbasek9 image). Other
switches and Cisco IOS versions can be used. Depending on the model and Cisco IOS version, the
commands available and output produced might vary from what is shown in the labs.
Note: Make sure that the switches have been erased and have no startup configurations. If you are unsure,
contact your instructor.
Instructor Note: Refer to the Instructor Lab Manual for the procedures to initialize and reload devices.
Required Resources

3 Switches (Cisco 2960 with Cisco IOS Release 15.0(2) lanbasek9 image or comparable)

2 PCs (Windows 7, Vista, or XP with a terminal emulation program, such as Tera Term)

Console cables to configure the Cisco IOS devices via the console ports

Ethernet cables as shown in the topology
Part 1: Build the Network and Load Device Configurations
In Part 1, you will set up the network topology, configure basic settings on the PC hosts, and load
configurations on the switches.
Step 1: Cable the network as shown in the topology.
Step 2: Configure the PC hosts.
Step 3: Erase the startup and VLAN configurations and reload the switches.
Step 4: Load switch configurations.
Load the following configurations into the appropriate switch. All switches have the same passwords. The
privileged EXEC password is class. The password for console and vty access is cisco. As all switches are
Cisco devices, the network administrator decided to use Cisco’s PAgP on all port channels configured with
EtherChannel. Switch S2 is the root bridge for all VLANs in the topology.
Switch S1 Configuration:
hostname S1
interface range f0/1-24, g0/1-2
shutdown
exit
enable secret class
no ip domain lookup
line vty 0 15
password cisco
login
line con 0
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 2 of 25
Lab – Troubleshooting EtherChannel
password cisco
logging synchronous
login
exit
vlan 10
name User
vlan 99
Name Management
interface range f0/1-2
switchport mode trunk
! channel-group 1 mode desirable
channel-group 1 mode active
switchport trunk native vlan 99
no shutdown
interface range f0/3-4
channel-group 2 mode desirable
switchport trunk native vlan 99
! switchport mode trunk
no shutdown
interface f0/6
switchport mode access
switchport access vlan 10
no shutdown
interface vlan 99
ip address 192.168.1.11 255.255.255.0
interface port-channel 1
switchport trunk native vlan 99
switchport mode trunk
interface port-channel 2
switchport trunk native vlan 99
switchport mode access
! switchport mode trunk
Switch S2 Configuration:
hostname S2
interface range f0/1-24, g0/1-2
shutdown
exit
enable secret class
no ip domain lookup
line vty 0 15
password cisco
login
line con 0
password cisco
logging synchronous
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 3 of 25
Lab – Troubleshooting EtherChannel
login
exit
vlan 10
name User
vlan 99
name Management
spanning-tree vlan 1,10,99 root primary
interface range f0/1-2
switchport mode trunk
channel-group 1 mode desirable
switchport trunk native vlan 99
no shutdown
interface range f0/3-4
switchport mode trunk
channel-group 3 mode desirable
switchport trunk native vlan 99
! no shutdown
interface vlan 99
ip address 192.168.1.12 255.255.255.0
interface port-channel 1
switchport trunk native vlan 99
switchport trunk allowed vlan 1,99
! switchport trunk allowed 1,10,99
interface port-channel 3
switchport trunk native vlan 99
switchport trunk allowed vlan 1,10,99
switchport mode trunk
Switch S3 Configuration:
hostname S3
interface range f0/1-24, g0/1-2
shutdown
exit
enable secret class
no ip domain lookup
line vty 0 15
password cisco
login
line con 0
password cisco
logging synchronous
login
exit
vlan 10
name User
vlan 99
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 4 of 25
Lab – Troubleshooting EtherChannel
name Management
interface range f0/1-2
! switchport mode trunk
! channel-group 3 mode desirable
! switchport trunk native vlan 99
! no shutdown
interface range f0/3-4
switchport mode trunk
! channel-group 2 mode desirable
channel-group 3 mode desirable
switchport trunk native vlan 99
no shutdown
interface f0/18
switchport mode access
switchport access vlan 10
no shutdown
interface vlan 99
ip address 192.168.1.13 255.255.255.0
! interface port-channel 2
! switchport trunk native vlan 99
! switchport mode trunk
interface port-channel 3
switchport trunk native vlan 99
switchport mode trunk
Step 5: Save your configuration.
Part 2: Troubleshoot EtherChannel
In Part 2, you must examine the configurations on all switches, make corrections if needed, and verify full
functionality.
Step 1: Troubleshoot S1.
a. Use the show interfaces trunk command to verify that the port channels are functioning as trunk ports.
S1# show interfaces trunk
Port
Fa0/1
Fa0/2
Mode
on
on
Encapsulation
802.1q
802.1q
Status
trunking
trunking
Port
Fa0/1
Fa0/2
Vlans allowed on trunk
1-4094
1-4094
Port
Fa0/1
Fa0/2
Vlans allowed and active in management domain
1,10,99
1,10,99
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Native vlan
99
99
Page 5 of 25
Lab – Troubleshooting EtherChannel
Port
Fa0/1
Fa0/2
Vlans in spanning tree forwarding state and not pruned
none
none
Do port channels 1 and 2 appear as trunked ports? _____ No
b. Use the show etherchannel summary command to verify that interfaces are configured in the correct
port channel, the proper protocol is configured, and the interfaces are in use.
S1# show etherchannel summary
Flags:
D
I
H
R
U
-
down
stand-alone
Hot-standby
Layer3
in use
P - bundled in port-channel
s - suspended
(LACP only)
S - Layer2
f - failed to allocate aggregator
M
u
w
d
-
not in use, minimum links not met
unsuitable for bundling
waiting to be aggregated
default port
Number of channel-groups in use: 2
Number of aggregators:
2
Group Port-channel Protocol
Ports
------+-------------+-----------+----------------------------------------------1
Po1(SD)
LACP
Fa0/1(I)
Fa0/2(I)
2
Po2(SD)
PAgP
Fa0/3(I)
Fa0/4(I)
Based on the output, are there any EtherChannel issues? If issues are found, record them in the space
provided below.
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
Yes. Port Channel 1 is configured with the Link Aggregation Control Protocol (LACP), and the ports in
Port Channel 2 are functioning independently (I = stand-alone).
c.
Use the command show run | begin interface Port-channel command to view the running configuration
beginning with the first port channel interface.
S1# show run | begin interface Port-channel
interface Port-channel1
switchport trunk native vlan 99
switchport mode trunk
!
interface Port-channel2
switchport trunk native vlan 99
switchport mode access
!
interface FastEthernet0/1
switchport trunk native vlan 99
switchport mode trunk
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 6 of 25
Lab – Troubleshooting EtherChannel
channel-group 1 mode active
!
interface FastEthernet0/2
switchport trunk native vlan 99
switchport mode trunk
channel-group 1 mode active
!
interface FastEthernet0/3
switchport trunk native vlan 99
switchport mode access
channel-group 2 mode desirable
!
interface FastEthernet0/4
switchport trunk native vlan 99
switchport mode access
channel-group 2 mode desirable
!
interface FastEthernet0/5
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/6
switchport access vlan 10
switchport mode access
!
interface FastEthernet0/7
shutdown
!
<output omitted>
d. Resolve all problems found in the outputs from the previous show commands. Record the commands
used to correct the configurations.
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
S1(config)# interface range f0/1-2
S1(config-if-range)# no channel-group 1 mode active
S1(config-if-range)# channel-group 1 mode desirable
S1(config-if-range)# exit
S1(config)# interface port-channel 2
S1(config-if)# switchport mode trunk
e. Use the show interfaces trunk command to verify trunk settings.
S1# show interfaces trunk
Port
Po1
Po2
Mode
on
on
Encapsulation
802.1q
802.1q
Status
trunking
trunking
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Native vlan
99
99
Page 7 of 25
Lab – Troubleshooting EtherChannel
f.
Port
Po1
Po2
Vlans allowed on trunk
1-4094
1-4094
Port
Po1
Po2
Vlans allowed and active in management domain
1,10,99
1,10,99
Port
Po1
Po2
Vlans in spanning tree forwarding state and not pruned
1,10,99
1,10,99
Use the show etherchannel summary command to verify that the port channels are up and in use.
S1# show etherchannel summary
Flags:
D
I
H
R
U
-
down
stand-alone
Hot-standby
Layer3
in use
P - bundled in port-channel
s - suspended
(LACP only)
S - Layer2
f - failed to allocate aggregator
M
u
w
d
-
not in use, minimum links not met
unsuitable for bundling
waiting to be aggregated
default port
Number of channel-groups in use: 2
Number of aggregators:
2
Group Port-channel Protocol
Ports
------+-------------+-----------+----------------------------------------------1
Po1(SU)
PAgP
Fa0/1(P)
Fa0/2(P)
2
Po2(SU)
PAgP
Fa0/3(P)
Fa0/4(P)
Step 2: Troubleshoot S2.
a. Issue the command to verify that the port channels are functioning as trunk ports. Record the command
used in the space provided below.
____________________________________________________________________________________
S2# show interfaces trunk
S2# show interfaces trunk
Port
Po1
Mode
on
Encapsulation
802.1q
Status
trunking
Port
Po1
Vlans allowed on trunk
1,99
Port
Vlans allowed and active in management domain
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Native vlan
99
Page 8 of 25
Lab – Troubleshooting EtherChannel
Po1
1,99
Port
Po1
Vlans in spanning tree forwarding state and not pruned
1,99
Based on the output, are there any issues with the configurations? If issues are found, record them in the
space provided below.
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
Port Channel 3 is not present in the output, and VLAN 10 is not allowed in Port Channel 1.
b. Issue the command to verify that interfaces are configured in the correct port channel and the proper
protocol is configured.
S2# show etherchannel summary
Flags:
D
I
H
R
U
-
down
stand-alone
Hot-standby
Layer3
in use
P - bundled in port-channel
s - suspended
(LACP only)
S - Layer2
f - failed to allocate aggregator
M
u
w
d
-
not in use, minimum links not met
unsuitable for bundling
waiting to be aggregated
default port
Number of channel-groups in use: 2
Number of aggregators:
2
Group Port-channel Protocol
Ports
------+-------------+-----------+----------------------------------------------1
Po1(SU)
PAgP
Fa0/1(P)
Fa0/2(P)
3
Po3(SD)
PAgP
Fa0/3(D)
Fa0/4(D)
Based on the output, are there any EtherChannel issues? If issues are found, record them in the space
provided below.
____________________________________________________________________________________
Yes. Port Channel 3 is down.
c.
Use the command show run | begin interface Port-channel to view the running configuration beginning
with the first port-channel interface.
S2# show run | begin interface Port-channel
interface Port-channel1
switchport trunk native vlan 99
switchport trunk allowed vlan 1,99
switchport mode trunk
!
interface Port-channel3
switchport trunk native vlan 99
switchport trunk allowed vlan 1,10,99
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 9 of 25
Lab – Troubleshooting EtherChannel
switchport mode trunk
!
interface FastEthernet0/1
switchport trunk native vlan 99
switchport trunk allowed vlan 1,99
switchport mode trunk
channel-group 1 mode desirable
!
interface FastEthernet0/2
switchport trunk native vlan 99
switchport trunk allowed vlan 1,99
switchport mode trunk
channel-group 1 mode desirable
!
interface FastEthernet0/3
switchport trunk native vlan 99
switchport trunk allowed vlan 1,10,99
switchport mode trunk
shutdown
channel-group 3 mode desirable
!
interface FastEthernet0/4
switchport trunk native vlan 99
switchport trunk allowed vlan 1,10,99
switchport mode trunk
shutdown
channel-group 3 mode desirable
!
interface FastEthernet0/5
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/6
shutdown
!
<output omitted>
d. Resolve all problems found in the outputs from the previous show commands. Record the commands
used to correct the configuration.
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
S2(config)# interface range f0/3-4
S2(config-if-range)# no shutdown
S2(config-if-range)# exit
S2(config)# interface port-channel 1
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 10 of 25
Lab – Troubleshooting EtherChannel
S2(config-if)# switchport trunk allowed vlan 1,10,99
e. Issue the command to verify trunk settings.
S2# show interfaces trunk
f.
Port
Po1
Mode
on
Encapsulation
802.1q
Status
trunking
Native vlan
99
Port
Po1
Vlans allowed on trunk
1,10,99
Port
Po1
Vlans allowed and active in management domain
1,10,99
Port
Po1
Vlans in spanning tree forwarding state and not pruned
1,10,99
Issue the command to verify that the port channels are functioning. Remember that port channel issues
can be caused by either end of the link.
S2# show etherchannel summary
Flags:
D
I
H
R
U
-
down
stand-alone
Hot-standby
Layer3
in use
P - bundled in port-channel
s - suspended
(LACP only)
S - Layer2
f - failed to allocate aggregator
M
u
w
d
-
not in use, minimum links not met
unsuitable for bundling
waiting to be aggregated
default port
Number of channel-groups in use: 2
Number of aggregators:
2
Group Port-channel Protocol
Ports
------+-------------+-----------+----------------------------------------------1
Po1(SU)
PAgP
Fa0/1(P)
Fa0/2(P)
3
Po3(SD)
PAgP
Fa0/3(D)
Fa0/4(D)
Step 3: Troubleshoot S3.
a. Issue the command to verify that the port channels are functioning as trunk ports.
S3# show interfaces trunk
Port
Po3
Mode
on
Encapsulation
802.1q
Status
trunking
Port
Po3
Vlans allowed on trunk
1-4094
Port
Vlans allowed and active in management domain
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Native vlan
99
Page 11 of 25
Lab – Troubleshooting EtherChannel
Po3
1,10,99
Port
Po3
Vlans in spanning tree forwarding state and not pruned
1,10,99
Based on the output, are there any issues with the configurations? If issues are found, record them in the
space provided below.
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
Port Channel 2 is not present in the output.
b. Issue the command to verify that the interfaces are configured in the correct port channel and that the
proper protocol is configured.
S3# show etherchannel summary
Flags:
D
I
H
R
U
-
down
stand-alone
Hot-standby
Layer3
in use
P - bundled in port-channel
s - suspended
(LACP only)
S - Layer2
f - failed to allocate aggregator
M
u
w
d
-
not in use, minimum links not met
unsuitable for bundling
waiting to be aggregated
default port
Number of channel-groups in use: 1
Number of aggregators:
1
Group Port-channel Protocol
Ports
------+-------------+-----------+----------------------------------------------3
Po3(SU)
PAgP
Fa0/3(P)
Fa0/4(P)
Based on the output, are there any EtherChannel issues? If issues are found, record them in the space
provided below.
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
Port Channel 2 is not present, and Port Channel 3 is incorrectly configured for interfaces f0/3 and f0/4.
c.
Use the command show run | begin interface Port-channel command to view the running configuration
beginning with the first port channel interface.
S3# show run | begin interface Port-channel
interface Port-channel3
switchport trunk native vlan 99
switchport mode trunk
!
interface FastEthernet0/1
shutdown
!
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 12 of 25
Lab – Troubleshooting EtherChannel
interface FastEthernet0/2
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/3
switchport trunk native vlan 99
switchport mode trunk
channel-group 3 mode desirable
!
interface FastEthernet0/4
switchport trunk native vlan 99
switchport mode trunk
channel-group 3 mode desirable
!
interface FastEthernet0/5
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/6
shutdown
!
<output omitted>
d. Resolve all problems found. Record the commands used to correct the configuration.
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
S3(config)# interface range f0/3-4
S3(config-if-range)# channel-group 2 mode desirable
S3(config-if-range)# interface range f0/1-2
S3(config-if-range)# switchport mode trunk
S3(config-if-range)# switchport trunk native vlan 99
S3(config-if-range)# channel-group 3 mode desirable
S3(config-if-range)# no shutdown
e. Issue the command to verify trunk settings. Record the command used in the space provided below.
____________________________________________________________________________________
S3# show interfaces trunk
S3# show interfaces trunk
Port
Po2
Po3
Mode
on
on
Encapsulation
802.1q
802.1q
Port
Vlans allowed on trunk
Status
trunking
trunking
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Native vlan
99
99
Page 13 of 25
Lab – Troubleshooting EtherChannel
f.
Po2
Po3
1-4094
1-4094
Port
Po2
Po3
Vlans allowed and active in management domain
1,10,99
1,10,99
Port
Po2
Po3
Vlans in spanning tree forwarding state and not pruned
1,10,99
1,10,99
Issue the command to verify that the port channels are functioning. Record the command used in the
space provided below.
____________________________________________________________________________________
S3# show etherchannel summary
S3# show etherchannel summary
Flags:
D
I
H
R
U
-
down
stand-alone
Hot-standby
Layer3
in use
P - bundled in port-channel
s - suspended
(LACP only)
S - Layer2
f - failed to allocate aggregator
M
u
w
d
-
not in use, minimum links not met
unsuitable for bundling
waiting to be aggregated
default port
Number of channel-groups in use: 2
Number of aggregators:
2
Group Port-channel Protocol
Ports
------+-------------+-----------+----------------------------------------------2
Po2(SU)
PAgP
Fa0/3(P)
Fa0/4(P)
3
Po3(SU)
PAgP
Fa0/1(P)
Fa0/2(P)
Step 4: Verify EtherChannel and Connectivity.
a. Use the show interfaces etherchannel command to verify full functionality of the port channels.
S1# show interfaces etherchannel
---FastEthernet0/1:
Port state
= Up Mstr In-Bndl
Channel group = 1
Mode = Desirable-Sl
Port-channel = Po1
GC
= 0x00010001
Port index
= 0
Load = 0x00
Flags:
S - Device is sending Slow hello.
A - Device is in Auto mode.
Gcchange = 0
Pseudo port-channel = Po1
Protocol =
PAgP
C - Device is in Consistent state.
P - Device learns on physical port.
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 14 of 25
Lab – Troubleshooting EtherChannel
d - PAgP is down.
Timers: H - Hello timer is running.
S - Switching timer is running.
Q - Quit timer is running.
I - Interface timer is running.
Local information:
Port
Fa0/1
Flags State
SC
U6/S7
Timers
H
Hello
Partner PAgP
Interval Count
Priority
30s
1
128
Learning Group
Method Ifindex
Any
5001
Partner's information:
Port
Fa0/1
Partner
Name
S2
Partner
Device ID
0cd9.96e8.6f80
Partner
Port
Fa0/1
Partner Group
Age Flags
Cap.
23s SC
10001
Age of the port in the current state: 0d:00h:38m:38s
---FastEthernet0/2:
Port state
= Up Mstr In-Bndl
Channel group = 1
Mode = Desirable-Sl
Port-channel = Po1
GC
= 0x00010001
Port index
= 0
Load = 0x00
Flags:
S
A
d
Timers: H
S
-
Device is sending Slow hello.
Device is in Auto mode.
PAgP is down.
Hello timer is running.
Switching timer is running.
Gcchange = 0
Pseudo port-channel = Po1
Protocol =
PAgP
C - Device is in Consistent state.
P - Device learns on physical port.
Q - Quit timer is running.
I - Interface timer is running.
Local information:
Port
Fa0/2
Flags State
SC
U6/S7
Timers
H
Hello
Partner PAgP
Interval Count
Priority
30s
1
128
Learning Group
Method Ifindex
Any
5001
Partner's information:
Port
Fa0/2
Partner
Name
S2
Partner
Device ID
0cd9.96e8.6f80
Partner
Port
Fa0/2
Partner Group
Age Flags
Cap.
7s SC
10001
Age of the port in the current state: 0d:00h:38m:38s
---FastEthernet0/3:
Port state
= Up Mstr In-Bndl
Channel group = 2
Mode = Desirable-Sl
Port-channel = Po2
GC
= 0x00020001
Port index
= 0
Load = 0x00
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Gcchange = 0
Pseudo port-channel = Po2
Protocol =
PAgP
Page 15 of 25
Lab – Troubleshooting EtherChannel
Flags:
S
A
d
Timers: H
S
-
Device is sending Slow hello.
Device is in Auto mode.
PAgP is down.
Hello timer is running.
Switching timer is running.
C - Device is in Consistent state.
P - Device learns on physical port.
Q - Quit timer is running.
I - Interface timer is running.
Local information:
Port
Fa0/3
Flags State
SC
U6/S7
Timers
H
Hello
Partner PAgP
Interval Count
Priority
30s
1
128
Learning Group
Method Ifindex
Any
5002
Partner's information:
Port
Fa0/3
Partner
Name
S3
Partner
Device ID
0cd9.96d2.5100
Partner
Port
Fa0/3
Partner Group
Age Flags
Cap.
5s SC
20001
Age of the port in the current state: 0d:00h:28m:48s
---FastEthernet0/4:
Port state
= Up Mstr In-Bndl
Channel group = 2
Mode = Desirable-Sl
Port-channel = Po2
GC
= 0x00020001
Port index
= 0
Load = 0x00
Flags:
S
A
d
Timers: H
S
-
Device is sending Slow hello.
Device is in Auto mode.
PAgP is down.
Hello timer is running.
Switching timer is running.
Gcchange = 0
Pseudo port-channel = Po2
Protocol =
PAgP
C - Device is in Consistent state.
P - Device learns on physical port.
Q - Quit timer is running.
I - Interface timer is running.
Local information:
Port
Fa0/4
Flags State
SC
U6/S7
Timers
H
Hello
Partner PAgP
Interval Count
Priority
30s
1
128
Learning Group
Method Ifindex
Any
5002
Partner's information:
Port
Fa0/4
Partner
Name
S3
Partner
Device ID
0cd9.96d2.5100
Partner
Port
Fa0/4
Partner Group
Age Flags
Cap.
6s SC
20001
Age of the port in the current state: 0d:00h:28m:48s
---Port-channel1:
Age of the Port-channel
= 0d:00h:57m:52s
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 16 of 25
Lab – Troubleshooting EtherChannel
Logical slot/port
GC
Port state
Protocol
Port security
=
=
=
=
=
2/1
Number of ports = 2
0x00010001
HotStandBy port = null
Port-channel Ag-Inuse
PAgP
Disabled
Ports in the Port-channel:
Index
Load
Port
EC state
No of bits
------+------+------+------------------+----------0
00
Fa0/1
Desirable-Sl
0
0
00
Fa0/2
Desirable-Sl
0
Time since last port bundled:
0d:00h:38m:38s
Fa0/1
Time since last port Un-bundled: 0d:00h:42m:15s
Fa0/2
---Port-channel2:
Age of the Port-channel
= 0d:00h:57m:48s
Logical slot/port
= 2/2
Number of ports = 2
GC
= 0x00020001
HotStandBy port = null
Port state
= Port-channel Ag-Inuse
Protocol
=
PAgP
Port security
= Disabled
Ports in the Port-channel:
Index
Load
Port
EC state
No of bits
------+------+------+------------------+----------0
00
Fa0/3
Desirable-Sl
0
0
00
Fa0/4
Desirable-Sl
0
Time since last port bundled:
0d:00h:28m:48s
Time since last port Un-bundled: 0d:00h:28m:51s
Fa0/4
Fa0/4
b. Verify connectivity of the management VLAN.
Can S1 ping S2? _____ Yes
Can S1 ping S3? _____ Yes
Can S2 ping S3? _____ Yes
c.
Verify connectivity of PCs.
Can PC-A ping PC-C? _____ Yes
If EtherChannels are not fully functional, connectivity between switches does not exist, or connectivity
between hosts does not exist. Troubleshoot to resolve any remaining issues.
Note: It may be necessary to disable the PC firewall for pings between the PCs to succeed.
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 17 of 25
Lab – Troubleshooting EtherChannel
Device Configs - Final
Switch S1
S1#show run
Building configuration...
Current configuration : 2241 bytes
!
version 15.0
no service pad
service timestamps debug datetime msec
service timestamps log datetime msec
no service password-encryption
!
hostname S1
!
boot-start-marker
boot-end-marker
!
enable secret 4 06YFDUHH61wAE/kLkDq9BGho1QM5EnRtoyr8cHAUg.2
!
no aaa new-model
system mtu routing 1500
!
no ip domain-lookup
!
spanning-tree mode pvst
spanning-tree extend system-id
!
vlan internal allocation policy ascending
!
interface Port-channel1
switchport trunk native vlan 99
switchport mode trunk
!
interface Port-channel2
switchport trunk native vlan 99
switchport mode trunk
!
interface FastEthernet0/1
switchport trunk native vlan 99
switchport mode trunk
channel-group 1 mode desirable
!
interface FastEthernet0/2
switchport trunk native vlan 99
switchport mode trunk
channel-group 1 mode desirable
!
interface FastEthernet0/3
switchport trunk native vlan 99
switchport mode trunk
channel-group 2 mode desirable
!
interface FastEthernet0/4
switchport trunk native vlan 99
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 18 of 25
Lab – Troubleshooting EtherChannel
switchport mode trunk
channel-group 2 mode desirable
!
interface FastEthernet0/5
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/6
switchport access vlan 10
switchport mode access
!
interface FastEthernet0/7
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/8
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/9
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/10
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/11
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/12
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/13
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/14
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/15
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/16
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/17
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/18
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/19
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/20
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/21
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/22
shutdown
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 19 of 25
Lab – Troubleshooting EtherChannel
!
interface FastEthernet0/23
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/24
shutdown
!
interface GigabitEthernet0/1
shudown
!
interface GigabitEthernet0/2
shudown
!
interface Vlan1
no ip address
!
interface Vlan99
ip address 192.168.1.11 255.255.255.0
!
ip http server
ip http secure-server
!
line con 0
password cisco
logging synchronous
login
line vty 0 4
password cisco
login
line vty 5 15
password cisco
login
!
end
Switch S2
S2#show run
Building configuration...
Current configuration : 2476 bytes
!
version 15.0
no service pad
service timestamps debug datetime msec
service timestamps log datetime msec
no service password-encryption
!
hostname S2
!
boot-start-marker
boot-end-marker
!
enable secret 4 06YFDUHH61wAE/kLkDq9BGho1QM5EnRtoyr8cHAUg.2
!
no aaa new-model
system mtu routing 1500
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 20 of 25
Lab – Troubleshooting EtherChannel
!
no ip domain-lookup
!
spanning-tree mode pvst
spanning-tree extend system-id
spanning-tree vlan 1,10,99 priority 24576
!
vlan internal allocation policy ascending
!
interface Port-channel1
switchport trunk native vlan 99
switchport trunk allowed vlan 1,10,99
switchport mode trunk
!
interface Port-channel3
switchport trunk native vlan 99
switchport trunk allowed vlan 1,10,99
switchport mode trunk
!
interface FastEthernet0/1
switchport trunk native vlan 99
switchport trunk allowed vlan 1,10,99
switchport mode trunk
channel-group 1 mode desirable
!
interface FastEthernet0/2
switchport trunk native vlan 99
switchport trunk allowed vlan 1,10,99
switchport mode trunk
channel-group 1 mode desirable
!
interface FastEthernet0/3
switchport trunk native vlan 99
switchport trunk allowed vlan 1,10,99
switchport mode trunk
channel-group 3 mode desirable
!
interface FastEthernet0/4
switchport trunk native vlan 99
switchport trunk allowed vlan 1,10,99
switchport mode trunk
channel-group 3 mode desirable
!
interface FastEthernet0/5
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/6
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/7
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/8
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/9
shutdown
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 21 of 25
Lab – Troubleshooting EtherChannel
!
interface FastEthernet0/10
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/11
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/12
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/13
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/14
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/15
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/16
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/17
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/18
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/19
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/20
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/21
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/22
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/23
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/24
shutdown
!
interface GigabitEthernet0/1
shudown
!
interface GigabitEthernet0/2
shudown
!
interface Vlan1
no ip address
!
interface Vlan99
ip address 192.168.1.12 255.255.255.0
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 22 of 25
Lab – Troubleshooting EtherChannel
!
ip http server
ip http secure-server
!
line con 0
password cisco
logging synchronous
login
line vty 0 4
password cisco
login
line vty 5 15
password cisco
login
!
end
Switch S3
S3#show run
Building configuration...
Current configuration : 2239 bytes
!
version 15.0
no service pad
service timestamps debug datetime msec
service timestamps log datetime msec
no service password-encryption
!
hostname S3
!
boot-start-marker
boot-end-marker
!
enable secret 4 06YFDUHH61wAE/kLkDq9BGho1QM5EnRtoyr8cHAUg.2
!
no aaa new-model
system mtu routing 1500
!
no ip domain-lookup
!
spanning-tree mode pvst
spanning-tree extend system-id
!
vlan internal allocation policy ascending
!
interface Port-channel2
switchport trunk native vlan 99
switchport mode trunk
!
interface Port-channel3
switchport trunk native vlan 99
switchport mode trunk
!
interface FastEthernet0/1
switchport trunk native vlan 99
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 23 of 25
Lab – Troubleshooting EtherChannel
switchport mode trunk
channel-group 3 mode desirable
!
interface FastEthernet0/2
switchport trunk native vlan 99
switchport mode trunk
channel-group 3 mode desirable
!
interface FastEthernet0/3
switchport trunk native vlan 99
switchport mode trunk
channel-group 2 mode desirable
!
interface FastEthernet0/4
switchport trunk native vlan 99
switchport mode trunk
channel-group 2 mode desirable
!
interface FastEthernet0/5
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/6
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/7
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/8
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/9
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/10
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/11
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/12
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/13
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/14
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/15
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/16
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/17
shutdown
!
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 24 of 25
Lab – Troubleshooting EtherChannel
interface FastEthernet0/18
switchport access vlan 10
switchport mode access
!
interface FastEthernet0/19
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/20
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/21
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/22
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/23
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/24
shutdown
!
interface GigabitEthernet0/1
shudown
!
interface GigabitEthernet0/2
shudown
!
interface Vlan1
no ip address
!
interface Vlan99
ip address 192.168.1.13 255.255.255.0
!
ip http server
ip http secure-server
!
line con 0
password cisco
logging synchronous
login
line vty 0 4
password cisco
login
line vty 5 15
password cisco
login
!
end
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 25 of 25
Linking Up (Instructor Version)
Instructor Note: Red font color or Gray highlights indicate text that appears in the instructor copy only.
Objective
Describe link aggregation.
Instructor Note: This modeling activity is best completed in very small groups and then shared with another group
or the class.
Scenario
Many bottlenecks occur on your small- to medium-sized business network, even though you have configured
VLANs, STP, and other network traffic options on the company’s switches.
Instead of keeping the switches as they are currently configured, you would like to try EtherChannel as an option
for, at least, part of the network to see if it will lesson traffic congestion between your access and distribution layer
switches.
Your company uses Catalyst 3560 switches at the distribution layer and Catalyst 2960 and 2950 switches at the
access layer of the network. To verify if these switches can perform EtherChannel, you visit the System
Requirements to Implement EtherChannel on Catalyst Switches. This site allows you to gather more information
to determine if EtherChannel is a good option for the equipment and network currently in place.
After researching the models, you decide to use a simulation software program to practice configuring
EtherChannel before implementing it live on your network. As a part of this procedure, you ensure that the
equipment simulated in Packet Tracer will support these practice configurations.
Resources

World Wide Web connectivity

Packet Tracer software

Word processing or spreadsheet software
Directions
Step 1:
Visit System Requirements to Implement EtherChannel on Catalyst Switches.
a. Pay particular attention to the Catalyst 3560, 2960, and 2950 model information.
b. Record any information you feel would be useful to deciding whether to use EtherChannel in your
company.
Step 2: Create a matrix to record the information you recorded in Step 1b, including:
a. Number of ports allowed to bundled for an EtherChannel group
b. Maximum group bandwidth supported by bundling the ports
c.
IOS version needed to support EtherChannel on the switch model
d. Load balancing availability
e. Load balancing configuration options
f.
Network layers supported for EtherChannel operation
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Page 1 of 2
Linking Up
Step 3: Open Packet Tracer.
a. Notice how many ports are available to bundle for EtherChannel on all three switch models.
b. Check all three models to see how many EtherChannel groups you could create on each model.
c.
Make sure the IOS version is recent enough to support all EtherChannel configurations.
d. Do not configure your simulated network, but do check the models available in the Packet Tracer to make
sure they will support all the EtherChannel configuration options.
Step 4: Share your matrix with another group or the class.
Instructor – Example Activity Solution
EtherChannel
Requirements
Catalyst 3560
Catalyst 2960
Catalyst 2950
8
8
8
Etherchannel
bandwidth created per
group
800 Mbps
8 Gbps
800 Mbps
2 Gbps
800 Mbps
2 Gbps
Minimum IOS Version
supported
12.1(19)EA
12.2(25)FX
12.0(5.2)WC(1)
Load balancing types
MAC or IP address
Source or destination
Source and destination
MAC or IP address
Source or destination
Source and destination
MAC address
Source or destination
Layers 2 and 3
Layers 2 and 3
Layer 2
Packet Tracer program
IOS version
1.2(37)SE1
12.2(25r)FX
12.1(22)EA4
Number of Packet
Tracer ports available
for channel groups
24 FastEthernet
2 GigabitEthernet
24 FastEthernet
2 GigabitEthernet
24 FastEthernet
Maximum number of
ports allowed for
channel groups
OSI Model layers
supported for
configuration
Identify elements of the model that map to IT-related content:

EtherChannel

EtherChannel switch models

Bandwidth for channel groups

EtherChannel configuration layers

IOS for switch models using EtherChannel
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 2 of 2
Make Mine Wireless (Instructor Version)
Instructor Note: Red font color or Gray highlights indicate text that appears in the instructor copy only.
Objective
Explain how wireless LAN components are deployed in a small- to medium-sized business.
Instructor Notes: This activity can be completed individually, in small groups, or as a class.
Scenario
As the network administrator for your small- to medium-sized business, you realize that your wireless network
needs updating, both inside and outside of your building. Therefore, you decide to research how other businesses
and educational and community groups set up their WLANs for better access to their employees and clients.
To research this topic, you visit the Customer Case Studies and Research website to see how other businesses
use wireless technology. After viewing a few of the videos, or reading some of the case study PDFs, you decide
to select two to show to your CEO to support upgrading to a more robust wireless solution for your company.
To complete this class modeling activity, open the accompanying PDF for further instructions on how to proceed.
Resources
Internet access to the WWW
Step 1: Open your browser and the URL specified for this activity.
a. Choose two case studies about wireless LAN upgrades from the list to read, located on the Customer
Case Studies and Research website.
b. As you view the media or read the PDFs, write notes for the following categories:
1) The WLAN challenge that the company sought to mitigate
2) The solution that was found to the challenge
3) The results that were gained by WLAN updates
Step 2: Share your findings.
a. Share your findings with the class or a classmate.
b. Play the media or show the PDF for one of the case studies you chose from the URL page.
c.
In your own words, explain the challenge, solution, and results learned from the media or PDF.
d. Explain how the results you found could be applied to improve your company’s network.
Instructor Suggested Example
Barrick Gold Corporation
Challenge
Provide continuous access and updates to the Caterpillar Minestar software for fleet management, drilling
and blasting, loading, hauling, dozing, and truck management.
Solutions
Created an outdoor mesh wireless network, deployed on solar-powered trailers across the mine and
inside the mining pit.
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 1 of 2
Make Mine Wireless
Results

Closely monitored dispatch process and managed operational efficiency.

Improved productivity and safety.

Cut costs by implementing single network for communications and data sharing of new applications.
Identify elements of the model that map to IT-related content:

Wireless topologies

Inside-building wireless solutions

Outside-building wireless solutions

Wireless LAN devices

Wireless LAN communication
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 2 of 2
Lab – Investigating Wireless Implementations (Instructor Version)
Instructor Note: Red font color or Gray highlights indicate text that appears in the instructor copy only.
Objectives
Part 1: Explore Integrated Wireless Routers
Part 2: Explore Wireless Access Points
Background / Scenario
The number of mobile devices, such as smart phones, tablets, and laptops, continues to increase. These
mobile devices can connect via integrated wireless routers or wireless access points (WAPs) to access the
Internet and other network resources. Wireless routers are typically employed in home and small business
networks. WAPs are more common in larger, more complex networks.
In this lab, you will explore some integrated wireless routers and Cisco WAPs. You will access online
emulators for some of Linksys routers and Cisco WAPs. The emulators imitate the configuration screens for
the Linksys routers and Cisco WAPs.
Required Resources
Device with Internet access
Part 1: Explore Integrated Wireless Routers
Integrated wireless routers usually perform the functions of the following devices:
-
a switch by connecting wired devices
-
an access point by connecting wireless devices
-
a router/gateway by providing access to the Internet through a modem to the ISP
Currently there are many different broadcast standards for wireless routers:
-
802.11b
-
802.11g
-
802.11n
-
802.11ac
The differences between these standards are speed and signal strength. In addition to the standards, each
integrated wireless router may have features that meet your network requirement, such as content filtering,
QoS, IPv6 support, and wireless security.
In Part 1, you will search the Internet for three different wireless routers and create a list of the important
router feature by recording them in the following table. During your search, you can also record additional
features that are important to you in the Other Features column in the table.
To explore emulators for some of the Linksys routers, go to http://ui.linksys.com/files/.
Note: The Linksys emulators may not provide the most current version of the firmware.
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Page 1 of 3
Lab – Investigating Wireless Implementations
Brand/Model
Linksys/EA4500
Price
$129.99 USD
IPv6Enabled
Yes
Wireless
Security
WPA2
Band
Dual-band N (2.4
GHz and 5 GHz)
Other Features
Separate Guest
Network, 4 Gigabit
Ethernet Ports, QoS,
remote administration
from mobile devices,
such as smart phones
After you have completed the table above, determine which integrated wireless router you would choose for
your home. Explain your choice.
_______________________________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________________________
Answer will vary. Some of the reasons can include ease of configuration, parental control, and QoS.
Part 2: Explore Wireless Access Points
Unlike integrated wireless routers, a WAP does not have integrated switch and router functions. A WAP only
allows users to access the network wirelessly using mobile devices and provides a connection to the main
wired network infrastructure. With the correct user credentials, wireless users can access resources on the
network.
In this part, you will explore two Cisco WAPs, WAP321 and AP541N. Cisco’s website (http://www.cisco.com)
can provide you with technical specifications regarding these WAPs. Furthermore, online emulators are also
available at the following links:
To access an online WAP321 emulator, go to
https://www.cisco.com/assets/sol/sb/WAP321_Emulators/WAP321_Emulator_v1.0.2.3/main.html.
To access an online AP541N emulator, go to
http://www.cisco.com/assets/sol/sb/AP541N_Emulators/AP541N_Emulator_v1.9.2/Getting_Started.htm.
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Page 2 of 3
Lab – Investigating Wireless Implementations
Model
Security
Band
Other Features / Comments
WAP321
AP541N
Reflection
What features on the wireless routers or WAPs are important for your network? Why?
_______________________________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________________________
Answer will vary. For example, wireless security is important because unauthorized wireless access to the
network can have devastating consequences, such as loss of confidential company information.
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 3 of 3
Lab – Configuring a Wireless Router and Client (Instructor Version)
Instructor Note: Red font color or Gray highlights indicate text that appears in the instructor copy only.
Topology
Linksys Router Settings
Network Name (SSID)
CCNA-Net
Network Password
cisconet
Router Password
cisco123
Objectives
Part 1: Configure Basic Settings on a Linksys EA Series Router
Part 2: Secure the Wireless Network
Part 3: Review Additional Features on a Linksys EA Series Router
Part 4: Connect a Wireless Client
Background / Scenario
Surfing the web from anywhere in the home or office has become common. Without wireless connectivity,
users would be limited to connect only where there is a wired connection. Users have embraced the flexibility
that wireless routers provide for accessing the network and the Internet.
In this lab, you will configure a Linksys Smart Wi-Fi router, which includes applying WPA2 security settings
and activating DHCP services. You will review some added features available on these routers, such as USB
storage, parental controls, and time restrictions. You will also configure a wireless PC client.
Required Resources

1 Linksys EA Series Router (EA4500 with firmware version 2.1.39.145204 or comparable)

1 Cable or DSL modem (Optional - needed for Internet service and normally supplied by ISP)

1 PC with a Wireless NIC (Windows 7, Vista, or XP)

Ethernet cables as shown in the topology
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Page 1 of 17
Lab – Configuring a Wireless Router and Client
Part 1: Configure Basic Settings on a Linksys EA Series Router
The most efficient way to configure basic settings on an EA Series router is to run the Linksys EA Series
Setup CD that came with the router. If the Setup CD is unavailable, download the Setup program from
http://Linksys.com/support.
Step 1: Insert the Linksys EA-Series Setup CD into the PC.
When prompted, select Set up your Linksys Router. You will be asked to read and accept the License
Terms for using the software. Click Next > after accepting the license terms.
Step 2: Cable the network as shown in the topology.
Follow the directions in the next window for connecting the power cable and Ethernet cable from your cable
modem or DSL modem. You may connect the PC to one of the four unused Ethernet ports on the back of the
router. After you have connected everything, click Next >.
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Page 2 of 17
Lab – Configuring a Wireless Router and Client
Step 3: Configure Linksys router settings.
a. Allow time for the Linksys router settings window to display. Use the Linksys Router Settings table at
the beginning of this lab to fill in the fields in this window. Click Next to display the summary router
settings screen. Click Next.
b. The Create your Linksys Smart Wi-Fi account window displays. A Linksys Smart Wi-Fi account
associates your router to the account, allowing you to remotely manage the router using a browser or
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Page 3 of 17
Lab – Configuring a Wireless Router and Client
mobile device running the Smart Wi-Fi app. For this lab, bypass the account setup process. Click the No
thanks box and press Continue.
Note: An account can be setup by browsing to www.linksyssmartwifi.com.
c.
A Sign In window displays. In the Access Router field, enter cisco123, and click Sign In.
d. On the Linksys Smart Wi-Fi home page, click Connectivity to view and change basic router settings.
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Page 4 of 17
Lab – Configuring a Wireless Router and Client
e. On the Basic tab, you can edit the SSID name and password, change the router password, perform
firmware updates, and set the time zone for your router. (The router password and SSID information was
set in Step 3a.) Select the correct time zone for your router from the drop-down box and click Apply.
f.
The Internet Settings tab provides information about the Internet connection. In the example, the router
automatically configured the connection for DHCP. Both IPv4 and IPv6 information can be displayed from
this screen.
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Page 5 of 17
Lab – Configuring a Wireless Router and Client
g. The Local Network tab controls the local DHCP server settings. The default local network settings
specify the 192.168.1.0/24 network and the local IP address of the default router is 192.168.1.1. This can
be changed by clicking Edit next to Router Details. DHCP Server settings can be changed on this
screen. You can set the DHCP starting address, maximum number of DHCP users, client lease time, and
static DNS servers. Click Apply to accept all changes made on this screen.
Note: If DHCP is used to obtain ISP connection information, these DNS addresses will most likely be
populated with the ISP’s DNS server information.
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Page 6 of 17
Lab – Configuring a Wireless Router and Client
h. The Advanced Routing tab allows you to disable Network Address translation (NAT), which is enabled
by default. This screen also allows you to add static routes. Click Apply to accept any desired changes
made on this screen.
i.
The Administration tab provides controls for the management of the Smart Wi-Fi software. By chicking
the appropriate box, you can activate remote management access to the router. You can also activate
HTTPS access and restrict wireless management. Universal Plug and Play (UPnP) and Application Layer
Gateway controls are also available on this screen. Click Apply to accept any desired changes made on
this screen.
Part 2: Secure the Wireless Network
In Part 2, you will secure the Linksys EA series router wireless network and review firewall and port
forwarding options on a Linksys Smart Wi-Fi router.
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Page 7 of 17
Lab – Configuring a Wireless Router and Client
Step 1: Add WPA security on the wireless routers.
a. From the Linksys Smart Wi-Fi home page, click Wireless.
b. The Wireless window displays the settings for both the 2.4 and 5 GHz radios. Use the Edit button next to
each column to modify the security setting on each wireless frequency range. (The SSID and password
were previously set in Part 1.) Click the Security mode drop-down list to select the WPA2/WPA Mixed
Personal option for each range. Click Apply to save your settings, and then click OK.
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Page 8 of 17
Lab – Configuring a Wireless Router and Client
Step 2: Apply firewall and port forwarding settings.
a. From the Linksys Smart Wi-Fi home page, click Security. In the Security windows, the Firewall, DMZ,
and Apps and Gaming tabs are available to view and change router security settings.
b. The Firewall tab displays firewall settings, where you can enable or disable IPv4 and IPv6 Stateful
Packet Inspection (SPI) firewall protection, Virtual Private Network (VPN) Passthrough options, and
Internet filters. Click Apply to accept any desired changes made on this screen.
c.
The Apps and Gaming tab provides port forwarding capabilities. In the example, ports 5060 and 5061
have been opened for a VoIP Softphone application running on a local device at IP address
192.168.1.126. Click Apply to accept any desired changes made on this screen.
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Page 9 of 17
Lab – Configuring a Wireless Router and Client
Part 3: Review Additional Features on a Linksys EA Series Router
In Part 3, you will review some of the additional features available on the Linksys EA series router.
Step 1: Review Smart Wi-Fi Tools.
a. From the Linksys Smart Wi-Fi home page, click Device List.
The Device List window displays the list of clients on the local network. Notice that there is a tab for the
Guest Network. If the Guest network was activated, clients on that network would be displayed in the
Guest Network tab.
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Page 10 of 17
Lab – Configuring a Wireless Router and Client
b. From the Linksys Smart Wi-Fi home page, click Guest Access. Clients on the guest network only have
access to the Internet and are unable to access other clients on the local network. To allow guest access,
click on the Allow guest access toggle button. Click Edit link (next to the Guest network name and
password) to change the Guest network password and click OK to accept the changes.
c.
From the Linksys Smart Wi-Fi home page, click Parental Controls. Use these settings to restrict Internet
access on selected devices and to restrict time and websites. Click OK to save the settings.
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Page 11 of 17
Lab – Configuring a Wireless Router and Client
d. From the Linksys Smart Wi-Fi home page, click on Media Prioritization. These settings allows you to
assign network bandwidth prioritization to selected devices on the local network. In the example, the
device labeled Apple TV has been given the highest priority for network resources. To make prioritization
changes, just drag and drop the listed devices, and click OK to save your settings.
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Page 12 of 17
Lab – Configuring a Wireless Router and Client
e. From the Linksys Smart Wi-Fi home page, click Speed Test. Use this utility to test your Internet access
speeds. The example shows the results of the speed test. The router stores the results of each speed
tests and allows you to display that history.
f.
From the Linksys Smart Wi-Fi home page, click USB Storage. Use this screen to review your USB drive
settings. From here, you can click on the appropriate tab to set up FTP and Media Servers. You can also
set up individual user accounts for access to these servers by clicking the tabs at the top of this screen. A
USB storage device is plugged into the back of the router to use this option. Click OK to save any desired
changes.
Step 2: Troubleshoot the router.
From the Linksys Smart Wi-Fi home page, click Troubleshooting.
a. The Status tab provides a list of clients on the local network along with their NIC MAC and IP addresses.
It also displays how they are connected to the network. Click OK to save any desired changes.
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Page 13 of 17
Lab – Configuring a Wireless Router and Client
b. The Diagnostics tab provides the ping and traceroute utilities. It also allows you to reboot the router,
backup and restore the router configuration, restore a previous firmware version, release and renew the
Internet addresses on your router, and reset to factory default settings. Click OK to save any desired
changes.
c.
The Logs tab provides Incoming and Outgoing, Security, and DHCP logs. You can print and clear these
logs from this screen. Click OK to save any desired changes.
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Page 14 of 17
Lab – Configuring a Wireless Router and Client
Part 4: Connect a Wireless Client
In Part 4, you will configure the PC’s wireless NIC to connect to the Linksys EA Series Router.
Note: This lab was performed using a PC running the Windows 7 operating system. You should be able to
perform the lab with other Windows operating systems listed; however, menu selections and screens may
vary.
Step 1: Use the Network and Sharing Center.
a. Open the Network and Sharing Center by clicking the Windows Start button > Control Panel > View
network status and tasks under Network and Internet heading in the Category View.
b. In the left pane, click the Change adapter settings link.
The Network Connections window provides the list of NICs available on this PC. Look for your Local
Area Connection and Wireless Network Connection adapters in this window.
Note: VPN adapters and other types of network connections may also be displayed in this window.
Step 2: Work with your wireless NIC.
a. Select and right-click the Wireless Network Connection option to display a drop-down list. If your
wireless NIC is disabled, you must Enable it.
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Page 15 of 17
Lab – Configuring a Wireless Router and Client
b. Right-click the Wireless Network Connection, and then click Connect/Disconnect. This displays a list
of SSIDs in range of your wireless NIC. Select CCNA-Net, then click the Connect.
c.
When prompted, enter cisconet to supply the network security key, and then click OK.
d. The wireless icon should display in your taskbar when you have a wireless connection. Click this icon to
display the list of SSIDs in range of your PC.
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Page 16 of 17
Lab – Configuring a Wireless Router and Client
e. The SSID CCNA-Net should now show that you are connected to the CCNA-Net wireless network.
Reflection
Why would you not want to use WEP security for your wireless network?
_______________________________________________________________________________________
WEP uses RC4 encryption, which can be easily hacked. WPA2 use Advanced Encryption Standard (AES),
which is considered the strongest encryption protocol.
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 17 of 17
Inside and Outside Control (Instructor Version)
Instructor Note: Red font color or Gray highlights indicate text that appears in the instructor copy only.
Objective
Explain how wireless LAN components are deployed in a small- to medium-sized business.
Instructor Notes: This activity can be completed individually, in small groups, or as a class.
Scenario
An assessment has been completed to validate the need for an upgrade to your small- to medium-sized wireless
network. Approved for purchase are indoor and outdoor access points and one wireless controller. You must
compare equipment models and their specifications before you purchase.
Therefore, you visit the Wireless Compare Products and Services web site and see a features chart for indoor
and outdoor wireless access points and controller devices. After reviewing the chart, you note there is some
terminology with which you are unfamiliar:
•
Federal Information Processing Standard (FIPS)
•
MIMO
•
Cisco CleanAir Technology
•
Cisco FlexConnect
•
Band Select
Research the above terms. Prepare your own chart with your company’s most important requirements listed for
purchasing the indoor and outdoor wireless access points and wireless controller. This chart will assist in
validating your purchase order to your accounting manager and CEO.
Resources
Internet access to the World Wide Web
Part 1: Secure Background Knowledge of Wireless Terminology
Step 1: Define unfamiliar wireless terms.
a. FIPS
b. MIMO
c.
Cisco CleanAir Technology
d. Cisco FlexConnect
e. Band Select
Step 2:
Visit the Wireless Compare Products and Services web site.
a. Compare the devices in each category based on their feature sets.
b. Choose one model from each category: indoor, outdoor, and controller categories for the upgrades for
your business.
Step 3: Create a chart for each device chosen in Step 2b to include:
a. The main type of selected device (indoor access point, outdoor access point, or controller).
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 1 of 4
Inside and Outside Control
b. A graphic of each selected device.
c.
Five of the most beneficial features that the selected models would provide your business.
Step 4: After research is complete, explain, and justify your choices with another student,
class group, or entire class.
Suggested Activity Completion Examples
Part 1:
Wireless device features definitions
FIPS
FIPS is the Federal Information Processing Standard regarding security for wireless
devices.
MIMO
Unlike SISO (Single Input, Single Output), MIMO technology uses multiple radio
bands and paths to transfer network data through multiple signals. Multiple antennas
are used to send multiple spatial streams at the same time allowing for higher data
transmission speeds and data delivery payloads.
CleanAir Technology allows Cisco devices to:

Cisco CleanAir
Technology
Cisco
FlexConnect

provide continual, system-wide wireless network discovery without wireless
performance impact
identify source, location and interference of wireless signals
take automatic steps to avoid current and future wireless interference while
recording what steps were taken to do so
FlexConnect (previously known as Hybrid Remote Edge Access Point or H-REAP) is
a wireless solution which enables network administrators to configure and control
access points located at remote locations. This is performed by using a local
wireless controller through a WAN connection.
Band Select is a Cisco-selected frequency range technology based upon the ISM
(industrial, scientific, and medical) unlicensed usage. These include:
Band Select



900 MHz
2.4 GHz (802.11b, g, and n standards) – better range but lower data rates
5 GHz (802.11a, n, and ac standards) – less range but higher data rates
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 2 of 4
Inside and Outside Control
Part 2:
Cisco 2600 Series Indoor Access Point
Wi-Fi Standards
802.11 a, b, g, n
(supports Dual paths/radio rates of 2.4 and 5 GHz)
Data rate capabilities of 450 Mbps
FIPS
In process
CleanAir Technology
Yes
FlexConnect
Yes
Antennas
Internal and external
Cisco 1552I Series Outdoor Access Point
Wi-Fi Standards
802.11 a, b, g, n
(supports Dual paths/radio rates of 2.4 and 5 GHz)
Data rate capabilities of 300 Mbps downstream with
10/100/1000 Mbps upstream
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 3 of 4
Inside and Outside Control
FIPS
In process
CleanAir Technology
Yes
FlexConnect
Yes
Antennas
Internal
Cisco Wireless Controller Module for ISR G2
Data Throughput
500 Mbps
Wireless Guest Services
Yes (up to 500 clients supported by 50 APs)
16 WLANs supported with 16 maximum VLANs
allowed
CleanAir Technology
Yes
FlexConnect
Yes
Access Control Lists (ACLs for security)
Yes
Identify elements of the model that map to IT-related content:

Wireless terminology

Inside and outside wireless access points

Wireless controllers

Wireless device capabilities
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Page 4 of 4
DR and BDR Elections (Instructor Version)
Instructor Note: Red font color or Gray highlights indicate text that appears in the instructor copy only.
Objectives
Modify the OSPF interface priority to influence the Designated Router (DR) and Backup Designated Router (BDR)
election.
The purpose of this activity is to simulate how designated and backup designated routers are selected for an
OSPF area.
Scenario
You are trying to decide how to influence the selection of the designated router and backup designated router for
your OSPF network. This activity simulates that process.
Three separate designated-router election scenarios will be presented. The focus is on electing a DR and BDR for
your group. Refer to the PDF for this activity for the remaining instructions.
If additional time is available, two groups can be combined to simulate DR and BDR elections.
Required Resources

Router priorities paper sign example (student developed)

Router ID paper sign example (student developed)
Directions
This is a group activity with four classmates comprising each group. Before reporting to the group, each student
will prepare router priority and router ID signs to bring to the group.
Step 1: Decide the router priority.
a. Prior to joining your group, use a clean sheet of paper. On one side of the paper, write DEFAULT
ROUTER PRIORITY = 1.
b. On the other side of the same sheet of paper, write ROUTER PRIORITY = (choose a number between 0
and 255).
Step 2: Decide the router ID.
a. On a second clean sheet of paper, on one side, write ROUTER ID = (any IPv4 number).
b. On the other side, write ROUTER ID = Loopback (any IPv4) number.
Step 3: Begin DR and BDR elections.
a. Start the first election process.
1) Students within the group will show each other the router priority numbers they selected for Step 1b.
2) After comparing their priority numbers, the student with the highest priority number is elected the DR
and the student with the second-highest priority number is elected the BDR. Any student, who wrote 0
as their priority number, cannot participate in the election.
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 1 of 2
DR and BDR Elections
3) The elected DR student will announce the elections by saying “I am the DR for all of you in this group.
Please send me any changes to your networks or interfaces to IP address 224.0.0.6. I will then
forward those changes to all of you at IP address 224.0.0.5. Stay tuned for future updates.”
4) The BDR’s elected student will say, “I am your BDR. Please send all changes to your router
interfaces or networks to the DR. If the DR does not announce your changes, I will step in and do
that from that point onward.”
b. Start the second election process.
1) Students will hold up their DEFAULT ROUTER PRIORITY = 1 sign first. When it is agreed that all of
the students have the same router priority, they will put that paper down.
2) Next, students will display their ROUTER ID = Loopback (IPv4) address signs.
3) The student with the highest loopback IPv4 address wins the election and repeats “I am the DR for all
of you in this group. Our priorities are the same, but I have the highest loopback address on my router
as compared to all of you; therefore, you have elected me as your DR. Please send all changes to
your network addresses or interfaces to 224.0.0.6. I will then report any changes to all of you via
224.0.0.5.”
4) The BDR will repeat his/her respective phrase from Step 3a,4).
c.
Start the third election process, but this time, all students can choose which sides of their papers to
display. The DR/BDR election process uses the highest router priority first, highest loopback router ID
second, and highest IPv4 router ID third, and elects a DR and BDR.
1) Elect a DR and BDR.
2) Justify your elections.
3) If you have time, get together with another group and go through the scenario processes again to
solidify DR and BDR elections.
Identify elements of the model that map to IT-related content:

Designated router

Backup designated router

Multicast 224.0.0.6

Multicast 224.0.0.5
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 2 of 2
Lab - Configuring Basic Single-Area OSPFv2 (Instructor Version)
Instructor Note: Red font color or Gray highlights indicate text that appears in the instructor copy only.
Topology
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Page 1 of 29
Lab - Configuring Basic Single-Area OSPFv2
Addressing Table
Device
R1
Interface
IP Address
Subnet Mask
Default Gateway
G0/0
192.168.1.1
255.255.255.0
N/A
S0/0/0 (DCE)
192.168.12.1
255.255.255.252
N/A
S0/0/1
192.168.13.1
255.255.255.252
N/A
G0/0
192.168.2.1
255.255.255.0
N/A
S0/0/0
192.168.12.2
255.255.255.252
N/A
S0/0/1 (DCE)
192.168.23.1
255.255.255.252
N/A
G0/0
192.168.3.1
255.255.255.0
N/A
S0/0/0 (DCE)
192.168.13.2
255.255.255.252
N/A
S0/0/1
192.168.23.2
255.255.255.252
N/A
PC-A
NIC
192.168.1.3
255.255.255.0
192.168.1.1
PC-B
NIC
192.168.2.3
255.255.255.0
192.168.2.1
PC-C
NIC
192.168.3.3
255.255.255.0
192.168.3.1
R2
R3
Objectives
Part 1: Build the Network and Configure Basic Device Settings
Part 2: Configure and Verify OSPF Routing
Part 3: Change Router ID Assignments
Part 4: Configure OSPF Passive Interfaces
Part 5: Change OSPF Metrics
Background / Scenario
Open Shortest Path First (OSPF) is a link-state routing protocol for IP networks. OSPFv2 is defined for IPv4
networks, and OSPFv3 is defined for IPv6 networks. OSPF detects changes in the topology, such as link
failures, and converges on a new loop-free routing structure very quickly. It computes each route using
Dijkstra’s algorithm, a shortest path first algorithm.
In this lab, you will configure the network topology with OSPFv2 routing, change the router ID assignments,
configure passive interfaces, adjust OSPF metrics, and use a number of CLI commands to display and verify
OSPF routing information.
Note: The routers used with CCNA hands-on labs are Cisco 1941 Integrated Services Routers (ISRs) with
Cisco IOS Release 15.2(4)M3 (universalk9 image). Other routers and Cisco IOS versions can be used.
Depending on the model and Cisco IOS version, the commands available and output produced might vary
from what is shown in the labs. Refer to the Router Interface Summary Table at the end of this lab for the
correct interface identifiers.
Note: Make sure that the routers have been erased and have no startup configurations. If you are unsure,
contact your instructor.
Instructor Note: Refer to the Instructor Lab Manual for the procedures to initialize and reload devices.
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 2 of 29
Lab - Configuring Basic Single-Area OSPFv2
Required Resources

3 Routers (Cisco 1941 with Cisco IOS Release 15.2(4)M3 universal image or comparable)

3 PCs (Windows 7, Vista, or XP with terminal emulation program, such as Tera Term)

Console cables to configure the Cisco IOS devices via the console ports

Ethernet and serial cables as shown in the topology
Part 1: Build the Network and Configure Basic Device Settings
In Part 1, you set up the network topology and configure basic settings on the PC hosts and routers.
Step 1: Cable the network as shown in the topology.
Step 2: Initialize and reload the routers as necessary.
Step 3: Configure basic settings for each router.
a. Disable DNS lookup.
b. Configure device name as shown in the topology.
c.
Assign class as the privileged EXEC password.
d. Assign cisco as the console and vty passwords.
e. Configure a message of the day (MOTD) banner to warn users that unauthorized access is prohibited.
f.
Configure logging synchronous for the console line.
g. Configure the IP address listed in the Addressing Table for all interfaces.
h. Set the clock rate for all DCE serial interfaces at 128000.
i.
Copy the running configuration to the startup configuration.
Step 4: Configure PC hosts.
Step 5: Test connectivity.
The routers should be able to ping one another, and each PC should be able to ping its default gateway. The
PCs are unable to ping other PCs until OSPF routing is configured. Verify and troubleshoot if necessary.
Part 2: Configure and Verify OSPF Routing
In Part 2, you will configure OSPFv2 routing on all routers in the network and then verify that routing tables
are updated correctly. After OSPF has been verified, you will configure OSPF authentication on the links for
added security.
Step 1: Configure OSPF on R1.
a. Use the router ospf command in global configuration mode to enable OSPF on R1.
R1(config)# router ospf 1
Note: The OSPF process id is kept locally and has no meaning to other routers on the network.
b. Configure the network statements for the networks on R1. Use an area ID of 0.
R1(config-router)# network 192.168.1.0 0.0.0.255 area 0
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Lab - Configuring Basic Single-Area OSPFv2
R1(config-router)# network 192.168.12.0 0.0.0.3 area 0
R1(config-router)# network 192.168.13.0 0.0.0.3 area 0
Step 2: Configure OSPF on R2 and R3.
Use the router ospf command and add the network statements for the networks on R2 and R3. Neighbor
adjacency messages display on R1 when OSPF routing is configured on R2 and R3.
R1#
00:22:29: %OSPF-5-ADJCHG: Process 1, Nbr 192.168.23.1 on Serial0/0/0 from LOADING to
FULL, Loading Done
R1#
00:23:14: %OSPF-5-ADJCHG: Process 1, Nbr 192.168.23.2 on Serial0/0/1 from LOADING to
FULL, Loading Done
R1#
Step 3: Verify OSPF neighbors and routing information.
a. Issue the show ip ospf neighbor command to verify that each router lists the other routers in the
network as neighbors.
R1# show ip ospf neighbor
Neighbor ID
192.168.23.2
192.168.23.1
Pri
0
0
State
FULL/
FULL/
-
Dead Time
00:00:33
00:00:30
Address
192.168.13.2
192.168.12.2
Interface
Serial0/0/1
Serial0/0/0
b. Issue the show ip route command to verify that all networks display in the routing table on all routers.
R1# show ip route
Codes: L - local, C - connected, S - static, R - RIP, M - mobile, B - BGP
D - EIGRP, EX - EIGRP external, O - OSPF, IA - OSPF inter area
N1 - OSPF NSSA external type 1, N2 - OSPF NSSA external type 2
E1 - OSPF external type 1, E2 - OSPF external type 2, E - EGP
i - IS-IS, L1 - IS-IS level-1, L2 - IS-IS level-2, ia - IS-IS inter area
* - candidate default, U - per-user static route, o - ODR
P - periodic downloaded static route
Gateway of last resort is not set
C
L
O
O
C
L
C
L
O
192.168.1.0/24 is variably subnetted, 2 subnets, 2 masks
192.168.1.0/24 is directly connected, GigabitEthernet0/0
192.168.1.1/32 is directly connected, GigabitEthernet0/0
192.168.2.0/24 [110/65] via 192.168.12.2, 00:32:33, Serial0/0/0
192.168.3.0/24 [110/65] via 192.168.13.2, 00:31:48, Serial0/0/1
192.168.12.0/24 is variably subnetted, 2 subnets, 2 masks
192.168.12.0/30 is directly connected, Serial0/0/0
192.168.12.1/32 is directly connected, Serial0/0/0
192.168.13.0/24 is variably subnetted, 2 subnets, 2 masks
192.168.13.0/30 is directly connected, Serial0/0/1
192.168.13.1/32 is directly connected, Serial0/0/1
192.168.23.0/30 is subnetted, 1 subnets
192.168.23.0/30 [110/128] via 192.168.12.2, 00:31:38, Serial0/0/0
[110/128] via 192.168.13.2, 00:31:38, Serial0/0/1
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 4 of 29
Lab - Configuring Basic Single-Area OSPFv2
What command would you use to only see the OSPF routes in the routing table?
_______________________________________________________________________________________
show ip route ospf
Step 4: Verify OSPF protocol settings.
The show ip protocols command is a quick way to verify vital OSPF configuration information. This
information includes the OSPF process ID, the router ID, networks the router is advertising, the neighbors the
router is receiving updates from, and the default administrative distance, which is 110 for OSPF.
R1# show ip protocols
*** IP Routing is NSF aware ***
Routing Protocol is "ospf 1"
Outgoing update filter list for all interfaces is not set
Incoming update filter list for all interfaces is not set
Router ID 192.168.13.1
Number of areas in this router is 1. 1 normal 0 stub 0 nssa
Maximum path: 4
Routing for Networks:
192.168.1.0 0.0.0.255 area 0
192.168.12.0 0.0.0.3 area 0
192.168.13.0 0.0.0.3 area 0
Routing Information Sources:
Gateway
Distance
Last Update
192.168.23.2
110
00:19:16
192.168.23.1
110
00:20:03
Distance: (default is 110)
Step 5: Verify OSPF process information.
Use the show ip ospf command to examine the OSPF process ID and router ID. This command displays the
OSPF area information, as well as the last time the SPF algorithm was calculated.
R1# show ip ospf
Routing Process "ospf 1" with ID 192.168.13.1
Start time: 00:20:23.260, Time elapsed: 00:25:08.296
Supports only single TOS(TOS0) routes
Supports opaque LSA
Supports Link-local Signaling (LLS)
Supports area transit capability
Supports NSSA (compatible with RFC 3101)
Event-log enabled, Maximum number of events: 1000, Mode: cyclic
Router is not originating router-LSAs with maximum metric
Initial SPF schedule delay 5000 msecs
Minimum hold time between two consecutive SPFs 10000 msecs
Maximum wait time between two consecutive SPFs 10000 msecs
Incremental-SPF disabled
Minimum LSA interval 5 secs
Minimum LSA arrival 1000 msecs
LSA group pacing timer 240 secs
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
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Lab - Configuring Basic Single-Area OSPFv2
Interface flood pacing timer 33 msecs
Retransmission pacing timer 66 msecs
Number of external LSA 0. Checksum Sum 0x000000
Number of opaque AS LSA 0. Checksum Sum 0x000000
Number of DCbitless external and opaque AS LSA 0
Number of DoNotAge external and opaque AS LSA 0
Number of areas in this router is 1. 1 normal 0 stub 0 nssa
Number of areas transit capable is 0
External flood list length 0
IETF NSF helper support enabled
Cisco NSF helper support enabled
Reference bandwidth unit is 100 mbps
Area BACKBONE(0)
Number of interfaces in this area is 3
Area has no authentication
SPF algorithm last executed 00:22:53.756 ago
SPF algorithm executed 7 times
Area ranges are
Number of LSA 3. Checksum Sum 0x019A61
Number of opaque link LSA 0. Checksum Sum 0x000000
Number of DCbitless LSA 0
Number of indication LSA 0
Number of DoNotAge LSA 0
Flood list length 0
Step 6: Verify OSPF interface settings.
a. Issue the show ip ospf interface brief command to display a summary of OSPF-enabled interfaces.
R1# show ip ospf interface brief
Interface
Se0/0/1
Se0/0/0
Gi0/0
PID
1
1
1
Area
0
0
0
IP Address/Mask
192.168.13.1/30
192.168.12.1/30
192.168.1.1/24
Cost
64
64
1
State
P2P
P2P
DR
Nbrs F/C
1/1
1/1
0/0
b. For a more detailed list of every OSPF-enabled interface, issue the show ip ospf interface command.
R1# show ip ospf interface
Serial0/0/1 is up, line protocol is up
Internet Address 192.168.13.1/30, Area 0, Attached via Network Statement
Process ID 1, Router ID 192.168.13.1, Network Type POINT_TO_POINT, Cost: 64
Topology-MTID
Cost
Disabled
Shutdown
Topology Name
0
64
no
no
Base
Transmit Delay is 1 sec, State POINT_TO_POINT
Timer intervals configured, Hello 10, Dead 40, Wait 40, Retransmit 5
oob-resync timeout 40
Hello due in 00:00:01
Supports Link-local Signaling (LLS)
Cisco NSF helper support enabled
IETF NSF helper support enabled
Index 3/3, flood queue length 0
Next 0x0(0)/0x0(0)
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Page 6 of 29
Lab - Configuring Basic Single-Area OSPFv2
Last flood scan length is 1, maximum is 1
Last flood scan time is 0 msec, maximum is 0 msec
Neighbor Count is 1, Adjacent neighbor count is 1
Adjacent with neighbor 192.168.23.2
Suppress hello for 0 neighbor(s)
Serial0/0/0 is up, line protocol is up
Internet Address 192.168.12.1/30, Area 0, Attached via Network Statement
Process ID 1, Router ID 192.168.13.1, Network Type POINT_TO_POINT, Cost: 64
Topology-MTID
Cost
Disabled
Shutdown
Topology Name
0
64
no
no
Base
Transmit Delay is 1 sec, State POINT_TO_POINT
Timer intervals configured, Hello 10, Dead 40, Wait 40, Retransmit 5
oob-resync timeout 40
Hello due in 00:00:03
Supports Link-local Signaling (LLS)
Cisco NSF helper support enabled
IETF NSF helper support enabled
Index 2/2, flood queue length 0
Next 0x0(0)/0x0(0)
Last flood scan length is 1, maximum is 1
Last flood scan time is 0 msec, maximum is 0 msec
Neighbor Count is 1, Adjacent neighbor count is 1
Adjacent with neighbor 192.168.23.1
Suppress hello for 0 neighbor(s)
GigabitEthernet0/0 is up, line protocol is up
Internet Address 192.168.1.1/24, Area 0, Attached via Network Statement
Process ID 1, Router ID 192.168.13.1, Network Type BROADCAST, Cost: 1
Topology-MTID
Cost
Disabled
Shutdown
Topology Name
0
1
no
no
Base
Transmit Delay is 1 sec, State DR, Priority 1
Designated Router (ID) 192.168.13.1, Interface address 192.168.1.1
No backup designated router on this network
Timer intervals configured, Hello 10, Dead 40, Wait 40, Retransmit 5
oob-resync timeout 40
Hello due in 00:00:01
Supports Link-local Signaling (LLS)
Cisco NSF helper support enabled
IETF NSF helper support enabled
Index 1/1, flood queue length 0
Next 0x0(0)/0x0(0)
Last flood scan length is 0, maximum is 0
Last flood scan time is 0 msec, maximum is 0 msec
Neighbor Count is 0, Adjacent neighbor count is 0
Suppress hello for 0 neighbor(s)
Step 7: Verify end-to-end connectivity.
Each PC should be able to ping the other PCs in the topology. Verify and troubleshoot if necessary.
Note: It may be necessary to disable the PC firewall to ping between PCs.
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Page 7 of 29
Lab - Configuring Basic Single-Area OSPFv2
Part 3: Change Router ID Assignments
The OSPF router ID is used to uniquely identify the router in the OSPF routing domain. Cisco routers derive
the router ID in one of three ways and with the following precedence:
1) IP address configured with the OSPF router-id command, if present
2) Highest IP address of any of the router’s loopback addresses, if present
3) Highest active IP address on any of the router’s physical interfaces
Because no router IDs or loopback interfaces have been configured on the three routers, the router ID for
each router is determined by the highest IP address of any active interface.
In Part 3, you will change the OSPF router ID assignment using loopback addresses. You will also use the
router-id command to change the router ID.
Step 1: Change router IDs using loopback addresses.
a. Assign an IP address to loopback 0 on R1.
R1(config)# interface lo0
R1(config-if)# ip address 1.1.1.1 255.255.255.255
R1(config-if)# end
b. Assign IP addresses to Loopback 0 on R2 and R3. Use IP address 2.2.2.2/32 for R2 and 3.3.3.3/32 for
R3.
c.
Save the running configuration to the startup configuration on all three routers.
d. You must reload the routers in order to reset the router ID to the loopback address. Issue the reload
command on all three routers. Press Enter to confirm the reload.
Instructor Note: The clear ip ospf process command does not reset the router IDs with the loopback
address. Reloading the router will reset the router ID to the loopback address.
e. After the router completes the reload process, issue the show ip protocols command to view the new
router ID.
R1# show ip protocols
*** IP Routing is NSF aware ***
Routing Protocol is "ospf 1"
Outgoing update filter list for all interfaces is not set
Incoming update filter list for all interfaces is not set
Router ID 1.1.1.1
Number of areas in this router is 1. 1 normal 0 stub 0 nssa
Maximum path: 4
Routing for Networks:
192.168.1.0 0.0.0.255 area 0
192.168.12.0 0.0.0.3 area 0
192.168.13.0 0.0.0.3 area 0
Routing Information Sources:
Gateway
Distance
Last Update
3.3.3.3
110
00:01:00
2.2.2.2
110
00:01:14
Distance: (default is 110)
f.
Issue the show ip ospf neighbor command to display the router ID changes for the neighboring routers.
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 8 of 29
Lab - Configuring Basic Single-Area OSPFv2
R1# show ip ospf neighbor
Neighbor ID
3.3.3.3
2.2.2.2
R1#
Pri
0
0
State
FULL/
FULL/
-
Dead Time
00:00:35
00:00:32
Address
192.168.13.2
192.168.12.2
Interface
Serial0/0/1
Serial0/0/0
Step 2: Change the router ID on R1 using the router-id command.
The preferred method for setting the router ID is with the router-id command.
a. Issue the router-id 11.11.11.11 command on R1 to reassign the router ID. Notice the informational
message that appears when issuing the router-id command.
R1(config)# router ospf 1
R1(config-router)# router-id 11.11.11.11
Reload or use "clear ip ospf process" command, for this to take effect
R1(config)# end
b. You will receive an informational message telling you that you must either reload the router or use the
clear ip ospf process command for the change to take effect. Issue the clear ip ospf process
command on all three routers. Type yes to reply to the reset verification message, and press ENTER.
c.
Set the router ID for R2 to 22.22.22.22 and the router ID for R3 to 33.33.33.33. Then use clear ip ospf
process command to reset ospf routing process.
d. Issue the show ip protocols command to verify that the router ID changed on R1.
R1# show ip protocols
*** IP Routing is NSF aware ***
Routing Protocol is "ospf 1"
Outgoing update filter list for all interfaces is not set
Incoming update filter list for all interfaces is not set
Router ID 11.11.11.11
Number of areas in this router is 1. 1 normal 0 stub 0 nssa
Maximum path: 4
Routing for Networks:
192.168.1.0 0.0.0.255 area 0
192.168.12.0 0.0.0.3 area 0
192.168.13.0 0.0.0.3 area 0
Passive Interface(s):
GigabitEthernet0/1
Routing Information Sources:
Gateway
Distance
Last Update
33.33.33.33
110
00:00:19
22.22.22.22
110
00:00:31
3.3.3.3
110
00:00:41
2.2.2.2
110
00:00:41
Distance: (default is 110)
e. Issue the show ip ospf neighbor command on R1 to verify that new router ID for R2 and R3 is listed.
R1# show ip ospf neighbor
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 9 of 29
Lab - Configuring Basic Single-Area OSPFv2
Neighbor ID
33.33.33.33
22.22.22.22
Pri
0
0
State
FULL/
FULL/
-
Dead Time
00:00:36
00:00:32
Address
192.168.13.2
192.168.12.2
Interface
Serial0/0/1
Serial0/0/0
Part 4: Configure OSPF Passive Interfaces
The passive-interface command prevents routing updates from being sent through the specified router
interface. This is commonly done to reduce traffic on the LANs as they do not need to receive dynamic routing
protocol communication. In Part 4, you will use the passive-interface command to configure a single
interface as passive. You will also configure OSPF so that all interfaces on the router are passive by default,
and then enable OSPF routing advertisements on selected interfaces.
Step 1: Configure a passive interface.
a. Issue the show ip ospf interface g0/0 command on R1. Notice the timer indicating when the next Hello
packet is expected. Hello packets are sent every 10 seconds and are used between OSPF routers to
verify that their neighbors are up.
R1# show ip ospf interface g0/0
GigabitEthernet0/0 is up, line protocol is up
Internet Address 192.168.1.1/24, Area 0, Attached via Network Statement
Process ID 1, Router ID 11.11.11.11, Network Type BROADCAST, Cost: 1
Topology-MTID
Cost
Disabled
Shutdown
Topology Name
0
1
no
no
Base
Transmit Delay is 1 sec, State DR, Priority 1
Designated Router (ID) 11.11.11.11, Interface address 192.168.1.1
No backup designated router on this network
Timer intervals configured, Hello 10, Dead 40, Wait 40, Retransmit 5
oob-resync timeout 40
Hello due in 00:00:02
Supports Link-local Signaling (LLS)
Cisco NSF helper support enabled
IETF NSF helper support enabled
Index 1/1, flood queue length 0
Next 0x0(0)/0x0(0)
Last flood scan length is 0, maximum is 0
Last flood scan time is 0 msec, maximum is 0 msec
Neighbor Count is 0, Adjacent neighbor count is 0
Suppress hello for 0 neighbor(s)
b. Issue the passive-interface command to change the G0/0 interface on R1 to passive.
R1(config)# router ospf 1
R1(config-router)# passive-interface g0/0
c.
Re-issue the show ip ospf interface g0/0 command to verify that G0/0 is now passive.
R1# show ip ospf interface g0/0
GigabitEthernet0/0 is up, line protocol is up
Internet Address 192.168.1.1/24, Area 0, Attached via Network Statement
Process ID 1, Router ID 11.11.11.11, Network Type BROADCAST, Cost: 1
Topology-MTID
Cost
Disabled
Shutdown
Topology Name
0
1
no
no
Base
Transmit Delay is 1 sec, State DR, Priority 1
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
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Lab - Configuring Basic Single-Area OSPFv2
Designated Router (ID) 11.11.11.11, Interface address 192.168.1.1
No backup designated router on this network
Timer intervals configured, Hello 10, Dead 40, Wait 40, Retransmit 5
oob-resync timeout 40
No Hellos (Passive interface)
Supports Link-local Signaling (LLS)
Cisco NSF helper support enabled
IETF NSF helper support enabled
Index 1/1, flood queue length 0
Next 0x0(0)/0x0(0)
Last flood scan length is 0, maximum is 0
Last flood scan time is 0 msec, maximum is 0 msec
Neighbor Count is 0, Adjacent neighbor count is 0
Suppress hello for 0 neighbor(s)
d. Issue the show ip route command on R2 and R3 to verify that a route to the 192.168.1.0/24 network is
still available.
R2# show ip route
Codes: L - local, C - connected, S - static, R - RIP, M - mobile, B - BGP
D - EIGRP, EX - EIGRP external, O - OSPF, IA - OSPF inter area
N1 - OSPF NSSA external type 1, N2 - OSPF NSSA external type 2
E1 - OSPF external type 1, E2 - OSPF external type 2
i - IS-IS, su - IS-IS summary, L1 - IS-IS level-1, L2 - IS-IS level-2
ia - IS-IS inter area, * - candidate default, U - per-user static route
o - ODR, P - periodic downloaded static route, H - NHRP, l - LISP
+ - replicated route, % - next hop override
Gateway of last resort is not set
C
O
C
L
O
C
L
O
C
L
2.0.0.0/32 is subnetted, 1 subnets
2.2.2.2 is directly connected, Loopback0
192.168.1.0/24 [110/65] via 192.168.12.1, 00:58:32, Serial0/0/0
192.168.2.0/24 is variably subnetted, 2 subnets, 2 masks
192.168.2.0/24 is directly connected, GigabitEthernet0/0
192.168.2.1/32 is directly connected, GigabitEthernet0/0
192.168.3.0/24 [110/65] via 192.168.23.2, 00:58:19, Serial0/0/1
192.168.12.0/24 is variably subnetted, 2 subnets, 2 masks
192.168.12.0/30 is directly connected, Serial0/0/0
192.168.12.2/32 is directly connected, Serial0/0/0
192.168.13.0/30 is subnetted, 1 subnets
192.168.13.0 [110/128] via 192.168.23.2, 00:58:19, Serial0/0/1
[110/128] via 192.168.12.1, 00:58:32, Serial0/0/0
192.168.23.0/24 is variably subnetted, 2 subnets, 2 masks
192.168.23.0/30 is directly connected, Serial0/0/1
192.168.23.1/32 is directly connected, Serial0/0/1
Step 2: Set passive interface as the default on a router.
a. Issue the show ip ospf neighbor command on R1 to verify that R2 is listed as an OSPF neighbor.
R1# show ip ospf neighbor
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Lab - Configuring Basic Single-Area OSPFv2
Neighbor ID
33.33.33.33
22.22.22.22
Pri
0
0
State
FULL/
FULL/
-
Dead Time
00:00:31
00:00:32
Address
192.168.13.2
192.168.12.2
Interface
Serial0/0/1
Serial0/0/0
b. Issue the passive-interface default command on R2 to set the default for all OSPF interfaces as
passive.
R2(config)# router ospf 1
R2(config-router)# passive-interface default
R2(config-router)#
*Apr 3 00:03:00.979: %OSPF-5-ADJCHG: Process 1, Nbr 11.11.11.11 on Serial0/0/0 from
FULL to DOWN, Neighbor Down: Interface down or detached
*Apr 3 00:03:00.979: %OSPF-5-ADJCHG: Process 1, Nbr 33.33.33.33 on Serial0/0/1 from
FULL to DOWN, Neighbor Down: Interface down or detached
c.
Re-issue the show ip ospf neighbor command on R1. After the dead timer expires, R2 will no longer be
listed as an OSPF neighbor.
R1# show ip ospf neighbor
Neighbor ID
33.33.33.33
Pri
0
State
FULL/
-
Dead Time
00:00:34
Address
192.168.13.2
Interface
Serial0/0/1
d. Issue the show ip ospf interface S0/0/0 command on R2 to view the OSPF status of interface S0/0/0.
R2# show ip ospf interface s0/0/0
Serial0/0/0 is up, line protocol is up
Internet Address 192.168.12.2/30, Area 0, Attached via Network Statement
Process ID 1, Router ID 22.22.22.22, Network Type POINT_TO_POINT, Cost: 64
Topology-MTID
Cost
Disabled
Shutdown
Topology Name
0
64
no
no
Base
Transmit Delay is 1 sec, State POINT_TO_POINT
Timer intervals configured, Hello 10, Dead 40, Wait 40, Retransmit 5
oob-resync timeout 40
No Hellos (Passive interface)
Supports Link-local Signaling (LLS)
Cisco NSF helper support enabled
IETF NSF helper support enabled
Index 2/2, flood queue length 0
Next 0x0(0)/0x0(0)
Last flood scan length is 0, maximum is 0
Last flood scan time is 0 msec, maximum is 0 msec
Neighbor Count is 0, Adjacent neighbor count is 0
Suppress hello for 0 neighbor(s)
e. If all interfaces on R2 are passive, then no routing information is being advertised. In this case, R1 and
R3 should no longer have a route to the 192.168.2.0/24 network. You can verify this by using the show ip
route command.
f.
On R2, issue the no passive-interface command so the router will send and receive OSPF routing
updates. After entering this command, you will see an informational message that a neighbor adjacency
has been established with R1.
R2(config)# router ospf 1
R2(config-router)# no passive-interface s0/0/0
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R2(config-router)#
*Apr 3 00:18:03.463: %OSPF-5-ADJCHG: Process 1, Nbr 11.11.11.11 on Serial0/0/0 from
LOADING to FULL, Loading Done
g. Re-issue the show ip route and show ip ospf neighbor commands on R1 and R3, and look for a route
to the 192.168.2.0/24 network.
R1:
O
192.168.2.0/24 [110/65] via 192.168.12.2, 00:00:24, Serial0/0/0
R3:
O
192.168.2.0/24 [110/129] via 192.168.13.1, 00:00:04, Serial0/0/0
What interface is R3 using to route to the 192.168.2.0/24 network? ____________ S0/0/0
What is the accumulated cost metric for the 192.168.2.0/24 network on R3? _________ 129
Does R2 show up as an OSPF neighbor on R1? ________ Yes
Does R2 show up as an OSPF neighbor on R3? ________ No
What does this information tell you?
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
Answers will vary, but all traffic to the 192.168.2.0/24 network from R3 will be routed through R1. The
S0/0/1 interface on R2 is still configured as a passive interface, so OSPF routing information is not being
advertised across this interface. The 129 accumulated cost results from the fact that traffic from R3 to the
192.168.2.0/24 network must pass through two T1 (1.544 Mb/s) serial links (at a cost of 64 each) plus the
R2 Gigabit 0/0 LAN link (at a cost of 1).
h. Change interface S0/0/1 on R2 to allow it to advertise OSPF routes. Record the commands used below.
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
R2(config)# router ospf 1
R2(config-router)# no passive-interface s0/0/1
i.
Re-issue the show ip route command on R3.
O
192.168.2.0/24 [110/65] via 192.168.23.1, 00:00:00, Serial0/0/1
What interface is R3 using to route to the 192.168.2.0/24 network? ____________ S0/0/1
What is the accumulated cost metric for the 192.168.2.0/24 network on R3 now and how is this
calculated?
____________________________________________________________________________________
65 (One T1 (1.544 Mb/s) serial link (at a cost of 64) plus the R2 Gigabit 0/0 LAN link (at a cost of 1)).
Is R2 listed as an OSPF neighbor to R3? ________ Yes
Part 5: Change OSPF Metrics
In Part 5, you will change OSPF metrics using the auto-cost reference-bandwidth command, the
bandwidth command, and the ip ospf cost command.
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Lab - Configuring Basic Single-Area OSPFv2
Note: All DCE interfaces should have been configured with a clocking rate of 128000 in Part 1.
Step 1: Change the reference bandwidth on the routers.
The default reference-bandwidth for OSPF is 100Mb/s (Fast Ethernet speed). However, most modern
infrastructure devices have links that are faster than 100Mb/s. Because the OSPF cost metric must be an
integer, all links with transmission speeds of 100Mb/s or higher have a cost of 1. This results in Fast Ethernet,
Gigabit Ethernet, and 10G Ethernet interfaces all having the same cost. Therefore, the reference-bandwidth
must be changed to a higher value to accommodate networks with links faster that 100Mb/s.
a. Issue the show interface command on R1 to view the default bandwidth setting for the G0/0 interface.
R1# show interface g0/0
GigabitEthernet0/0 is up, line protocol is up
Hardware is CN Gigabit Ethernet, address is c471.fe45.7520 (bia c471.fe45.7520)
MTU 1500 bytes, BW 1000000 Kbit/sec, DLY 100 usec,
reliability 255/255, txload 1/255, rxload 1/255
Encapsulation ARPA, loopback not set
Keepalive set (10 sec)
Full Duplex, 100Mbps, media type is RJ45
output flow-control is unsupported, input flow-control is unsupported
ARP type: ARPA, ARP Timeout 04:00:00
Last input never, output 00:17:31, output hang never
Last clearing of "show interface" counters never
Input queue: 0/75/0/0 (size/max/drops/flushes); Total output drops: 0
Queueing strategy: fifo
Output queue: 0/40 (size/max)
5 minute input rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec
5 minute output rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec
0 packets input, 0 bytes, 0 no buffer
Received 0 broadcasts (0 IP multicasts)
0 runts, 0 giants, 0 throttles
0 input errors, 0 CRC, 0 frame, 0 overrun, 0 ignored
0 watchdog, 0 multicast, 0 pause input
279 packets output, 89865 bytes, 0 underruns
0 output errors, 0 collisions, 1 interface resets
0 unknown protocol drops
0 babbles, 0 late collision, 0 deferred
1 lost carrier, 0 no carrier, 0 pause output
0 output buffer failures, 0 output buffers swapped out
Note: The bandwidth setting on G0/0 may differ from what is shown above if the PC host interface can
only support Fast Ethernet speed. If the PC host interface is not capable of supporting gigabit speed, then
the bandwidth will most likely be displayed as 100000 Kbit/sec.
b. Issue the show ip route ospf command on R1 to determine the route to the 192.168.3.0/24 network.
R1# show ip route ospf
Codes: L - local, C - connected, S - static, R - RIP, M - mobile, B - BGP
D - EIGRP, EX - EIGRP external, O - OSPF, IA - OSPF inter area
N1 - OSPF NSSA external type 1, N2 - OSPF NSSA external type 2
E1 - OSPF external type 1, E2 - OSPF external type 2
i - IS-IS, su - IS-IS summary, L1 - IS-IS level-1, L2 - IS-IS level-2
ia - IS-IS inter area, * - candidate default, U - per-user static route
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Lab - Configuring Basic Single-Area OSPFv2
o - ODR, P - periodic downloaded static route, H - NHRP, l - LISP
+ - replicated route, % - next hop override
Gateway of last resort is not set
O
O
O
192.168.2.0/24 [110/65] via 192.168.12.2, 00:01:08, Serial0/0/0
192.168.3.0/24 [110/65] via 192.168.13.2, 00:00:57, Serial0/0/1
192.168.23.0/30 is subnetted, 1 subnets
192.168.23.0 [110/128] via 192.168.13.2, 00:00:57, Serial0/0/1
[110/128] via 192.168.12.2, 00:01:08, Serial0/0/0
Note: The accumulated cost to the 192.168.3.0/24 network from R1 is 65.
c.
Issue the show ip ospf interface command on R3 to determine the routing cost for G0/0.
R3# show ip ospf interface g0/0
GigabitEthernet0/0 is up, line protocol is up
Internet Address 192.168.3.1/24, Area 0, Attached via Network Statement
Process ID 1, Router ID 3.3.3.3, Network Type BROADCAST, Cost: 1
Topology-MTID
Cost
Disabled
Shutdown
Topology Name
0
1
no
no
Base
Transmit Delay is 1 sec, State DR, Priority 1
Designated Router (ID) 192.168.23.2, Interface address 192.168.3.1
No backup designated router on this network
Timer intervals configured, Hello 10, Dead 40, Wait 40, Retransmit 5
oob-resync timeout 40
Hello due in 00:00:05
Supports Link-local Signaling (LLS)
Cisco NSF helper support enabled
IETF NSF helper support enabled
Index 1/1, flood queue length 0
Next 0x0(0)/0x0(0)
Last flood scan length is 0, maximum is 0
Last flood scan time is 0 msec, maximum is 0 msec
Neighbor Count is 0, Adjacent neighbor count is 0
Suppress hello for 0 neighbor(s)
d. Issue the show ip ospf interface s0/0/1 command on R1 to view the routing cost for S0/0/1.
R1# show ip ospf interface s0/0/1
Serial0/0/1 is up, line protocol is up
Internet Address 192.168.13.1/30, Area 0, Attached via Network Statement
Process ID 1, Router ID 1.1.1.1, Network Type POINT_TO_POINT, Cost: 64
Topology-MTID
Cost
Disabled
Shutdown
Topology Name
0
64
no
no
Base
Transmit Delay is 1 sec, State POINT_TO_POINT
Timer intervals configured, Hello 10, Dead 40, Wait 40, Retransmit 5
oob-resync timeout 40
Hello due in 00:00:04
Supports Link-local Signaling (LLS)
Cisco NSF helper support enabled
IETF NSF helper support enabled
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Index 3/3, flood queue length 0
Next 0x0(0)/0x0(0)
Last flood scan length is 1, maximum is 1
Last flood scan time is 0 msec, maximum is 0 msec
Neighbor Count is 1, Adjacent neighbor count is 1
Adjacent with neighbor 192.168.23.2
Suppress hello for 0 neighbor(s)
The sum of the costs of these two interfaces is the accumulated cost for the route to the 192.168.3.0/24
network on R3 (1 + 64 = 65), as can be seen in the output from the show ip route command.
e. Issue the auto-cost reference-bandwidth 10000 command on R1 to change the default reference
bandwidth setting. With this setting, 10Gb/s interfaces will have a cost of 1, 1 Gb/s interfaces will have a
cost of 10, and 100Mb/s interfaces will have a cost of 100.
R1(config)# router ospf 1
R1(config-router)# auto-cost reference-bandwidth 10000
% OSPF: Reference bandwidth is changed.
Please ensure reference bandwidth is consistent across all routers.
f.
Issue the auto-cost reference-bandwidth 10000 command on routers R2 and R3.
g. Re-issue the show ip ospf interface command to view the new cost of G0/0 on R3, and S0/0/1 on R1.
R3# show ip ospf interface g0/0
GigabitEthernet0/0 is up, line protocol is up
Internet Address 192.168.3.1/24, Area 0, Attached via Network Statement
Process ID 1, Router ID 3.3.3.3, Network Type BROADCAST, Cost: 10
Topology-MTID
Cost
Disabled
Shutdown
Topology Name
0
10
no
no
Base
Transmit Delay is 1 sec, State DR, Priority 1
Designated Router (ID) 192.168.23.2, Interface address 192.168.3.1
No backup designated router on this network
Timer intervals configured, Hello 10, Dead 40, Wait 40, Retransmit 5
oob-resync timeout 40
Hello due in 00:00:02
Supports Link-local Signaling (LLS)
Cisco NSF helper support enabled
IETF NSF helper support enabled
Index 1/1, flood queue length 0
Next 0x0(0)/0x0(0)
Last flood scan length is 0, maximum is 0
Last flood scan time is 0 msec, maximum is 0 msec
Neighbor Count is 0, Adjacent neighbor count is 0
Suppress hello for 0 neighbor(s)
Note: If the device connected to the G0/0 interface does not support Gigabit Ethernet speed, the cost will
be different than the output display. For example, the cost will be 100 for Fast Ethernet speed (100Mb/s).
R1# show ip ospf interface s0/0/1
Serial0/0/1 is up, line protocol is up
Internet Address 192.168.13.1/30, Area 0, Attached via Network Statement
Process ID 1, Router ID 1.1.1.1, Network Type POINT_TO_POINT, Cost: 6476
Topology-MTID
Cost
Disabled
Shutdown
Topology Name
0
6476
no
no
Base
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Lab - Configuring Basic Single-Area OSPFv2
Transmit Delay is 1 sec, State POINT_TO_POINT
Timer intervals configured, Hello 10, Dead 40, Wait 40, Retransmit 5
oob-resync timeout 40
Hello due in 00:00:05
Supports Link-local Signaling (LLS)
Cisco NSF helper support enabled
IETF NSF helper support enabled
Index 3/3, flood queue length 0
Next 0x0(0)/0x0(0)
Last flood scan length is 1, maximum is 1
Last flood scan time is 0 msec, maximum is 0 msec
Neighbor Count is 1, Adjacent neighbor count is 1
Adjacent with neighbor 192.168.23.2
Suppress hello for 0 neighbor(s)
h. Re-issue the show ip route ospf command to view the new accumulated cost for the 192.168.3.0/24
route (10 + 6476 = 6486).
Note: If the device connected to the G0/0 interface does not support Gigabit Ethernet speed, the total
cost will be different than the output display. For example, the accumulated cost will be 6576 if G0/0 is
operating at Fast Ethernet speed (100Mb/s).
R1# show ip route ospf
Codes: L - local, C - connected, S - static, R - RIP, M - mobile, B - BGP
D - EIGRP, EX - EIGRP external, O - OSPF, IA - OSPF inter area
N1 - OSPF NSSA external type 1, N2 - OSPF NSSA external type 2
E1 - OSPF external type 1, E2 - OSPF external type 2
i - IS-IS, su - IS-IS summary, L1 - IS-IS level-1, L2 - IS-IS level-2
ia - IS-IS inter area, * - candidate default, U - per-user static route
o - ODR, P - periodic downloaded static route, H - NHRP, l - LISP
+ - replicated route, % - next hop override
Gateway of last resort is not set
O
O
O
192.168.2.0/24 [110/6486] via 192.168.12.2, 00:05:40, Serial0/0/0
192.168.3.0/24 [110/6486] via 192.168.13.2, 00:01:08, Serial0/0/1
192.168.23.0/30 is subnetted, 1 subnets
192.168.23.0 [110/12952] via 192.168.13.2, 00:05:17, Serial0/0/1
[110/12952] via 192.168.12.2, 00:05:17, Serial0/0/
Note: Changing the default reference-bandwidth on the routers from 100 to 10,000 in effect changed the
accumulated costs of all routes by a factor of 100, but the cost of each interface link and route is now
more accurately reflected.
i.
To reset the reference-bandwidth back to its default value, issue the auto-cost reference-bandwidth
100 command on all three routers.
R1(config)# router ospf 1
R1(config-router)# auto-cost reference-bandwidth 100
% OSPF: Reference bandwidth is changed.
Please ensure reference bandwidth is consistent across all routers.
Why would you want to change the OSPF default reference-bandwidth?
_______________________________________________________________________________________
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
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Lab - Configuring Basic Single-Area OSPFv2
_______________________________________________________________________________________
Answers may vary, but today’s equipment supports link speeds that are faster than 100 Mb/s. To obtain a
more accurate cost calculation for these faster links, a higher default reference-bandwidth setting is needed.
Step 2: Change the bandwidth for an interface.
On most serial links, the bandwidth metric will default to 1544 Kbits (that of a T1). If this is not the actual
speed of the serial link, the bandwidth setting will need to be changed to match the actual speed to allow the
route cost to be calculated correctly in OSPF. Use the bandwidth command to adjust the bandwidth setting
on an interface.
Note: A common misconception is to assume that the bandwidth command will change the physical
bandwidth, or speed, of the link. The command modifies the bandwidth metric used by OSPF to calculate
routing costs, and does not modify the actual bandwidth (speed) of the link.
a. Issue the show interface s0/0/0 command on R1 to view the current bandwidth setting on S0/0/0. Even
though the clock rate, link speed on this interface was set to 128Kb/s, the bandwidth is still showing
1544Kb/s.
R1# show interface s0/0/0
Serial0/0/0 is up, line protocol is up
Hardware is WIC MBRD Serial
Internet address is 192.168.12.1/30
MTU 1500 bytes, BW 1544 Kbit/sec, DLY 20000 usec,
reliability 255/255, txload 1/255, rxload 1/255
Encapsulation HDLC, loopback not set
Keepalive set (10 sec)
<Output omitted>
b. Issue the show ip route ospf command on R1 to view the accumulated cost for the route to network
192.168.23.0/24 using S0/0/0. Note that there are two equal-cost (128) routes to the 192.168.23.0/24
network, one via S0/0/0 and one via S0/0/1.
R1# show ip route ospf
Codes: L - local, C - connected, S - static, R - RIP, M - mobile, B - BGP
D - EIGRP, EX - EIGRP external, O - OSPF, IA - OSPF inter area
N1 - OSPF NSSA external type 1, N2 - OSPF NSSA external type 2
E1 - OSPF external type 1, E2 - OSPF external type 2
i - IS-IS, su - IS-IS summary, L1 - IS-IS level-1, L2 - IS-IS level-2
ia - IS-IS inter area, * - candidate default, U - per-user static route
o - ODR, P - periodic downloaded static route, H - NHRP, l - LISP
+ - replicated route, % - next hop override
Gateway of last resort is not set
O
O
O
c.
192.168.2.0/24 [110/65] via 192.168.12.2, 00:00:26, Serial0/0/0
192.168.3.0/24 [110/65] via 192.168.13.2, 00:00:26, Serial0/0/1
192.168.23.0/30 is subnetted, 1 subnets
192.168.23.0 [110/128] via 192.168.13.2, 00:00:26, Serial0/0/1
[110/128] via 192.168.12.2, 00:00:26, Serial0/0/0
Issue the bandwidth 128 command to set the bandwidth on S0/0/0 to 128Kb/s.
R1(config)# interface s0/0/0
R1(config-if)# bandwidth 128
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Lab - Configuring Basic Single-Area OSPFv2
d. Re-issue the show ip route ospf command. The routing table no longer displays the route to the
192.168.23.0/24 network over the S0/0/0 interface. This is because the best route, the one with the
lowest cost, is now via S0/0/1.
R1# show ip route ospf
Codes: L - local, C - connected, S - static, R - RIP, M - mobile, B - BGP
D - EIGRP, EX - EIGRP external, O - OSPF, IA - OSPF inter area
N1 - OSPF NSSA external type 1, N2 - OSPF NSSA external type 2
E1 - OSPF external type 1, E2 - OSPF external type 2
i - IS-IS, su - IS-IS summary, L1 - IS-IS level-1, L2 - IS-IS level-2
ia - IS-IS inter area, * - candidate default, U - per-user static route
o - ODR, P - periodic downloaded static route, H - NHRP, l - LISP
+ - replicated route, % - next hop override
Gateway of last resort is not set
O
O
O
192.168.2.0/24 [110/129] via 192.168.12.2, 00:01:47, Serial0/0/0
192.168.3.0/24 [110/65] via 192.168.13.2, 00:04:51, Serial0/0/1
192.168.23.0/30 is subnetted, 1 subnets
192.168.23.0 [110/128] via 192.168.13.2, 00:04:51, Serial0/0/1
e. Issue the show ip ospf interface brief command. The cost for S0/0/0 has changed from 64 to 781 which
is an accurate cost representation of the link speed.
R1# show ip ospf interface brief
Interface
Se0/0/1
Se0/0/0
Gi0/0
f.
PID
1
1
1
Area
0
0
0
IP Address/Mask
192.168.13.1/30
192.168.12.1/30
192.168.1.1/24
Cost
64
781
1
State
P2P
P2P
DR
Nbrs F/C
1/1
1/1
0/0
Change the bandwidth for interface S0/0/1 to the same setting as S0/0/0 on R1.
R1(config)# interface s0/0/1
R1(config-if)# bandwidth 128
g. Re-issue the show ip route ospf command to view the accumulated cost of both routes to the
192.168.23.0/24 network. Note that there are again two equal-cost (845) routes to the 192.168.23.0/24
network, one via S0/0/0 and one via S0/0/1.
R1# show ip route ospf
Codes: L - local, C - connected, S - static, R - RIP, M - mobile, B - BGP
D - EIGRP, EX - EIGRP external, O - OSPF, IA - OSPF inter area
N1 - OSPF NSSA external type 1, N2 - OSPF NSSA external type 2
E1 - OSPF external type 1, E2 - OSPF external type 2
i - IS-IS, su - IS-IS summary, L1 - IS-IS level-1, L2 - IS-IS level-2
ia - IS-IS inter area, * - candidate default, U - per-user static route
o - ODR, P - periodic downloaded static route, H - NHRP, l - LISP
+ - replicated route, % - next hop override
Gateway of last resort is not set
O
O
192.168.2.0/24 [110/782] via 192.168.12.2, 00:00:09, Serial0/0/0
192.168.3.0/24 [110/782] via 192.168.13.2, 00:00:09, Serial0/0/1
192.168.23.0/30 is subnetted, 1 subnets
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Lab - Configuring Basic Single-Area OSPFv2
O
192.168.23.0 [110/845] via 192.168.13.2, 00:00:09, Serial0/0/1
[110/845] via 192.168.12.2, 00:00:09, Serial0/0/0
Explain how the costs to the 192.168.3.0/24 and 192.168.23.0/30 networks from R1 were calculated.
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
The cost to 192.168.3.0/24: R1 S0/0/1 + R3 G0/0 (781+1=782). The cost to 192.168.23.0/30: R1 S0/0/1
and R3 S0/0/1 (781+64=845).
h. Issue the show ip route ospf command on R3. The accumulated cost of the 192.168.1.0/24 is still
showing as 65. Unlike the clock rate command, the bandwidth command needs to be applied on each
side of a serial link.
R3# show ip route ospf
Codes: L - local, C - connected, S - static, R - RIP, M - mobile, B - BGP
D - EIGRP, EX - EIGRP external, O - OSPF, IA - OSPF inter area
N1 - OSPF NSSA external type 1, N2 - OSPF NSSA external type 2
E1 - OSPF external type 1, E2 - OSPF external type 2
i - IS-IS, su - IS-IS summary, L1 - IS-IS level-1, L2 - IS-IS level-2
ia - IS-IS inter area, * - candidate default, U - per-user static route
o - ODR, P - periodic downloaded static route, H - NHRP, l - LISP
+ - replicated route, % - next hop override
Gateway of last resort is not set
O
O
O
i.
192.168.1.0/24 [110/65] via 192.168.13.1, 00:30:58, Serial0/0/0
192.168.2.0/24 [110/65] via 192.168.23.1, 00:30:58, Serial0/0/1
192.168.12.0/30 is subnetted, 1 subnets
192.168.12.0 [110/128] via 192.168.23.1, 00:30:58, Serial0/0/1
[110/128] via 192.168.13.1, 00:30:58, Serial0/0/0
Issue the bandwidth 128 command on all remaining serial interfaces in the topology.
What is the new accumulated cost to the 192.168.23.0/24 network on R1? Why?
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
1,562. Each serial link now has a cost of 781, and the route to the 192.168.23.0/24 network travels over
two serial links. 781 + 781 = 1,562.
Step 3: Change the route cost.
OSPF uses the bandwidth setting to calculate the cost for a link by default. However, you can override this
calculation by manually setting the cost of a link using the ip ospf cost command. Like the bandwidth
command, the ip ospf cost command only affects the side of the link where it was applied.
a. Issue the show ip route ospf on R1.
R1# show ip route ospf
Codes: L - local, C - connected, S - static, R - RIP, M - mobile, B - BGP
D - EIGRP, EX - EIGRP external, O - OSPF, IA - OSPF inter area
N1 - OSPF NSSA external type 1, N2 - OSPF NSSA external type 2
E1 - OSPF external type 1, E2 - OSPF external type 2
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 20 of 29
Lab - Configuring Basic Single-Area OSPFv2
i - IS-IS, su - IS-IS summary, L1 - IS-IS level-1, L2 - IS-IS level-2
ia - IS-IS inter area, * - candidate default, U - per-user static route
o - ODR, P - periodic downloaded static route, H - NHRP, l - LISP
+ - replicated route, % - next hop override
Gateway of last resort is not set
O
O
O
192.168.2.0/24 [110/782] via 192.168.12.2, 00:00:26, Serial0/0/0
192.168.3.0/24 [110/782] via 192.168.13.2, 00:02:50, Serial0/0/1
192.168.23.0/30 is subnetted, 1 subnets
192.168.23.0 [110/1562] via 192.168.13.2, 00:02:40, Serial0/0/1
[110/1562] via 192.168.12.2, 00:02:40, Serial0/0/0
b. Apply the ip ospf cost 1565 command to the S0/0/1 interface on R1. A cost of 1565 is higher than the
accumulated cost of the route through R2 which is 1562.
R1(config)# interface s0/0/1
R1(config-if)# ip ospf cost 1565
c.
Re-issue the show ip route ospf command on R1 to display the effect this change has made on the
routing table. All OSPF routes for R1 are now being routed through R2.
R1# show ip route ospf
Codes: L - local, C - connected, S - static, R - RIP, M - mobile, B - BGP
D - EIGRP, EX - EIGRP external, O - OSPF, IA - OSPF inter area
N1 - OSPF NSSA external type 1, N2 - OSPF NSSA external type 2
E1 - OSPF external type 1, E2 - OSPF external type 2
i - IS-IS, su - IS-IS summary, L1 - IS-IS level-1, L2 - IS-IS level-2
ia - IS-IS inter area, * - candidate default, U - per-user static route
o - ODR, P - periodic downloaded static route, H - NHRP, l - LISP
+ - replicated route, % - next hop override
Gateway of last resort is not set
O
O
O
192.168.2.0/24 [110/782] via 192.168.12.2, 00:02:06, Serial0/0/0
192.168.3.0/24 [110/1563] via 192.168.12.2, 00:05:31, Serial0/0/0
192.168.23.0/30 is subnetted, 1 subnets
192.168.23.0 [110/1562] via 192.168.12.2, 01:14:02, Serial0/0/0
Note: Manipulating link costs using the ip ospf cost command is the easiest and preferred method for
changing OSPF route costs. In addition to changing the cost based on bandwidth, a network administrator
may have other reasons for changing the cost of a route, such as preference for a particular service provider
or the actual monetary cost of a link or route.
Explain why the route to the 192.168.3.0/24 network on R1 is now going through R2?
_______________________________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________________________
OSPF will choose the route with the least accumulated cost. The route with the lowest accumulated cost is:
R1-S0/0/0 + R2-S0/0/1 + R3-G0/0, or 781 + 781 + 1 = 1,563. This metric is smaller than the accumulated cost
of R1-S0/0/1 + R3-G0/0, or 1565 + 1 = 1,566.
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 21 of 29
Lab - Configuring Basic Single-Area OSPFv2
Reflection
1. Why is it important to control the router ID assignment when using the OSPF protocol?
_______________________________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________________________
Router ID assignments control the Designated Router (DR) and Backup Designated Router (BDR) election
process on a multi-access network. If the router ID is associated with an active interface, it can change if the
interface goes down. For this reason it should be set using the IP address of a loopback interface (which
cannot go down) or set using the router-id command.
2. Why is the DR/BDR election process not a concern in this lab?
_______________________________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________________________
The DR/BDR election process is only an issue on a multi-access network such as Ethernet or Frame Relay.
The serial links used in this lab are point-to-point links, so no DR/BDR election is performed.
3. Why would you want to set an OSPF interface to passive?
_______________________________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________________________
Answers will vary, but configuring a LAN interface as passive eliminates unnecessary OSPF routing
information on that interface, freeing up bandwidth. The router will still advertise the network to its neighbors.
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 22 of 29
Lab - Configuring Basic Single-Area OSPFv2
Router Interface Summary Table
Router Interface Summary
Router Model
Ethernet Interface #1
Ethernet Interface #2
Serial Interface #1
Serial Interface #2
1800
Fast Ethernet 0/0
(F0/0)
Fast Ethernet 0/1
(F0/1)
Serial 0/0/0 (S0/0/0)
Serial 0/0/1 (S0/0/1)
1900
Gigabit Ethernet 0/0
(G0/0)
Gigabit Ethernet 0/1
(G0/1)
Serial 0/0/0 (S0/0/0)
Serial 0/0/1 (S0/0/1)
2801
Fast Ethernet 0/0
(F0/0)
Fast Ethernet 0/1
(F0/1)
Serial 0/1/0 (S0/1/0)
Serial 0/1/1 (S0/1/1)
2811
Fast Ethernet 0/0
(F0/0)
Fast Ethernet 0/1
(F0/1)
Serial 0/0/0 (S0/0/0)
Serial 0/0/1 (S0/0/1)
2900
Gigabit Ethernet 0/0
(G0/0)
Gigabit Ethernet 0/1
(G0/1)
Serial 0/0/0 (S0/0/0)
Serial 0/0/1 (S0/0/1)
Note: To find out how the router is configured, look at the interfaces to identify the type of router and how many
interfaces the router has. There is no way to effectively list all the combinations of configurations for each router
class. This table includes identifiers for the possible combinations of Ethernet and Serial interfaces in the device.
The table does not include any other type of interface, even though a specific router may contain one. An
example of this might be an ISDN BRI interface. The string in parenthesis is the legal abbreviation that can be
used in Cisco IOS commands to represent the interface.
Device Configs - Final
Router R1
R1#sh run
Building configuration...
Current configuration : 1794 bytes
!
version 15.2
service timestamps debug datetime msec
service timestamps log datetime msec
no service password-encryption
!
hostname R1
!
boot-start-marker
boot-end-marker
!
!
enable secret 4 06YFDUHH61wAE/kLkDq9BGho1QM5EnRtoyr8cHAUg.2
!
no aaa new-model
memory-size iomem 15
!
no ip domain lookup
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 23 of 29
Lab - Configuring Basic Single-Area OSPFv2
ip cef
no ipv6 cef
multilink bundle-name authenticated
!
interface Loopback0
ip address 1.1.1.1 255.255.255.255
!
interface Embedded-Service-Engine0/0
no ip address
shutdown
!
interface GigabitEthernet0/0
ip address 192.168.1.1 255.255.255.0
duplex auto
speed auto
!
interface GigabitEthernet0/1
no ip address
shutdown
duplex auto
speed auto
!
interface Serial0/0/0
bandwidth 128
ip address 192.168.12.1 255.255.255.252
clock rate 128000
!
interface Serial0/0/1
bandwidth 128
ip address 192.168.13.1 255.255.255.252
ip ospf cost 1565
!
router ospf 1
router-id 11.11.11.11
passive-interface GigabitEthernet0/0
network 192.168.1.0 0.0.0.255 area 0
network 192.168.12.0 0.0.0.3 area 0
network 192.168.13.0 0.0.0.3 area 0
!
ip forward-protocol nd
!
no ip http server
no ip http secure-server
!
control-plane
!
!
banner motd ^C
Unauthorized Access is Prohibited!
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 24 of 29
Lab - Configuring Basic Single-Area OSPFv2
^C
!
line con 0
password cisco
logging synchronous
login
line aux 0
line 2
no activation-character
no exec
transport preferred none
transport input all
transport output pad telnet rlogin lapb-ta mop udptn v120 ssh
stopbits 1
line vty 0
password cisco
login
transport input all
line vty 1 4
login
transport input all
!
scheduler allocate 20000 1000
!
end
Router R2
R2#sh run
Building configuration...
Current configuration : 1912 bytes
!
version 15.2
service timestamps debug datetime msec
service timestamps log datetime msec
no service password-encryption
!
hostname R2
!
boot-start-marker
boot-end-marker
!
enable secret 4 06YFDUHH61wAE/kLkDq9BGho1QM5EnRtoyr8cHAUg.2
!
no aaa new-model
memory-size iomem 15
!
no ip domain lookup
ip cef
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 25 of 29
Lab - Configuring Basic Single-Area OSPFv2
no ipv6 cef
multilink bundle-name authenticated
!
interface Loopback0
ip address 2.2.2.2 255.255.255.255
!
interface Embedded-Service-Engine0/0
no ip address
shutdown
!
interface GigabitEthernet0/0
ip address 192.168.2.1 255.255.255.0
duplex auto
speed auto
!
interface GigabitEthernet0/1
no ip address
shutdown
duplex auto
speed auto
!
interface Serial0/0/0
bandwidth 128
ip address 192.168.12.2 255.255.255.252
!
interface Serial0/0/1
bandwidth 128
ip address 192.168.23.1 255.255.255.252
clock rate 128000
!
router ospf 1
router-id 22.22.22.22
passive-interface default
no passive-interface Serial0/0/0
no passive-interface Serial0/0/1
network 192.168.2.0 0.0.0.255 area 0
network 192.168.12.0 0.0.0.3 area 0
network 192.168.23.0 0.0.0.3 area 0
!
ip forward-protocol nd
!
no ip http server
no ip http secure-server
!
control-plane
!
banner motd ^C
Unauthorized Access is Prohibited!
^C
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 26 of 29
Lab - Configuring Basic Single-Area OSPFv2
!
line con 0
password cisco
logging synchronous
login
line aux 0
line 2
no activation-character
no exec
transport preferred none
transport input all
transport output pad telnet rlogin lapb-ta mop udptn v120 ssh
stopbits 1
line vty 0
password cisco
login
transport input all
line vty 1 4
login
transport input all
!
scheduler allocate 20000 1000
!
end
Router R3
R3#sh run
Building configuration...
Current configuration : 1674 bytes
!
version 15.2
service timestamps debug datetime msec
service timestamps log datetime msec
no service password-encryption
!
hostname R3
!
boot-start-marker
boot-end-marker
!
enable secret 4 06YFDUHH61wAE/kLkDq9BGho1QM5EnRtoyr8cHAUg.2
!
no aaa new-model
memory-size iomem 10
!
no ip domain lookup
ip cef
no ipv6 cef
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 27 of 29
Lab - Configuring Basic Single-Area OSPFv2
multilink bundle-name authenticated
!
interface Loopback0
ip address 3.3.3.3 255.255.255.255
!
interface Embedded-Service-Engine0/0
no ip address
shutdown
!
interface GigabitEthernet0/0
ip address 192.168.3.1 255.255.255.0
duplex auto
speed auto
!
interface GigabitEthernet0/1
no ip address
shutdown
duplex auto
speed auto
!
interface Serial0/0/0
bandwidth 128
ip address 192.168.13.2 255.255.255.252
clock rate 128000
!
interface Serial0/0/1
bandwidth 128
ip address 192.168.23.2 255.255.255.252
!
router ospf 1
router-id 33.33.33.33
network 192.168.3.0 0.0.0.255 area 0
network 192.168.13.0 0.0.0.3 area 0
network 192.168.23.0 0.0.0.3 area 0
!
ip forward-protocol nd
!
no ip http server
no ip http secure-server
!
control-plane
!
banner motd ^C
Unauthorized Access is Prohibited!
^C
!
line con 0
password cisco
logging synchronous
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 28 of 29
Lab - Configuring Basic Single-Area OSPFv2
login
line aux 0
line 2
no activation-character
no exec
transport preferred none
transport input all
transport output pad telnet rlogin lapb-ta mop udptn v120 ssh
stopbits 1
line vty 0 4
password cisco
login
transport input all
!
scheduler allocate 20000 1000
!
end
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 29 of 29
Lab - Configuring OSPFv2 on a Multiaccess Network (Instructor
Version)
Instructor Note: Red font color or Gray highlights indicate text that appears in the instructor copy only.
Topology
Addressing Table
Device
R1
R2
R3
Interface
IP Address
Subnet Mask
G0/1
192.168.1.1
255.255.255.0
Lo0
192.168.31.11
255.255.255.255
G0/0
192.168.1.2
255.255.255.0
Lo0
192.168.31.22
255.255.255.255
G0/1
192.168.1.3
255.255.255.0
Lo0
192.168.31.33
255.255.255.255
Objectives
Part 1: Build the Network and Configure Basic Device Settings
Part 2: Configure and Verify OSPFv2 on the DR, BDR, and DROther
Part 3: Configure OSPFv2 Interface Priority to Determine the DR and BDR
Background / Scenario
A multiaccess network is a network with more than two devices on the same shared media. Examples include
Ethernet and Frame Relay. On multiaccess networks, OSPFv2 elects a Designated Router (DR) to be the
collection and distribution point for link-state advertisements (LSAs) that are sent and received. A Backup
Designated Router (BDR) is also elected in case the DR fails. All other routers become DROthers as this
indicates a router that is neither the DR nor the BDR.
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 1 of 13
Lab - Configuring OSPFv2 on a Multiaccess Network
Because the DR acts as a focal point for OSPF routing protocol communication, the router chosen should be
capable of supporting a heavier traffic load than other routers in the network. A router with a powerful CPU
and adequate DRAM is typically the best choice for the DR.
In this lab, you will configure OSPFv2 on the DR, BDR, and DROther. You will then modify the priority of
routers to control the outcome of the DR/BDR election process and ensure that the desired router becomes
the DR.
Note: The routers used with CCNA hands-on labs are Cisco 1941 Integrated Services Routers (ISRs) with
Cisco IOS Release 15.2(4)M3 (universalk9 image). The switches used are Cisco Catalyst 2960s with Cisco
IOS Release 15.0(2) (lanbasek9 image). Other routers, switches, and Cisco IOS versions can be used.
Depending on the model and Cisco IOS version, the commands available and output produced might vary
from what is shown in the labs. Refer to the Router Interface Summary Table at the end of this lab for the
correct interface identifiers.
Note: Make sure that the routers and switches have been erased and have no startup configurations. If you
are unsure, contact your instructor.
Instructor Note: Refer to the Instructor Lab Manual for the procedures to initialize and reload devices.
Required Resources

3 Routers (Cisco 1941 with Cisco IOS Release 15.2(4)M3 universal image or comparable)

1 Switch (Cisco 2960 with Cisco IOS Release 15.0(2) lanbasek9 image or comparable)

Console cables to configure the Cisco IOS devices via the console ports

Ethernet cables as shown in the topology
Part 1: Build the Network and Configure Basic Device Settings
In Part 1, you will set up the network topology and configure basic settings on the routers.
Step 1: Cable the network as shown in the topology.
Attach the devices as shown in the topology diagram, and cable as necessary.
Step 2: Initialize and reload the routers.
Step 3: Configure basic settings for each router.
a. Disable DNS lookup.
b. Configure device names as shown in the topology.
c.
Assign class as the privileged EXEC password.
d. Assign cisco as the console and vty passwords.
e. Encrypt the plain text passwords.
f.
Configure a MOTD banner to warn users that unauthorized access is prohibited.
g. Configure logging synchronous for the console line.
h. Configure the IP addresses listed in the Addressing Table for all interfaces.
i.
Use the show ip interface brief command to verify that the IP addressing is correct and that the
interfaces are active.
j.
Copy the running configuration to the startup configuration.
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 2 of 13
Lab - Configuring OSPFv2 on a Multiaccess Network
Part 2: Configure and Verify OSPFv2 on the DR, BDR, and DROther
In Part 2, you will configure OSPFv2 on the DR, BDR, and DROther. The DR and BDR election process takes
place as soon as the first router has its interface enabled on the multiaccess network. This can happen as the
routers are powered-on or when the OSPF network command for that interface is configured. If a new router
enters the network after the DR and BDR have already been elected, it does not become the DR or BDR,
even if it has a higher OSPF interface priority or router ID than the current DR or BDR. Configure the OSPF
process on the router with the highest router ID first to ensure that this router becomes the DR.
Step 1: Configure OSPF on R3.
Configure the OSPF process on R3 (the router with the highest router ID) to ensure that this router becomes
the DR.
a. Assign 1 as the process ID for the OSPF process. Configure the router to advertise the 192.168.1.0/24
network. Use an area ID of 0 for the OSPF area-id parameter in the network statement.
What factor determined that R3 has the highest router ID?
____________________________________________________________________________________
Highest loopback address
b. Verify that OSPF has been configured and R3 is the DR.
What command would you use to verify that OSPF has been configured correctly and R3 is the DR?
____________________________________________________________________________________
show ip ospf interface or show ip ospf interface brief
R3# show ip ospf interface
GigabitEthernet0/1 is up, line protocol is up
Internet Address 192.168.1.3/24, Area 0, Attached via Network Statement
Process ID 1, Router ID 192.168.31.33, Network Type BROADCAST, Cost: 1
Topology-MTID
Cost
Disabled
Shutdown
Topology Name
0
1
no
no
Base
Transmit Delay is 1 sec, State DR, Priority 1
Designated Router (ID) 192.168.31.33, Interface address 192.168.1.3
No backup designated router on this network
Timer intervals configured, Hello 10, Dead 40, Wait 40, Retransmit 5
oob-resync timeout 40
Hello due in 00:00:06
Supports Link-local Signaling (LLS)
Cisco NSF helper support enabled
IETF NSF helper support enabled
Index 1/1, flood queue length 0
Next 0x0(0)/0x0(0)
Last flood scan length is 0, maximum is 2
Last flood scan time is 0 msec, maximum is 0 msec
Neighbor Count is 0, Adjacent neighbor count is 0
Suppress hello for 0 neighbor(s)
Step 2: Configure OSPF on R2.
Configure the OSPF process on R2 (the router with the second highest router ID) to ensure that this router
becomes the BDR.
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 3 of 13
Lab - Configuring OSPFv2 on a Multiaccess Network
a. Assign 1 as the process ID for the OSPF process. Configure the router to advertise the 192.168.1.0/24
network. Use an area ID of 0 for the OSPF area-id parameter in the network statement.
b. Verify that the OSPF has been configured and that R2 is the BDR. Record the command used for
verification.
____________________________________________________________________________________
show ip ospf interface
R2# show ip ospf interface
GigabitEthernet0/0 is up, line protocol is up
Internet Address 192.168.1.2/24, Area 0, Attached via Network Statement
Process ID 1, Router ID 192.168.31.22, Network Type BROADCAST, Cost: 1
Topology-MTID
Cost
Disabled
Shutdown
Topology Name
0
1
no
no
Base
Transmit Delay is 1 sec, State BDR, Priority 1
Designated Router (ID) 192.168.31.33, Interface address 192.168.1.3
Backup Designated router (ID) 192.168.31.22, Interface address 192.168.1.2
Timer intervals configured, Hello 10, Dead 40, Wait 40, Retransmit 5
oob-resync timeout 40
Hello due in 00:00:03
Supports Link-local Signaling (LLS)
Cisco NSF helper support enabled
IETF NSF helper support enabled
Index 1/1, flood queue length 0
Next 0x0(0)/0x0(0)
Last flood scan length is 1, maximum is 1
Last flood scan time is 0 msec, maximum is 0 msec
Neighbor Count is 1, Adjacent neighbor count is 1
Adjacent with neighbor 192.168.31.33 (Designated Router)
Suppress hello for 0 neighbor(s)
c.
Issue the show ip ospf neighbor command to view information about the other routers in the OSPF
area.
R2# show ip ospf neighbor
Neighbor ID
192.168.31.33
Pri
1
State
FULL/DR
Dead Time
00:00:33
Address
192.168.1.3
Interface
GigabitEthernet0/0
Notice that R3 is the DR.
Step 3: Configure OSPF on R1.
Configure the OSPF process on R1 (the router with the lowest router ID). This router will be designated as
DROther instead of DR or BDR.
a. Assign 1 as the process ID for the OSPF process. Configure the router to advertise the 192.168.1.0/24
network. Use an area ID of 0 for the OSPF area-id parameter in the network statement.
b. Issue show ip ospf interface brief command to verify that OSPF has been configured and R1 is the
DROther.
R1# show ip ospf interface brief
Interface
Gi0/1
PID
1
Area
0
IP Address/Mask
192.168.1.1/24
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Cost
1
State Nbrs F/C
DROTH 2/2
Page 4 of 13
Lab - Configuring OSPFv2 on a Multiaccess Network
c.
Issue the show ip ospf neighbor command to view information about the other routers in the OSPF
area.
R1# show ip ospf neighbor
Neighbor ID
192.168.31.22
192.168.31.33
Pri
1
1
State
FULL/BDR
FULL/DR
Dead Time
00:00:35
00:00:30
Address
192.168.1.2
192.168.1.3
Interface
GigabitEthernet0/1
GigabitEthernet0/1
What priority are both the DR and BDR routers? _________ One
Part 3: Configure OSPFv2 Interface Priority to Determine the DR and BDR
In Part 3, you will configure router interface priority to determine the DR/BDR election, reset the OSPFv2
process, and then verify that the DR and BDR routers have changed. OSPF interface priority overrides all
other settings in determining which routers become the DR and BDR.
Step 1: Configure R1 G0/1 with OSPF priority 255.
A value of 255 is the highest possible interface priority.
R1(config)# interface g0/1
R1(config-if)# ip ospf priority 255
R1(config-if)# end
Step 2: Configure R3 G0/1 with OSPF priority 100.
R3(config)# interface g0/1
R3(config-if)# ip ospf priority 100
R3(config-if)# end
Step 3: Configure R2 G0/0 with OSPF priority 0.
A priority of 0 causes the router to be ineligible to participate in an OSPF election and does not become a DR
or BDR.
R2(config)# interface g0/0
R2(config-if)# ip ospf priority 0
R2(config-if)# end
Step 4: Reset the OSPF process.
a. Issue the show ip ospf neighbor command to determine the DR and BDR.
b. Has the DR designation changed? _____________ No Which router is the DR? _____________ R3
Has the BDR designation changed? _____________ Yes Which router is the BDR? _____________ R1
What is the role of R2 now? ____________ DROther
Explain the immediate effects caused by the ip ospf priority command.
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
The effect for changing the ospf priority on an interface usually only takes effect when the existing DR
goes down. The DR does not relinquish its status just because a new interface reports a higher priority in
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 5 of 13
Lab - Configuring OSPFv2 on a Multiaccess Network
its hello packet. The DR does not change its status until a new election occurs. Issuing the clear ip ospf
process command on all of the routers resets the OSPF process.
If a router interface is assigned an OSPF priority of 0, the interface will not be elected for either the DR or
BDR role and the router changes its state immediately to DROther.
Note: If the DR and BDR designations did not change, issue the clear ip ospf 1 process command on
all of the routers to reset the OSPF processes and force a new election.
If the clear ip ospf process command does not reset the DR and BDR, issue the reload command on all
routers after saving the running configuration to the startup configuration.
c.
Issue the show ip ospf interface command on R1 and R3 to confirm the priority settings and DR/BDR
status on the routers.
R1# show ip ospf interface
GigabitEthernet0/1 is up, line protocol is up
Internet Address 192.168.1.1/24, Area 0
Process ID 1, Router ID 192.168.31.11, Network Type BROADCAST, Cost: 1
Transmit Delay is 1 sec, State DR, Priority 255
Designated Router (ID) 192.168.31.11, Interface address 192.168.1.1
Backup Designated router (ID) 192.168.31.33, Interface address 192.168.1.3
Timer intervals configured, Hello 10, Dead 40, Wait 40, Retransmit 5
oob-resync timeout 40
Hello due in 00:00:00
Supports Link-local Signaling (LLS)
Index 1/1, flood queue length 0
Next 0x0(0)/0x0(0)
Last flood scan length is 1, maximum is 2
Last flood scan time is 0 msec, maximum is 0 msec
Neighbor Count is 2, Adjacent neighbor count is 2
Adjacent with neighbor 192.168.31.22
Adjacent with neighbor 192.168.31.33 (Backup Designated Router)
Suppress hello for 0 neighbor(s)
R3# show ip ospf interface
GigabitEthernet0/1 is up, line protocol is up
Internet Address 192.168.1.3/24, Area 0
Process ID 1, Router ID 192.168.31.33, Network Type BROADCAST, Cost: 1
Transmit Delay is 1 sec, State BDR, Priority 100
Designated Router (ID) 192.168.31.11, Interface address 192.168.1.1
Backup Designated router (ID) 192.168.31.33, Interface address 192.168.1.3
Timer intervals configured, Hello 10, Dead 40, Wait 40, Retransmit 5
oob-resync timeout 40
Hello due in 00:00:00
Supports Link-local Signaling (LLS)
Index 1/1, flood queue length 0
Next 0x0(0)/0x0(0)
Last flood scan length is 0, maximum is 2
Last flood scan time is 0 msec, maximum is 0 msec
Neighbor Count is 2, Adjacent neighbor count is 2
Adjacent with neighbor 192.168.31.22
Adjacent with neighbor 192.168.31.11 (Designated Router)
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Lab - Configuring OSPFv2 on a Multiaccess Network
Suppress hello for 0 neighbor(s)
Which router is now the DR? ___________ R1
Which router is now the BDR? __________ R3
Did the interface priority override the router ID in determining the DR/BDR? __________ yes
Reflection
1. List the criteria used from highest to lowest for determining the DR on an OSPF network.
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
Highest is interface priority. Next is highest router ID. The highest router ID can be explicitly set using the
router-id command. If no router ID is explicitly set, the router ID is based on the highest loopback address, as
it was at the start of this lab. In the event no loopbacks are configured, the router ID is the highest active
interface address.
2. What is the significance of a 255 interface priority?
_______________________________________________________________________________________
Highest possible priority
Router Interface Summary Table
Router Interface Summary
Router Model
Ethernet Interface #1
Ethernet Interface #2
Serial Interface #1
Serial Interface #2
1800
Fast Ethernet 0/0
(F0/0)
Fast Ethernet 0/1
(F0/1)
Serial 0/0/0 (S0/0/0)
Serial 0/0/1 (S0/0/1)
1900
Gigabit Ethernet 0/0
(G0/0)
Gigabit Ethernet 0/1
(G0/1)
Serial 0/0/0 (S0/0/0)
Serial 0/0/1 (S0/0/1)
2801
Fast Ethernet 0/0
(F0/0)
Fast Ethernet 0/1
(F0/1)
Serial 0/1/0 (S0/1/0)
Serial 0/1/1 (S0/1/1)
2811
Fast Ethernet 0/0
(F0/0)
Fast Ethernet 0/1
(F0/1)
Serial 0/0/0 (S0/0/0)
Serial 0/0/1 (S0/0/1)
2900
Gigabit Ethernet 0/0
(G0/0)
Gigabit Ethernet 0/1
(G0/1)
Serial 0/0/0 (S0/0/0)
Serial 0/0/1 (S0/0/1)
Note: To find out how the router is configured, look at the interfaces to identify the type of router and how many
interfaces the router has. There is no way to effectively list all the combinations of configurations for each router
class. This table includes identifiers for the possible combinations of Ethernet and Serial interfaces in the device.
The table does not include any other type of interface, even though a specific router may contain one. An
example of this might be an ISDN BRI interface. The string in parenthesis is the legal abbreviation that can be
used in Cisco IOS commands to represent the interface.
Device Configs
Router R1
R1#show run
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Page 7 of 13
Lab - Configuring OSPFv2 on a Multiaccess Network
Building configuration...
Current configuration : 1623 bytes
!
version 15.2
service timestamps debug datetime msec
service timestamps log datetime msec
service password-encryption
!
hostname R1
!
boot-start-marker
boot-end-marker
!
enable secret 4 06YFDUHH61wAE/kLkDq9BGho1QM5EnRtoyr8cHAUg.2
!
no aaa new-model
memory-size iomem 15
!
no ip domain lookup
ip cef
no ipv6 cef
multilink bundle-name authenticated
!
!
interface Loopback0
ip address 192.168.31.11 255.255.255.255
!
interface Embedded-Service-Engine0/0
no ip address
shutdown
!
interface GigabitEthernet0/0
no ip address
shutdown
duplex auto
speed auto
!
interface GigabitEthernet0/1
ip address 192.168.1.1 255.255.255.0
ip ospf priority 255
duplex auto
speed auto
!
interface Serial0/0/0
no ip address
shutdown
!
interface Serial0/0/1
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Page 8 of 13
Lab - Configuring OSPFv2 on a Multiaccess Network
no ip address
shutdown
!
router ospf 1
network 192.168.1.0 0.0.0.255 area 0
!
ip forward-protocol nd
!
no ip http server
no ip http secure-server
!
control-plane
!
banner motd ^C
Unauthorized access is strictly prohibited.
^C
!
line con 0
password 7 045802150C2E
logging synchronous
login
line aux 0
line 2
no activation-character
no exec
transport preferred none
transport input all
transport output pad telnet rlogin lapb-ta mop udptn v120 ssh
stopbits 1
line vty 0 4
password 7 060506324F41
login
transport input all
line vty 5 15
password 7 060506324F41
login
transport input all
!
scheduler allocate 20000 1000
!
end
Router R2
R2#show run
Building configuration...
Current configuration : 1708 bytes
!
version 15.2
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Page 9 of 13
Lab - Configuring OSPFv2 on a Multiaccess Network
service timestamps debug datetime msec
service timestamps log datetime msec
service password-encryption
!
hostname R2
!
boot-start-marker
boot-end-marker
!
enable secret 4 06YFDUHH61wAE/kLkDq9BGho1QM5EnRtoyr8cHAUg.2
!
no aaa new-model
memory-size iomem 15
!
no ip domain lookup
ip cef
no ipv6 cef
multilink bundle-name authenticated
!
!
interface Loopback0
ip address 192.168.31.22 255.255.255.255
!
interface Embedded-Service-Engine0/0
no ip address
shutdown
!
interface GigabitEthernet0/0
ip address 192.168.1.2 255.255.255.0
ip ospf priority 0
duplex auto
speed auto
!
interface GigabitEthernet0/1
no ip address
shutdown
duplex auto
speed auto
!
interface Serial0/0/0
no ip address
shutdown
!
interface Serial0/0/1
no ip address
shutdown
!
router ospf 1
network 192.168.1.0 0.0.0.255 area 0
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Page 10 of 13
Lab - Configuring OSPFv2 on a Multiaccess Network
!
ip forward-protocol nd
!
no ip http server
no ip http secure-server
!!
control-plane
!
banner motd ^C
Unauthorized access is strictly prohibited.
^C
!
line con 0
password 7 0822455D0A16
logging synchronous
login
line aux 0
line 2
no activation-character
no exec
transport preferred none
transport input all
transport output pad telnet rlogin lapb-ta mop udptn v120 ssh
stopbits 1
line vty 0 4
password 7 110A1016141D
login
transport input all
line vty 5 15
password 7 110A1016141D
login
transport input all
!
scheduler allocate 20000 1000
!
end
Router R3
R3#show run
Building configuration...
Current configuration : 1662 bytes
!
version 15.2
service timestamps debug datetime msec
service timestamps log datetime msec
service password-encryption
!
hostname R3
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Page 11 of 13
Lab - Configuring OSPFv2 on a Multiaccess Network
!
boot-start-marker
boot-end-marker
!
enable secret 4 06YFDUHH61wAE/kLkDq9BGho1QM5EnRtoyr8cHAUg.2
!
no aaa new-model
memory-size iomem 10
!
no ip domain lookup
ip cef
no ipv6 cef
multilink bundle-name authenticated
!
!
interface Loopback0
ip address 192.168.31.33 255.255.255.255
!
interface Embedded-Service-Engine0/0
no ip address
shutdown
!
interface GigabitEthernet0/0
no ip address
shutdown
duplex auto
speed auto
!
interface GigabitEthernet0/1
ip address 192.168.1.3 255.255.255.0
ip ospf priority 100
duplex auto
speed auto
!
interface Serial0/0/0
no ip address
shutdown
!
interface Serial0/0/1
no ip address
shutdown
!
router ospf 1
network 192.168.1.0 0.0.0.255 area 0
!
ip forward-protocol nd
!
no ip http server
no ip http secure-server
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Page 12 of 13
Lab - Configuring OSPFv2 on a Multiaccess Network
!
control-plane
!
banner motd ^C
Unauthorized access is strictly prohibited. ^C
!
line con 0
password 7 02050D480809
logging synchronous
login
line aux 0
line 2
no activation-character
no exec
transport preferred none
transport input all
transport output pad telnet rlogin lapb-ta mop udptn v120 ssh
stopbits 1
line vty 0 4
password 7 14141B180F0B
login
transport input all
line vty 5 15
password 7 14141B180F0B
login
transport input all
!
scheduler allocate 20000 1000
!
end
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Page 13 of 13
Lab - Configuring OSFPv2 Advanced Features (Instructor Version)
Instructor Note: Red font color or Gray highlights indicate text that appears in the instructor copy only.
Topology
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Page 1 of 24
Lab - Configuring OSFPv2 Advanced Features
Addressing Table
Device
R1
Interface
IP Address
Subnet Mask
Default Gateway
G0/0
192.168.1.1
255.255.255.0
N/A
S0/0/0 (DCE)
192.168.12.1
255.255.255.252
N/A
S0/0/1
192.168.13.1
255.255.255.252
N/A
Lo0
209.165.200.225
255.255.255.252
N/A
S0/0/0
192.168.12.2
255.255.255.252
N/A
S0/0/1 (DCE)
192.168.23.1
255.255.255.252
N/A
G0/0
192.168.3.1
255.255.255.0
N/A
S0/0/0 (DCE)
192.168.13.2
255.255.255.252
N/A
S0/0/1
192.168.23.2
255.255.255.252
N/A
PC-A
NIC
192.168.1.3
255.255.255.0
192.168.1.1
PC-C
NIC
192.168.3.3
255.255.255.0
192.168.3.1
R2
R3
Objectives
Part 1: Build the Network and Configure Basic Device Settings
Part 2: Configure and Verify OSPF Routing
Part 3: Change OSPF Metrics
Part 4: Configure and Propagate a Static Default Route
Part 5: Configure OSPF Authentication
Background / Scenario
Open Shortest Path First (OSPF) has advanced features to allow changes to be made to control metrics,
default route propagation, and security.
In this lab, you will adjust OSPF metrics on the router interfaces, configure OSPF route propagation, and use
Message Digest 5 (MD5) authentication to secure OSPF routing information.
Note: The routers used with CCNA hands-on labs are Cisco 1941 Integrated Services Routers (ISRs) with
Cisco IOS Release 15.2(4)M3 (universalk9 image). Other routers and Cisco IOS versions can be used.
Depending on the model and Cisco IOS version, the commands available and output produced might vary
from what is shown in the labs. Refer to the Router Interface Summary Table at the end of this lab for the
correct interface identifiers.
Note: Make sure that the routers have been erased and have no startup configurations. If you are unsure,
contact your instructor.
Instructor Note: Refer to the Instructor Lab Manual for the procedures to initialize and reload devices.
Required Resources

3 Routers (Cisco 1941 with Cisco IOS Release 15.2(4)M3 universal image or comparable)

2 PCs (Windows 7, Vista, or XP with terminal emulation program, such as Tera Term)

Console cables to configure the Cisco IOS devices via the console ports
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Page 2 of 24
Lab - Configuring OSFPv2 Advanced Features

Ethernet and serial cables as shown in the topology
Part 1: Build the Network and Configure Basic Device Settings
In Part 1, you will set up the network topology and configure basic settings on the PC hosts and routers.
Step 1: Cable the network as shown in the topology.
Step 2: Initialize and reload the routers as necessary.
Step 3: Configure basic settings for each router.
a. Disable DNS lookup.
b. Configure device name as shown in the topology.
c.
Assign class as the privileged EXEC password.
d. Assign cisco as the console and vty passwords.
e. Encrypt the clear text passwords.
f.
Configure a MOTD banner to warn users that unauthorized access is prohibited.
g. Configure logging synchronous for the console line.
h. Configure the IP addresses listed in the Addressing Table for all interfaces.
i.
Set the clock rate for all DCE serial interfaces at 128000.
j.
Copy the running configuration to the startup configuration.
Step 4: Configure PC hosts.
Refer to the Addressing Table for PC host address information.
Step 5: Test connectivity.
At this point, the PCs are unable to ping each other. However, the routers should be able to ping the directly
connected neighbor interfaces, and the PCs should be able to ping their default gateway. Verify and
troubleshoot if necessary.
Part 2: Configure and Verify OSPF Routing
In Part 2, you will configure OSPFv2 routing on all routers in the network and then verify that routing tables
are updated correctly.
Step 1: Configure the router ID on all routers.
Assign 1 as the process ID for this OSPF process. Each router should be given the following router ID
assignments:

R1 Router ID: 1.1.1.1

R2 Router ID: 2.2.2.2

R3 Router ID: 3.3.3.3
R1(config)# router ospf 1
R1(config-router)# router-id 1.1.1.1
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Page 3 of 24
Lab - Configuring OSFPv2 Advanced Features
R2(config)# router ospf 1
R2(config-router)# router-id 2.2.2.2
R3(config)# router ospf 1
R3(config-router)# router-id 3.3.3.3
Step 2: Configure OSPF network information on the routers.
R1(config)# router
R1(config-router)#
R1(config-router)#
R1(config-router)#
ospf 1
network 192.168.1.0 0.0.0.255 area 0
network 192.168.12.0 0.0.0.3 area 0
network 192.168.13.0 0.0.0.3 area 0
R2(config)# router ospf 1
R2(config-router)# network 192.168.12.0 0.0.0.3 area 0
R2(config-router)# network 192.168.23.0 0.0.0.3 area 0
R3(config)# router
R3(config-router)#
R3(config-router)#
R3(config-router)#
ospf 1
network 192.168.3.0 0.0.0.255 area 0
network 192.168.13.0 0.0.0.3 area 0
network 192.168.23.0 0.0.0.3 area 0
Step 3: Verify OSPF routing.
a. Issue the show ip ospf neighbor command to verify that each router is listing the other routers in the
network.
R1# show ip ospf neighbor
Neighbor ID
3.3.3.3
2.2.2.2
Pri
0
0
State
FULL/
FULL/
-
Dead Time
00:00:36
00:00:33
Address
192.168.13.2
192.168.12.2
Interface
Serial0/0/1
Serial0/0/0
b. Issue the show ip route ospf command to verify that all OSPF networks are present in the routing table
on all routers.
R1# show ip route ospf
Codes: L - local, C - connected, S - static, R - RIP, M - mobile, B - BGP
D - EIGRP, EX - EIGRP external, O - OSPF, IA - OSPF inter area
N1 - OSPF NSSA external type 1, N2 - OSPF NSSA external type 2
E1 - OSPF external type 1, E2 - OSPF external type 2
i - IS-IS, su - IS-IS summary, L1 - IS-IS level-1, L2 - IS-IS level-2
ia - IS-IS inter area, * - candidate default, U - per-user static route
o - ODR, P - periodic downloaded static route, H - NHRP, l - LISP
+ - replicated route, % - next hop override
Gateway of last resort is not set
O
O
192.168.3.0/24 [110/65] via 192.168.13.2, 00:00:20, Serial0/0/1
192.168.23.0/30 is subnetted, 1 subnets
192.168.23.0 [110/128] via 192.168.13.2, 00:12:58, Serial0/0/1
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Page 4 of 24
Lab - Configuring OSFPv2 Advanced Features
[110/128] via 192.168.12.2, 00:03:38, Serial0/0/0
R2# show ip route ospf
Codes: L - local, C - connected, S - static, R - RIP, M - mobile, B - BGP
D - EIGRP, EX - EIGRP external, O - OSPF, IA - OSPF inter area
N1 - OSPF NSSA external type 1, N2 - OSPF NSSA external type 2
E1 - OSPF external type 1, E2 - OSPF external type 2
i - IS-IS, su - IS-IS summary, L1 - IS-IS level-1, L2 - IS-IS level-2
ia - IS-IS inter area, * - candidate default, U - per-user static route
o - ODR, P - periodic downloaded static route, H - NHRP, l - LISP
+ - replicated route, % - next hop override
Gateway of last resort is not set
O
O
O
192.168.1.0/24 [110/65] via 192.168.12.1, 00:06:18, Serial0/0/0
192.168.3.0/24 [110/65] via 192.168.23.2, 00:03:38, Serial0/0/1
192.168.13.0/30 is subnetted, 1 subnets
192.168.13.0 [110/128] via 192.168.23.2, 00:03:38, Serial0/0/1
[110/128] via 192.168.12.1, 00:04:20, Serial0/0/0
R3# show ip route ospf
Codes: L - local, C - connected, S - static, R - RIP, M - mobile, B - BGP
D - EIGRP, EX - EIGRP external, O - OSPF, IA - OSPF inter area
N1 - OSPF NSSA external type 1, N2 - OSPF NSSA external type 2
E1 - OSPF external type 1, E2 - OSPF external type 2
i - IS-IS, su - IS-IS summary, L1 - IS-IS level-1, L2 - IS-IS level-2
ia - IS-IS inter area, * - candidate default, U - per-user static route
o - ODR, P - periodic downloaded static route, H - NHRP, l - LISP
+ - replicated route, % - next hop override
Gateway of last resort is not set
O
O
192.168.1.0/24 [110/65] via 192.168.13.1, 00:16:12, Serial0/0/0
192.168.12.0/30 is subnetted, 1 subnets
192.168.12.0 [110/128] via 192.168.23.1, 00:06:52, Serial0/0/1
[110/128] via 192.168.13.1, 00:16:12, Serial0/0/0
Step 4: Test end-to-end connectivity.
Ping PC-C from PC-A to verify end-to-end connectivity. The pings should be successful. If they are not,
troubleshoot as necessary.
Note: It may be necessary to disable the PC firewall for the pings to be successful.
Part 3: Change OSPF Metrics
In Part 3, you will change OSPF metrics using the bandwidth command, the auto-cost referencebandwidth command, and the ip ospf cost command. Making these changes will provide more accurate
metrics to OSPF.
Note: All DCE interfaces should have been configured with a clocking rate of 128000 in Part 1.
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Page 5 of 24
Lab - Configuring OSFPv2 Advanced Features
Step 1: Change the bandwidth on all serial interfaces to 128Kb/s.
a. Issue the show ip ospf interface brief command to view the default cost settings on the router
interfaces.
R1# show ip ospf interface brief
Interface
Se0/0/1
Se0/0/0
Gi0/0
PID
1
1
1
Area
0
0
0
IP Address/Mask
192.168.13.1/30
192.168.12.1/30
192.168.1.1/24
Cost
64
64
1
State
P2P
P2P
DR
Nbrs F/C
1/1
1/1
0/0
b. Use the bandwidth 128 interface command on all serial interfaces.
R1(config)# interface s0/0/0
R1(config-if)# bandwidth 128
R1(config)# interface s0/0/1
R1(config-if)# bandwidth 128
R2(config)# interface s0/0/0
R2(config-if)# bandwidth 128
R2(config)# interface s0/0/1
R2(config-if)# bandwidth 128
R3(config)# interface s0/0/0
R3(config-if)# bandwidth 128
R3(config)# interface s0/0/1
R3(config-if)# bandwidth 128
c.
Issue the show ip ospf interface brief command to view the new cost settings.
R1# show ip ospf interface brief
Interface
Se0/0/1
Se0/0/0
Gi0/0
PID
1
1
1
Area
0
0
0
IP Address/Mask
192.168.13.1/30
192.168.12.1/30
192.168.1.1/24
Cost
781
781
1
State
P2P
P2P
DR
Nbrs F/C
1/1
1/1
0/0
Step 2: Change the reference bandwidth on the routers.
a. Issue the auto-cost reference-bandwidth 1000 command on the routers to change the default reference
bandwidth setting to account for Gigabit Ethernet Interfaces.
R1(config)# router ospf 1
R1(config-router)# auto-cost reference-bandwidth 1000
% OSPF: Reference bandwidth is changed.
Please ensure reference bandwidth is consistent across all routers.
R2(config)# router ospf 1
R2(config-router)# auto-cost reference-bandwidth 1000
% OSPF: Reference bandwidth is changed.
Please ensure reference bandwidth is consistent across all routers.
R3(config)# router ospf 1
R3(config-router)# auto-cost reference-bandwidth 1000
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
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Lab - Configuring OSFPv2 Advanced Features
% OSPF: Reference bandwidth is changed.
Please ensure reference bandwidth is consistent across all routers.
b. Re-issue the show ip ospf interface brief command to view how this command has changed cost
values.
R1# show ip ospf interface brief
Interface
Se0/0/1
Se0/0/0
Gi0/0
PID
1
1
1
Area
0
0
0
IP Address/Mask
192.168.13.1/30
192.168.12.1/30
192.168.1.1/24
Cost
7812
7812
1
State
P2P
P2P
DR
Nbrs F/C
0/0
0/0
0/0
Note: If the router had Fast Ethernet interfaces instead of Gigabit Ethernet interfaces, then the cost would
now be 10 on those interfaces.
Step 3: Change the route cost.
a. Issue the show ip route ospf command to display the current OSPF routes on R1. Notice that there are
currently two routes in the table that use the S0/0/1 interface.
R1# show ip route ospf
Codes: L - local, C - connected, S - static, R - RIP, M - mobile, B - BGP
D - EIGRP, EX - EIGRP external, O - OSPF, IA - OSPF inter area
N1 - OSPF NSSA external type 1, N2 - OSPF NSSA external type 2
E1 - OSPF external type 1, E2 - OSPF external type 2
i - IS-IS, su - IS-IS summary, L1 - IS-IS level-1, L2 - IS-IS level-2
ia - IS-IS inter area, * - candidate default, U - per-user static route
o - ODR, P - periodic downloaded static route, H - NHRP, l - LISP
+ - replicated route, % - next hop override
Gateway of last resort is not set
O
O
192.168.3.0/24 [110/7822] via 192.168.13.2, 00:00:12, Serial0/0/1
192.168.23.0/30 is subnetted, 1 subnets
192.168.23.0 [110/15624] via 192.168.13.2, 00:00:12, Serial0/0/1
[110/15624] via 192.168.12.2, 00:20:03, Serial0/0/0
b. Apply the ip ospf cost 16000 command to the S0/0/1 interface on R1. A cost of 16,000 is higher than the
accumulated cost of the route through R2 which is 15,624.
R1(config)# int s0/0/1
R1(config-if)# ip ospf cost 16000
c.
Issue the show ip ospf interface brief command on R1 to view the cost change to S0/0/1.
R1# show ip ospf interface brief
Interface
Se0/0/1
Se0/0/0
Gi0/0
PID
1
1
1
Area
0
0
0
IP Address/Mask
192.168.13.1/30
192.168.12.1/30
192.168.1.1/24
Cost
16000
7812
1
State
P2P
P2P
DR
Nbrs F/C
1/1
1/1
0/0
d. Re-issue the show ip route ospf command on R1 to display the effect this change has made on the
routing table. All OSPF routes for R1 are now being routed through R2.
R1# show ip route ospf
Codes: L - local, C - connected, S - static, R - RIP, M - mobile, B - BGP
D - EIGRP, EX - EIGRP external, O - OSPF, IA - OSPF inter area
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
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Lab - Configuring OSFPv2 Advanced Features
N1 - OSPF NSSA external type 1, N2 - OSPF NSSA external type 2
E1 - OSPF external type 1, E2 - OSPF external type 2
i - IS-IS, su - IS-IS summary, L1 - IS-IS level-1, L2 - IS-IS level-2
ia - IS-IS inter area, * - candidate default, U - per-user static route
o - ODR, P - periodic downloaded static route, H - NHRP, l - LISP
+ - replicated route, % - next hop override
Gateway of last resort is not set
O
O
192.168.3.0/24 [110/15625] via 192.168.12.2, 00:05:31, Serial0/0/0
192.168.23.0/30 is subnetted, 1 subnets
192.168.23.0 [110/15624] via 192.168.12.2, 01:14:02, Serial0/0/0
Explain why the route to the 192.168.3.0/24 network on R1 is now going through R2?
_______________________________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________________________
OSPF will choose the route with the least accumulated cost. The route with the lowest accumulated cost is:
R1-S0/0/0 + R2-S0/0/1 + R3-G0/0, or 7812 + 7812 + 1 = 15,625. This metric is smaller than the accumulated
cost of R1-S0/0/1 + R3-G0/0, or 16,000 + 1 = 16,001.
Part 4: Configure and Propagate a Static Default Route
In Part 4, you will use a loopback interface on R2 to simulate an ISP connection to the Internet. You will
create a static default route on R2, and then OSPF will propagate that route to the other two routers on the
network.
Step 1: Configure a static default route on R2 to loopback 0.
Configure a default route using the loopback interface configured in Part 1, to simulate a connection to an
ISP.
R2(config)# ip route 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 loopback0
Step 2: Have OSPF propagate the default static route.
Issue the default-information originate command to include the static default route in the OSPF updates
that are sent from R2.
R2(config)# router ospf 1
R2(config-router)# default-information originate
Step 3: Verify OSPF static route propagation.
a. Issue the show ip route static command on R2.
R2# show ip route static
Codes: L - local, C - connected, S - static, R - RIP, M - mobile, B - BGP
D - EIGRP, EX - EIGRP external, O - OSPF, IA - OSPF inter area
N1 - OSPF NSSA external type 1, N2 - OSPF NSSA external type 2
E1 - OSPF external type 1, E2 - OSPF external type 2
i - IS-IS, su - IS-IS summary, L1 - IS-IS level-1, L2 - IS-IS level-2
ia - IS-IS inter area, * - candidate default, U - per-user static route
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
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Lab - Configuring OSFPv2 Advanced Features
o - ODR, P - periodic downloaded static route, H - NHRP, l - LISP
+ - replicated route, % - next hop override
Gateway of last resort is 0.0.0.0 to network 0.0.0.0
S*
0.0.0.0/0 is directly connected, Loopback0
b. Issue the show ip route command on R1 to verify the propagation of the static route from R2.
R1# show ip route
Codes: L - local, C - connected, S - static, R - RIP, M - mobile, B - BGP
D - EIGRP, EX - EIGRP external, O - OSPF, IA - OSPF inter area
N1 - OSPF NSSA external type 1, N2 - OSPF NSSA external type 2
E1 - OSPF external type 1, E2 - OSPF external type 2
i - IS-IS, su - IS-IS summary, L1 - IS-IS level-1, L2 - IS-IS level-2
ia - IS-IS inter area, * - candidate default, U - per-user static route
o - ODR, P - periodic downloaded static route, H - NHRP, l - LISP
+ - replicated route, % - next hop override
Gateway of last resort is 192.168.12.2 to network 0.0.0.0
O*E2
C
L
O
C
L
C
L
O
c.
0.0.0.0/0 [110/1] via 192.168.12.2, 00:02:57, Serial0/0/0
192.168.1.0/24 is variably subnetted, 2 subnets, 2 masks
192.168.1.0/24 is directly connected, GigabitEthernet0/0
192.168.1.1/32 is directly connected, GigabitEthernet0/0
192.168.3.0/24 [110/15634] via 192.168.12.2, 00:03:35, Serial0/0/0
192.168.12.0/24 is variably subnetted, 2 subnets, 2 masks
192.168.12.0/30 is directly connected, Serial0/0/0
192.168.12.1/32 is directly connected, Serial0/0/0
192.168.13.0/24 is variably subnetted, 2 subnets, 2 masks
192.168.13.0/30 is directly connected, Serial0/0/1
192.168.13.1/32 is directly connected, Serial0/0/1
192.168.23.0/30 is subnetted, 1 subnets
192.168.23.0 [110/15624] via 192.168.12.2, 00:05:18, Serial0/0/0
Verify end-to-end connectivity by issuing a ping from PC-A to the ISP interface address 209.165.200.225.
Were the pings successful? ________________ Yes
Part 5: Configure OSPF Authentication
OSPF authentication can be set up at the link level or the area level. There are three authentication types
available for OSPF authentication: Null, plain text, or MD5. In Part 5, you will set up OSPF MD5
authentication, which is the strongest available.
Step 1: Set up MD5 OSPF authentication on a single link.
a. Issue the debug ip ospf adj command on R2 to view OSPF adjacency messages.
R2# debug ip ospf adj
OSPF adjacency debugging is on
b. Assign an MD5 key for OSPF Authentication on R1, interface S0/0/0.
R1(config)# interface s0/0/0
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
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Lab - Configuring OSFPv2 Advanced Features
R1(config-if)# ip ospf message-digest-key 1 md5 MD5KEY
c.
Activate MD5 authentication on R1, interface S0/0/0.
R1(config-if)# ip ospf authentication message-digest
OSPF debug messages informing you of a Mismatched Authentication type displays on R2.
*Mar 19 00:03:18.187: OSPF-1 ADJ
Se0/0/0: Rcv pkt from 192.168.12.1 : Mismatched
Authentication type. Input packet specified type 2, we use type 0
d. Issue the u all command, which is the shortest version of the undebug all command on R2 to disable
debugging.
e. Configure OSPF authentication on R2, interface S0/0/0. Use the same MD5 password you entered for
R1.
f.
Issue a show ip ospf interface s0/0/0 command on R2. This command displays the type of
authentication at the bottom of the output.
R2# show ip ospf interface s0/0/0
Serial0/0/0 is up, line protocol is up
Internet Address 192.168.12.2/30, Area 0, Attached via Network Statement
Process ID 1, Router ID 2.2.2.2, Network Type POINT_TO_POINT, Cost: 7812
Topology-MTID
Cost
Disabled
Shutdown
Topology Name
0
7812
no
no
Base
Transmit Delay is 1 sec, State POINT_TO_POINT
Timer intervals configured, Hello 10, Dead 40, Wait 40, Retransmit 5
oob-resync timeout 40
Hello due in 00:00:03
Supports Link-local Signaling (LLS)
Cisco NSF helper support enabled
IETF NSF helper support enabled
Index 1/1, flood queue length 0
Next 0x0(0)/0x0(0)
Last flood scan length is 1, maximum is 1
Last flood scan time is 0 msec, maximum is 0 msec
Neighbor Count is 1, Adjacent neighbor count is 1
Adjacent with neighbor 1.1.1.1
Suppress hello for 0 neighbor(s)
Message digest authentication enabled
Youngest key id is 1
Step 2: Set up OSPF authentication at the area level.
a. Issue the area 0 authentication command to set MD5 authentication for OSPF Area 0 on R1.
R1(config)# router ospf 1
R1(config-router)# area 0 authentication message-digest
b. This option still requires that you assign the MD5 password at the interface level.
R1(config)# interface s0/0/1
R1(config-if)# ip ospf message-digest-key 1 md5 MD5KEY
c.
Issue the show ip ospf neighbor command on R3. R1 no longer has an adjacency with R3.
R3# show ip ospf neighbor
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Lab - Configuring OSFPv2 Advanced Features
Neighbor ID
2.2.2.2
0
Pri
State
FULL/ -
Dead Time
Address
00:00:31
192.168.23.1
Interface
Serial0/0/1
d. Set up area authentication on R3 and assign the same MD5 password to interface S0/0/0.
R3(config)# router ospf 1
R3(config-router)# area 0 authentication message-digest
R3(config-router)# interface s0/0/0
R3(config-if)# ip ospf message-digest-key 1 md5 MD5KEY
e. Issue the show ip ospf neighbor command on R3. Notice that R1 is now showing as a neighbor, but R2
is missing.
R3# show ip ospf neighbor
Neighbor ID
1.1.1.1
0
Pri
State
FULL/ -
Dead Time
Address
00:00:38
192.168.13.1
Interface
Serial0/0/0
Why is R2 no longer showing as an OSPF neighbor?
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
R2 currently is only configured with OSPF authentication on S0/0/0. For R2 to form an adjacency with R3
again, interface S0/0/1 must also perform OSPF authentication.
f.
Configure R2 to perform area-level MD5 authentication.
R2(config)# router ospf 1
R2(config-router)# area 0 authentication message-digest
g. Assign MD5KEY as the MD5 password for the link between R2 and R3.
R2(config-router)# interface s0/0/1
R2(config-if)# ip ospf message-digest-key 1 md5 MD5KEY
R3(config-router)# interface s0/0/1
R3(config-if)# ip ospf message-digest-key 1 md5 MD5KEY
h. Issue the show ip ospf neighbor command on all routers to verify that all adjacencies have been reestablished.
R1# show ip ospf neighbor
Neighbor ID
3.3.3.3
2.2.2.2
Pri
0
0
State
FULL/
FULL/
-
Dead Time
00:00:39
00:00:35
Address
192.168.13.2
192.168.12.2
Interface
Serial0/0/1
Serial0/0/0
-
Dead Time
00:00:36
00:00:32
Address
192.168.23.2
192.168.12.1
Interface
Serial0/0/1
Serial0/0/0
Dead Time
Address
Interface
R2# show ip ospf neighbor
Neighbor ID
3.3.3.3
1.1.1.1
Pri
0
0
State
FULL/
FULL/
R3# show ip ospf neighbor
Neighbor ID
Pri
State
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
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Lab - Configuring OSFPv2 Advanced Features
2.2.2.2
1.1.1.1
0
0
FULL/
FULL/
-
00:00:33
00:00:39
192.168.23.1
192.168.13.1
Serial0/0/1
Serial0/0/0
Reflection
1. What is the easiest and preferred method of manipulating OSPF route costs?
_______________________________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________________________
Using the ip ospf cost command overrides the cost calculation completely and sets the link cost to the
desired amount.
2. What does the default-information originate command do for a network using the OSPF routing protocol?
_______________________________________________________________________________________
The default-information originate command is used to inject a default route into an OSPF area which will
propagate the default route to other OSPF routers.
3. Why is it a good idea to use OSPF authentication?
_______________________________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________________________
Routing protocols are used to exchange reachability information between routers. Routing information learned
from peers is used to determine the next hop toward the destination. To route traffic correctly, it is necessary
to prevent malicious or incorrect routing information from being introduced into the routing table. You should
enable authentication in OSPF in order to exchange routing information in a secure manner.
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 12 of 24
Lab - Configuring OSFPv2 Advanced Features
Router Interface Summary Table
Router Interface Summary
Router Model
Ethernet Interface #1
Ethernet Interface #2
Serial Interface #1
Serial Interface #2
1800
Fast Ethernet 0/0
(F0/0)
Fast Ethernet 0/1
(F0/1)
Serial 0/0/0 (S0/0/0)
Serial 0/0/1 (S0/0/1)
1900
Gigabit Ethernet 0/0
(G0/0)
Gigabit Ethernet 0/1
(G0/1)
Serial 0/0/0 (S0/0/0)
Serial 0/0/1 (S0/0/1)
2801
Fast Ethernet 0/0
(F0/0)
Fast Ethernet 0/1
(F0/1)
Serial 0/1/0 (S0/1/0)
Serial 0/1/1 (S0/1/1)
2811
Fast Ethernet 0/0
(F0/0)
Fast Ethernet 0/1
(F0/1)
Serial 0/0/0 (S0/0/0)
Serial 0/0/1 (S0/0/1)
2900
Gigabit Ethernet 0/0
(G0/0)
Gigabit Ethernet 0/1
(G0/1)
Serial 0/0/0 (S0/0/0)
Serial 0/0/1 (S0/0/1)
Note: To find out how the router is configured, look at the interfaces to identify the type of router and how many
interfaces the router has. There is no way to effectively list all the combinations of configurations for each router
class. This table includes identifiers for the possible combinations of Ethernet and Serial interfaces in the device.
The table does not include any other type of interface, even though a specific router may contain one. An
example of this might be an ISDN BRI interface. The string in parenthesis is the legal abbreviation that can be
used in Cisco IOS commands to represent the interface.
Device Configs
Router R1 (After parts 1 and 2 of this lab)
R1#sh run
Building configuration...
Current configuration : 1557 bytes
!
version 15.2
service timestamps debug datetime msec
service timestamps log datetime msec
service password-encryption
!
hostname R1
!
boot-start-marker
boot-end-marker
!
enable secret 4 06YFDUHH61wAE/kLkDq9BGho1QM5EnRtoyr8cHAUg.2
!
no aaa new-model
memory-size iomem 15
!
ip cef
!
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Lab - Configuring OSFPv2 Advanced Features
no ip domain lookup
no ipv6 cef
multilink bundle-name authenticated
!
interface Embedded-Service-Engine0/0
no ip address
shutdown
!
interface GigabitEthernet0/0
ip address 192.168.1.1 255.255.255.0
duplex auto
speed auto
!
interface GigabitEthernet0/1
no ip address
shutdown
duplex auto
speed auto
!
interface Serial0/0/0
ip address 192.168.12.1 255.255.255.252
clock rate 128000
!
interface Serial0/0/1
ip address 192.168.13.1 255.255.255.252
!
router ospf 1
router-id 1.1.1.1
network 192.168.1.0 0.0.0.255 area 0
network 192.168.12.0 0.0.0.3 area 0
network 192.168.13.0 0.0.0.3 area 0
!
ip forward-protocol nd
!
no ip http server
no ip http secure-server
!
control-plane
!
banner motd ^C
Unauthorized Access is Prohibited!
^C
!
line con 0
password 7 01100F175804
logging synchronous
login
line aux 0
line 2
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Lab - Configuring OSFPv2 Advanced Features
no activation-character
no exec
transport preferred none
transport input all
transport output pad telnet rlogin lapb-ta mop udptn v120 ssh
stopbits 1
line vty 0 4
password 7 045802150C2E
login
transport input all
scheduler allocate 20000 1000
!
end
Router R2 (After parts 1 and 2 of this lab)
R2#sh run
Building configuration...
Current configuration : 1572 bytes
!
version 15.2
service timestamps debug datetime msec
service timestamps log datetime msec
service password-encryption
!
hostname R2
!
boot-start-marker
boot-end-marker
!
enable secret 4 06YFDUHH61wAE/kLkDq9BGho1QM5EnRtoyr8cHAUg.2
!
no aaa new-model
memory-size iomem 15
!
ip cef
!
no ip domain lookup
no ipv6 cef
multilink bundle-name authenticated
!
interface Loopback0
ip address 209.165.200.225 255.255.255.252
!
interface Embedded-Service-Engine0/0
no ip address
shutdown
!
interface GigabitEthernet0/0
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 15 of 24
Lab - Configuring OSFPv2 Advanced Features
no ip address
shutdown
duplex auto
speed auto
!
interface GigabitEthernet0/1
no ip address
shutdown
duplex auto
speed auto
!
interface Serial0/0/0
ip address 192.168.12.2 255.255.255.252
!
interface Serial0/0/1
ip address 192.168.23.1 255.255.255.252
clock rate 128000
!
router ospf 1
router-id 2.2.2.2
network 192.168.12.0 0.0.0.3 area 0
network 192.168.23.0 0.0.0.3 area 0
!
ip forward-protocol nd
!
no ip http server
no ip http secure-server
!
control-plane
!
banner motd ^C
Unauthorized Access is Prohibited!
^C
!
line con 0
password 7 01100F175804
logging synchronous
login
line aux 0
line 2
no activation-character
no exec
transport preferred none
transport input all
transport output pad telnet rlogin lapb-ta mop udptn v120 ssh
stopbits 1
line vty 0 4
password 7 030752180500
login
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Lab - Configuring OSFPv2 Advanced Features
transport input all
scheduler allocate 20000 1000
!
end
Router R3 (After parts 1 and 2 of this lab)
R3#sh run
Building configuration...
Current configuration : 1596 bytes
!
version 15.2
service timestamps debug datetime msec
service timestamps log datetime msec
service password-encryption
!
hostname R3
!
boot-start-marker
boot-end-marker
!
enable secret 4 06YFDUHH61wAE/kLkDq9BGho1QM5EnRtoyr8cHAUg.2
!
no aaa new-model
memory-size iomem 15
!
ip cef
!
no ip domain lookup
no ipv6 cef
multilink bundle-name authenticated
!
interface Embedded-Service-Engine0/0
no ip address
shutdown
!
interface GigabitEthernet0/0
ip address 192.168.3.1 255.255.255.0
duplex auto
speed auto
!
interface GigabitEthernet0/1
no ip address
shutdown
duplex auto
speed auto
!
interface Serial0/0/0
ip address 192.168.13.2 255.255.255.252
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
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Lab - Configuring OSFPv2 Advanced Features
clock rate 128000
!
interface Serial0/0/1
ip address 192.168.23.2 255.255.255.252
!
router ospf 1
router-id 3.3.3.3
network 192.168.3.0 0.0.0.255 area 0
network 192.168.13.0 0.0.0.3 area 0
network 192.168.23.0 0.0.0.3 area 0
!
ip forward-protocol nd
!
no ip http server
no ip http secure-server
!
control-plane
!
banner motd ^C
Unauthorized Access is Prohibited!
^C
!
line con 0
password 7 01100F175804
logging synchronous
login
line aux 0
line 2
no activation-character
no exec
transport preferred none
transport input all
transport output pad telnet rlogin lapb-ta mop udptn v120 ssh
stopbits 1
line vty 0 4
password 7 05080F1C2243
login
transport input all
scheduler allocate 20000 1000
!
End
Router R1 (Final)
R1# show run
Building configuration...
Current configuration : 1895 bytes
!
version 15.2
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Lab - Configuring OSFPv2 Advanced Features
service timestamps debug datetime msec
service timestamps log datetime msec
service password-encryption
!
hostname R1
!
boot-start-marker
boot-end-marker
!
enable secret 4 06YFDUHH61wAE/kLkDq9BGho1QM5EnRtoyr8cHAUg.2
!
no aaa new-model
memory-size iomem 15
!
ip cef
!
no ip domain lookup
no ipv6 cef
multilink bundle-name authenticated
!
interface Embedded-Service-Engine0/0
no ip address
shutdown
!
interface GigabitEthernet0/0
ip address 192.168.1.1 255.255.255.0
duplex auto
speed auto
!
interface GigabitEthernet0/1
no ip address
shutdown
duplex auto
speed auto
!
interface Serial0/0/0
bandwidth 128
ip address 192.168.12.1 255.255.255.252
ip ospf authentication message-digest
ip ospf message-digest-key 1 md5 7 013E2251702E3F
clock rate 128000
!
interface Serial0/0/1
bandwidth 128
ip address 192.168.13.1 255.255.255.252
ip ospf message-digest-key 1 md5 7 12342142392E35
ip ospf cost 16000
!
router ospf 1
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Lab - Configuring OSFPv2 Advanced Features
router-id 1.1.1.1
auto-cost reference-bandwidth 1000
area 0 authentication message-digest
network 192.168.1.0 0.0.0.255 area 0
network 192.168.12.0 0.0.0.3 area 0
network 192.168.13.0 0.0.0.3 area 0
!
ip forward-protocol nd
!
no ip http server
no ip http secure-server
!
control-plane
!
banner motd @ Unauthorized Access is Prohibited! @
!
line con 0
password 7 01100F175804
logging synchronous
login
line aux 0
line 2
no activation-character
no exec
transport preferred none
transport input all
transport output pad telnet rlogin lapb-ta mop udptn v120 ssh
stopbits 1
line vty 0 4
password 7 045802150C2E
login
transport input all
!
scheduler allocate 20000 1000
!
end
Router R2 (Final)
R2# show run
Building configuration...
Current configuration : 1878 bytes
!
version 15.2
service timestamps debug datetime msec
service timestamps log datetime msec
service password-encryption
!
hostname R2
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Page 20 of 24
Lab - Configuring OSFPv2 Advanced Features
!
boot-start-marker
boot-end-marker
!
enable secret 4 06YFDUHH61wAE/kLkDq9BGho1QM5EnRtoyr8cHAUg.2
!
no aaa new-model
memory-size iomem 15
!
ip cef
!
no ip domain lookup
no ipv6 cef
multilink bundle-name authenticated
!
interface Loopback0
ip address 209.165.200.225 255.255.255.252
!
interface Embedded-Service-Engine0/0
no ip address
shutdown
!
interface GigabitEthernet0/0
no ip address
shutdown
duplex auto
speed auto
!
interface GigabitEthernet0/1
no ip address
shutdown
duplex auto
speed auto
!
interface Serial0/0/0
bandwidth 128
ip address 192.168.12.2 255.255.255.252
ip ospf authentication message-digest
ip ospf message-digest-key 1 md5 7 002937532F7E32
!
interface Serial0/0/1
bandwidth 128
ip address 192.168.23.1 255.255.255.252
ip ospf message-digest-key 1 md5 7 1328334720293D
clock rate 128000
!
router ospf 1
router-id 2.2.2.2
auto-cost reference-bandwidth 1000
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Page 21 of 24
Lab - Configuring OSFPv2 Advanced Features
area 0 authentication message-digest
network 192.168.12.0 0.0.0.3 area 0
network 192.168.23.0 0.0.0.3 area 0
default-information originate
!
ip forward-protocol nd
!
no ip http server
no ip http secure-server
!
ip route 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 Loopback0
!
control-plane
!
banner motd @ Unauthorized Access is Prohibited! @
!
line con 0
password 7 01100F175804
logging synchronous
login
line aux 0
line 2
no activation-character
no exec
transport preferred none
transport input all
transport output pad telnet rlogin lapb-ta mop udptn v120 ssh
stopbits 1
line vty 0 4
password 7 030752180500
login
transport input all
!
scheduler allocate 20000 1000
!
end
Router R3 (Final)
R3# show run
Building configuration...
Current configuration : 1904 bytes
!
version 15.2
service timestamps debug datetime msec
service timestamps log datetime msec
service password-encryption
!
hostname R3
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Page 22 of 24
Lab - Configuring OSFPv2 Advanced Features
!
boot-start-marker
boot-end-marker
!
enable secret 4 06YFDUHH61wAE/kLkDq9BGho1QM5EnRtoyr8cHAUg.2
!
no aaa new-model
memory-size iomem 15
!
ip cef
!
no ip domain lookup
no ipv6 cef
!
multilink bundle-name authenticated
!
interface Embedded-Service-Engine0/0
no ip address
shutdown
!
interface GigabitEthernet0/0
ip address 192.168.3.1 255.255.255.0
duplex auto
speed auto
!
interface GigabitEthernet0/1
no ip address
shutdown
duplex auto
speed auto
!
interface Serial0/0/0
bandwidth 128
ip address 192.168.13.2 255.255.255.252
ip ospf message-digest-key 1 md5 7 10632D4C2E322B
clock rate 128000
!
interface Serial0/0/1
bandwidth 128
ip address 192.168.23.2 255.255.255.252
ip ospf message-digest-key 1 md5 7 10632D4C2E322B
!
router ospf 1
router-id 3.3.3.3
auto-cost reference-bandwidth 1000
area 0 authentication message-digest
network 192.168.3.0 0.0.0.255 area 0
network 192.168.13.0 0.0.0.3 area 0
network 192.168.23.0 0.0.0.3 area 0
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 23 of 24
Lab - Configuring OSFPv2 Advanced Features
!
ip forward-protocol nd
!
no ip http server
no ip http secure-server
!
control-plane
!
banner motd @ Unauthorized Access is Prohibited! @
!
line con 0
password 7 01100F175804
logging synchronous
login
line aux 0
line 2
no activation-character
no exec
transport preferred none
transport input all
transport output pad telnet rlogin lapb-ta mop udptn v120 ssh
stopbits 1
line vty 0 4
password 7 05080F1C2243
login
transport input all
!
scheduler allocate 20000 1000
!
end
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Page 24 of 24
Lab – Troubleshooting Basic Single-Area OSPFv2 and OSPFv3
(Instructor Version)
Instructor Note: Red font color or Gray highlights indicate text that appears in the instructor copy only.
Topology
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Page 1 of 31
Lab – Troubleshooting Basic Single-Area OSPFv2 and OSPFv3
Addressing Table
OSPF
Router ID
Interface
1.1.1.1
G0/0
192.168.1.1/24
2001:DB8:ACAD:A::1/64
FE80::1 link-local
N/A
S0/0/0
192.168.12.1/30
2001:DB8:ACAD:12::1/64
FE80::1 link-local
N/A
S0/0/1
192.18.13.1/30
2001:DB8:ACAD:13::1/64
FE80::1 link-local
N/A
G0/0
192.168.2.1/24
2001:DB8:ACAD:B::2/64
FE80::2 link-local
N/A
S0/0/0
192.168.12.2/30
2001:DB8:ACAD:12::2/64
FE80::2 link-local
N/A
S0/0/1
192.168.23.1/30
2001:DB8:ACAD:23::2/64
FE80::2 link-local
N/A
G0/0
192.168.3.1/24
2001:DB8:ACAD:C::3/64
FE80::3 link-local
N/A
S0/0/0
192.168.13.2/30
2001:DB8:ACAD:13::3/64
FE80::3 link-local
N/A
S0/0/1
192.168.23.2/30
2001:DB8:ACAD:23::3/64
FE80::3 link-local
N/A
PC-A
NIC
192.168.1.3/24
2001:DB8:ACAD:A::A/64
192.168.1.1
FE80::1
PC-B
NIC
192.168.2.3/24
2001:DB8:ACAD:B::B/64
192.168.2.1
FE80::2
PC-C
NIC
192.168.3.3/24
2001:DB8:ACAD:C::C/64
192.168.3.1
FE80::3
Device
R1
R2
R3
2.2.2.2
3.3.3.3
IP Address
Default Gateway
Objectives
Part 1: Build the Network and Load Device Configurations
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Page 2 of 31
Lab – Troubleshooting Basic Single-Area OSPFv2 and OSPFv3
Part 2: Troubleshoot Layer 3 Connectivity
Part 3: Troubleshoot OSPFv2
Part 4: Troubleshoot OSPFv3
Background / Scenario
Open Shortest Path First (OSPF) is a link-state routing protocol for IP networks. OSPFv2 is defined for IPv4
networks, and OSPFv3 is defined for IPv6 networks. OSPFv2 and OSPFv3 are completely isolated routing
protocols, changes in OSPFv2 do not affect OSPFv3 routing, and vice versa.
In this lab, a single-area OSPF network running OSPFv2 and OSPFv3 is experiencing problems. You have
been assigned to find the problems with the network and correct them.
Note: The routers used with CCNA hands-on labs are Cisco 1941 Integrated Services Routers (ISRs) with
Cisco IOS Release 15.2(4)M3 (universalk9 image). Other routers and Cisco IOS versions can be used.
Depending on the model and Cisco IOS version, the commands available and output produced might vary
from what is shown in the labs. Refer to the Router Interface Summary Table at the end of this lab for the
correct interface identifiers.
Note: Make sure that the routers have been erased and have no startup configurations. If you are unsure,
contact your instructor.
Instructor Note: Refer to the Instructor Lab Manual for the procedures to initialize and reload devices.
Required Resources

3 Routers (Cisco 1941 with Cisco IOS Release 15.2(4)M3 universal image or comparable)

3 PCs (Windows 7, Vista, or XP with terminal emulation program, such as Tera Term)

Console cables to configure the Cisco IOS devices via the console ports

Ethernet and serial cables as shown in the topology
Part 1: Build the Network and Load Device Configurations
In Part 1, you will set up the network topology and configure basic settings on the PC hosts and routers.
Step 1: Cable the network as shown in the topology.
Step 2: Configure PC hosts.
Step 3: Load router configurations.
Load the following configurations into the appropriate router. All routers have the same passwords. The
privileged EXEC password is cisco. The password for console and vty access is class.
Router R1 Configuration:
conf t
service password-encryption
no ip domain lookup
hostname R1
enable secret class
line con 0
logging synchronous
password cisco
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Page 3 of 31
Lab – Troubleshooting Basic Single-Area OSPFv2 and OSPFv3
login
line vty 0
password cisco
login
banner motd @Unauthorized Access is [email protected]
ipv6 unicast-routing
ipv6 router ospf 1
router-id 1.1.1.1
passive-interface g0/0
interface g0/0
ip address 192.168.1.1 255.255.255.0
ipv6 address 2001:db8:acad:a::1/64
ipv6 address fe80::1 link-local
!ipv6 ospf 1 area 0
!no shutdown
interface s0/0/0
clock rate 128000
ip address 192.168.12.1 255.255.255.0
!ip address 192.168.12.1 255.255.255.252
ipv6 address 2001:db8:acad:12::1/64
ipv6 address fe80::1 link-local
ipv6 ospf 1 area 0
no shutdown
interface s0/0/1
ip address 192.168.13.1 255.255.255.0
!ip address 192.168.13.1 255.255.255.252
ipv6 address 2001:db8:acad:13::1/64
ipv6 address fe80::1 link-local
ipv6 ospf 1 area 0
no shutdown
router ospf 1
network 192.168.1.0 0.0.0.255 area 0
network 129.168.12.0 0.0.0.3 area 0
!network 192.168.12.0 0.0.0.3 area 0
network 192.168.13.0 0.0.0.3 area 0
passive-interface g0/0
!router-id 1.1.1.1
end
Router R2 Configuration:
conf t
service password-encryption
no ip domain lookup
hostname R2
enable secret class
line con 0
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Page 4 of 31
Lab – Troubleshooting Basic Single-Area OSPFv2 and OSPFv3
logging synchronous
password cisco
login
line vty 0
password cisco
login
banner motd @Unauthorized Access is [email protected]
ipv6 unicast-routing
ipv6 router ospf 1
router-id 2.2.2.2
!passive-interface g0/0
interface g0/0
ip address 192.168.2.1 255.255.255.0
ipv6 address 2001:db8:acad:B::2/64
ipv6 address fe80::1 link-local
!no ipv6 address fe80::1 link-local
!ipv6 address fe80::2 link-local
!ipv6 ospf 1 area 0
no shutdown
interface s0/0/0
ip address 192.168.12.2 255.255.255.252
ipv6 address 2001:db8:acad:12::2/64
ipv6 address fe80::2 link-local
ipv6 ospf 1 area 0
no shutdown
interface s0/0/1
clock rate 128000
!ip address 192.168.23.1 255.255.255.252
ipv6 address 2001:db8:acad:23::2/64
ipv6 address fe80::2 link-local
!ipv6 ospf 1 area 0
no shutdown
router ospf 1
network 192.168.2.0 0.0.0.255 area 0
network 192.168.12.0 0.0.0.3 area 0
network 192.168.23.0 0.0.0.3 area 0
!passive-interface g0/0
end
Router R3 Configuration:
conf t
service password-encryption
no ip domain lookup
enable secret class
hostname R3
line con 0
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Page 5 of 31
Lab – Troubleshooting Basic Single-Area OSPFv2 and OSPFv3
logging synchronous
password cisco
login
line vty 0
password cisco
login
banner motd @Unauthorized Access is [email protected]
interface g0/0
!ip address 192.168.3.1 255.255.255.0
ipv6 address 2001:db8:acad:c::3/64
ipv6 address fe80::3 link-local
!ipv6 ospf 1 area 0
!no shutdown
interface s0/0/0
clock rate 128000
ip address 192.168.13.1 255.255.255.252
!ip address 192.168.13.2 255.255.255.252
ipv6 address 2001:db8:acad:13::3/64
ipv6 address fe80::3 link-local
!ipv6 ospf 1 area 0
no shutdown
interface s0/0/1
ip address 192.168.23.2 255.255.255.252
ipv6 address 2001:db8:acad:23::3/64
ipv6 address fe80::3 link-local
!ipv6 ospf 1 area 0
!no shutdown
!ipv6 unicast-routing
!ipv6 router ospf 1
!router-id 3.3.3.3
!passive-interface g0/0
router ospf 1
network 192.168.3.0 0.0.0.255 area 0
!network 192.168.13.0 0.0.0.3 area 0
!network 192.168.23.0 0.0.0.3 area 0
passive-interface g0/0
end
Part 2: Troubleshoot Layer 3 Connectivity
In Part 2, you will verify that Layer 3 connectivity is established on all interfaces. You will need to test both
IPv4 and IPv6 connectivity for all device interfaces.
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Page 6 of 31
Lab – Troubleshooting Basic Single-Area OSPFv2 and OSPFv3
Step 1: Verify that the interfaces listed in the Addressing Table are active and configured with
the correct IP address information.
a. Issue the show ip interface brief command on all routers to verify that the interfaces are in an up/up
state. Record your findings.
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
R1 - G0/0 is administratively down
R2 - S0/0/1 is down
R3 - G0/0 & S0/0/1 are administratively down
R1# show ip interface brief
Interface
Embedded-Service-Engine0/0
GigabitEthernet0/0
GigabitEthernet0/1
Serial0/0/0
Serial0/0/1
IP-Address
unassigned
192.168.1.1
unassigned
192.168.12.1
192.168.13.1
OK?
YES
YES
YES
YES
YES
Method
unset
manual
unset
manual
manual
Status
Protocol
administratively down down
administratively down down
administratively down down
up
up
up
up
OK?
YES
YES
YES
YES
YES
Method
unset
manual
unset
manual
unset
Status
Protocol
administratively down down
up
up
administratively down down
up
up
down
down
OK?
YES
YES
YES
YES
YES
Method
unset
unset
unset
manual
manual
Status
administratively
administratively
administratively
up
administratively
R2# show ip interface bri
Interface
Embedded-Service-Engine0/0
GigabitEthernet0/0
GigabitEthernet0/1
Serial0/0/0
Serial0/0/1
IP-Address
unassigned
192.168.2.1
unassigned
192.168.12.2
unassigned
R3# show ip interface bri
Interface
Embedded-Service-Engine0/0
GigabitEthernet0/0
GigabitEthernet0/1
Serial0/0/0
Serial0/0/1
IP-Address
unassigned
unassigned
unassigned
192.168.3.1
192.168.23.2
down
down
down
down
Protocol
down
down
down
up
down
b. Issue the show run interface command to verify IP address assignments on all router interfaces.
Compare the interface IP addresses against the Addressing Table and verify the subnet mask
assignments. For IPv6, verify that the link-local address has been assigned. Record your findings.
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
R1 – S0/0/0 & S0/0/1 incorrect subnet mask, should be 255.255.255.252
R2 – G0/0 incorrect IPv6 link local address, S0/0/1 no IPv4 address
R3 – G0/0 no IPv4 address, S0/0/0 incorrect IPv4 address
--R1 Intefaces --
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Page 7 of 31
Lab – Troubleshooting Basic Single-Area OSPFv2 and OSPFv3
R1# show run interface g0/0
Building configuration...
Current configuration : 178 bytes
!
interface GigabitEthernet0/0
ip address 192.168.1.1 255.255.255.0
shutdown
duplex auto
speed auto
ipv6 address FE80::1 link-local
ipv6 address 2001:DB8:ACAD:A::1/64
end
R1# show run interface s0/0/0
Building configuration...
Current configuration : 158 bytes
!
interface Serial0/0/0
ip address 192.168.12.1 255.255.255.0
ipv6 address FE80::1 link-local
ipv6 address 2001:DB8:ACAD:12::1/64
ipv6 ospf 1 area 0
clock rate 2000000
end
R1# show run interface s0/0/1
Building configuration...
Current configuration : 138 bytes
!
interface Serial0/0/1
ip address 192.168.13.1 255.255.255.0
ipv6 address FE80::1 link-local
ipv6 address 2001:DB8:ACAD:13::1/64
ipv6 ospf 1 area 0
end
--R2 Interfaces -R2# show run interface g0/0
Building configuration...
Current configuration : 168 bytes
!
interface GigabitEthernet0/0
ip address 192.168.2.1 255.255.255.0
duplex auto
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Page 8 of 31
Lab – Troubleshooting Basic Single-Area OSPFv2 and OSPFv3
speed auto
ipv6 address FE80::1 link-local
ipv6 address 2001:DB8:ACAD:B::2/64
end
R2# show run interface s0/0/0
Building configuration...
Current configuration : 160 bytes
!
interface Serial0/0/0
ip address 192.168.12.2 255.255.255.252
ipv6 address FE80::2 link-local
ipv6 address 2001:DB8:ACAD:12::2/64
ipv6 ospf 1 area 0
end
R2# show run interface s0/0/1
Building configuration...
Current configuration : 133 bytes
!
interface Serial0/0/1
no ip address
ipv6 address FE80::2 link-local
ipv6 address 2001:DB8:ACAD:23::2/64
clock rate 128000
end
--R3 Interfaces --
R3# show run interface g0/0
Building configuration...
Current configuration : 155 bytes
!
interface GigabitEthernet0/0
no ip address
shutdown
duplex auto
speed auto
ipv6 address FE80::3 link-local
ipv6 address 2001:DB8:ACAD:C::3/64
end
R3# show run interface s0/0/0
Building configuration...
Current configuration : 159 bytes
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Page 9 of 31
Lab – Troubleshooting Basic Single-Area OSPFv2 and OSPFv3
!
interface Serial0/0/0
ip address 192.168.13.1 255.255.255.252
ipv6 address FE80::3 link-local
ipv6 address 2001:DB8:ACAD:13::3/64
clock rate 128000
end
R3# show run interface s0/0/1
Building configuration...
Current configuration : 150 bytes
!
interface Serial0/0/1
ip address 192.168.23.2 255.255.255.252
shutdown
ipv6 address FE80::3 link-local
ipv6 address 2001:DB8:ACAD:23::3/64
end
c.
Resolve all problems that are found. Record the commands used to correct the issues.
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
R1(config)# interface g0/0
R1(config-if)# no shutdown
R1(config-if)# interface s0/0/0
R1(config-if)# ip address 192.168.12.1 255.255.255.252
R1(config-if)# interface s0/0/1
R1(config-if)# ip address 192.168.13.1 255.255.255.252
R1(config-if)# end
R2(config)# interface g0/0
R2(config-if)# no ipv6 address fe80::1 link-local
R2(config-if)# ipv6 address fe80::2 link-local
R2(config-if)# interface s0/0/1
R2(config-if)# ip address 192.168.23.1 255.255.255.252
R2(config-if)# end
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 10 of 31
Lab – Troubleshooting Basic Single-Area OSPFv2 and OSPFv3
R3(config)# interface g0/0
R3(config-if)# ip address 192.168.3.1 255.255.255.0
R3(config-if)# no shutdown
R3(config-if)# interface s0/0/0
R3(config-if)# ip address 192.168.13.2 255.255.255.252
R3(config-if)# interface s0/0/1
R3(config-if)# no shutdown
R3(config-if)# end
d. Using the ping command, verify that each router has network connectivity with the serial interfaces on the
neighbor routers. Verify that the PCs can ping their default gateways. If problems still exist, continue
troubleshooting Layer 3 issues.
Part 3: Troubleshoot OSPFv2
In Part 3, you will troubleshoot OSPFv2 problems and make the necessary changes needed to establish
OSPFv2 routes and end-to-end IPv4 connectivity.
Note: LAN (G0/0) interfaces should not advertise OSPF routing information, but routes to these networks
should be in the routing tables.
Step 1: Test IPv4 end-to-end connectivity.
From each PC host, ping the other PC hosts in the topology to verify end-to-end connectivity.
Note: It may be necessary to disable the PC firewall before testing, to ping between PCs.
a. Ping from PC-A to PC-B. Were the pings successful? _____________ No
b. Ping from PC-A to PC-C. Were the pings successful? _____________ No
c.
Ping from PC-B to PC-C. Were the pings successful? _____________ No
Step 2: Verify that all interfaces are assigned to OSPFv2 area 0 on R1.
a. Issue the show ip protocols command to verify that OSPF is running and that all networks are
advertised in area 0. Verify that the router ID is set correctly. Record your findings.
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
Router ID is incorrectly configured. The router ID should be 1.1.1.1, not 192.168.13.1. The network
129.168.12.0 0.0.0.3 area 0 statement is incorrect. The network statement should be for 192.168.12.0/30.
R1# show ip protocols
*** IP Routing is NSF aware ***
Routing Protocol is "ospf 1"
Outgoing update filter list for all interfaces is not set
Incoming update filter list for all interfaces is not set
Router ID 192.168.13.1
Number of areas in this router is 1. 1 normal 0 stub 0 nssa
Maximum path: 4
Routing for Networks:
129.168.12.0 0.0.0.3 area 0
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 11 of 31
Lab – Troubleshooting Basic Single-Area OSPFv2 and OSPFv3
192.168.1.0 0.0.0.255 area 0
192.168.13.0 0.0.0.3 area 0
Routing Information Sources:
Gateway
Distance
Distance: (default is 110)
Last Update
b. Make the necessary changes to the configuration on R1 based on the output from the show ip protocols
command. Record the commands used to correct the issues.
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
R1(config)# router
R1(config-router)#
R1(config-router)#
R1(config-router)#
R1(config-router)#
c.
ospf 1
no network 129.168.12.0 0.0.0.3 area 0
network 192.168.12.0 0.0.0.3 area 0
router-id 1.1.1.1
end
Issue the clear ip ospf process command if necessary.
d. Re-issue the show ip protocols command to verify that your changes had the desired effect.
e. Issue the show ip ospf interface brief command to verify that all interfaces are listed as OSPF networks
assigned to area 0.
R1# show ip ospf interface brief
Interface
Se0/0/0
Se0/0/1
Gi0/0
f.
PID
1
1
1
Area
0
0
0
IP Address/Mask
192.168.12.1/30
192.168.13.1/30
192.168.1.1/24
Cost
64
64
1
State
P2P
P2P
DR
Nbrs F/C
1/1
0/0
0/0
Issue the show ip ospf interface g0/0 command to verify that G0/0 is a passive interface.
Note: This information is also in the show ip protocols command.
R1# show ip ospf interface g0/0
GigabitEthernet0/0 is up, line protocol is up
Internet Address 192.168.1.1/24, Area 0, Attached via Network Statement
Process ID 1, Router ID 1.1.1.1, Network Type BROADCAST, Cost: 1
Topology-MTID
Cost
Disabled
Shutdown
Topology Name
0
1
no
no
Base
Transmit Delay is 1 sec, State DR, Priority 1
Designated Router (ID) 1.1.1.1, Interface address 192.168.1.1
No backup designated router on this network
Timer intervals configured, Hello 10, Dead 40, Wait 40, Retransmit 5
oob-resync timeout 40
No Hellos (Passive interface)
Supports Link-local Signaling (LLS)
Cisco NSF helper support enabled
IETF NSF helper support enabled
Index 1/1, flood queue length 0
Next 0x0(0)/0x0(0)
Last flood scan length is 0, maximum is 0
Last flood scan time is 0 msec, maximum is 0 msec
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 12 of 31
Lab – Troubleshooting Basic Single-Area OSPFv2 and OSPFv3
Neighbor Count is 0, Adjacent neighbor count is 0
Suppress hello for 0 neighbor(s)
g. Resolve any problems discovered on R1. List any additional changes made to R1. If no problems were
found on the device, then respond with “no problems were found”.
____________________________________________________________________________________
No problems were found
Instructor Note: The passive interface command was configured correctly in the original configs.
Step 3: Verify that all interfaces are assigned to OSPFv2 area 0 on R2.
a. Issue the show ip protocols command to verify that OSPF is running and that all networks are being
advertised in area 0. Verify that the router ID is set correctly. Record your findings.
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
Router ID is incorrect 192.168.12.2. The correct router ID is 2.2.2.2.
R2# show ip protocols
*** IP Routing is NSF aware ***
Routing Protocol is "ospf 1"
Outgoing update filter list for all interfaces is not set
Incoming update filter list for all interfaces is not set
Router ID 192.168.12.2
Number of areas in this router is 1. 1 normal 0 stub 0 nssa
Maximum path: 4
Routing for Networks:
192.168.2.0 0.0.0.255 area 0
192.168.12.0 0.0.0.3 area 0
192.168.23.0 0.0.0.3 area 0
Routing Information Sources:
Gateway
Distance
Last Update
1.1.1.1
110
00:16:38
192.168.13.1
110
00:17:01
Distance: (default is 110)
b. Make the necessary changes to the configuration on R2 based on the output from the show ip protocols
command. Record the commands used to correct the issues.
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
R2(config)# router ospf 1
R2(config-router)# router-id 2.2.2.2
c.
Issue the clear ip ospf process command if necessary.
d. Re-issue the show ip protocols command to verify that your changes had the desired effect.
e. Issue the show ip ospf interface brief command to verify that all interfaces are listed as OSPF networks
assigned to area 0.
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 13 of 31
Lab – Troubleshooting Basic Single-Area OSPFv2 and OSPFv3
R2# sh ip ospf interface brief
Interface
Se0/0/1
Se0/0/0
Gi0/0
f.
PID
1
1
1
Area
0
0
0
IP Address/Mask
192.168.23.1/30
192.168.12.2/30
192.168.2.1/24
Cost
64
64
1
State
P2P
P2P
DR
Nbrs F/C
0/0
1/1
0/0
Issue the show ip ospf interface g0/0 command to verify that G0/0 is a passive interface.
Note: This information is also available from the show ip protocols command.
R2# show ip ospf interface g0/0
GigabitEthernet0/0 is up, line protocol is up
Internet Address 192.168.2.1/24, Area 0, Attached via Network Statement
Process ID 1, Router ID 2.2.2.2, Network Type BROADCAST, Cost: 1
Topology-MTID
Cost
Disabled
Shutdown
Topology Name
0
1
no
no
Base
Transmit Delay is 1 sec, State DR, Priority 1
Designated Router (ID) 2.2.2.2, Interface address 192.168.2.1
No backup designated router on this network
Timer intervals configured, Hello 10, Dead 40, Wait 40, Retransmit 5
oob-resync timeout 40
Hello due in 00:00:00
Supports Link-local Signaling (LLS)
Cisco NSF helper support enabled
IETF NSF helper support enabled
Index 1/1, flood queue length 0
Next 0x0(0)/0x0(0)
Last flood scan length is 0, maximum is 0
Last flood scan time is 0 msec, maximum is 0 msec
Neighbor Count is 0, Adjacent neighbor count is 0
Suppress hello for 0 neighbor(s)
g. Resolve any problems discovered on R2. List any additional changes made to R2. If no problems were
found on the device, then respond with “no problems were found”.
____________________________________________________________________________________
R2(config)# router ospf 1
R2(config-router)# passive-interface g0/0
Step 4: Verify that all interfaces are assigned to OSPFv2 area 0 on R3.
a. Issue the show ip protocols command to verify that OSPF is running and that all networks are being
advertised in area 0. Verify that the router ID is set correctly as well. Record your findings.
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
The router ID, 192.168.13.1 is incorrectly configured. The correct router ID for R3 is 3.3.3.3. The network
statements for 192.168.13.0/30 and 192.168.23.0/30 are missing.
R3# show ip protocols
*** IP Routing is NSF aware ***
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 14 of 31
Lab – Troubleshooting Basic Single-Area OSPFv2 and OSPFv3
Routing Protocol is "ospf 1"
Outgoing update filter list for all interfaces is not set
Incoming update filter list for all interfaces is not set
Router ID 192.168.13.1
Number of areas in this router is 1. 1 normal 0 stub 0 nssa
Maximum path: 4
Routing for Networks:
192.168.3.0 0.0.0.255 area 0
Passive Interface(s):
GigabitEthernet0/0
Routing Information Sources:
Gateway
Distance
Last Update
Distance: (default is 110)
b. Make the necessary changes to the configuration on R3 based on the output from the show ip protocols
command. Record the commands used to correct the issues.
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
R3(config)# router
R3(config-router)#
R3(config-router)#
R3(config-router)#
c.
ospf 1
network 192.168.13.0 0.0.0.3 area 0
network 192.168.23.0 0.0.0.3 area 0
router-id 3.3.3.3
Issue the clear ip ospf process command if necessary.
d. Re-issue the show ip protocols command to verify that your changes had the desired effect.
e. Issue the show ip ospf interface brief command to verify that all interfaces are listed as OSPF networks
assigned to area 0.
R3# show ip ospf interface brief
Interface
Se0/0/1
Se0/0/0
Gi0/0
f.
PID
1
1
1
Area
0
0
0
IP Address/Mask
192.168.23.2/30
192.168.13.2/30
192.168.3.1/24
Cost
64
64
1
State
P2P
P2P
DR
Nbrs F/C
1/1
1/1
0/0
Issue the show ip ospf interface g0/0 command to verify that G0/0 is a passive interface.
Note: This information is also in the show ip protocols command.
R3# show ip ospf interface g0/0
GigabitEthernet0/0 is up, line protocol is up
Internet Address 192.168.3.1/24, Area 0, Attached via Network Statement
Process ID 1, Router ID 3.3.3.3, Network Type BROADCAST, Cost: 1
Topology-MTID
Cost
Disabled
Shutdown
Topology Name
0
1
no
no
Base
Transmit Delay is 1 sec, State DR, Priority 1
Designated Router (ID) 3.3.3.3, Interface address 192.168.3.1
No backup designated router on this network
Timer intervals configured, Hello 10, Dead 40, Wait 40, Retransmit 5
oob-resync timeout 40
No Hellos (Passive interface)
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 15 of 31
Lab – Troubleshooting Basic Single-Area OSPFv2 and OSPFv3
Supports Link-local Signaling (LLS)
Cisco NSF helper support enabled
IETF NSF helper support enabled
Index 1/1, flood queue length 0
Next 0x0(0)/0x0(0)
Last flood scan length is 0, maximum is 0
Last flood scan time is 0 msec, maximum is 0 msec
Neighbor Count is 0, Adjacent neighbor count is 0
Suppress hello for 0 neighbor(s)
g. Resolve any problems discovered on R3. List any additional changes made to R3. If no problems were
found on the device, then respond with “no problems were found”.
____________________________________________________________________________________
No problems were found
Instructor Note: The passive interface command was configured correctly in the original configuration.
Step 5: Verify OSPF neighbor information.
a. Issue the show ip ospf neighbor command on all routers to view the OSPF neighbor information.
R1# show ip ospf neighbor
Neighbor ID
2.2.2.2
3.3.3.3
Pri
0
0
State
FULL/
FULL/
-
Dead Time
00:00:38
00:00:36
Address
192.168.12.2
192.168.13.2
Interface
Serial0/0/0
Serial0/0/1
-
Dead Time
00:00:33
00:00:35
Address
192.168.23.2
192.168.12.1
Interface
Serial0/0/1
Serial0/0/0
-
Dead Time
00:00:31
00:00:32
Address
192.168.23.1
192.168.13.1
Interface
Serial0/0/1
Serial0/0/0
R2# show ip ospf neighbor
Neighbor ID
3.3.3.3
1.1.1.1
Pri
0
0
State
FULL/
FULL/
R3# show ip ospf neighbor
Neighbor ID
2.2.2.2
1.1.1.1
Pri
0
0
State
FULL/
FULL/
Step 6: Verify OSPFv2 Routing Information.
a. Issue the show ip route ospf command to verify that each router has OSPFv2 routes to all non-adjoining
networks.
R1# show ip route ospf
Codes: L - local, C - connected, S - static, R - RIP, M - mobile, B - BGP
D - EIGRP, EX - EIGRP external, O - OSPF, IA - OSPF inter area
N1 - OSPF NSSA external type 1, N2 - OSPF NSSA external type 2
E1 - OSPF external type 1, E2 - OSPF external type 2
i - IS-IS, su - IS-IS summary, L1 - IS-IS level-1, L2 - IS-IS level-2
ia - IS-IS inter area, * - candidate default, U - per-user static route
o - ODR, P - periodic downloaded static route, H - NHRP, l - LISP
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 16 of 31
Lab – Troubleshooting Basic Single-Area OSPFv2 and OSPFv3
+ - replicated route, % - next hop override
Gateway of last resort is not set
O
O
O
192.168.2.0/24 [110/65] via 192.168.12.2, 00:26:56, Serial0/0/0
192.168.3.0/24 [110/65] via 192.168.13.2, 00:12:20, Serial0/0/1
192.168.23.0/30 is subnetted, 1 subnets
192.168.23.0 [110/128] via 192.168.13.2, 00:12:20, Serial0/0/1
[110/128] via 192.168.12.2, 00:26:56, Serial0/0/0
R2# show ip route ospf
Codes: L - local, C - connected, S - static, R - RIP, M - mobile, B - BGP
D - EIGRP, EX - EIGRP external, O - OSPF, IA - OSPF inter area
N1 - OSPF NSSA external type 1, N2 - OSPF NSSA external type 2
E1 - OSPF external type 1, E2 - OSPF external type 2
i - IS-IS, su - IS-IS summary, L1 - IS-IS level-1, L2 - IS-IS level-2
ia - IS-IS inter area, * - candidate default, U - per-user static route
o - ODR, P - periodic downloaded static route, H - NHRP, l - LISP
+ - replicated route, % - next hop override
Gateway of last resort is not set
O
O
O
192.168.1.0/24 [110/65] via 192.168.12.1, 00:32:23, Serial0/0/0
192.168.3.0/24 [110/65] via 192.168.23.2, 00:17:47, Serial0/0/1
192.168.13.0/30 is subnetted, 1 subnets
192.168.13.0 [110/128] via 192.168.23.2, 00:17:47, Serial0/0/1
[110/128] via 192.168.12.1, 00:32:23, Serial0/0/0
R3# show ip route ospf
Codes: L - local, C - connected, S - static, R - RIP, M - mobile, B - BGP
D - EIGRP, EX - EIGRP external, O - OSPF, IA - OSPF inter area
N1 - OSPF NSSA external type 1, N2 - OSPF NSSA external type 2
E1 - OSPF external type 1, E2 - OSPF external type 2
i - IS-IS, su - IS-IS summary, L1 - IS-IS level-1, L2 - IS-IS level-2
ia - IS-IS inter area, * - candidate default, U - per-user static route
o - ODR, P - periodic downloaded static route, H - NHRP, l - LISP
+ - replicated route, % - next hop override
Gateway of last resort is not set
O
O
O
192.168.1.0/24 [110/65] via 192.168.13.1, 00:14:12, Serial0/0/0
192.168.2.0/24 [110/65] via 192.168.23.1, 00:14:12, Serial0/0/1
192.168.12.0/30 is subnetted, 1 subnets
192.168.12.0 [110/128] via 192.168.23.1, 00:14:12, Serial0/0/1
[110/128] via 192.168.13.1, 00:14:12, Serial0/0/0
Are all OSPFv2 routes available? ________ yes
If any OSPFv2 routes are missing, what is missing?
____________________________________________________________________________________
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 17 of 31
Lab – Troubleshooting Basic Single-Area OSPFv2 and OSPFv3
All OSPFv2 routes are present.
b. If any routing information is missing, resolve these issues.
Instructor Note: All problems should have been resolved.
Step 7: Verify IPv4 end-to-end connectivity.
From each PC, verify that IPv4 end-to-end connectivity exists. PCs should be able to ping the other PC hosts
in the topology. If IPv4 end-to-end connectivity does not exist, then continue troubleshooting to resolve any
remaining issues.
Note: It may be necessary to disable the PC firewall to ping between PCs.
Part 4: Troubleshoot OSPFv3
In Part 4, you will troubleshoot OSPFv3 problems and make the necessary changes needed to establish
OSPFv3 routes and end-to-end IPv6 connectivity.
Note: LAN (G0/0) interfaces should not advertise OSPFv3 routing information, but routes to these networks
should be contained in the routing tables.
Step 1: Test IPv6 end-to-end connectivity.
From each PC host, ping the IPv6 addresses of the other PC hosts in the topology to verify IPv6 end-to-end
connectivity.
Note: It may be necessary to disable the PC firewall to ping between PCs.
Step 2: Verify that IPv6 unicast routing has been enabled on all routers.
a. An easy way to verify that IPv6 routing has been enabled on a router is to use the show run | section
ipv6 unicast command. By adding this pipe (|) section to the show run command, the ipv6 unicastrouting command displays if IPv6 routing has been enabled.
Note: The show run command can also be issued without any pipe, and then a manual search for the
ipv6 unicast-routing command can be done.
Issue the command on each router. Record your findings.
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
R3 does not have ipv6 unicast routing enabled.
R1# show run | section ipv6 unicast
ipv6 unicast-routing
R2# show run | section ipv6 unicast
ipv6 unicast-routing
R3# show run | section ipv6 unicast
R3#
b. If IPv6 unicast routing is not enabled on one or more routers, enable it now. Record the commands used
to correct the issues.
____________________________________________________________________________________
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 18 of 31
Lab – Troubleshooting Basic Single-Area OSPFv2 and OSPFv3
____________________________________________________________________________________
R3(config)# ipv6 unicast-routing
Step 3: Verify that all interfaces are assigned to OSPFv3 area 0 on R1.
a. Issue the show ipv6 protocols command and verify that the router ID is correct. Also verify that the
expected interfaces are displayed under area 0.
Note: If no output is generated from this command, then the OSPFv3 process has not been configured.
Record your findings.
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
Router ID is correct. The network for G0/0 interface is advertised in the OSPFv3 process.
R1# show ipv6 protocols
IPv6 Routing Protocol is "connected"
IPv6 Routing Protocol is "ospf 1"
Router ID 1.1.1.1
Number of areas: 1 normal, 0 stub, 0 nssa
Interfaces (Area 0):
Serial0/0/1
Serial0/0/0
Redistribution:
None
IPv6 Routing Protocol is "ND"
b. Make the necessary configuration changes to R1. Record the commands used to correct the issues.
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
R1(config)# interface g0/0
R1(config-if)# ipv6 ospf 1 area 0
c.
Issue the clear ipv6 ospf process command if necessary.
d. Re-issue the show ipv6 protocols command to verify that your changes had the desired effect.
e. Issue the show ipv6 ospf interface brief command to verify that all interfaces are listed as OSPF
networks assigned to area 0.
f.
Issue the show ipv6 ospf interface g0/0 command to verify that this interface is set not to advertise
OSPFv3 routes.
R1# show ipv6 ospf interface g0/0
GigabitEthernet0/0 is up, line protocol is up
Link Local Address FE80::1, Interface ID 3
Area 0, Process ID 1, Instance ID 0, Router ID 1.1.1.1
Network Type BROADCAST, Cost: 1
Transmit Delay is 1 sec, State WAITING, Priority 1
No designated router on this network
No backup designated router on this network
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 19 of 31
Lab – Troubleshooting Basic Single-Area OSPFv2 and OSPFv3
Timer intervals configured, Hello 10, Dead 40, Wait 40, Retransmit 5
No Hellos (Passive interface)
Wait time before Designated router selection 00:00:23
Graceful restart helper support enabled
Index 1/3/3, flood queue length 0
Next 0x0(0)/0x0(0)/0x0(0)
Last flood scan length is 0, maximum is 0
Last flood scan time is 0 msec, maximum is 0 msec
Neighbor Count is 0, Adjacent neighbor count is 0
Suppress hello for 0 neighbor(s)
g. Resolve any problems discovered on R1. List any additional changes made to R1. If no problems were
found on the device, then respond with “no problems were found”.
____________________________________________________________________________________
No problems were found, G0/0 is already a passive OSPFv3 interface.
Step 4: Verify that all interfaces are assigned to OSPFv3 area 0 on R2.
a. Issue the show ipv6 protocols command and verify the router ID is correct. Also verify that the expected
interfaces display under area 0.
Note: If no output is generated from this command, then the OSPFv3 process has not been configured.
Record your findings.
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
Router ID is correct, interfaces G0/0 & S0/0/1 are missing
R2# show ipv6 protocols
IPv6 Routing Protocol is "connected"
IPv6 Routing Protocol is "ospf 1"
Router ID 2.2.2.2
Number of areas: 1 normal, 0 stub, 0 nssa
Interfaces (Area 0):
Serial0/0/0
Redistribution:
None
IPv6 Routing Protocol is "ND"
b. Make the necessary configuration changes to R2. Record the commands used to correct the issues.
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
R2(config)# interface g0/0
R2(config-if)# ipv6 ospf 1 area 0
R2(config-if)# interface s0/0/1
R2(config-if)# ipv6 ospf 1 area 0
c.
Issue the clear ipv6 ospf process command if necessary.
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 20 of 31
Lab – Troubleshooting Basic Single-Area OSPFv2 and OSPFv3
d. Re-issue the show ipv6 protocols command to verify that your changes had the desired effect.
e. Issue the show ipv6 ospf interface brief command to verify that all interfaces are listed as OSPF
networks assigned to area 0.
f.
Issue the show ipv6 ospf interface g0/0 command to verify that this interface is not set to advertise
OSPFv3 routes.
R2# show ipv6 ospf interface g0/0
GigabitEthernet0/0 is up, line protocol is up
Link Local Address FE80::2, Interface ID 3
Area 0, Process ID 1, Instance ID 0, Router ID 2.2.2.2
Network Type BROADCAST, Cost: 1
Transmit Delay is 1 sec, State WAITING, Priority 1
No designated router on this network
No backup designated router on this network
Timer intervals configured, Hello 10, Dead 40, Wait 40, Retransmit 5
Hello due in 00:00:04
Wait time before Designated router selection 00:00:05
Graceful restart helper support enabled
Index 1/2/2, flood queue length 0
Next 0x0(0)/0x0(0)/0x0(0)
Last flood scan length is 0, maximum is 0
Last flood scan time is 0 msec, maximum is 0 msec
Neighbor Count is 0, Adjacent neighbor count is 0
Suppress hello for 0 neighbor(s)
g. List any additional changes made to R2. If no problems were found on the device, then respond with “no
problems were found”.
____________________________________________________________________________________
R2(config)# ipv6 router ospf 1
R2(config-rtr)# passive-interface g0/0
Step 5: Verify that all interfaces are assigned to OSPFv3 area 0 on R3.
a. Issue the show ipv6 protocols command and verify that the router ID is correct. Also verify that the
expected interfaces display under area 0.
Note: If no output is generated from this command, then the OSPFv3 process has not been configured.
Record your findings.
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
OSPFv3 has not been configured on this router.
R3# show ipv6 protocols
b. Make the necessary configuration changes to R3. Record the commands used to correct the issues.
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 21 of 31
Lab – Troubleshooting Basic Single-Area OSPFv2 and OSPFv3
R3(config)# ipv6 router ospf 1
R3(config-rtr)# router-id 3.3.3.3
R3(config-rtr)# passive-interface g0/0
R3(config-rtr)# interface g0/0
R3(config-if)# ipv6 ospf 1 area 0
R3(config-if)# interface s0/0/0
R3(config-if)# ipv6 ospf 1 area 0
R3(config-if)# interface s0/0/1
R3(config-if)# ipv6 ospf 1 area 0
c.
Issue the clear ipv6 ospf process command if necessary.
d. Re-issue the show ipv6 protocols command to verify that your changes had the desired effect.
e. Issue the show ipv6 ospf interface brief command to verify that all interfaces are listed as OSPF
networks assigned to area 0.
f.
Issue the show ipv6 ospf interface g0/0 command to verify that this interface is set not to advertise
OSPFv3 routes.
R3# show ipv6 ospf interface g0/0
GigabitEthernet0/0 is up, line protocol is up
Link Local Address FE80::3, Interface ID 3
Area 0, Process ID 1, Instance ID 0, Router ID 3.3.3.3
Network Type BROADCAST, Cost: 1
Transmit Delay is 1 sec, State DR, Priority 1
Designated Router (ID) 3.3.3.3, local address FE80::3
No backup designated router on this network
Timer intervals configured, Hello 10, Dead 40, Wait 40, Retransmit 5
No Hellos (Passive interface)
Graceful restart helper support enabled
Index 1/1/1, flood queue length 0
Next 0x0(0)/0x0(0)/0x0(0)
Last flood scan length is 0, maximum is 0
Last flood scan time is 0 msec, maximum is 0 msec
Neighbor Count is 0, Adjacent neighbor count is 0
Suppress hello for 0 neighbor(s)
g. Resolve any problems discovered on R3. List any additional changes made to R3. If no problems were
found on the device, then respond with “no problems were found”.
____________________________________________________________________________________
No problems were found as long as G0/0 was configured as a passive OSPFv3 interface in Step 5b.
Step 6: Verify that all routers have correct neighbor adjacency information.
a. Issue the show ipv6 ospf neighbor command to verify that adjacencies have formed between
neighboring routers.
R1# show ipv6 ospf neighbor
OSPFv3 Router with ID (1.1.1.1) (Process ID 1)
Neighbor ID
Pri
State
Dead Time
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Interface ID
Interface
Page 22 of 31
Lab – Troubleshooting Basic Single-Area OSPFv2 and OSPFv3
3.3.3.3
2.2.2.2
0
0
FULL/
FULL/
-
00:00:34
00:00:32
6
6
Serial0/0/1
Serial0/0/0
R2# sh ipv6 ospf neighbor
OSPFv3 Router with ID (2.2.2.2) (Process ID 1)
Neighbor ID
3.3.3.3
1.1.1.1
Pri
0
0
State
FULL/
FULL/
-
Dead Time
00:00:32
00:00:30
Interface ID
7
6
Interface
Serial0/0/1
Serial0/0/0
R3# sh ipv6 ospf neighbor
OSPFv3 Router with ID (3.3.3.3) (Process ID 1)
Neighbor ID
2.2.2.2
1.1.1.1
Pri
0
0
State
FULL/
FULL/
-
Dead Time
00:00:32
00:00:37
Interface ID
7
7
Interface
Serial0/0/1
Serial0/0/0
b. Resolve any OSPFv3 adjacency issues that still exist.
Instructor Note: All adjacency issues should have been resolved in earlier steps.
Step 7: Verify OSPFv3 routing information.
a. Issue the show ipv6 route ospf command, and verify that OSPFv3 routes exist to all non-adjoining
networks.
R1# show ipv6 route ospf
IPv6 Routing Table - default - 10 entries
Codes: C - Connected, L - Local, S - Static, U - Per-user Static route
B - BGP, R - RIP, I1 - ISIS L1, I2 - ISIS L2
IA - ISIS interarea, IS - ISIS summary, D - EIGRP, EX - EIGRP external
ND - ND Default, NDp - ND Prefix, DCE - Destination, NDr - Redirect
O - OSPF Intra, OI - OSPF Inter, OE1 - OSPF ext 1, OE2 - OSPF ext 2
ON1 - OSPF NSSA ext 1, ON2 - OSPF NSSA ext 2
O
2001:DB8:ACAD:B::/64 [110/65]
via FE80::2, Serial0/0/0
O
2001:DB8:ACAD:C::/64 [110/65]
via FE80::3, Serial0/0/1
O
2001:DB8:ACAD:23::/64 [110/128]
via FE80::2, Serial0/0/0
via FE80::3, Serial0/0/1
R2# show ipv6 route ospf
IPv6 Routing Table - default - 10 entries
Codes: C - Connected, L - Local, S - Static, U - Per-user Static route
B - BGP, R - RIP, I1 - ISIS L1, I2 - ISIS L2
IA - ISIS interarea, IS - ISIS summary, D - EIGRP, EX - EIGRP external
ND - ND Default, NDp - ND Prefix, DCE - Destination, NDr - Redirect
O - OSPF Intra, OI - OSPF Inter, OE1 - OSPF ext 1, OE2 - OSPF ext 2
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Page 23 of 31
Lab – Troubleshooting Basic Single-Area OSPFv2 and OSPFv3
O
O
O
ON1 - OSPF NSSA ext 1, ON2 - OSPF NSSA ext 2
2001:DB8:ACAD:A::/64 [110/65]
via FE80::1, Serial0/0/0
2001:DB8:ACAD:C::/64 [110/65]
via FE80::3, Serial0/0/1
2001:DB8:ACAD:13::/64 [110/128]
via FE80::1, Serial0/0/0
via FE80::3, Serial0/0/1
R3# show ipv6 route ospf
IPv6 Routing Table - default - 10 entries
Codes: C - Connected, L - Local, S - Static, U - Per-user Static route
B - BGP, R - RIP, I1 - ISIS L1, I2 - ISIS L2
IA - ISIS interarea, IS - ISIS summary, D - EIGRP, EX - EIGRP external
ND - ND Default, NDp - ND Prefix, DCE - Destination, NDr - Redirect
O - OSPF Intra, OI - OSPF Inter, OE1 - OSPF ext 1, OE2 - OSPF ext 2
ON1 - OSPF NSSA ext 1, ON2 - OSPF NSSA ext 2
O
2001:DB8:ACAD:A::/64 [110/65]
via FE80::1, Serial0/0/0
O
2001:DB8:ACAD:B::/64 [110/65]
via FE80::2, Serial0/0/1
O
2001:DB8:ACAD:12::/64 [110/128]
via FE80::1, Serial0/0/0
via FE80::2, Serial0/0/1
Are all OSPFv3 routes available? ________ yes
If any OSPFv3 routes are missing, what is missing?
____________________________________________________________________________________
All OSPFv3 routes are present.
b. Resolve any routing issues that still exist.
Instructor Note: All OSPFv3 routes issues should have been resolved.
Step 8: Verify IPv6 end-to-end connectivity.
From each PC, verify that IPv6 end-to-end connectivity exists. PCs should be able to ping each interface on
the network. If IPv6 end-to-end connectivity does not exist, then continue troubleshooting to resolve remaining
issues.
Note: It may be necessary to disable the PC firewall to ping between PCs.
Reflection
Why would you troubleshoot OSPFv2 and OSPFv3 separately?
_______________________________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________________________
OSPFv2 and OSPFv3 do not share routing information and their configuration is completely independent.
Troubleshooting for these two protocols should be done independently.
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Page 24 of 31
Lab – Troubleshooting Basic Single-Area OSPFv2 and OSPFv3
Router Interface Summary Table
Router Interface Summary
Router Model
Ethernet Interface #1
Ethernet Interface #2
Serial Interface #1
Serial Interface #2
1800
Fast Ethernet 0/0
(F0/0)
Fast Ethernet 0/1
(F0/1)
Serial 0/0/0 (S0/0/0)
Serial 0/0/1 (S0/0/1)
1900
Gigabit Ethernet 0/0
(G0/0)
Gigabit Ethernet 0/1
(G0/1)
Serial 0/0/0 (S0/0/0)
Serial 0/0/1 (S0/0/1)
2801
Fast Ethernet 0/0
(F0/0)
Fast Ethernet 0/1
(F0/1)
Serial 0/1/0 (S0/1/0)
Serial 0/1/1 (S0/1/1)
2811
Fast Ethernet 0/0
(F0/0)
Fast Ethernet 0/1
(F0/1)
Serial 0/0/0 (S0/0/0)
Serial 0/0/1 (S0/0/1)
2900
Gigabit Ethernet 0/0
(G0/0)
Gigabit Ethernet 0/1
(G0/1)
Serial 0/0/0 (S0/0/0)
Serial 0/0/1 (S0/0/1)
Note: To find out how the router is configured, look at the interfaces to identify the type of router and how many
interfaces the router has. There is no way to effectively list all the combinations of configurations for each router
class. This table includes identifiers for the possible combinations of Ethernet and Serial interfaces in the device.
The table does not include any other type of interface, even though a specific router may contain one. An
example of this might be an ISDN BRI interface. The string in parenthesis is the legal abbreviation that can be
used in Cisco IOS commands to represent the interface.
Device Configs - Final
Router R1
R1#sh run
Building configuration...
Current configuration : 2010 bytes
!
version 15.2
service timestamps debug datetime msec
service timestamps log datetime msec
service password-encryption
!
hostname R1
!
boot-start-marker
boot-end-marker
!
enable secret 4 06YFDUHH61wAE/kLkDq9BGho1QM5EnRtoyr8cHAUg.2
!
no aaa new-model
memory-size iomem 15
!
ip cef
!
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Page 25 of 31
Lab – Troubleshooting Basic Single-Area OSPFv2 and OSPFv3
no ip domain lookup
ipv6 unicast-routing
ipv6 cef
multilink bundle-name authenticated
!
interface Embedded-Service-Engine0/0
no ip address
shutdown
!
interface GigabitEthernet0/0
ip address 192.168.1.1 255.255.255.0
duplex auto
speed auto
ipv6 address FE80::1 link-local
ipv6 address 2001:DB8:ACAD:A::1/64
ipv6 ospf 1 area 0
!
interface GigabitEthernet0/1
no ip address
shutdown
duplex auto
speed auto
!
interface Serial0/0/0
ip address 192.168.12.1 255.255.255.252
ipv6 address FE80::1 link-local
ipv6 address 2001:DB8:ACAD:12::1/64
ipv6 ospf 1 area 0
clock rate 128000
!
interface Serial0/0/1
ip address 192.168.13.1 255.255.255.252
ipv6 address FE80::1 link-local
ipv6 address 2001:DB8:ACAD:13::1/64
ipv6 ospf 1 area 0
!
router ospf 1
router-id 1.1.1.1
passive-interface GigabitEthernet0/0
network 192.168.1.0 0.0.0.255 area 0
network 192.168.12.0 0.0.0.3 area 0
network 192.168.13.0 0.0.0.3 area 0
!
ip forward-protocol nd
!
no ip http server
no ip http secure-server
!
ipv6 router ospf 1
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Page 26 of 31
Lab – Troubleshooting Basic Single-Area OSPFv2 and OSPFv3
router-id 1.1.1.1
passive-interface GigabitEthernet0/0
!
control-plane
!
banner motd ^CUnauthorized Access is Prohibited!^C
!
line con 0
password 7 060506324F41
logging synchronous
login
line aux 0
line 2
no activation-character
no exec
transport preferred none
transport input all
transport output pad telnet rlogin lapb-ta mop udptn v120 ssh
stopbits 1
line vty 0
password 7 00071A150754
login
transport input all
line vty 1 4
login
transport input all
!
scheduler allocate 20000 1000
!
end
Router R2
R2#sh run
Building configuration...
Current configuration : 2010 bytes
!
version 15.2
service timestamps debug datetime msec
service timestamps log datetime msec
service password-encryption
!
hostname R2
!
boot-start-marker
boot-end-marker
!
enable secret 4 06YFDUHH61wAE/kLkDq9BGho1QM5EnRtoyr8cHAUg.2
!
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Page 27 of 31
Lab – Troubleshooting Basic Single-Area OSPFv2 and OSPFv3
no aaa new-model
memory-size iomem 15
!
ip cef
!
no ip domain lookup
ipv6 unicast-routing
ipv6 cef
multilink bundle-name authenticated
!
interface Embedded-Service-Engine0/0
no ip address
shutdown
!
interface GigabitEthernet0/0
ip address 192.168.2.1 255.255.255.0
duplex auto
speed auto
ipv6 address FE80::2 link-local
ipv6 address 2001:DB8:ACAD:B::2/64
ipv6 ospf 1 area 0
!
interface GigabitEthernet0/1
no ip address
shutdown
duplex auto
speed auto
!
interface Serial0/0/0
ip address 192.168.12.2 255.255.255.252
ipv6 address FE80::2 link-local
ipv6 address 2001:DB8:ACAD:12::2/64
ipv6 ospf 1 area 0
!
interface Serial0/0/1
ip address 192.168.23.1 255.255.255.252
ipv6 address FE80::2 link-local
ipv6 address 2001:DB8:ACAD:23::2/64
ipv6 ospf 1 area 0
clock rate 128000
!
router ospf 1
router-id 2.2.2.2
passive-interface GigabitEthernet0/0
network 192.168.2.0 0.0.0.255 area 0
network 192.168.12.0 0.0.0.3 area 0
network 192.168.23.0 0.0.0.3 area 0
!
ip forward-protocol nd
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Page 28 of 31
Lab – Troubleshooting Basic Single-Area OSPFv2 and OSPFv3
!
no ip http server
no ip http secure-server
!
ipv6 router ospf 1
router-id 2.2.2.2
passive-interface GigabitEthernet0/0
!
control-plane
!
banner motd ^CUnauthorized Access is Prohibited!^C
!
line con 0
password 7 094F471A1A0A
logging synchronous
login
line aux 0
line 2
no activation-character
no exec
transport preferred none
transport input all
transport output pad telnet rlogin lapb-ta mop udptn v120 ssh
stopbits 1
line vty 0
password 7 14141B180F0B
login
transport input all
line vty 1 4
login
transport input all
!
scheduler allocate 20000 1000
!
end
Router R3
R3#sh run
Building configuration...
Current configuration : 2049 bytes
!
version 15.2
service timestamps debug datetime msec
service timestamps log datetime msec
service password-encryption
!
hostname R3
!
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Page 29 of 31
Lab – Troubleshooting Basic Single-Area OSPFv2 and OSPFv3
boot-start-marker
boot-end-marker
!
enable secret 4 06YFDUHH61wAE/kLkDq9BGho1QM5EnRtoyr8cHAUg.2
!
no aaa new-model
memory-size iomem 15
!
ip cef
!
no ip domain lookup
ipv6 unicast-routing
ipv6 cef
multilink bundle-name authenticated
!
!
interface Embedded-Service-Engine0/0
no ip address
shutdown
!
interface GigabitEthernet0/0
ip address 192.168.3.1 255.255.255.0
duplex auto
speed auto
ipv6 address FE80::3 link-local
ipv6 address 2001:DB8:ACAD:C::3/64
ipv6 ospf 1 area 0
!
interface GigabitEthernet0/1
no ip address
shutdown
duplex auto
speed auto
!
interface Serial0/0/0
ip address 192.168.13.2 255.255.255.252
ipv6 address FE80::3 link-local
ipv6 address 2001:DB8:ACAD:13::3/64
ipv6 ospf 1 area 0
clock rate 128000
!
interface Serial0/0/1
ip address 192.168.23.2 255.255.255.252
ipv6 address FE80::3 link-local
ipv6 address 2001:DB8:ACAD:23::3/64
ipv6 ospf 1 area 0
!
router ospf 1
router-id 3.3.3.3
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Page 30 of 31
Lab – Troubleshooting Basic Single-Area OSPFv2 and OSPFv3
passive-interface GigabitEthernet0/0
network 192.168.3.0 0.0.0.255 area 0
network 192.168.13.0 0.0.0.3 area 0
network 192.168.23.0 0.0.0.3 area 0
!
ip forward-protocol nd
!
no ip http server
no ip http secure-server
!
ipv6 router ospf 1
router-id 3.3.3.3
passive-interface GigabitEthernet0/0
!
control-plane
!
banner motd ^CUnauthorized Access is Prohibited!^C
!
line con 0
password 7 02050D480809
logging synchronous
login
line aux 0
line 2
no activation-character
no exec
transport preferred none
transport input all
transport output pad telnet rlogin lapb-ta mop udptn v120 ssh
stopbits 1
line vty 0
password 7 104D000A0618
login
transport input all
line vty 1 4
login
transport input all
!
scheduler allocate 20000 1000
!
end
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Page 31 of 31
Lab – Troubleshooting Advanced Single-Area OSPFv2 (Instructor
Version)
Instructor Note: Red font color or Gray highlights indicate text that appears in the instructor copy only.
Topology
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Page 1 of 14
Lab – Troubleshooting Advanced Single-Area OSPFv2
Addressing Table
Device
R1
Interface
IP Address
Subnet Mask
Default Gateway
G0/0
192.168.1.1
255.255.255.0
N/A
S0/0/0 (DCE)
192.168.12.1
255.255.255.252
N/A
S0/0/1
192.168.13.1
255.255.255.252
N/A
Lo0
209.165.200.225
255.255.255.252
N/A
S0/0/0
192.168.12.2
255.255.255.252
N/A
S0/0/1 (DCE)
192.168.23.1
255.255.255.252
N/A
G0/0
192.168.3.1
255.255.255.0
N/A
S0/0/0 (DCE)
192.168.13.2
255.255.255.252
N/A
S0/0/1
192.168.23.2
255.255.255.252
N/A
PC-A
NIC
192.168.1.3
255.255.255.0
192.168.1.1
PC-C
NIC
192.168.3.3
255.255.255.0
192.168.3.1
R2
R3
Objectives
Part 1: Build the Network and Load Device Configurations
Part 2: Troubleshoot OSPF
Background / Scenario
OSPF is a popular routing protocol used by businesses worldwide. A Network Administrator should be able to
isolate OSPF issues and resolve those issues in a timely manner.
In this lab, you will troubleshoot a single-area OSPFv2 network and resolve all issues that exist.
Note: The routers used with CCNA hands-on labs are Cisco 1941 Integrated Services Routers (ISRs) with
Cisco IOS Release 15.2(4)M3 (universalk9 image). Other routers and Cisco IOS versions can be used.
Depending on the model and Cisco IOS version, the commands available and output produced might vary
from what is shown in the labs. Refer to the Router Interface Summary Table at the end of this lab for the
correct interface identifiers.
Note: Make sure that the routers have been erased and have no startup configurations. If you are unsure,
contact your instructor.
Instructor Note: Refer to the Instructor Lab Manual for the procedures to initialize and reload devices.
Required Resources

3 Routers (Cisco 1941 with Cisco IOS Release 15.2(4)M3 universal image or comparable)

3 PCs (Windows 7, Vista, or XP with terminal emulation program, such as Tera Term)

Console cables to configure the Cisco IOS devices via the console ports

Ethernet and serial cables, as shown in the topology
Part 1: Build the Network and Load Device Configurations
In Part 1, you will set up the network topology and configure basic settings on the PC hosts and routers.
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Page 2 of 14
Lab – Troubleshooting Advanced Single-Area OSPFv2
Step 1: Cable the network as shown in the topology.
Step 2: Configure PC hosts.
Step 3: Load router configurations.
Load the following configurations into the appropriate router. All routers have the same passwords. The
privileged EXEC password is class. The password for console and vty lines is cisco.
Router R1 Configuration:
conf t
hostname R1
enable secret class
no ip domain lookup
interface GigabitEthernet0/0
ip address 192.168.1.1 255.255.255.0
duplex auto
speed auto
no shut
interface Serial0/0/0
bandwidth 128
ip address 192.168.12.1 255.255.255.252
ip ospf message-digest-key 1 md5 MD5LINKS
clock rate 128000
no shut
interface Serial0/0/1
bandwidth 64
! bandwidth 128
ip ospf message-digest-key 1 md5 MD5LINKS
ip address 192.168.13.1 255.255.255.252
no shut
router ospf 1
auto-cost reference-bandwidth 1000
! router-id 1.1.1.1
area 0 authentication message-digest
passive-interface g0/0
network 192.168.1.0 0.0.0.255 area 0
network 192.168.12.0 0.0.0.3 area 0
network 192.168.13.0 0.0.0.3 area 0
banner motd ^
Unauthorized Access is Prohibited!
^
line con 0
password cisco
logging synchronous
login
line vty 0 4
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Page 3 of 14
Lab – Troubleshooting Advanced Single-Area OSPFv2
password cisco
login
transport input all
end
Router R2 Configuration:
conf t
hostname R2
enable secret class
no ip domain lookup
interface Loopback0
ip address 209.165.200.225 255.255.255.252
interface Serial0/0/0
bandwidth 182
! bandwidth 128
ip ospf message-digest-key 1 md5 MD5LINKS
ip address 192.168.12.2 255.255.255.252
no shut
interface Serial0/0/1
bandwidth 128
ip ospf message-digest-key 1 md5 MD5LINKS
ip address 192.168.23.1 255.255.255.252
clock rate 128000
no shut
router ospf 1
router-id 2.2.2.2
auto-cost reference-bandwidth 1000
area 0 authentication message-digest
passive-interface g0/0
network 192.168.12.0 0.0.0.3 area 0
network 192.168.23.0 0.0.0.3 area 0
! default-information originate
ip route 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 Loopback0
banner motd ^
Unauthorized Access is Prohibited!
^
line con 0
password cisco
logging synchronous
login
line vty 0 4
password cisco
login
transport input all
end
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Page 4 of 14
Lab – Troubleshooting Advanced Single-Area OSPFv2
Router R3 Configuration:
conf t
hostname R3
enable secret class
no ip domain lookup
interface GigabitEthernet0/0
ip address 192.168.3.1 255.255.255.0
duplex auto
speed auto
no shut
interface Serial0/0/0
bandwidth 128
ip ospf message-digest-key 1 md5 MD5LINKS
ip address 192.168.13.2 255.255.255.252
clock rate 128000
no shut
interface Serial0/0/1
bandwidth 128
ip address 192.168.23.2 255.255.255.252
! ip ospf message-digest-key 1 md5 MD5LINKS
no shut
router ospf 1
router-id 3.3.3.3
! auto-cost reference-bandwidth 1000
area 0 authentication message-digest
passive-interface g0/0
network 192.168.3.0 0.0.0.255 area 0
network 192.168.13.0 0.0.0.3 area 0
network 192.168.23.0 0.0.0.3 area 0
banner motd ^
Unauthorized Access is Prohibited!
^
line con 0
password cisco
logging synchronous
login
line vty 0 4
password cisco
login
transport input all
end
Step 4: Test end-to-end connectivity.
All interfaces should be up and the PCs should be able to ping the default gateway.
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Page 5 of 14
Lab – Troubleshooting Advanced Single-Area OSPFv2
Part 2: Troubleshoot OSPF
In Part 2, verify that all routers have established neighbor adjacencies, and that all network routes are
available.
Additional OSPF Requirements:

Each router should have the following router ID assignments:
-
R1 Router ID: 1.1.1.1
-
R2 Router ID: 2.2.2.2
-
R3 Router ID: 3.3.3.3

All serial interface clocking rates should be set at 128 Kb/s and a matching bandwidth setting should be
available to allow OSPF cost metrics to be calculated correctly.

The 1941 routers have Gigabit interfaces, so the default OSPF reference bandwidth should be adjusted
to allow cost metrics to reflect appropriate costs for all interfaces.

OSPF should propagate a default route to the Internet. This is simulated by using Loopback interface 0
on R2.

All interfaces advertising OSPF routing information should be configured with MD5 authentication, using
MD5LINKS as the key.
List the commands used during your OSPF troubleshooting process:
_______________________________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________________________
Answers may vary, but the list of commands can include:

clear ip ospf process

show interface interface

show ip ospf neighbor

show ip route

show ip route ospf

show ip protocols

show ip ospf interface interface

show ip ospf interface brief

show ip ospf database

show ip ospf route

show run

show run | include router ospf
List the changes made to resolve the OSPF issues. If no problems were found on the device, then respond
with “no problems were found”.
R1 Router:
_______________________________________________________________________________________
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Page 6 of 14
Lab – Troubleshooting Advanced Single-Area OSPFv2
_______________________________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________________________
router ospf 1
router-id 1.1.1.1
interface s0/0/1
bandwidth 128
end
clear ip ospf process
R2 Router:
_______________________________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________________________
router ospf 1
default-information originate
interface s0/0/1
bandwidth 128
end
clear ip ospf process
R3 Router:
_______________________________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________________________
router ospf 1
auto-cost reference-bandwidth 1000
interface s0/0/1
ip ospf message-digest-key 1 md5 MD5LINKS
end
clear ip ospf process
Reflection
How would you change the network in this lab so all LAN traffic was routed through R2?
_______________________________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________________________
Answers may vary, but through the use of the ip ospf cost command the cost for the link between R1 and R3
could be adjusted to a number larger than the accumulated cost of the two serial links between R1 - R2, and
R2 - R3. This adjusted cost would need to be applied to both sides of the R1 – R3 serial link.
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 7 of 14
Lab – Troubleshooting Advanced Single-Area OSPFv2
Router Interface Summary Table
Router Interface Summary
Router Model
Ethernet Interface #1
Ethernet Interface #2
Serial Interface #1
Serial Interface #2
1800
Fast Ethernet 0/0
(F0/0)
Fast Ethernet 0/1
(F0/1)
Serial 0/0/0 (S0/0/0)
Serial 0/0/1 (S0/0/1)
1900
Gigabit Ethernet 0/0
(G0/0)
Gigabit Ethernet 0/1
(G0/1)
Serial 0/0/0 (S0/0/0)
Serial 0/0/1 (S0/0/1)
2801
Fast Ethernet 0/0
(F0/0)
Fast Ethernet 0/1
(F0/1)
Serial 0/1/0 (S0/1/0)
Serial 0/1/1 (S0/1/1)
2811
Fast Ethernet 0/0
(F0/0)
Fast Ethernet 0/1
(F0/1)
Serial 0/0/0 (S0/0/0)
Serial 0/0/1 (S0/0/1)
2900
Gigabit Ethernet 0/0
(G0/0)
Gigabit Ethernet 0/1
(G0/1)
Serial 0/0/0 (S0/0/0)
Serial 0/0/1 (S0/0/1)
Note: To find out how the router is configured, look at the interfaces to identify the type of router and how many
interfaces the router has. There is no way to effectively list all the combinations of configurations for each router
class. This table includes identifiers for the possible combinations of Ethernet and Serial interfaces in the device.
The table does not include any other type of interface, even though a specific router may contain one. An
example of this might be an ISDN BRI interface. The string in parenthesis is the legal abbreviation that can be
used in Cisco IOS commands to represent the interface.
Device Configs
Router R1 (Final)
R1#sh run
Building configuration...
Current configuration : 1760 bytes
!
version 15.2
service timestamps debug datetime msec
service timestamps log datetime msec
no service password-encryption
!
hostname R1
!
boot-start-marker
boot-end-marker
enable secret 4 06YFDUHH61wAE/kLkDq9BGho1QM5EnRtoyr8cHAUg.2
!
no aaa new-model
memory-size iomem 15
!
ip cef
!
no ip domain lookup
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Page 8 of 14
Lab – Troubleshooting Advanced Single-Area OSPFv2
no ipv6 cef
multilink bundle-name authenticated
!
interface Embedded-Service-Engine0/0
no ip address
shutdown
!
interface GigabitEthernet0/0
ip address 192.168.1.1 255.255.255.0
duplex auto
speed auto
!
interface GigabitEthernet0/1
no ip address
shutdown
duplex auto
speed auto
!
interface Serial0/0/0
bandwidth 128
ip address 192.168.12.1 255.255.255.252
ip ospf message-digest-key 1 md5 MD5LINKS
clock rate 128000
!
interface Serial0/0/1
bandwidth 128
ip address 192.168.13.1 255.255.255.252
ip ospf message-digest-key 1 md5 MD5LINKS
!
router ospf 1
router-id 1.1.1.1
auto-cost reference-bandwidth 1000
area 0 authentication message-digest
passive-interface GigabitEthernet0/0
network 192.168.1.0 0.0.0.255 area 0
network 192.168.12.0 0.0.0.3 area 0
network 192.168.13.0 0.0.0.3 area 0
!
ip forward-protocol nd
!
no ip http server
no ip http secure-server
!
control-plane
!
banner motd ^C
Unauthorized Access is Prohibited!
^C
!
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Page 9 of 14
Lab – Troubleshooting Advanced Single-Area OSPFv2
line con 0
password cisco
login
logging synchronous
line aux 0
line 2
no activation-character
no exec
transport preferred none
transport input all
transport output pad telnet rlogin lapb-ta mop udptn v120 ssh
stopbits 1
line vty 0 4
password cisco
login
transport input all
!
scheduler allocate 20000 1000
!
end
Router R2 (Final)
R2#sh run
Building configuration...
Current configuration : 1804 bytes
!
version 15.2
service timestamps debug datetime msec
service timestamps log datetime msec
no service password-encryption
!
hostname R2
!
boot-start-marker
boot-end-marker
!
enable secret 4 06YFDUHH61wAE/kLkDq9BGho1QM5EnRtoyr8cHAUg.2
!
no aaa new-model
memory-size iomem 15
!
ip cef
!
no ip domain lookup
no ipv6 cef
multilink bundle-name authenticated
!
interface Loopback0
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Page 10 of 14
Lab – Troubleshooting Advanced Single-Area OSPFv2
ip address 209.165.200.225 255.255.255.252
!
interface Embedded-Service-Engine0/0
no ip address
shutdown
!
interface GigabitEthernet0/0
no ip address
shutdown
duplex auto
speed auto
!
interface GigabitEthernet0/1
no ip address
shutdown
duplex auto
speed auto
!
interface Serial0/0/0
bandwidth 128
ip address 192.168.12.2 255.255.255.252
ip ospf message-digest-key 1 md5 MD5LINKS
!
interface Serial0/0/1
bandwidth 128
ip address 192.168.23.1 255.255.255.252
ip ospf message-digest-key 1 md5 MD5LINKS
clock rate 128000
!
router ospf 1
router-id 2.2.2.2
auto-cost reference-bandwidth 1000
area 0 authentication message-digest
network 192.168.12.0 0.0.0.3 area 0
network 192.168.23.0 0.0.0.3 area 0
default-information originate
!
ip forward-protocol nd
!
no ip http server
no ip http secure-server
!
ip route 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 Loopback0
!
control-plane
!
banner motd ^C
Unauthorized Access is Prohibited!
^C
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Page 11 of 14
Lab – Troubleshooting Advanced Single-Area OSPFv2
!
line con 0
password cisco
login
logging synchronous
line aux 0
line 2
no activation-character
no exec
transport preferred none
transport input all
transport output pad telnet rlogin lapb-ta mop udptn v120 ssh
stopbits 1
line vty 0 4
password cisco
login
transport input all
!
scheduler allocate 20000 1000
!
end
Router R3 (Final)
R3#sh run
Building configuration...
Current configuration : 1760 bytes
!
version 15.2
service timestamps debug datetime msec
service timestamps log datetime msec
no service password-encryption
!
hostname R3
!
boot-start-marker
boot-end-marker
!
enable secret 4 06YFDUHH61wAE/kLkDq9BGho1QM5EnRtoyr8cHAUg.2
!
no aaa new-model
memory-size iomem 15
!
ip cef
!
no ip domain lookup
no ipv6 cef
multilink bundle-name authenticated
!
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Page 12 of 14
Lab – Troubleshooting Advanced Single-Area OSPFv2
interface Embedded-Service-Engine0/0
no ip address
shutdown
!
interface GigabitEthernet0/0
ip address 192.168.3.1 255.255.255.0
duplex auto
speed auto
!
interface GigabitEthernet0/1
no ip address
shutdown
duplex auto
speed auto
!
interface Serial0/0/0
bandwidth 128
ip address 192.168.13.2 255.255.255.252
ip ospf message-digest-key 1 md5 MD5LINKS
clock rate 128000
!
interface Serial0/0/1
bandwidth 128
ip address 192.168.23.2 255.255.255.252
ip ospf message-digest-key 1 md5 MD5LINKS
!
router ospf 1
router-id 3.3.3.3
auto-cost reference-bandwidth 1000
area 0 authentication message-digest
passive-interface GigabitEthernet0/0
network 192.168.3.0 0.0.0.255 area 0
network 192.168.13.0 0.0.0.3 area 0
network 192.168.23.0 0.0.0.3 area 0
!
ip forward-protocol nd
!
no ip http server
no ip http secure-server
!
control-plane
!
banner motd ^C
Unauthorized Access is Prohibited!
^C
!
line con 0
password cisco
login
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Page 13 of 14
Lab – Troubleshooting Advanced Single-Area OSPFv2
logging synchronous
line aux 0
line 2
no activation-character
no exec
transport preferred none
transport input all
transport output pad telnet rlogin lapb-ta mop udptn v120 ssh
stopbits 1
line vty 0 4
password cisco
login
transport input all
!
scheduler allocate 20000 1000
!
end
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 14 of 14
OSPF Troubleshooting Mastery (Instructor Version)
Instructor Note: Red font color or Gray highlights indicate text that appears in the instructor copy only.
Objective
Explain the process and tools used to troubleshoot a single-area OSPF network.
This activity gives students practice in configuring OSPF and the opportunity to use troubleshooting commands to
fix other networks as they were designed.
Scenario
You have decided to change your routing protocol from RIPv2 to OSPFv2. Your small- to medium-sized business
network topology will not change from its original physical settings. Use the diagram on the PDF for this activity as
your company’s small- to medium- business network design.
Your addressing design is complete and you then configure your routers with IPv4 and VLSM. OSPF has been
applied as the routing protocol. However, some routers are sharing routing information with each other and some
are not.
Open the PDF file that accompanies this modeling activity and follow the directions to complete the activity.
When the steps in the directions are complete, regroup as a class and compare recorded activity correction times.
The group taking the shortest time to find and fix the configuration error will be declared the winner only after
successfully explaining how they found the error, fixed it, and proved that the topology is now working.
Required Resources

Topology diagram

Packet Tracer software

Timer
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Page 1 of 3
OSPF Troubleshooting Mastery
Topology Diagram
Area 0
G0/1
R2
G0/0
G0/1
G0/0
R1
S1
G0/0
G0/1
R3
Directions
Choose a partner from the class with whom to work on this activity. Use Packet Tracer to create the topology
diagram shown for this activity.
Step 1: Build the topology based on the modeling activity page for this scenario.
Step 2: Configure the routers.
a. Use IPv4 for all interfaces.
b. Incorporate VLSM into the addressing scheme.
c.
Make one intentional configuration error.
d. Verify that the network does not work based upon the intentional error.
e. Save your file to be used with Step 3.
Step 3: Exchange your Packet Tracer file with another group.
a. Find the configuration error on the Packet Tracer network file you received from another group.
b. Fix the OSPF configuration error so that the network operates fully.
c.
Record the time it took to find and fix the OSPF network error.
d. When complete, meet with your class to determine the Master Troubleshooter for the day.
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Page 2 of 3
OSPF Troubleshooting Mastery
Instructor Resource Diagram
Area 0
G0/1
R2
G0/0
G0/1
G0/0
G0/0
R1
G0/1
R3
OSPF answers will vary depending upon student designs and configuration errors.
Some troubleshooting commands include:

show ip ospf neighbor

show ip ospf interface GigabitEthernet 0/0

show ip route

show running config
Identify elements of the model that map to IT-related content:

OSPF network troubleshooting commands

OSPF network configuration commands

IPv4 network addressing

VLSM network addressing
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 3 of 3
Leaving on a Jet Plane (Instructor Version)
Instructor Note: Red font color or Gray highlights indicate text that appears in the instructor copy only.
Objective
Explain the operation of multiarea OSPF to enable internetworking in a small- to medium-sized business network.
This activity will introduce the concept of regular and core areas and their relation to how backbone, area border,
internal and autonomous system boundary routers serve to deliver data from internal to external networks.
Scenario
You and a classmate are starting a new airline to serve your continent. In addition to your core area or
headquarters airport, you will locate and map four intra-continental airport service areas and one transcontinental
airport service area that can be used for additional source and destination travel.
Use the blank world map provided to design your airport locations. Additional instructions for completing this
activity can be found in the accompanying PDF.
Required Resources

Blank world map diagram

Word processing software or alternative graphics software for marking airport locations and their
connections
Blank World Map Diagram
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Page 1 of 3
Leaving on a Jet Plane
Directions
Step 1: Design the airport locations.
a. Use the blank world map diagram provided.
b. On your map, place a star in the center of the continent in which you live. This is now the Airport Core
Site and will serve as your core transit location. Label it as Airport Core Site. This is your first area of
intra-continental service and all airports will be connected to the Airport Core Site.
Step 2: Map airports within your continent to serve your passengers.
a. Map four airport locations within your continent to connect to the Airport Core Site. Call them North,
South, East, and West Airport Sites.
b. Place four circles on your continent’s map to represent the North, South, East, and West Airport Sites.
Some circles may overlap due to the size of the continent and the sites placement on the map.
c.
Draw a straight line from each of these airports to the Airport Core Site. These intra-continent locations
are your first level of service for your airlines. They are also known as area border airport sites.
Step 3: Identify another continent your airline will serve.
a. On the world map, locate another continent you would like to provide service to and from the Airlines
Core Site.
b. Place a circle in the center of the continent you chose for second-level service. This airport will be called
Transcontinental Airport Site.
c.
Draw a line from your Airlines Core Site to the Transcontinental Airport Site. This airport will be known as
an autonomous system border router (ASBR) airport site.
Summary
After completing Step 3, you should be able to see that the airport connections resemble a network topology.
Complete the reflection questions, save your work, and be prepared to share your answers with the class.
Reflection
1. While designing your airline travel routes, did you pay close attention to the headquarters location? Why
would it be important to have a core site for airline travel?
_______________________________________________________________________________________
Answers will vary. Some groups will mention that most airlines do incorporate a main location to and from
which their airplanes fly. The purpose of having a headquarters or a core location allows airlines save costs
and time when delivering passengers to and from other locations. Network design also incorporates routers
which serve as core delivery areas for network traffic. Some of these routers carry data from many other
areas and some carry network traffic from only one area. This type of routing can save costs.
2. Would networks incorporate core, border, and ASBRs into area sites? Justify your answer.
_______________________________________________________________________________________
Answers will vary. If a network is very small, one area will be sufficient to route network traffic. But if there
are plans to expand the network, it would be a good idea to map the routers into groups based on
functionality and location to make the network scalable.
3. What is the significance of mapping transcontinental areas?
_______________________________________________________________________________________
Mapping transcontinental locations allows airlines to know which main intra-continental areas and external
extra-continental routes they serve. In routing, this would indicate major internal router locations for a small-
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 2 of 3
Leaving on a Jet Plane
to medium-sized business and ISP external connections to route external information to and from your smallto medium-sized business location.
4. What is the significance of mapping internal airline destination routes? Compare this to a routing topology.
_______________________________________________________________________________________
Airlines often will serve fairly close subsidiary airport customers. The same holds true for network data
delivery, as sometimes routers are locally situated in order to provide alternate paths or methods (protocols)
to be delivered by data routes.
5. Is it possible that the Airlines Core Site could serve several functions for your airlines (network)? Explain your
answer.
_______________________________________________________________________________________
Core headquarters can serve as a central location for intra-country routing or external transcontinental
routing. The same holds true for core routers, as their purpose is to deliver data traffic to areas to which they
are directly connected or provide connections to areas outside of their areas or domains.
Instructor Resource Example
The information listed in this section is only one depiction of what students could see as a result of this activity.
Other topology designs may vary per student groups.
Identify elements of the model that map to IT-related content:

Regular, internal routing areas

Backbone router

Core, backbone areas

Cost

External, autonomous system boundary or
border router

Border area router
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 3 of 3
Lab - Configuring Multiarea OSPFv2 (Instructor Version)
Instructor Note: Red font color or Gray highlights indicate text that appears in the instructor copy only.
Topology
Addressing Table
Device
R1
R2
R3
Interface
IP Address
Subnet Mask
Lo0
209.165.200.225
255.255.255.252
Lo1
192.168.1.1
255.255.255.0
Lo2
192.168.2.1
255.255.255.0
S0/0/0 (DCE)
192.168.12.1
255.255.255.252
Lo6
192.168.6.1
255.255.255.0
S0/0/0
192.168.12.2
255.255.255.252
S0/0/1 (DCE)
192.168.23.1
255.255.255.252
Lo4
192.168.4.1
255.255.255.0
Lo5
192.168.5.1
255.255.255.0
S0/0/1
192.168.23.2
255.255.255.252
Objectives
Part 1: Build the Network and Configure Basic Device Settings
Part 2: Configure a Multiarea OSPFv2 Network
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 1 of 23
Lab - Configuring Multiarea OSPFv2
Part 3: Configure Interarea Summary Routes
Background / Scenario
To make OSPF more efficient and scalable, OSPF supports hierarchical routing using the concept of areas.
An OSPF area is a group of routers that share the same link-state information in their link-state databases
(LSDBs). When a large OSPF area is divided into smaller areas, it is called multiarea OSPF. Multiarea OSPF
is useful in larger network deployments to reduce processing and memory overhead.
In the lab, you will configure a multiarea OSPFv2 network with interarea summary routes.
Note: The routers used with CCNA hands-on labs are Cisco 1941 Integrated Services Routers (ISRs) with
Cisco IOS Release 15.2(4)M3 (universalk9 image). Other routers and Cisco IOS versions can be used.
Depending on the model and Cisco IOS version, the commands available and output produced might vary
from what is shown in the labs. Refer to the Router Interface Summary Table at the end of this lab for the
correct interface identifiers.
Note: Make sure that the routers have been erased and have no startup configurations. If you are unsure,
contact your instructor.
Instructor Note: Refer to the Instructor Lab Manual for the procedures to initialize and reload devices.
Required Resources
3 Routers (Cisco 1941 with Cisco IOS Release 15.2(4)M3 universal image or comparable)
Console cables to configure the Cisco IOS devices via the console ports
Serial cables as shown in the topology
Part 1: Build the Network and Configure Basic Device Settings
In Part 1, you will set up the network topology and configure basic settings on the routers.
Step 1: Cable the network as shown in the topology.
Step 2: Initialize and reload the routers as necessary.
Step 3: Configure basic settings for each router.
a. Disable DNS lookup.
b. Configure device name, as shown in the topology.
c.
Assign class as the privileged EXEC password.
d. Assign cisco as the console and vty passwords.
e. Configure logging synchronous for the console line.
f.
Configure an MOTD banner to warn users that unauthorized access is prohibited.
g. Configure the IP addresses listed in the Addressing Table for all interfaces. DCE interfaces should be
configured with a clock rate of 128000. Bandwidth should be set to 128 Kb/s on all serial interfaces.
h. Copy the running configuration to the startup configuration.
Step 4: Verify Layer 3 connectivity.
Use the show ip interface brief command to verify that the IP addressing is correct and that the interfaces
are active. Verify that each router can ping their neighbor’s serial interface.
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 2 of 23
Lab - Configuring Multiarea OSPFv2
Part 2: Configure a Multiarea OSPFv2 Network
In Part 2, you will configure a multiarea OSPFv2 network with process ID of 1. All LAN loopback interfaces
should be passive, and all serial interfaces should be configured with MD5 authentication using Cisco123 as
the key.
Step 1: Identify the OSPF router types in the topology.
Identify the Backbone router(s): ______________________ R1 and R2
Identify the Autonomous System Boundary Router(s) (ASBR): __________________ R1
Identify the Area Border Router(s) (ABR): ____________________ R1 and R2
Identify the Internal router(s): _______________________ R3
Step 2: Configure OSPF on R1.
a. Configure a router ID of 1.1.1.1 with OSPF process ID of 1.
R1(config)# router ospf 1
R1(config-router)# router-id 1.1.1.1
b. Add the networks for R1 to OSPF.
R1(config-router)# network 192.168.1.0 0.0.0.255 area 1
R1(config-router)# network 192.168.2.0 0.0.0.255 area 1
R1(config-router)# network 192.168.12.0 0.0.0.3 area 0
c.
Set all LAN loopback interfaces, Lo1 and Lo2, as passive.
R1(config-router)# passive-interface lo1
R1(config-router)# passive-interface lo2
R1(config-router)# exit
d. Create a default route to the Internet using exit interface Lo0.
R1(config)# ip route 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 lo0
Note: You may see the “%Default route without gateway, if not a point-to-point interface, may impact
performance” message. This is normal behavior if using a Loopback interface to simulate a default route.
e. Configure OSPF to propagate the routes throughout the OSPF areas.
R1(config)# router ospf 1
R1(config-router)# default-information originate
Step 3: Configure OSPF on R2.
a. Configure a router ID of 2.2.2.2 with OSPF process ID of 1.
R2(config)# router ospf 1
R2(config-router)# router-id 2.2.2.2
b. Add the networks for R2 to OSPF. Add the networks to the correct area. Write the commands used in the
space below.
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
R2(config-router)# network 192.168.12.0 0.0.0.3 area 0
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 3 of 23
Lab - Configuring Multiarea OSPFv2
R2(config-router)# network 192.168.23.0 0.0.0.3 area 3
R2(config-router)# network 192.168.6.0 0.0.0.255 area 3
c.
Set all LAN loopback interfaces as passive.
R2(config-router)# passive-interface lo6
Step 4: Configure OSPF on R3.
a. Configure a router ID of 3.3.3.3 with OSPF process ID of 1.
R3(config)# router ospf 1
R3(config-router)# router-id 3.3.3.3
b. Add the networks for R3 to OSPF. Write the commands used in the space below.
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
R3(config-router)# network 192.168.23.0 0.0.0.3 area 3
R3(config-router)# network 192.168.4.0 0.0.0.255 area 3
R3(config-router)# network 192.168.5.0 0.0.0.255 area 3
c.
Set all LAN loopback interfaces as passive.
R3(config-router)# passive-interface lo4
R3(config-router)# passive-interface l05
Step 5: Verify that OSPF settings are correct and adjacencies have been established between
routers.
a. Issue the show ip protocols command to verify OSPF settings on each router. Use this command
to identify the OSPF router types and to determine the networks assigned to each area.
R1# show ip protocols
*** IP Routing is NSF aware ***
Routing Protocol is "ospf 1"
Outgoing update filter list for all interfaces is not set
Incoming update filter list for all interfaces is not set
Router ID 1.1.1.1
It is an area border and autonomous system boundary router
Redistributing External Routes from,
Number of areas in this router is 2. 2 normal 0 stub 0 nssa
Maximum path: 4
Routing for Networks:
192.168.1.0 0.0.0.255 area 1
192.168.2.0 0.0.0.255 area 1
192.168.12.0 0.0.0.3 area 0
Passive Interface(s):
Loopback1
Loopback2
Routing Information Sources:
Gateway
Distance
Last Update
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 4 of 23
Lab - Configuring Multiarea OSPFv2
2.2.2.2
110
Distance: (default is 110)
00:01:45
R2# show ip protocols
*** IP Routing is NSF aware ***
Routing Protocol is "ospf 1"
Outgoing update filter list for all interfaces is not set
Incoming update filter list for all interfaces is not set
Router ID 2.2.2.2
It is an area border router
Number of areas in this router is 2. 2 normal 0 stub 0 nssa
Maximum path: 4
Routing for Networks:
192.168.6.0 0.0.0.255 area 3
192.168.12.0 0.0.0.3 area 0
192.168.23.0 0.0.0.3 area 3
Passive Interface(s):
Loopback6
Routing Information Sources:
Gateway
Distance
Last Update
3.3.3.3
110
00:01:20
1.1.1.1
110
00:10:12
Distance: (default is 110)
R3# show ip protocols
*** IP Routing is NSF aware ***
Routing Protocol is "ospf 1"
Outgoing update filter list for all interfaces is not set
Incoming update filter list for all interfaces is not set
Router ID 3.3.3.3
Number of areas in this router is 1. 1 normal 0 stub 0 nssa
Maximum path: 4
Routing for Networks:
192.168.4.0 0.0.0.255 area 3
192.168.5.0 0.0.0.255 area 3
192.168.23.0 0.0.0.3 area 3
Passive Interface(s):
Loopback4
Loopback5
Routing Information Sources:
Gateway
Distance
Last Update
1.1.1.1
110
00:07:46
2.2.2.2
110
00:07:46
Distance: (default is 110)
What is the OSPF router type for each router?
R1: ______________________________________________________________________________
R2: ______________________________________________________________________________
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
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Lab - Configuring Multiarea OSPFv2
R3: ______________________________________________________________________________
R1 - ABR and ASBR
R2 - ABR
R3 - No special OSPF router type
b. Issue the show ip ospf neighbor command to verify that OSPF adjacencies have been established
between routers.
R1# show ip ospf neighbor
Neighbor ID
2.2.2.2
Pri
0
State
FULL/
-
Dead Time
00:00:34
Address
192.168.12.2
Interface
Serial0/0/0
-
Dead Time
00:00:36
00:00:36
Address
192.168.12.1
192.168.23.2
Interface
Serial0/0/0
Serial0/0/1
-
Dead Time
00:00:38
Address
192.168.23.1
Interface
Serial0/0/1
R2# show ip ospf neighbor
Neighbor ID
1.1.1.1
3.3.3.3
Pri
0
0
State
FULL/
FULL/
R3# show ip ospf neighbor
Neighbor ID
2.2.2.2
c.
Pri
0
State
FULL/
Issue the show ip ospf interface brief command to display a summary of interface route costs.
R1# show ip ospf interface brief
Interface
Se0/0/0
Lo1
Lo2
PID
1
1
1
Area
0
1
1
IP Address/Mask
192.168.12.1/30
192.168.1.1/24
192.168.2.1/24
Cost
781
1
1
State
P2P
LOOP
LOOP
Nbrs F/C
1/1
0/0
0/0
Cost
781
1
781
State
P2P
LOOP
P2P
Nbrs F/C
1/1
0/0
1/1
Cost
1
1
781
State
LOOP
LOOP
P2P
Nbrs F/C
0/0
0/0
1/1
R2# show ip ospf interface brief
Interface
Se0/0/0
Lo6
Se0/0/1
PID
1
1
1
Area
0
3
3
IP Address/Mask
192.168.12.2/30
192.168.6.1/24
192.168.23.1/30
R3# show ip ospf interface brief
Interface
Lo4
Lo5
Se0/0/1
PID
1
1
1
Area
3
3
3
IP Address/Mask
192.168.4.1/24
192.168.5.1/24
192.168.23.2/30
Step 6: Configure MD5 authentication on all serial interfaces.
Configure OSPF MD5 authentication at the interface level with an authentication key of Cisco123.
R1(config)# interface s0/0/0
R1(config-if)# ip ospf message-digest-key 1 md5 Cisco123
R1(config-if)# ip ospf authentication message-digest
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
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R2(config)# int s0/0/0
R2(config-if)# ip ospf message-digest-key 1 md5 Cisco123
R2(config-if)# ip ospf authentication message-digest
R2(config-if)# interface s0/0/1
R2(config-if)# ip ospf message-digest-key 1 md5 Cisco123
R2(config-if)# ip ospf authentication message-digest
R3(config)# interface s0/0/1
R3(config-if)# ip ospf message-digest-key 1 md5 Cisco123
R3(config-if)# ip ospf authentication message-digest
Why is it a good idea to verify that OSPF is functioning correctly before configuring OSPF authentication?
_______________________________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________________________
Troubleshooting OSPF problems is much easier if OSPF adjacencies have been established and verified
before implementing authentication. You then know that your authentication implementation is flawed, as
adjacencies do not re-establish.
Step 7: Verify OSPF adjacencies have been re-established.
Issue the show ip ospf neighbor command again to verify that adjacencies have been re-established after
MD5 authentication was implemented. Troubleshoot any issues found before moving on to Part 3.
Part 3: Configure Interarea Summary Routes
OSPF does not perform automatic summarization. Interarea summarization must be manually configured on
ABRs. In Part 3, you will apply interarea summary routes on the ABRs. Using show commands, you will be
able to observe how summarization affects the routing table and LSDBs.
Step 1: Display the OSPF routing tables on all routers.
a. Issue the show ip route ospf command on R1. OSPF routes that originate from a different area have a
descriptor (O IA) indicating that these are interarea routes.
R1# show ip route ospf
Codes: L - local, C - connected, S - static, R - RIP, M - mobile, B - BGP
D - EIGRP, EX - EIGRP external, O - OSPF, IA - OSPF inter area
N1 - OSPF NSSA external type 1, N2 - OSPF NSSA external type 2
E1 - OSPF external type 1, E2 - OSPF external type 2
i - IS-IS, su - IS-IS summary, L1 - IS-IS level-1, L2 - IS-IS level-2
ia - IS-IS inter area, * - candidate default, U - per-user static route
o - ODR, P - periodic downloaded static route, H - NHRP, l - LISP
+ - replicated route, % - next hop override
Gateway of last resort is 0.0.0.0 to network 0.0.0.0
O IA
O IA
192.168.4.0/32
192.168.4.1
192.168.5.0/32
192.168.5.1
is subnetted, 1 subnets
[110/1563] via 192.168.12.2, 00:23:49, Serial0/0/0
is subnetted, 1 subnets
[110/1563] via 192.168.12.2, 00:23:49, Serial0/0/0
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
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Lab - Configuring Multiarea OSPFv2
O IA
O IA
192.168.23.0/30 is subnetted, 1 subnets
192.168.6.1 [110/782] via 192.168.12.2, 00:02:01, Serial0/0/0
192.168.23.0/30 is subnetted, 1 subnets
192.168.23.0 [110/1562] via 192.168.12.2, 00:23:49, Serial0/0/0
b. Repeat the show ip route ospf command for R2 and R3. Record the OSPF interarea routes for each
router.
R2:
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
O IA
O IA
192.168.1.1 [110/782] via 192.168.12.1, 00:25:22, Serial0/0/0
192.168.2.1 [110/782] via 192.168.12.1, 00:25:22, Serial0/0/0
R3:
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
O IA
O IA
O IA
192.168.1.1 [110/1563] via 192.168.23.1, 00:30:41, Serial0/0/1
192.168.2.1 [110/1563] via 192.168.23.1, 00:30:41, Serial0/0/1
192.168.12.0 [110/1562] via 192.168.23.1, 01:40:46, Serial0/0/1
R2# show ip route ospf
Codes: L - local, C - connected, S - static, R - RIP, M - mobile, B - BGP
D - EIGRP, EX - EIGRP external, O - OSPF, IA - OSPF inter area
N1 - OSPF NSSA external type 1, N2 - OSPF NSSA external type 2
E1 - OSPF external type 1, E2 - OSPF external type 2
i - IS-IS, su - IS-IS summary, L1 - IS-IS level-1, L2 - IS-IS level-2
ia - IS-IS inter area, * - candidate default, U - per-user static route
o - ODR, P - periodic downloaded static route, H - NHRP, l - LISP
+ - replicated route, % - next hop override
Gateway of last resort is 192.168.12.1 to network 0.0.0.0
O*E2
O IA
O IA
O
O
0.0.0.0/0 [110/1] via 192.168.12.1, 00:25:22, Serial0/0/0
192.168.1.0/32 is subnetted, 1 subnets
192.168.1.1 [110/782] via 192.168.12.1, 00:25:22, Serial0/0/0
192.168.2.0/32 is subnetted, 1 subnets
192.168.2.1 [110/782] via 192.168.12.1, 00:25:22, Serial0/0/0
192.168.4.0/32 is subnetted, 1 subnets
192.168.4.1 [110/782] via 192.168.23.2, 01:35:23, Serial0/0/1
192.168.5.0/32 is subnetted, 1 subnets
192.168.5.1 [110/782] via 192.168.23.2, 01:35:23, Serial0/0/1
R3# show ip route ospf
Codes: L - local, C - connected, S - static, R - RIP, M - mobile, B - BGP
D - EIGRP, EX - EIGRP external, O - OSPF, IA - OSPF inter area
N1 - OSPF NSSA external type 1, N2 - OSPF NSSA external type 2
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
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Lab - Configuring Multiarea OSPFv2
E1 - OSPF external type 1, E2 - OSPF external type 2
i - IS-IS, su - IS-IS summary, L1 - IS-IS level-1, L2 - IS-IS level-2
ia - IS-IS inter area, * - candidate default, U - per-user static route
o - ODR, P - periodic downloaded static route, H - NHRP, l - LISP
+ - replicated route, % - next hop override
Gateway of last resort is 192.168.23.1 to network 0.0.0.0
O*E2
O IA
O IA
O
O IA
0.0.0.0/0 [110/1] via 192.168.23.1, 00:30:36, Serial0/0/1
192.168.1.0/32 is subnetted, 1 subnets
192.168.1.1 [110/1563] via 192.168.23.1, 00:30:41, Serial0/0/1
192.168.2.0/32 is subnetted, 1 subnets
192.168.2.1 [110/1563] via 192.168.23.1, 00:30:41, Serial0/0/1
192.168.12.0/30 is subnetted, 1 subnets
192.168.6.1 [110/782] via 192.168.23.1, 00:00:38, Serial0/0/1
192.168.12.0/30 is subnetted, 1 subnets
192.168.12.0 [110/1562] via 192.168.23.1, 01:40:46, Serial0/0/1
Step 2: Display the LSDB on all routers.
a. Issue the show ip ospf database command on R1. A router maintains a separate LSDB for every area
that it is a member.
R1# show ip ospf database
OSPF Router with ID (1.1.1.1) (Process ID 1)
Router Link States (Area 0)
Link ID
1.1.1.1
2.2.2.2
ADV Router
1.1.1.1
2.2.2.2
Age
1295
1282
Seq#
Checksum Link count
0x80000003 0x0039CD 2
0x80000002 0x00D430 2
Summary Net Link States (Area 0)
Link ID
192.168.1.1
192.168.2.1
192.168.4.1
192.168.5.1
192.168.6.1
192.168.23.0
ADV Router
1.1.1.1
1.1.1.1
2.2.2.2
2.2.2.2
2.2.2.2
2.2.2.2
Age
1387
1387
761
751
1263
1273
Seq#
0x80000002
0x80000002
0x80000001
0x80000001
0x80000001
0x80000001
Checksum
0x00AC1F
0x00A129
0x000DA8
0x0002B2
0x00596A
0x00297E
Router Link States (Area 1)
Link ID
1.1.1.1
ADV Router
1.1.1.1
Age
1342
Seq#
Checksum Link count
0x80000006 0x0094A4 2
Summary Net Link States (Area 1)
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
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Link ID
192.168.4.1
192.168.5.1
192.168.6.1
192.168.12.0
192.168.23.0
ADV Router
1.1.1.1
1.1.1.1
1.1.1.1
1.1.1.1
1.1.1.1
Age
760
750
1262
1387
1272
Seq#
0x80000001
0x80000001
0x80000001
0x80000001
0x80000001
Checksum
0x00C8E0
0x00BDEA
0x0015A2
0x00C0F5
0x00E4B6
Type-5 AS External Link States
Link ID
0.0.0.0
ADV Router
1.1.1.1
Age
1343
Seq#
Checksum Tag
0x80000001 0x001D91 1
b. Repeat the show ip ospf database command for R2 and R3. Record the Link IDs for the Summary Net
Link States for each area.
R2:
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
Area 0 - 192.168.1.1, 192.168.2.1, 192.168.4.1, 192.168.5.1, 192.168.6.1, 192.168.23.0
Area 3 – 192.168.1.1, 192.168.2.1, 192.168.12.0
R3:
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
Area 3 - 192.168.1.1, 192.168.2.1, 192.168.12.0
R2# show ip ospf database
OSPF Router with ID (2.2.2.2) (Process ID 1)
Router Link States (Area 0)
Link ID
1.1.1.1
2.2.2.2
ADV Router
1.1.1.1
2.2.2.2
Age
1444
1429
Seq#
Checksum Link count
0x80000003 0x0039CD 2
0x80000002 0x00D430 2
Summary Net Link States (Area 0)
Link ID
192.168.1.1
192.168.2.1
192.168.4.1
192.168.5.1
192.168.6.1
192.168.23.0
ADV Router
1.1.1.1
1.1.1.1
2.2.2.2
2.2.2.2
2.2.2.2
2.2.2.2
Age
1535
1535
908
898
1410
1420
Seq#
0x80000002
0x80000002
0x80000001
0x80000001
0x80000001
0x80000001
Checksum
0x00AC1F
0x00A129
0x000DA8
0x0002B2
0x00596A
0x00297E
Router Link States (Area 3)
Link ID
2.2.2.2
ADV Router
2.2.2.2
Age
1212
Seq#
Checksum Link count
0x80000003 0x00DE86 3
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
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Lab - Configuring Multiarea OSPFv2
3.3.3.3
3.3.3.3
892
0x80000005 0x00DB05 4
Summary Net Link States (Area 3)
Link ID
192.168.1.1
192.168.2.1
192.168.12.0
ADV Router
2.2.2.2
2.2.2.2
2.2.2.2
Age
1420
1420
1420
Seq#
0x80000002
0x80000002
0x80000002
Checksum
0x002C8B
0x002195
0x00A011
Summary ASB Link States (Area 3)
Link ID
1.1.1.1
ADV Router
2.2.2.2
Age
1420
Seq#
Checksum
0x80000002 0x00AC72
Type-5 AS External Link States
Link ID
0.0.0.0
ADV Router
1.1.1.1
Age
1492
Seq#
Checksum Tag
0x80000001 0x001D91 1
R3# show ip ospf database
OSPF Router with ID (3.3.3.3) (Process ID 1)
Router Link States (Area 3)
Link ID
2.2.2.2
3.3.3.3
ADV Router
2.2.2.2
3.3.3.3
Age
1251
930
Seq#
Checksum Link count
0x80000003 0x00DE86 3
0x80000005 0x00DB05 4
Summary Net Link States (Area 3)
Link ID
192.168.1.1
192.168.2.1
192.168.12.0
ADV Router
2.2.2.2
2.2.2.2
2.2.2.2
Age
1459
1459
1459
Seq#
0x80000002
0x80000002
0x80000002
Checksum
0x002C8B
0x002195
0x00A011
Summary ASB Link States (Area 3)
Link ID
1.1.1.1
ADV Router
2.2.2.2
Age
1459
Seq#
Checksum
0x80000002 0x00AC72
Type-5 AS External Link States
Link ID
0.0.0.0
ADV Router
1.1.1.1
Age
1531
Seq#
Checksum Tag
0x80000001 0x001D91 1
Step 3: Configure the interarea summary routes.
a. Calculate the summary route for the networks in area 1.
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Lab - Configuring Multiarea OSPFv2
Networks 192.168.1.0 and 192.168.2.0 can be summarized as 192.168.0.0/22.
b. Configure the summary route for area 1 on R1.
R1(config)# router ospf 1
R1(config-router)# area 1 range 192.168.0.0 255.255.252.0
c.
Calculate the summary route for the networks in area 3. Record your results.
____________________________________________________________________________________
Networks 192.168.4.0, 192.168.5.0, and 192.168.6.0 can be summarized as 192.168.4.0/22.
d. Configure the summary route for area 3 on R2. Write the commands you used in the space below.
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
R2(config)# router ospf 1
R2(config-router)# area 3 range 192.168.4.0 255.255.252.0
Step 4: Re-display the OSPF routing tables on all routers.
Issue the show ip route ospf command on each router. Record the results for the summary and interarea
routes.
R1:
_______________________________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________________________
O IA
O IA
192.168.4.0/22 [110/782] via 192.168.12.2, 00:04:04, Serial0/0/0
192.168.23.0 [110/1562] via 192.168.12.2, 00:06:31, Serial0/0/0
R2:
_______________________________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________________________
O IA
O
192.168.0.0/22 [110/782] via 192.168.12.1, 00:04:42, Serial0/0/0
192.168.4.0/22 is a summary, 00:04:42, Null0
R3:
_______________________________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________________________
O IA
O IA
192.168.0.0/22 [110/1563] via 192.168.23.1, 00:08:01, Serial0/0/1
192.168.12.0 [110/1562] via 192.168.23.1, 00:53:17, Serial0/0/1
R1# show ip route ospf
Codes: L - local, C - connected, S - static, R - RIP, M - mobile, B - BGP
D - EIGRP, EX - EIGRP external, O - OSPF, IA - OSPF inter area
N1 - OSPF NSSA external type 1, N2 - OSPF NSSA external type 2
E1 - OSPF external type 1, E2 - OSPF external type 2
i - IS-IS, su - IS-IS summary, L1 - IS-IS level-1, L2 - IS-IS level-2
ia - IS-IS inter area, * - candidate default, U - per-user static route
o - ODR, P - periodic downloaded static route, H - NHRP, l - LISP
+ - replicated route, % - next hop override
Gateway of last resort is 0.0.0.0 to network 0.0.0.0
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
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O
O IA
O IA
192.168.0.0/22 is a summary, 00:06:31, Null0
192.168.4.0/22 [110/782] via 192.168.12.2, 00:04:04, Serial0/0/0
192.168.23.0/30 is subnetted, 1 subnets
192.168.23.0 [110/1562] via 192.168.12.2, 00:06:31, Serial0/0/0
R2# show ip route ospf
Codes: L - local, C - connected, S - static, R - RIP, M - mobile, B - BGP
D - EIGRP, EX - EIGRP external, O - OSPF, IA - OSPF inter area
N1 - OSPF NSSA external type 1, N2 - OSPF NSSA external type 2
E1 - OSPF external type 1, E2 - OSPF external type 2
i - IS-IS, su - IS-IS summary, L1 - IS-IS level-1, L2 - IS-IS level-2
ia - IS-IS inter area, * - candidate default, U - per-user static route
o - ODR, P - periodic downloaded static route, H - NHRP, l - LISP
+ - replicated route, % - next hop override
Gateway of last resort is 192.168.12.1 to network 0.0.0.0
O*E2
O IA
O
O
O
0.0.0.0/0 [110/1] via 192.168.12.1, 00:04:42, Serial0/0/0
192.168.0.0/22 [110/782] via 192.168.12.1, 00:04:42, Serial0/0/0
192.168.4.0/22 is a summary, 00:04:42, Null0
192.168.4.0/32 is subnetted, 1 subnets
192.168.4.1 [110/782] via 192.168.23.2, 00:04:42, Serial0/0/1
192.168.5.0/32 is subnetted, 1 subnets
192.168.5.1 [110/782] via 192.168.23.2, 00:04:42, Serial0/0/1
R3# show ip route ospf
Codes: L - local, C - connected, S - static, R - RIP, M - mobile, B - BGP
D - EIGRP, EX - EIGRP external, O - OSPF, IA - OSPF inter area
N1 - OSPF NSSA external type 1, N2 - OSPF NSSA external type 2
E1 - OSPF external type 1, E2 - OSPF external type 2
i - IS-IS, su - IS-IS summary, L1 - IS-IS level-1, L2 - IS-IS level-2
ia - IS-IS inter area, * - candidate default, U - per-user static route
o - ODR, P - periodic downloaded static route, H - NHRP, l - LISP
+ - replicated route, % - next hop override
Gateway of last resort is 192.168.23.1 to network 0.0.0.0
O*E2
O IA
O
O IA
0.0.0.0/0 [110/1] via 192.168.23.1, 00:53:17, Serial0/0/1
192.168.0.0/22 [110/1563] via 192.168.23.1, 00:08:01, Serial0/0/1
192.168.6.0/32 is subnetted, 1 subnets
192.168.6.1 [110/782] via 192.168.23.1, 00:53:17, Serial0/0/1
192.168.12.0/30 is subnetted, 1 subnets
192.168.12.0 [110/1562] via 192.168.23.1, 00:53:17, Serial0/0/1
Step 5: Display the LSDB on all routers.
Issue the show ip ospf database command again on each router. Record the Link IDs for the Summary Net
Link States for each area.
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
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Lab - Configuring Multiarea OSPFv2
R1:
_______________________________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________________________
Area 0 - 192.168.0.0, 192.168.4.0, 192.168.23.0
Area 1 – 192.168.4.0, 192.168.12.0, 192.168.23.0
R2:
_______________________________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________________________
Area 0 - 192.168.0.0, 192.168.4.0, 192.168.23.0
Area 3 - 192.168.0.0, 192.168.12.0
R3:
_______________________________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________________________
Area 3 - 192.168.0.0, 192.168.12.0
R1# show ip ospf database
OSPF Router with ID (1.1.1.1) (Process ID 1)
Router Link States (Area 0)
Link ID
1.1.1.1
2.2.2.2
ADV Router
1.1.1.1
2.2.2.2
Age
1452
1451
Seq#
Checksum Link count
0x80000006 0x0033D0 2
0x80000005 0x00CE33 2
Summary Net Link States (Area 0)
Link ID
192.168.0.0
192.168.4.0
192.168.23.0
ADV Router
1.1.1.1
2.2.2.2
2.2.2.2
Age
807
660
1753
Seq#
0x80000001
0x80000001
0x80000002
Checksum
0x00B41D
0x006A5F
0x00277F
Router Link States (Area 1)
Link ID
1.1.1.1
ADV Router
1.1.1.1
Age
1871
Seq#
Checksum Link count
0x80000007 0x0092A5 2
Summary Net Link States (Area 1)
Link ID
192.168.4.0
192.168.12.0
192.168.23.0
ADV Router
1.1.1.1
1.1.1.1
1.1.1.1
Age
659
1871
1449
Seq#
0x80000001
0x80000002
0x80000004
Checksum
0x002697
0x00BEF6
0x00DEB9
Type-5 AS External Link States
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Page 14 of 23
Lab - Configuring Multiarea OSPFv2
Link ID
0.0.0.0
ADV Router
1.1.1.1
Age
1871
Seq#
Checksum Tag
0x80000002 0x001B92 1
R2# show ip ospf database
OSPF Router with ID (2.2.2.2) (Process ID 1)
Router Link States (Area 0)
Link ID
1.1.1.1
2.2.2.2
ADV Router
1.1.1.1
2.2.2.2
Age
1467
1464
Seq#
Checksum Link count
0x80000006 0x0033D0 2
0x80000005 0x00CE33 2
Summary Net Link States (Area 0)
Link ID
192.168.0.0
192.168.4.0
192.168.23.0
ADV Router
1.1.1.1
2.2.2.2
2.2.2.2
Age
821
673
1766
Seq#
0x80000001
0x80000001
0x80000002
Checksum
0x00B41D
0x006A5F
0x00277F
Router Link States (Area 3)
Link ID
2.2.2.2
3.3.3.3
ADV Router
2.2.2.2
3.3.3.3
Age
1521
1295
Seq#
Checksum Link count
0x80000004 0x00DC87 3
0x80000006 0x00D906 4
Summary Net Link States (Area 3)
Link ID
192.168.0.0
192.168.12.0
ADV Router
2.2.2.2
2.2.2.2
Age
820
1766
Seq#
Checksum
0x80000001 0x003489
0x80000003 0x009E12
Summary ASB Link States (Area 3)
Link ID
1.1.1.1
ADV Router
2.2.2.2
Age
1766
Seq#
Checksum
0x80000003 0x00AA73
Type-5 AS External Link States
Link ID
0.0.0.0
ADV Router
1.1.1.1
Age
1886
Seq#
Checksum Tag
0x80000002 0x001B92 1
R3# show ip ospf database
OSPF Router with ID (3.3.3.3) (Process ID 1)
Router Link States (Area 3)
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 15 of 23
Lab - Configuring Multiarea OSPFv2
Link ID
2.2.2.2
3.3.3.3
ADV Router
2.2.2.2
3.3.3.3
Age
1548
1320
Seq#
Checksum Link count
0x80000004 0x00DC87 3
0x80000006 0x00D906 4
Summary Net Link States (Area 3)
Link ID
192.168.0.0
192.168.12.0
ADV Router
2.2.2.2
2.2.2.2
Age
847
1793
Seq#
Checksum
0x80000001 0x003489
0x80000003 0x009E12
Summary ASB Link States (Area 3)
Link ID
1.1.1.1
ADV Router
2.2.2.2
Age
1793
Seq#
Checksum
0x80000003 0x00AA73
Type-5 AS External Link States
Link ID
0.0.0.0
ADV Router
1.1.1.1
Age
1913
Seq#
Checksum Tag
0x80000002 0x001B92 1
What type of LSA is injected into the backbone by the ABR when interarea summarization is enabled?
_______________________________________________________________________________________
A type-3 LSA or an interarea summary route.
Step 6: Verify end-to-end connectivity.
Verify that all networks can be reached from each router. If any issues exist, troubleshoot until they have been
resolved.
Reflection
What are three advantages for designing a network with multiarea OSPF?
_______________________________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________________________
1. Smaller routing tables. 2. Reduced link-state update overhead. 3. Reduced frequency of SPF calculations.
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 16 of 23
Lab - Configuring Multiarea OSPFv2
Router Interface Summary Table
Router Interface Summary
Router Model
Ethernet Interface #1
Ethernet Interface #2
Serial Interface #1
Serial Interface #2
1800
Fast Ethernet 0/0
(F0/0)
Fast Ethernet 0/1
(F0/1)
Serial 0/0/0 (S0/0/0)
Serial 0/0/1 (S0/0/1)
1900
Gigabit Ethernet 0/0
(G0/0)
Gigabit Ethernet 0/1
(G0/1)
Serial 0/0/0 (S0/0/0)
Serial 0/0/1 (S0/0/1)
2801
Fast Ethernet 0/0
(F0/0)
Fast Ethernet 0/1
(F0/1)
Serial 0/1/0 (S0/1/0)
Serial 0/1/1 (S0/1/1)
2811
Fast Ethernet 0/0
(F0/0)
Fast Ethernet 0/1
(F0/1)
Serial 0/0/0 (S0/0/0)
Serial 0/0/1 (S0/0/1)
2900
Gigabit Ethernet 0/0
(G0/0)
Gigabit Ethernet 0/1
(G0/1)
Serial 0/0/0 (S0/0/0)
Serial 0/0/1 (S0/0/1)
Note: To find out how the router is configured, look at the interfaces to identify the type of router and how many
interfaces the router has. There is no way to effectively list all the combinations of configurations for each router
class. This table includes identifiers for the possible combinations of Ethernet and Serial interfaces in the device.
The table does not include any other type of interface, even though a specific router may contain one. An
example of this might be an ISDN BRI interface. The string in parenthesis is the legal abbreviation that can be
used in Cisco IOS commands to represent the interface.
Device Configs - Final
Router R1
R1# show run
Building configuration...
Current configuration : 2062 bytes
!
version 15.2
service timestamps debug datetime msec
service timestamps log datetime msec
no service password-encryption
!
hostname R1
!
boot-start-marker
boot-end-marker
!
enable secret 4 06YFDUHH61wAE/kLkDq9BGho1QM5EnRtoyr8cHAUg.2
!
no aaa new-model
memory-size iomem 15
!
ip cef
!
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Page 17 of 23
Lab - Configuring Multiarea OSPFv2
no ip domain lookup
no ipv6 cef
multilink bundle-name authenticated
!
interface Loopback0
ip address 209.165.200.225 255.255.255.252
!
interface Loopback1
ip address 192.168.1.1 255.255.255.0
!
interface Loopback2
ip address 192.168.2.1 255.255.255.0
!
interface Embedded-Service-Engine0/0
no ip address
shutdown
!
interface GigabitEthernet0/0
no ip address
shutdown
duplex auto
speed auto
!
interface GigabitEthernet0/1
no ip address
shutdown
duplex auto
speed auto
!
interface Serial0/0/0
bandwidth 128
ip address 192.168.12.1 255.255.255.252
ip ospf authentication message-digest
ip ospf message-digest-key 1 md5 Cisco123
clock rate 128000
!
interface Serial0/0/1
no ip address
shutdown
!
router ospf 1
router-id 1.1.1.1
area 1 range 192.168.0.0 255.255.252.0
passive-interface Loopback1
passive-interface Loopback2
network 192.168.1.0 0.0.0.255 area 1
network 192.168.2.0 0.0.0.255 area 1
network 192.168.12.0 0.0.0.3 area 0
default-information originate
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Page 18 of 23
Lab - Configuring Multiarea OSPFv2
!
ip forward-protocol nd
!
no ip http server
no ip http secure-server
!
ip route 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 Loopback0
!
control-plane
!
!
banner motd @
Unauthorized Access is Prohibited! @
!
line con 0
password cisco
logging synchronous
login
line aux 0
line 2
no activation-character
no exec
transport preferred none
transport input all
transport output pad telnet rlogin lapb-ta mop udptn v120 ssh
stopbits 1
line vty 0 4
password cisco
login
transport input all
!
scheduler allocate 20000 1000
!
end
Router R2
R2# show run
Building configuration...
Current configuration : 1905 bytes
!
version 15.2
service timestamps debug datetime msec
service timestamps log datetime msec
no service password-encryption
!
hostname R2
!
boot-start-marker
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Page 19 of 23
Lab - Configuring Multiarea OSPFv2
boot-end-marker
!
enable secret 4 06YFDUHH61wAE/kLkDq9BGho1QM5EnRtoyr8cHAUg.2
!
no aaa new-model
memory-size iomem 15
!
ip cef
!
no ip domain lookup
no ipv6 cef
multilink bundle-name authenticated
!
interface Loopback6
ip address 192.168.6.1 255.255.255.0
!
interface Embedded-Service-Engine0/0
no ip address
shutdown
!
interface GigabitEthernet0/0
no ip address
shutdown
duplex auto
speed auto
!
interface GigabitEthernet0/1
no ip address
shutdown
duplex auto
speed auto
!
interface Serial0/0/0
bandwidth 128
ip address 192.168.12.2 255.255.255.252
ip ospf authentication message-digest
ip ospf message-digest-key 1 md5 Cisco123
!
interface Serial0/0/1
bandwidth 128
ip address 192.168.23.1 255.255.255.252
ip ospf authentication message-digest
ip ospf message-digest-key 1 md5 Cisco123
clock rate 128000
!
router ospf 1
router-id 2.2.2.2
area 3 range 192.168.4.0 255.255.252.0
passive-interface Loopback6
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Page 20 of 23
Lab - Configuring Multiarea OSPFv2
network 192.168.6.0 0.0.0.255 area 3
network 192.168.12.0 0.0.0.3 area 0
network 192.168.23.0 0.0.0.3 area 3
!
ip forward-protocol nd
!
no ip http server
no ip http secure-server
!
control-plane
!
banner motd @
Unauthorized Access is Prohibited! @
!
line con 0
password cisco
logging synchronous
login
line aux 0
line 2
no activation-character
no exec
transport preferred none
transport input all
transport output pad telnet rlogin lapb-ta mop udptn v120 ssh
stopbits 1
line vty 0 4
password cisco
login
transport input all
!
scheduler allocate 20000 1000
!
end
Router R3
R3# show run
Building configuration...
Current configuration : 1958 bytes
!
version 15.2
service timestamps debug datetime msec
service timestamps log datetime msec
no service password-encryption
!
hostname R3
!
boot-start-marker
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Page 21 of 23
Lab - Configuring Multiarea OSPFv2
boot-end-marker
!
enable secret 4 06YFDUHH61wAE/kLkDq9BGho1QM5EnRtoyr8cHAUg.2
!
no aaa new-model
memory-size iomem 15
!
ip cef
!
no ip domain lookup
no ipv6 cef
!
multilink bundle-name authenticated
!
interface Loopback4
ip address 192.168.4.1 255.255.255.0
!
interface Loopback5
ip address 192.168.5.1 255.255.255.0
!
interface Embedded-Service-Engine0/0
no ip address
shutdown
!
interface GigabitEthernet0/0
no ip address
shutdown
duplex auto
speed auto
!
interface GigabitEthernet0/1
no ip address
shutdown
duplex auto
speed auto
!
interface Serial0/0/0
no ip address
shutdown
clock rate 2000000
!
interface Serial0/0/1
bandwidth 128
ip address 192.168.23.2 255.255.255.252
ip ospf authentication message-digest
ip ospf message-digest-key 1 md5 Cisco123
!
router ospf 1
router-id 3.3.3.3
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Page 22 of 23
Lab - Configuring Multiarea OSPFv2
passive-interface Loopback4
passive-interface Loopback5
network 192.168.4.0 0.0.0.255 area 3
network 192.168.5.0 0.0.0.255 area 3
network 192.168.23.0 0.0.0.3 area 3
!
ip forward-protocol nd
!
no ip http server
no ip http secure-server
!
control-plane
!
banner motd @
Unauthorized Access is Prohibited! @
!
line con 0
password cisco
logging synchronous
login
line aux 0
line 2
no activation-character
no exec
transport preferred none
transport input all
transport output pad telnet rlogin lapb-ta mop udptn v120 ssh
stopbits 1
line vty 0 4
password cisco
login
transport input all
!
scheduler allocate 20000 1000
!
end
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Page 23 of 23
Lab - Configuring Multiarea OSPFv3 (Instructor Version)
Instructor Note: Red font color or Gray highlights indicate text that appears in the instructor copy only.
Topology
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Page 1 of 19
Lab - Configuring Multiarea OSPFv3
Addressing Table
Device
R1
R2
R3
Interface
IPv6 Address
Default Gateway
S0/0/0 (DCE)
2001:DB8:ACAD:12::1/64
FE80::1 link-local
N/A
Lo0
2001:DB8:ACAD::1/64
N/A
Lo1
2001:DB8:ACAD:1::1/64
N/A
Lo2
2001:DB8:ACAD:2::1/64
N/A
Lo3
2001:DB8:ACAD:3::1/64
N/A
S0/0/0
2001:DB8:ACAD:12::2/64
FE80::2 link-local
N/A
S0/0/1 (DCE)
2001:DB8:ACAD:23::2/64
FE80::2 link-local
N/A
Lo8
2001:DB8:ACAD:8::1/64
N/A
S0/0/1
2001:DB8:ACAD:23::3/64
FE80::3 link-local
N/A
Lo4
2001:DB8:ACAD:4::1/64
N/A
Lo5
2001:DB8:ACAD:5::1/64
N/A
Lo6
2001:DB8:ACAD:6::1/64
N/A
Lo7
2001:DB8:ACAD:7::1/64
N/A
Objectives
Part 1: Build the Network and Configure Basic Device Settings
Part 2: Configure Multiarea OSPFv3 Routing
Part 3: Configure Interarea Route Summarization
Background / Scenario
Using multiarea OSPFv3 in large IPv6 network deployments can reduce router processing by creating smaller
routing tables and requiring less memory overhead. In multiarea OSPFv3, all areas are connected to the
backbone area (area 0) through area border routers (ABRs).
In this lab, you will implement OSPFv3 routing for multiple areas and configure interarea route
summarizations on the Area Border Routers (ABRs). You will also use a number of show commands to
display and verify OSPFv3 routing information. This lab uses loopback addresses to simulate networks in
multiple OSPFv3 areas.
Note: The routers used with CCNA hands-on labs are Cisco 1941 Integrated Services Routers (ISRs) with
Cisco IOS Release 15.2(4)M3 (universalk9 image). Other routers and Cisco IOS versions can be used.
Depending on the model and Cisco IOS version, the commands available and output produced might vary
from what is shown in the labs. Refer to the Router Interface Summary Table at this end of this lab for the
correct interface identifiers.
Note: Make sure that the routers have been erased and have no startup configurations. If you are unsure,
contact your instructor.
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Page 2 of 19
Lab - Configuring Multiarea OSPFv3
Instructor Note: Refer to the Instructor Lab Manual for the procedures to initialize and reload devices.
Required Resources

3 Routers (Cisco 1941 with Cisco IOS Release 15.2(4)M3 universal image or comparable)

3 PCs (Windows 7, Vista, or XP with terminal emulation program, such as Tera Term)

Console cables to configure the Cisco IOS devices via the console ports

Serial cables as shown in the topology
Part 1: Build the Network and Configure Basic Device Settings
In Part 1, you will set up the network topology and configure basic settings on the routers.
Step 1: Cable the network as shown in the topology.
Step 2: Initialize and reload the routers as necessary.
Step 3: Configure basic settings for each router.
a. Disable DNS lookup.
b. Configure device name as shown in the topology.
c.
Assign class as the privileged EXEC password.
d. Assign cisco as the vty password.
e. Configure a MOTD banner to warn users that unauthorized access is prohibited.
f.
Configure logging synchronous for the console line.
g. Encrypt plain text passwords.
h. Configure the IPv6 unicast and link-local addresses listed in the Addressing Table for all interfaces.
i.
Enable IPv6 unicast routing on each router.
j.
Copy the running configuration to the startup configuration.
Step 4: Test connectivity.
The routers should be able to ping one another. The routers are unable to ping distant loopbacks until
OSPFv3 routing is configured. Verify and troubleshoot if necessary.
Part 2: Configure Multiarea OSPFv3 Routing
In Part 2, you will configure OSPFv3 routing on all routers to separate the network domain into three distinct
areas, and then verify that routing tables are updated correctly.
Step 1: Assign router IDs.
a. On R1, issue the ipv6 router ospf command to start an OSPFv3 process on the router.
R1(config)# ipv6 router ospf 1
Note: The OSPF process ID is kept locally and has no meaning to other routers on the network.
b. Assign the OSPFv3 router ID 1.1.1.1 to R1.
R1(config-rtr)# router-id 1.1.1.1
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Page 3 of 19
Lab - Configuring Multiarea OSPFv3
c.
Assign a router ID of 2.2.2.2 to R2 and a router ID of 3.3.3.3 to R3.
d. Issue the show ipv6 ospf command to verify the router IDs on all routers.
R2# show ipv6 ospf
Routing Process "ospfv3 1" with ID 2.2.2.2
Event-log enabled, Maximum number of events: 1000, Mode: cyclic
Router is not originating router-LSAs with maximum metric
<output omitted>
Step 2: Configure multiarea OSPFv3.
a. Issue the ipv6 ospf 1 area area-id command for each interface on R1 that is to participate in OSPFv3
routing. The loopback interfaces are assigned to area 1 and the serial interface is assigned to area 0. You
will change the network type on the loopback interfaces to ensure that the correct subnet is advertised.
R1(config)# interface lo0
R1(config-if)# ipv6 ospf 1 area 1
R1(config-if)# ipv6 ospf network point-to-point
R1(config-if)# interface lo1
R1(config-if)# ipv6 ospf 1 area 1
R1(config-if)# ipv6 ospf network point-to-point
R1(config-if)# interface lo2
R1(config-if)# ipv6 ospf 1 area 1
R1(config-if)# ipv6 ospf network point-to-point
R1(config-if)# interface lo3
R1(config-if)# ipv6 ospf 1 area 1
R1(config-if)# ipv6 ospf network point-to-point
R1(config-if)# interface s0/0/0
R1(config-if)# ipv6 ospf 1 area 0
b. Use the show ipv6 protocols command to verify multiarea OSPFv3 status.
R1# show ipv6 protocols
IPv6 Routing Protocol is "connected"
IPv6 Routing Protocol is "ND"
IPv6 Routing Protocol is "ospf 1"
Router ID 1.1.1.1
Area border router
Number of areas: 2 normal, 0 stub, 0 nssa
Interfaces (Area 0):
Serial0/0/0
Interfaces (Area 1):
Loopback0
Loopback1
Loopback2
Loopback3
Redistribution:
None
c.
Assign all interfaces on R2 to participate in OSPFv3 area 0. For the loopback interface, change the
network type to point-to point. Write the commands used in the space below.
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 4 of 19
Lab - Configuring Multiarea OSPFv3
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
R2(config)# interface lo8
R2(config-if)# ipv6 ospf 1 area 0
R2(config-if)# ipv6 ospf network point-to-point
R2(config-if)# interface s0/0/0
R2(config-if)# ipv6 ospf 1 area 0
R2(config-if)# interface s0/0/1
R2(config-if)# ipv6 ospf 1 area 0
d. Use the show ipv6 ospf interface brief command to view OSPFv3 enabled interfaces.
R2# show ipv6 ospf interface brief
Interface
Lo8
Se0/0/1
Se0/0/0
PID
1
1
1
Area
0
0
0
Intf ID
13
7
6
Cost
1
64
64
State
P2P
P2P
P2P
Nbrs F/C
0/0
1/1
1/1
e. Assign the loopback interfaces on R3 to participate in OSPFv3 area 2 and change the network type to
point-to-point. Assign the serial interface to participate in OSPFv3 area 0. Write the commands used in
the space below.
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
R3(config)# interface lo4
R3(config-if)# ipv6 ospf 1 area 2
R3(config-if)# ipv6 ospf network point-to-point
R3(config-if)# interface lo5
R3(config-if)# ipv6 ospf 1 area 2
R3(config-if)# ipv6 ospf network point-to-point
R3(config-if)# interface lo6
R3(config-if)# ipv6 ospf 1 area 2
R3(config-if)# ipv6 ospf network point-to-point
R3(config-if)# interface lo7
R3(config-if)# ipv6 ospf 1 area 2
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Page 5 of 19
Lab - Configuring Multiarea OSPFv3
R3(config-if)# ipv6 ospf network point-to-point
R3(config-if)# interface s0/0/1
R3(config-if)# ipv6 ospf 1 area 0
f.
Use the show ipv6 ospf command to verify configurations.
R3# show ipv6 ospf
Routing Process "ospfv3 1" with ID 3.3.3.3
Event-log enabled, Maximum number of events: 1000, Mode: cyclic
It is an area border router
Router is not originating router-LSAs with maximum metric
Initial SPF schedule delay 5000 msecs
Minimum hold time between two consecutive SPFs 10000 msecs
Maximum wait time between two consecutive SPFs 10000 msecs
Minimum LSA interval 5 secs
Minimum LSA arrival 1000 msecs
LSA group pacing timer 240 secs
Interface flood pacing timer 33 msecs
Retransmission pacing timer 66 msecs
Number of external LSA 0. Checksum Sum 0x000000
Number of areas in this router is 2. 2 normal 0 stub 0 nssa
Graceful restart helper support enabled
Reference bandwidth unit is 100 mbps
RFC1583 compatibility enabled
Area BACKBONE(0)
Number of interfaces in this area is 1
SPF algorithm executed 2 times
Number of LSA 16. Checksum Sum 0x0929F8
Number of DCbitless LSA 0
Number of indication LSA 0
Number of DoNotAge LSA 0
Flood list length 0
Area 2
Number of interfaces in this area is 4
SPF algorithm executed 2 times
Number of LSA 13. Checksum Sum 0x048E3C
Number of DCbitless LSA 0
Number of indication LSA 0
Number of DoNotAge LSA 0
Flood list length 0
Step 3: Verify OSPFv3 neighbors and routing information.
a. Issue the show ipv6 ospf neighbor command on all routers to verify that each router is listing the correct
routers as neighbors.
R1# show ipv6 ospf neighbor
OSPFv3 Router with ID (1.1.1.1) (Process ID 1)
Neighbor ID
Pri
State
Dead Time
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Interface ID
Interface
Page 6 of 19
Lab - Configuring Multiarea OSPFv3
2.2.2.2
0
FULL/
-
00:00:39
6
Serial0/0/0
b. Issue the show ipv6 route ospf command on all routers to verify that each router has learned routes to
all networks in the Addressing Table.
R1# show ipv6 route ospf
IPv6 Routing Table - default - 16 entries
Codes: C - Connected, L - Local, S - Static, U - Per-user Static route
B - BGP, R - RIP, H - NHRP, I1 - ISIS L1
I2 - ISIS L2, IA - ISIS interarea, IS - ISIS summary, D - EIGRP
EX - EIGRP external, ND - ND Default, NDp - ND Prefix, DCE - Destination
NDr - Redirect, O - OSPF Intra, OI - OSPF Inter, OE1 - OSPF ext 1
OE2 - OSPF ext 2, ON1 - OSPF NSSA ext 1, ON2 - OSPF NSSA ext 2
OI 2001:DB8:ACAD:4::/64 [110/129]
via FE80::2, Serial0/0/0
OI 2001:DB8:ACAD:5::/64 [110/129]
via FE80::2, Serial0/0/0
OI 2001:DB8:ACAD:6::/64 [110/129]
via FE80::2, Serial0/0/0
OI 2001:DB8:ACAD:7::/64 [110/129]
via FE80::2, Serial0/0/0
O
2001:DB8:ACAD:8::/64 [110/65]
via FE80::2, Serial0/0/0
O
2001:DB8:ACAD:23::/64 [110/128]
via FE80::2, Serial0/0/0
What is the significance of an OI route?
____________________________________________________________________________________
An OI route is an OSPF interarea route, which was learned from an OSPF neighbor participating in
another area.
c.
Issue the show ipv6 ospf database command on all routers.
R1# show ipv6 ospf database
OSPFv3 Router with ID (1.1.1.1) (Process ID 1)
Router Link States (Area 0)
ADV Router
1.1.1.1
2.2.2.2
3.3.3.3
Age
908
898
899
Seq#
0x80000001
0x80000003
0x80000001
Fragment ID
0
0
0
Link count
1
2
1
Bits
B
None
B
Inter Area Prefix Link States (Area 0)
ADV Router
1.1.1.1
3.3.3.3
Age
907
898
Seq#
0x80000001
0x80000001
Prefix
2001:DB8:ACAD::/62
2001:DB8:ACAD:4::/62
Link (Type-8) Link States (Area 0)
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Lab - Configuring Multiarea OSPFv3
ADV Router
1.1.1.1
2.2.2.2
Age
908
909
Seq#
0x80000001
0x80000002
Link ID
6
6
Interface
Se0/0/0
Se0/0/0
Intra Area Prefix Link States (Area 0)
ADV Router
1.1.1.1
2.2.2.2
3.3.3.3
Age
908
898
899
Seq#
0x80000001
0x80000003
0x80000001
Link ID
0
0
0
Ref-lstype
0x2001
0x2001
0x2001
Ref-LSID
0
0
0
Router Link States (Area 1)
ADV Router
1.1.1.1
Age
908
Seq#
0x80000001
Fragment ID
0
Link count
0
Bits
B
Inter Area Prefix Link States (Area 1)
ADV Router
1.1.1.1
1.1.1.1
1.1.1.1
1.1.1.1
Age
907
907
888
888
Seq#
0x80000001
0x80000001
0x80000001
0x80000001
Prefix
2001:DB8:ACAD:12::/64
2001:DB8:ACAD:8::/64
2001:DB8:ACAD:23::/64
2001:DB8:ACAD:4::/62
Link (Type-8) Link States (Area 1)
ADV Router
1.1.1.1
1.1.1.1
1.1.1.1
1.1.1.1
Age
908
908
908
908
Seq#
0x80000001
0x80000001
0x80000001
0x80000001
Link ID
13
14
15
16
Interface
Lo0
Lo1
Lo2
Lo3
Intra Area Prefix Link States (Area 1)
ADV Router
1.1.1.1
Age
908
Seq#
0x80000001
Link ID
0
Ref-lstype
0x2001
Ref-LSID
0
How many link state databases are found on R1? _____ 2
How many link state databases are found on R2? _____ 1
How many link state databases are found on R3? _____ 2
Part 3: Configure Interarea Route Summarization
In Part 3, you will manually configure interarea route summarization on the ABRs.
Step 1: Summarize networks on R1.
a. List the network addresses for the loopback interfaces and identify the hextet section where the
addresses differ.
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Page 8 of 19
Lab - Configuring Multiarea OSPFv3
2001:DB8:ACAD:0000::1/64
2001:DB8:ACAD:0001::1/64
2001:DB8:ACAD:0002::1/64
2001:DB8:ACAD:0003::1/64
b. Convert the differing section from hex to binary.
2001:DB8:ACAD: 0000 0000 0000 0000::1/64
2001:DB8:ACAD: 0000 0000 0000 0001::1/64
2001:DB8:ACAD: 0000 0000 0000 0010::1/64
2001:DB8:ACAD: 0000 0000 0000 0011::1/64
c.
Count the number of leftmost matching bits to determine the prefix for the summary route.
2001:DB8:ACAD: 0000 0000 0000 0000::1/64
2001:DB8:ACAD: 0000 0000 0000 0001::1/64
2001:DB8:ACAD: 0000 0000 0000 0010::1/64
2001:DB8:ACAD: 0000 0000 0000 0011::1/64
How many bits match? _____ /62
d. Copy the matching bits and then add zero bits to determine the summarized network address.
2001:DB8:ACAD: 0000 0000 0000 0000::0
e. Convert the binary section back to hex.
2001:DB8:ACAD::
f.
Append the prefix of the summary route (result of Step 1c).
2001:DB8:ACAD::/62
Step 2: Configure interarea route summarization on R1.
a. To manually configure interarea route summarization on R1, use the area area-id range address mask
command.
R1(config)# ipv6 router ospf 1
R1(config-rtr)# area 1 range 2001:DB8:ACAD::/62
b. View the OSPFv3 routes on R3.
R3# show ipv6 route ospf
IPv6 Routing Table - default - 14 entries
Codes: C - Connected, L - Local, S - Static, U - Per-user Static route
B - BGP, R - RIP, H - NHRP, I1 - ISIS L1
I2 - ISIS L2, IA - ISIS interarea, IS - ISIS summary, D - EIGRP
EX - EIGRP external, ND - ND Default, NDp - ND Prefix, DCE - Destination
NDr - Redirect, O - OSPF Intra, OI - OSPF Inter, OE1 - OSPF ext 1
OE2 - OSPF ext 2, ON1 - OSPF NSSA ext 1, ON2 - OSPF NSSA ext 2
OI 2001:DB8:ACAD::/62 [110/129]
via FE80::2, Serial0/0/1
O
2001:DB8:ACAD:8::/64 [110/65]
via FE80::2, Serial0/0/1
O
2001:DB8:ACAD:12::/64 [110/128]
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Page 9 of 19
Lab - Configuring Multiarea OSPFv3
via FE80::2, Serial0/0/1
Compare this output to the output from Part 2, Step 3b. How are the networks in area 1 now expressed in
the routing table on R3?
____________________________________________________________________________________
The networks are summarized as a single OSPF interarea route.
c.
View the OSPFv3 routes on R1.
R1# show ipv6 route ospf
IPv6 Routing Table - default - 18 entries
Codes: C - Connected, L - Local, S - Static, U - Per-user Static route
B - BGP, R - RIP, H - NHRP, I1 - ISIS L1
I2 - ISIS L2, IA - ISIS interarea, IS - ISIS summary, D - EIGRP
EX - EIGRP external, ND - ND Default, NDp - ND Prefix, DCE - Destination
NDr - Redirect, O - OSPF Intra, OI - OSPF Inter, OE1 - OSPF ext 1
OE2 - OSPF ext 2, ON1 - OSPF NSSA ext 1, ON2 - OSPF NSSA ext 2
O
2001:DB8:ACAD::/62 [110/1]
via Null0, directly connected
OI 2001:DB8:ACAD:4::/64 [110/129]
via FE80::2, Serial0/0/0
OI 2001:DB8:ACAD:5::/64 [110/129]
via FE80::2, Serial0/0/0
OI 2001:DB8:ACAD:6::/64 [110/129]
via FE80::2, Serial0/0/0
OI 2001:DB8:ACAD:7::/64 [110/129]
via FE80::2, Serial0/0/0
O
2001:DB8:ACAD:8::/64 [110/65]
via FE80::2, Serial0/0/0
O
2001:DB8:ACAD:23::/64 [110/128]
via FE80::2, Serial0/0/0
Compare this output to the output from Part 2, Step 3b. How are the summarized networks expressed in
the routing table on R1?
____________________________________________________________________________________
The summarized networks appear as an OSPF intra-area (O) entry with a Null0 exit interface. This is a
bogus entry created by the router to prevent routing loops.
Step 3: Summarize networks and configure interarea route summarization on R3.
a. Summarize the loopback interfaces on R3.
1) List the network addresses and identify the hextet section where the addresses differ.
2) Convert the differing section from hex to binary.
3) Count the number of left-most matching bits to determine the prefix for the summary route.
4) Copy the matching bits and then add zero bits to determine the summarized network address.
5) Convert the binary section back to hex.
6) Append the prefix of the summary route.
Write the summary address in the space provided.
____________________________________________________________________________________
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Page 10 of 19
Lab - Configuring Multiarea OSPFv3
2001:db8:acad:4::/62
b. Manually configure interarea route summarization on R3. Write the commands in the space provided.
____________________________________________________________________________________
R3(config)# ipv6 router ospf 1
R3(config-rtr)# area 2 range 2001:db8:acad:4::/62
c.
Verify that area 2 routes are summarized on R1. What command was used?
____________________________________________________________________________________
show ipv6 route or show ipv6 route ospf
d. Record the routing table entry on R1 for the summarized route advertised from R3.
____________________________________________________________________________________
OI
2001:DB8:ACAD:4::/62 [110/129]
via FE80::2, Serial0/0/0
Reflection
1. Why would multiarea OSPFv3 be used?
_______________________________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________________________
Answers will vary. Multiarea OSPFv3 can be used in large network domains to improve the efficiency of the
routing process, decrease the size of routing tables, and decrease router CPU/memory processing
requirements.
2. What is the benefit of configuring interarea route summarization?
_______________________________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________________________
Configuring interarea route summarization decreases the size of routing tables throughout the network
domain and decreases the number of type 3 link state advertisements (LSAs) sent from area border routers to
the backbone area. If one of the summarized networks is down, it does not necessarily cause the routers in
other areas to rerun their SPF algorithm.
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Page 11 of 19
Lab - Configuring Multiarea OSPFv3
Router Interface Summary Table
Router Interface Summary
Router Model
Ethernet Interface #1
Ethernet Interface #2
Serial Interface #1
Serial Interface #2
1800
Fast Ethernet 0/0
(F0/0)
Fast Ethernet 0/1
(F0/1)
Serial 0/0/0 (S0/0/0)
Serial 0/0/1 (S0/0/1)
1900
Gigabit Ethernet 0/0
(G0/0)
Gigabit Ethernet 0/1
(G0/1)
Serial 0/0/0 (S0/0/0)
Serial 0/0/1 (S0/0/1)
2801
Fast Ethernet 0/0
(F0/0)
Fast Ethernet 0/1
(F0/1)
Serial 0/1/0 (S0/1/0)
Serial 0/1/1 (S0/1/1)
2811
Fast Ethernet 0/0
(F0/0)
Fast Ethernet 0/1
(F0/1)
Serial 0/0/0 (S0/0/0)
Serial 0/0/1 (S0/0/1)
2900
Gigabit Ethernet 0/0
(G0/0)
Gigabit Ethernet 0/1
(G0/1)
Serial 0/0/0 (S0/0/0)
Serial 0/0/1 (S0/0/1)
Note: To find out how the router is configured, look at the interfaces to identify the type of router and how many
interfaces the router has. There is no way to effectively list all the combinations of configurations for each router
class. This table includes identifiers for the possible combinations of Ethernet and Serial interfaces in the device.
The table does not include any other type of interface, even though a specific router may contain one. An
example of this might be an ISDN BRI interface. The string in parenthesis is the legal abbreviation that can be
used in Cisco IOS commands to represent the interface.
Device Configs - Final
Router R1
R1#show run
Building configuration...
Current configuration : 2078 bytes
!
version 15.2
service timestamps debug datetime msec
service timestamps log datetime msec
no service password-encryption
!
hostname R1
!
boot-start-marker
boot-end-marker
!
!
!
no aaa new-model
!
!
no ip domain lookup
ip cef
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Page 12 of 19
Lab - Configuring Multiarea OSPFv3
ipv6 unicast-routing
ipv6 cef
!
multilink bundle-name authenticated
!
redundancy
!
interface Loopback0
no ip address
ipv6 address 2001:DB8:ACAD::1/64
ipv6 ospf 1 area 1
ipv6 ospf network point-to-point
!
interface Loopback1
no ip address
ipv6 address 2001:DB8:ACAD:1::1/64
ipv6 ospf 1 area 1
ipv6 ospf network point-to-point
!
interface Loopback2
no ip address
ipv6 address 2001:DB8:ACAD:2::1/64
ipv6 ospf 1 area 1
ipv6 ospf network point-to-point
!
interface Loopback3
no ip address
ipv6 address 2001:DB8:ACAD:3::1/64
ipv6 ospf 1 area 1
ipv6 ospf network point-to-point
!
interface Embedded-Service-Engine0/0
no ip address
shutdown
!
interface GigabitEthernet0/0
no ip address
shutdown
duplex auto
speed auto
!
interface GigabitEthernet0/1
no ip address
shutdown
duplex auto
speed auto
!
interface Serial0/0/0
no ip address
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Page 13 of 19
Lab - Configuring Multiarea OSPFv3
ipv6 address FE80::1 link-local
ipv6 address 2001:DB8:ACAD:12::1/64
ipv6 ospf 1 area 0
clock rate 2000000
!
interface Serial0/0/1
no ip address
shutdown
!
ip forward-protocol nd
!
no ip http server
no ip http secure-server
!
!
ipv6 router ospf 1
router-id 1.1.1.1
area 1 range 2001:DB8:ACAD::/62
!
!
!
!
control-plane
!
!
banner motd ^CUnauthorized access is strictly prohibited.^C
!
line con 0
password 7 045802150C2E
logging synchronous
login
line aux 0
line 2
no activation-character
no exec
transport preferred none
transport input all
transport output pad telnet rlogin lapb-ta mop udptn v120 ssh
stopbits 1
line vty 0 4
password 7 060506324F41
login
transport input all
!
scheduler allocate 20000 1000
!
end
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Page 14 of 19
Lab - Configuring Multiarea OSPFv3
Router R2
R2#show run
Building configuration...
Current configuration : 1809 bytes
!
version 15.2
service timestamps debug datetime msec
service timestamps log datetime msec
no service password-encryption
!
hostname R2
!
boot-start-marker
boot-end-marker
!
no aaa new-model
!
no ip domain lookup
ip cef
ipv6 unicast-routing
ipv6 cef
!
multilink bundle-name authenticated
!
redundancy
!
interface Loopback8
no ip address
ipv6 address 2001:DB8:ACAD:8::1/64
ipv6 ospf 1 area 0
ipv6 ospf network point-to-point
!
interface Embedded-Service-Engine0/0
no ip address
shutdown
!
interface GigabitEthernet0/0
no ip address
shutdown
duplex auto
speed auto
!
interface GigabitEthernet0/1
no ip address
shutdown
duplex auto
speed auto
!
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Page 15 of 19
Lab - Configuring Multiarea OSPFv3
interface Serial0/0/0
no ip address
ipv6 address FE80::2 link-local
ipv6 address 2001:DB8:ACAD:12::2/64
ipv6 ospf 1 area 0
!
interface Serial0/0/1
no ip address
ipv6 address FE80::2 link-local
ipv6 address 2001:DB8:ACAD:23::2/64
ipv6 ospf 1 area 0
clock rate 2000000
!
ip forward-protocol nd
!
no ip http server
no ip http secure-server
!
!
ipv6 router ospf 1
router-id 2.2.2.2
!
!
!
control-plane
!
!
banner motd ^CUnauthorized access is strictly prohibited.^C
!
line con 0
password 7 0822455D0A16
logging synchronous
login
line aux 0
line 2
no activation-character
no exec
transport preferred none
transport input all
transport output pad telnet rlogin lapb-ta mop udptn v120 ssh
stopbits 1
line vty 0 4
password 7 110A1016141D
login
transport input all
!
scheduler allocate 20000 1000
!
end
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 16 of 19
Lab - Configuring Multiarea OSPFv3
Router R3
R3#show run
Building configuration...
Current configuration : 2142 bytes
!
version 15.2
service timestamps debug datetime msec
service timestamps log datetime msec
no service password-encryption
!
hostname R3
!
boot-start-marker
boot-end-marker
!
no aaa new-model
memory-size iomem 15
!
no ip domain lookup
ip cef
ipv6 unicast-routing
ipv6 cef
!
multilink bundle-name authenticated!
!
redundancy
!
interface Loopback4
no ip address
ipv6 address 2001:DB8:ACAD:4::1/64
ipv6 ospf 1 area 2
ipv6 ospf network point-to-point
!
interface Loopback5
no ip address
ipv6 address 2001:DB8:ACAD:5::1/64
ipv6 ospf 1 area 2
ipv6 ospf network point-to-point
!
interface Loopback6
no ip address
ipv6 address 2001:DB8:ACAD:6::1/64
ipv6 ospf 1 area 2
ipv6 ospf network point-to-point
!
interface Loopback7
no ip address
ipv6 address 2001:DB8:ACAD:7::1/64
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Page 17 of 19
Lab - Configuring Multiarea OSPFv3
ipv6 ospf 1 area 2
ipv6 ospf network point-to-point
!
interface Embedded-Service-Engine0/0
no ip address
shutdown
!
interface GigabitEthernet0/0
no ip address
shutdown
duplex auto
speed auto
!
interface GigabitEthernet0/1
no ip address
shutdown
duplex auto
speed auto
!
interface Serial0/0/0
no ip address
shutdown
clock rate 2000000
!
interface Serial0/0/1
no ip address
ipv6 address FE80::3 link-local
ipv6 address 2001:DB8:ACAD:23::3/64
ipv6 ospf 1 area 0
!
ip forward-protocol nd
!
no ip http server
no ip http secure-server
!
ipv6 router ospf 1
router-id 3.3.3.3
area 2 range 2001:DB8:ACAD:4::/62
!
control-plane
!
banner motd ^CUnauthorized access is strictly prohibited.^C
!
line con 0
password 7 02050D480809
logging synchronous
login
line aux 0
line 2
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Page 18 of 19
Lab - Configuring Multiarea OSPFv3
no activation-character
no exec
transport preferred none
transport input all
transport output pad telnet rlogin lapb-ta mop udptn v120 ssh
stopbits 1
line vty 0 4
password 7 14141B180F0B
login
transport input all
!
scheduler allocate 20000 1000
!
end
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 19 of 19
Lab – Troubleshooting Multiarea OSPFv2 and OSPFv3 (Instructor
Version)
Instructor Note: Red font color or Gray highlights indicate text that appears in the instructor copy only.
Topology
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Page 1 of 29
Lab – Troubleshooting Multiarea OSPFv2 and OSPFv3
Addressing Table
Device
R1
R2
R3
Interface
IP Address
Lo0
209.165.200.225/30
Lo1
192.168.1.1/24
2001:DB8:ACAD:1::1/64
FE80::1 link-local
Lo2
192.168.2.1/24
2001:DB8:ACAD:2::1/64
FE80::1 link-local
S0/0/0 (DCE)
192.168.12.1/30
2001:DB8:ACAD:12::1/64
FE80::1 link-local
S0/0/0
192.168.12.2/30
2001:DB8:ACAD:12::2/64
FE80::2 link-local
S0/0/1 (DCE)
192.168.23.2/30
2001:DB8:ACAD:23::2/64
FE80::2 link-local
Lo6
192.168.6.1/24
2001:DB8:ACAD:6::1/64
FE80::2 link-local
Lo4
192.168.4.1/24
2001:DB8:ACAD:4::1/64
FE80::3 link-local
Lo5
192.168.5.1/24
2001:DB8:ACAD:5::1/64
FE80::3 link-local
S0/0/1
192.168.23.1/30
2001:DB8:ACAD:23::1/64
FE80::3 link-local
Objectives
Part 1: Build the Network and Load Device Configurations
Part 2: Troubleshoot Layer 3 Connectivity
Part 3: Troubleshoot OSPFv2
Part 4: Troubleshoot OSPFv3
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 2 of 29
Lab – Troubleshooting Multiarea OSPFv2 and OSPFv3
Background / Scenario
Open Shortest Path First (OSPF) is an open-standard link-state routing protocol for IP networks. OSPFv2 is
defined for IPv4 networks, while OSPFv3 is defined for IPv6 networks. OSPFv2 and OSPFv3 are completely
isolated routing protocols, meaning changes in OSPFv2 do not affect OSPFv3 routing, and vice versa.
In this lab, a multiarea OSPF network running OSPFv2 and OSPFv3 is experiencing problems. You have
been assigned to find the problems with the network and correct them.
Note: The routers used with CCNA hands-on labs are Cisco 1941 Integrated Services Routers (ISRs) with
Cisco IOS Release 15.2(4)M3 (universalk9 image). Other routers and Cisco IOS versions can be used.
Depending on the model and Cisco IOS version, the commands available and output produced might vary
from what is shown in the labs. Refer to the Router Interface Summary Table at the end of this lab for the
correct interface identifiers.
Note: Make sure that the routers have been erased and have no startup configurations. If you are unsure,
contact your instructor.
Instructor Note: Refer to the Instructor Lab Manual for the procedures to initialize and reload devices.
Required Resources

3 Routers (Cisco 1941 with Cisco IOS Release 15.2(4)M3 universal image or comparable)

Console cables to configure the Cisco IOS devices via the console ports

Serial cables as shown in the topology
Part 1: Build the Network and Load Device Configurations
Step 1: Cable the network as shown in the topology.
Step 2: Load router configuration files.
Load the following configurations into the appropriate router. All routers have the same passwords. The
enable password is class, and the line password is cisco.
Router R1 Configuration:
enable
conf t
hostname R1
enable secret class
ipv6 unicast-routing
no ip domain lookup
interface Loopback0
ip address 209.165.200.225 255.255.255.252
interface Loopback1
ip address 192.168.1.1 255.255.255.0
ipv6 address 2001:DB80:ACAD:1::1/64
! ipv6 address 2001:DB8:ACAD:1::1/64
! ipv6 ospf 1 area 1
ipv6 ospf network point-to-point
interface Loopback2
ip address 192.168.2.1 255.255.255.0
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Page 3 of 29
Lab – Troubleshooting Multiarea OSPFv2 and OSPFv3
ipv6 address 2001:DB8:ACAD:2::1/64
ipv6 ospf 1 area 1
ipv6 ospf network point-to-point
interface Serial0/0/0
ip address 192.168.21.1 255.255.255.252
!ip address 192.168.12.1 255.255.255.252
ipv6 address FE80::1 link-local
ipv6 address 2001:DB8:ACAD:12::1/64
ipv6 ospf 1 area 0
clock rate 128000
shutdown
!no shutdown
router ospf 1
router-id 1.1.1.1
passive-interface Loopback1
passive-interface Loopback2
!network 192.168.1.0 0.0.0.255 area 1
network 192.168.2.0 0.0.0.255 area 1
network 192.168.12.0 0.0.0.3 area 0
default-information originate
ipv6 router ospf 1
! router-id 1.1.1.1
area 1 range 2001:DB8:ACAD::/61
! area 1 range 2001:DB8:ACAD::/62
ip route 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 Loopback0
banner motd @
Unauthorized Access is Prohibited! @
line con 0
password cisco
logging synchronous
login
line vty 0 4
password cisco
logging synchronous
login
transport input all
end
Router R2 Configuration:
enable
conf t
hostname R2
ipv6 unicast-routing
no ip domain lookup
enable secret class
interface Loopback6
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 4 of 29
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ip address 192.168.6.1 255.255.255.0
ipv6 address 2001:DB8:CAD:6::1/64
! ipv6 address 2001:DB8:ACAD:6::1/64
! ipv6 ospf 1 area 3
interface Serial0/0/0
ip address 192.168.12.2 255.255.255.252
ipv6 address FE80::2 link-local
ipv6 address 2001:DB8:ACAD:12::2/64
ipv6 ospf 1 area 0
no shutdown
interface Serial0/0/1
ip address 192.168.23.2 255.255.255.252
ipv6 address FE80::2 link-local
ipv6 address 2001:DB8:ACAD:23::2/64
ipv6 ospf 1 area 3
clock rate 128000
no shutdown
router ospf 1
router-id 2.2.2.2
passive-interface Loopback6
network 192.168.6.0 0.0.0.255 area 3
network 192.168.12.0 0.0.0.3 area 0
network 192.168.23.0 0.0.0.3 area 3
ipv6 router ospf 1
router-id 2.2.2.2
banner motd @
Unauthorized Access is Prohibited! @
line con 0
password cisco
logging synchronous
login
line vty 0 4
password cisco
logging synchronous
login
transport input all
end
Router R3 Configuration:
enable
conf t
hostname R3
no ip domain lookup
ipv6 unicast-routing
enable secret class
interface Loopback4
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 5 of 29
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ip address 192.168.4.1 255.255.255.0
ipv6 address 2001:DB8:ACAD:4::1/64
ipv6 ospf 1 area 3
interface Loopback5
ip address 192.168.5.1 255.255.255.0
ipv6 address 2001:DB8:ACAD:5::1/64
ipv6 ospf 1 area 3
interface Serial0/0/1
ip address 192.168.23.1 255.255.255.252
ipv6 address FE80::3 link-local
ipv6 address 2001:DB8:ACAD:23::1/64
ipv6 ospf 1 area 3
no shutdown
router ospf 1
router-id 3.3.3.3
passive-interface Loopback4
passive-interface Loopback5
network 192.168.4.0 0.0.0.255 area 3
network 192.168.5.0 0.0.0.255 area 3
! network 192.168.23.0 0.0.0.3 area 3
ipv6 router ospf 1
router-id 3.3.3.3
banner motd @
Unauthorized Access is Prohibited! @
line con 0
password cisco
logging synchronous
login
line vty 0 4
password cisco
logging synchronous
login
transport input all
end
Step 3: Save your configuration.
Part 2: Troubleshoot Layer 3 Connectivity
In Part 2, you will verify that Layer 3 connectivity is established on all interfaces. You will need to test both
IPv4 and IPv6 connectivity for all device interfaces.
Step 1: Verify the interfaces listed in the Addressing Table are active and configured with
correct IP address information.
a. Issue the show ip interface brief command on all three routers to verify that the interfaces are in an
up/up state.
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
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R1# show ip interface brief
Interface
Embedded-Service-Engine0/0
GigabitEthernet0/0
GigabitEthernet0/1
Serial0/0/0
Serial0/0/1
Loopback0
Loopback1
Loopback2
IP-Address
unassigned
unassigned
unassigned
192.168.21.1
unassigned
209.165.200.225
192.168.1.1
192.168.2.1
OK?
YES
YES
YES
YES
YES
YES
YES
YES
Method
unset
unset
unset
manual
unset
manual
manual
manual
Status
administratively
administratively
administratively
administratively
administratively
up
up
up
OK?
YES
YES
YES
YES
YES
YES
Method
unset
unset
unset
manual
SLARP
manual
Status
Protocol
administratively down down
administratively down down
administratively down down
down
down
up
up
up
up
OK?
YES
YES
YES
YES
YES
YES
YES
Method
unset
unset
unset
unset
manual
manual
manual
Status
administratively
administratively
administratively
administratively
up
up
up
down
down
down
down
down
Protocol
down
down
down
down
down
up
up
up
R2# show ip interface brief
Interface
Embedded-Service-Engine0/0
GigabitEthernet0/0
GigabitEthernet0/1
Serial0/0/0
Serial0/0/1
Loopback6
IP-Address
unassigned
unassigned
unassigned
192.168.12.2
192.168.23.2
192.168.6.1
R3# show ip interface brief
Interface
Embedded-Service-Engine0/0
GigabitEthernet0/0
GigabitEthernet0/1
Serial0/0/0
Serial0/0/1
Loopback4
Loopback5
IP-Address
unassigned
unassigned
unassigned
unassigned
192.168.23.1
192.168.4.1
192.168.5.1
down
down
down
down
Protocol
down
down
down
down
up
up
up
b. Issue the show run | section interface command to view all the commands related to interfaces.
R1:
R1# show run | section interface
interface Loopback0
ip address 209.165.200.225 255.255.255.252
interface Loopback1
ip address 192.168.1.1 255.255.255.0
ipv6 address 2001:DB80:ACAD:1::1/64
ipv6 ospf 1 area 0
ipv6 ospf network point-to-point
interface Loopback2
ip address 192.168.2.1 255.255.255.0
ipv6 address 2001:DB8:ACAD:2::1/64
ipv6 ospf 1 area 1
ipv6 ospf network point-to-point
interface Embedded-Service-Engine0/0
no ip address
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
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shutdown
interface GigabitEthernet0/0
no ip address
shutdown
duplex auto
speed auto
interface GigabitEthernet0/1
no ip address
shutdown
duplex auto
speed auto
interface Serial0/0/0
ip address 192.168.21.1 255.255.255.252
shutdown
ipv6 address FE80::1 link-local
ipv6 address 2001:DB8:ACAD:12::1/64
ipv6 ospf 1 area 1
clock rate 128000
interface Serial0/0/1
no ip address
shutdown
passive-interface Loopback1
passive-interface Loopback2
R2:
R2# show run | section interface
interface Loopback6
ip address 192.168.6.1 255.255.255.0
ipv6 address 2001:DB8:CAD:6::1/64
interface Embedded-Service-Engine0/0
no ip address
shutdown
interface GigabitEthernet0/0
no ip address
shutdown
duplex auto
speed auto
interface GigabitEthernet0/1
no ip address
shutdown
duplex auto
speed auto
interface Serial0/0/0
ip address 192.168.12.2 255.255.255.252
ipv6 address FE80::2 link-local
ipv6 address 2001:DB8:ACAD:12::2/64
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
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ipv6 ospf 1 area 0
interface Serial0/0/1
ip address 192.168.23.2 255.255.255.252
ipv6 address FE80::2 link-local
ipv6 address 2001:DB8:ACAD:23::2/64
ipv6 ospf 1 area 3
clock rate 128000
passive-interface Loopback6
R3:
R3# show run | section interface
interface Loopback4
ip address 192.168.4.1 255.255.255.0
ipv6 address 2001:DB8:ACAD:4::1/64
ipv6 ospf 1 area 3
interface Loopback5
ip address 192.168.5.1 255.255.255.0
ipv6 address 2001:DB8:ACAD:5::1/64
ipv6 ospf 1 area 3
interface Embedded-Service-Engine0/0
no ip address
shutdown
interface GigabitEthernet0/0
no ip address
shutdown
duplex auto
speed auto
interface GigabitEthernet0/1
no ip address
shutdown
duplex auto
speed auto
interface Serial0/0/0
no ip address
shutdown
clock rate 2000000
interface Serial0/0/1
ip address 192.168.23.1 255.255.255.252
ipv6 address FE80::3 link-local
ipv6 address 2001:DB8:ACAD:23::1/64
ipv6 ospf 1 area 3
passive-interface Loopback4
passive-interface Loopback5
c.
Resolve all problems found. Record the commands used to correct the configuration.
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
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Lab – Troubleshooting Multiarea OSPFv2 and OSPFv3
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
R1(config)# interface s0/0/0
R1(config-if)# ip address 192.168.12.1 255.255.255.252
R1(config-if)# no shutdown
R1(config-if)# interface lo1
R1(config-if)# no ipv6 address 2001:DB80:ACAD:1::1/64
R1(config-if)# ipv6 address 2001:db8:acad:1::1/64
R1(config-if)# end
R2(config)# interface lo6
R2(config-if)# no ipv6 address 2001:DB8:CAD:6::1/64
R2(config-if)# ipv6 address 2001:db8:acad:6::1/64
R2(config-if)# end
R3: No L3 connectivity issues
d. Using the ping command, verify that IPv4 and IPv6 connectivity has been established on all directly
connected router interfaces. If problems still exist, continue troubleshooting Layer 3 issues.
Part 3: Troubleshoot OSPFv2
Note: LAN (loopback) interfaces should not advertise OSPF routing information, but routes to these networks
should be contained in the routing tables.
Step 1: Test IPv4 end-to-end connectivity.
From each router, ping all interfaces on the other routers. Record your results below as IPv4 OSPFv2
connectivity problems do exist.
_______________________________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________________________
R1 to R2: All pings were successful.
R1 to R3: All pings failed.
R2 to R1: All pings were successful.
R2 to R3: Pings to the Loopback 4 and 5 failed.
R3 to R1: All pings failed.
R3 to R2: Pings to the Loopback 6 and Serial 0/0/0 failed.
Step 2: Verify that all interfaces are assigned to the proper OSPFv2 areas on R1.
a. Issue the show ip protocols command to verify that OSPF is running and that all networks are being
advertised in the correct areas. Verify that the router ID is set correctly, as well for OSPF.
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
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R1# show ip protocols
*** IP Routing is NSF aware ***
Routing Protocol is "ospf 1"
Outgoing update filter list for all interfaces is not set
Incoming update filter list for all interfaces is not set
Router ID 1.1.1.1
It is an area border and autonomous system boundary router
Redistributing External Routes from,
Number of areas in this router is 2. 2 normal 0 stub 0 nssa
Maximum path: 4
Routing for Networks:
192.168.2.0 0.0.0.255 area 1
192.168.12.0 0.0.0.3 area 0
Passive Interface(s):
Loopback1
Loopback2
Routing Information Sources:
Gateway
Distance
Last Update
2.2.2.2
110
00:10:43
Distance: (default is 110)
b. If required, make the necessary changes needed to the configuration on R1 based on the output from the
show ip protocols command. Record the commands used to correct the configuration.
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
R1(config)# router ospf 1
R1(config-router)# network 192.168.1.0 0.0.0.255 area 1
R1(config-router)# end
c.
If required, re-issue the show ip protocols command to verify that your changes had the desired effect.
d. Issue the show ip ospf interface brief command to verify that the serial interface and loopback
interfaces 1 and 2 are listed as OSPF networks assigned to their respective areas.
R1# show ip ospf interface brief
Interface
Se0/0/0
Lo2
Lo1
PID
1
1
1
Area
0
1
1
IP Address/Mask
192.168.12.1/30
192.168.2.1/24
192.168.1.1/24
Cost
64
1
1
State
P2P
LOOP
LOOP
Nbrs F/C
1/1
0/0
0/0
e. Resolve any problems discovered on R1 for OSPFv2.
Instructor Note: All problems were resolved for OSPFv2 on R1.
Step 3: Verify that all interfaces are assigned to the proper OSPFv2 areas on R2.
a. Issue the show ip protocols command to verify that OSPF is running and that all networks are being
advertised in their proper respective areas. Verify that the router ID is also set correctly.
R2# show ip protocols
*** IP Routing is NSF aware ***
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
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Routing Protocol is "ospf 1"
Outgoing update filter list for all interfaces is not set
Incoming update filter list for all interfaces is not set
Router ID 2.2.2.2
It is an area border router
Number of areas in this router is 2. 2 normal 0 stub 0 nssa
Maximum path: 4
Routing for Networks:
192.168.6.0 0.0.0.255 area 3
192.168.12.0 0.0.0.3 area 0
192.168.23.0 0.0.0.3 area 3
Passive Interface(s):
Loopback6
Routing Information Sources:
Gateway
Distance
Last Update
1.1.1.1
110
00:09:33
Distance: (default is 110)
b. If required, make any necessary changes to the configuration on R2 based on the output from the show
ip protocols command. Record the commands used to correct the configuration.
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
No changes are necessary on R2 for OSPFv2.
Instructor Note: No changes are necessary on R2 for OSPFv2.
c.
If required, re-issue the show ip protocols command to verify that your changes had the desired effect.
d. Issue the show ip ospf interface brief command to verify that all interfaces are listed as OSPF networks
assigned to their proper respective areas.
R2# show ip ospf interface brief
Interface
Se0/0/0
Lo6
Se0/0/1
PID
1
1
1
Area
0
3
3
IP Address/Mask
192.168.12.2/30
192.168.6.1/24
192.168.23.2/30
Cost
64
1
64
State
P2P
LOOP
P2P
Nbrs F/C
1/1
0/0
0/0
e. Resolve any problems discovered on R2 for OSPFv2.
Instructor Note: All problems were resolved for OSPFv2 on R2.
Step 4: Verify that all interfaces are assigned to the proper OSPFv2 areas on R3.
a. Issue the show ip protocols command to verify that OSPF is running and that all networks are being
advertised in their respective areas. Verify that the router ID is also set correctly.
R3# show ip protocols
*** IP Routing is NSF aware ***
Routing Protocol is "ospf 1"
Outgoing update filter list for all interfaces is not set
Incoming update filter list for all interfaces is not set
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
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Lab – Troubleshooting Multiarea OSPFv2 and OSPFv3
Router ID 3.3.3.3
Number of areas in this router is 1. 1 normal 0 stub 0 nssa
Maximum path: 4
Routing for Networks:
192.168.4.0 0.0.0.255 area 3
192.168.5.0 0.0.0.255 area 3
Passive Interface(s):
Loopback4
Loopback5
Routing Information Sources:
Gateway
Distance
Last Update
Distance: (default is 110)
b. If required, make the necessary changes to the configuration on R3 based on the output from the show
ip protocols command. Record the commands used to correct the configuration.
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
R3(config)# router ospf 1
R3(config-router)# network 192.168.23.0 0.0.0.3 area 3
R3(config-router)# end
c.
If required, re-issue the show ip protocols command to verify that your changes had the desired effect.
d. Issue the show ip ospf interface brief command to verify that all interfaces are listed as OSPF networks
assigned to their proper areas.
R3# show ip ospf interface brief
Interface
Lo4
Lo5
Se0/0/1
PID
1
1
1
Area
3
3
3
IP Address/Mask
192.168.4.1/24
192.168.5.1/24
192.168.23.1/30
Cost
1
1
64
State
LOOP
LOOP
P2P
Nbrs F/C
0/0
0/0
1/1
e. Resolve any problems discovered on R3 for OSPFv2.
Instructor Note: All problems were resolved for OSPFv2 on R3.
Step 5: Verify OSPFv2 neighbor information.
Issue the show ip ospf neighbor command to verify that each router has all OSPFv2 neighbors listed.
R1# show ip ospf neighbor
Neighbor ID
2.2.2.2
Pri
0
State
FULL/
-
Dead Time
00:00:39
Address
192.168.12.2
Interface
Serial0/0/0
-
Dead Time
00:00:31
00:00:39
Address
192.168.12.1
192.168.23.1
Interface
Serial0/0/0
Serial0/0/1
-
Dead Time
00:00:39
Address
192.168.23.2
Interface
Serial0/0/1
R2# show ip ospf neighbor
Neighbor ID
1.1.1.1
3.3.3.3
Pri
0
0
State
FULL/
FULL/
R3# show ip ospf neighbor
Neighbor ID
2.2.2.2
Pri
0
State
FULL/
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 13 of 29
Lab – Troubleshooting Multiarea OSPFv2 and OSPFv3
Step 6: Verify OSPFv2 routing information.
a. Issue the show ip route ospf command to verify that each router has all OSPFv2 routes in their
respective routing tables.
R1# show ip route ospf
Codes: L - local, C - connected, S - static, R - RIP, M - mobile, B - BGP
D - EIGRP, EX - EIGRP external, O - OSPF, IA - OSPF inter area
N1 - OSPF NSSA external type 1, N2 - OSPF NSSA external type 2
E1 - OSPF external type 1, E2 - OSPF external type 2
i - IS-IS, su - IS-IS summary, L1 - IS-IS level-1, L2 - IS-IS level-2
ia - IS-IS inter area, * - candidate default, U - per-user static route
o - ODR, P - periodic downloaded static route, H - NHRP, l - LISP
+ - replicated route, % - next hop override
Gateway of last resort is 0.0.0.0 to network 0.0.0.0
O IA
O IA
O IA
O IA
192.168.4.0/32 is subnetted, 1 subnets
192.168.4.1 [110/129] via 192.168.12.2, 00:16:10, Serial0/0/0
192.168.5.0/32 is subnetted, 1 subnets
192.168.5.1 [110/129] via 192.168.12.2, 00:16:10, Serial0/0/0
192.168.6.0/32 is subnetted, 1 subnets
192.168.6.1 [110/65] via 192.168.12.2, 00:56:07, Serial0/0/0
192.168.23.0/30 is subnetted, 1 subnets
192.168.23.0 [110/128] via 192.168.12.2, 00:56:07, Serial0/0/0
R2# show ip route ospf
Codes: L - local, C - connected, S - static, R - RIP, M - mobile, B - BGP
D - EIGRP, EX - EIGRP external, O - OSPF, IA - OSPF inter area
N1 - OSPF NSSA external type 1, N2 - OSPF NSSA external type 2
E1 - OSPF external type 1, E2 - OSPF external type 2
i - IS-IS, su - IS-IS summary, L1 - IS-IS level-1, L2 - IS-IS level-2
ia - IS-IS inter area, * - candidate default, U - per-user static route
o - ODR, P - periodic downloaded static route, H - NHRP, l - LISP
+ - replicated route, % - next hop override
Gateway of last resort is 192.168.12.1 to network 0.0.0.0
O*E2
O IA
O IA
O
O
0.0.0.0/0 [110/1] via 192.168.12.1, 00:57:11, Serial0/0/0
192.168.1.0/32 is subnetted, 1 subnets
192.168.1.1 [110/65] via 192.168.12.1, 00:39:50, Serial0/0/0
192.168.2.0/32 is subnetted, 1 subnets
192.168.2.1 [110/65] via 192.168.12.1, 00:57:10, Serial0/0/0
192.168.4.0/32 is subnetted, 1 subnets
192.168.4.1 [110/65] via 192.168.23.1, 00:17:13, Serial0/0/1
192.168.5.0/32 is subnetted, 1 subnets
192.168.5.1 [110/65] via 192.168.23.1, 00:17:13, Serial0/0/1
R3# show ip route ospf
Codes: L - local, C - connected, S - static, R - RIP, M - mobile, B - BGP
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 14 of 29
Lab – Troubleshooting Multiarea OSPFv2 and OSPFv3
D - EIGRP, EX - EIGRP external, O - OSPF, IA - OSPF inter area
N1 - OSPF NSSA external type 1, N2 - OSPF NSSA external type 2
E1 - OSPF external type 1, E2 - OSPF external type 2
i - IS-IS, su - IS-IS summary, L1 - IS-IS level-1, L2 - IS-IS level-2
ia - IS-IS inter area, * - candidate default, U - per-user static route
o - ODR, P - periodic downloaded static route, H - NHRP, l - LISP
+ - replicated route, % - next hop override
Gateway of last resort is 192.168.23.1 to network 0.0.0.0
O*E2
O IA
O IA
O
O IA
0.0.0.0/0 [110/1] via 192.168.23.1, 00:18:06, Serial0/0/1
192.168.1.0/32 is subnetted, 1 subnets
192.168.1.1 [110/129] via 192.168.23.2, 00:18:06, Serial0/0/1
192.168.2.0/32 is subnetted, 1 subnets
192.168.2.1 [110/129] via 192.168.23.2, 00:18:06, Serial0/0/1
192.168.6.0/32 is subnetted, 1 subnets
192.168.6.1 [110/65] via 192.168.23.2, 00:18:06, Serial0/0/1
192.168.12.0/30 is subnetted, 1 subnets
192.168.12.0 [110/128] via 192.168.23.2, 00:18:06, Serial0/0/1
b. If any OSPFv2 routes are missing, troubleshoot and resolve the problems.
Instructor Note: All routes for OSPFv2 are in all three routing tables.
Step 7: Verify IPv4 end-to-end connectivity.
From each router, ping all interfaces on other routers. If IPv4 end-to-end connectivity does not exist, then
continue troubleshooting to resolve any remaining issues.
Part 4: Troubleshoot OSPFv3
Note: LAN (loopback) interfaces should not advertise OSPFv3 routing information, but routes to these
networks should be contained in the routing tables.
Step 1: Test IPv6 end-to-end connectivity.
From each router, ping all interfaces on the other routers. Record your results as IPv6 connectivity problems
do exist.
_______________________________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________________________
R1 to R2: All pings to loopback 6 failed.
R1 to R3: All pings were successful.
R2 to R1: All pings to loopback 1 and 2 failed.
R2 to R3: All pings were successful.
R3 to R1: All pings were successful.
R3 to R2: All pings were successful.
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 15 of 29
Lab – Troubleshooting Multiarea OSPFv2 and OSPFv3
Step 2: Verify that IPv6 unicast routing has been enabled on all routers.
a. An easy way to verify that IPv6 routing has been enabled on a router is to use the show run | section
ipv6 unicast command. By adding the pipe section to the show run command, the ipv6 unicast-routing
command is displayed if IPv6 routing has been enabled.
R1# show run | section ipv6 unicast
ipv6 unicast-routing
R2# show run | section ipv6 unicast
ipv6 unicast-routing
R3# show run | section ipv6 unicast
ipv6 unicast-routing
b. If IPv6 unicast routing is not enabled on one or more routers, enable it now. If required, record the
commands used to correct the configuration.
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
IPv6 routing has been enabled on all routers.
Step 3: Verify that all interfaces are assigned to the proper OSPFv3 areas on R1.
a. Issue the show ipv6 protocols command to verify that the router ID is correct and the expected
interfaces display in their proper areas.
R1# show ipv6 protocols
IPv6 Routing Protocol is "connected"
IPv6 Routing Protocol is "ND"
IPv6 Routing Protocol is "ospf 1"
Router ID 209.165.200.225
Area border router
Number of areas: 2 normal, 0 stub, 0 nssa
Interfaces (Area 0):
Serial0/0/0
Interfaces (Area 1):
Loopback2
Redistribution:
None
b. If required, make any necessary changes to the configuration on R1 based on the output from the show
ipv6 protocols command. Record the commands used to correct the configuration. It may be necessary
to reset OSPF process by issuing the clear ipv6 ospf process command.
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
R1(config)# interface lo1
R1(config-if)# ipv6 ospf 1 area 1
R1(config-if)# ipv6 router ospf 1
R1(config-rtr)# router-id 1.1.1.1
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
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Lab – Troubleshooting Multiarea OSPFv2 and OSPFv3
c.
Re-issue the show ipv6 protocols command on R1 to make sure changes took effect.
R1# show ipv6 protocols
IPv6 Routing Protocol is "connected"
IPv6 Routing Protocol is "ND"
IPv6 Routing Protocol is "ospf 1"
Router ID 1.1.1.1
Area border router
Number of areas: 2 normal, 0 stub, 0 nssa
Interfaces (Area 0):
Serial0/0/0
Interfaces (Area 1):
Loopback2
Loopback1
Redistribution:
None
d. Enter the show ipv6 route ospf command on R1 to verify that the interarea route summarization is
configured correctly.
R1# show ipv6 route ospf
IPv6 Routing Table - default - 12 entries
Codes: C - Connected, L - Local, S - Static, U - Per-user Static route
B - BGP, R - RIP, I1 - ISIS L1, I2 - ISIS L2
IA - ISIS interarea, IS - ISIS summary, D - EIGRP, EX - EIGRP external
ND - ND Default, NDp - ND Prefix, DCE - Destination, NDr - Redirect
O - OSPF Intra, OI - OSPF Inter, OE1 - OSPF ext 1, OE2 - OSPF ext 2
ON1 - OSPF NSSA ext 1, ON2 - OSPF NSSA ext 2
O
2001:DB8:ACAD::/61 [110/1]
via Null0, directly connected
OI 2001:DB8:ACAD:4::/64 [110/129]
via FE80::2, Serial0/0/0
OI 2001:DB8:ACAD:5::/64 [110/129]
via FE80::2, Serial0/0/0
OI 2001:DB8:ACAD:23::/64 [110/128]
via FE80::2, Serial0/0/0
e. Which IPv6 networks are included in the interarea route summarization shown in the routing table?
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
2001:DB8:ACAD::/64 through 2001:DB8:ACAD:7::/64
f.
If required, make the necessary configuration changes on R1. Record the commands used to correct the
configuration.
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
R1(config)# ipv6 router ospf 1
R1(config-rtr)# no area 1 range 2001:DB8:ACAD::/61
R1(config-rtr)# area 1 range 2001:DB8:ACAD::/62
g. If required, re-issue the show ipv6 route ospf command on R1 to verify the changes.
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
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Lab – Troubleshooting Multiarea OSPFv2 and OSPFv3
R1# show ipv6 route ospf
IPv6 Routing Table - default - 11 entries
Codes: C - Connected, L - Local, S - Static, U - Per-user Static route
B - BGP, R - RIP, I1 - ISIS L1, I2 - ISIS L2
IA - ISIS interarea, IS - ISIS summary, D - EIGRP, EX - EIGRP external
ND - ND Default, NDp - ND Prefix, DCE - Destination, NDr - Redirect
O - OSPF Intra, OI - OSPF Inter, OE1 - OSPF ext 1, OE2 - OSPF ext 2
ON1 - OSPF NSSA ext 1, ON2 - OSPF NSSA ext 2
O
2001:DB8:ACAD::/62 [110/1]
via Null0, directly connected
OI 2001:DB8:ACAD:4::1/128 [110/128]
via FE80::2, Serial0/0/0
OI 2001:DB8:ACAD:5::1/128 [110/128]
via FE80::2, Serial0/0/0
OI 2001:DB8:ACAD:23::/64 [110/128]
via FE80::2, Serial0/0/0
Step 4: Verify that all interfaces are assigned to the proper OSPFv3 areas on R2.
a. Issue the show ipv6 protocols command and verify that the router ID is correct and that the expected
interfaces are showing up under their proper areas.
R2# show ipv6 protocols
IPv6 Routing Protocol is "connected"
IPv6 Routing Protocol is "ND"
IPv6 Routing Protocol is "ospf 1"
Router ID 2.2.2.2
Area border router
Number of areas: 2 normal, 0 stub, 0 nssa
Interfaces (Area 0):
Serial0/0/0
Interfaces (Area 3):
Serial0/0/1
Redistribution:
None
b. If required, make any necessary changes to the configuration on R2 based on the output from the show
ipv6 protocols command. Record the commands used to correct the configuration. It may be necessary
to reset OSPF process by issuing the clear ipv6 ospf process command.
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
R2(config)# interface lo 6
R2(config-if)# ipv6 ospf 1 area 3
c.
Verify that the configuration change has the desired effect.
R2# show ipv6 protocols
IPv6 Routing Protocol is "connected"
IPv6 Routing Protocol is "ND"
IPv6 Routing Protocol is "ospf 1"
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
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Lab – Troubleshooting Multiarea OSPFv2 and OSPFv3
Router ID 2.2.2.2
Area border router
Number of areas: 2 normal, 0 stub, 0 nssa
Interfaces (Area 0):
Serial0/0/0
Interfaces (Area 3):
Loopback6
Serial0/0/1
Redistribution:
None
Step 5: Verify that all interfaces are assigned to the proper OSPFv3 areas on R3.
a. Issue the show ipv6 protocols command to verify that the router ID is correct and the expected
interfaces display under their respective areas.
R3# show ipv6 protocols
IPv6 Routing Protocol is "connected"
IPv6 Routing Protocol is "ND"
IPv6 Routing Protocol is "ospf 1"
Router ID 3.3.3.3
Number of areas: 1 normal, 0 stub, 0 nssa
Interfaces (Area 3):
Loopback4
Loopback5
Serial0/0/1
Redistribution:
None
b. If required, make any necessary changes to the configuration on R3 based on the output from the show
ipv6 protocols command. Record the commands used to correct the configuration. It may be necessary
to reset OSPF process by issuing the clear ipv6 ospf process command.
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
There are no problems with R3.
c.
Verify that the configuration changes have the desired effect.
Step 6: Verify that all routers have correct neighbor adjacency information.
a. Issue the show ipv6 ospf neighbor command to verify that adjacencies have formed between
neighboring routers.
R1# show ipv6 ospf neighbor
OSPFv3 Router with ID (1.1.1.1) (Process ID 1)
Neighbor ID
2.2.2.2
Pri
0
State
FULL/
-
Dead Time
00:00:37
Interface ID
6
Interface
Serial0/0/0
R2# show ipv6 ospf neighbor
OSPFv3 Router with ID (2.2.2.2) (Process ID 1)
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
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Lab – Troubleshooting Multiarea OSPFv2 and OSPFv3
Neighbor ID
1.1.1.1
3.3.3.3
Pri
0
0
State
FULL/
FULL/
-
Dead Time
00:00:39
00:00:35
Interface ID
6
7
Interface
Serial0/0/0
Serial0/0/1
Interface ID
7
Interface
Serial0/0/1
R3# show ipv6 ospf neighbor
OSPFv3 Router with ID (3.3.3.3) (Process ID 1)
Neighbor ID
2.2.2.2
Pri
0
State
FULL/
-
Dead Time
00:00:34
Step 7: Verify OSPFv3 routing information.
a. Issue the show ipv6 route ospf command, and verify that OSPFv3 routes exist to all networks.
R1# show ipv6 route ospf
IPv6 Routing Table - default - 12 entries
Codes: C - Connected, L - Local, S - Static, U - Per-user Static route
B - BGP, R - RIP, I1 - ISIS L1, I2 - ISIS L2
IA - ISIS interarea, IS - ISIS summary, D - EIGRP, EX - EIGRP external
ND - ND Default, NDp - ND Prefix, DCE - Destination, NDr - Redirect
O - OSPF Intra, OI - OSPF Inter, OE1 - OSPF ext 1, OE2 - OSPF ext 2
ON1 - OSPF NSSA ext 1, ON2 - OSPF NSSA ext 2
O
2001:DB8:ACAD::/62 [110/1]
via Null0, directly connected
OI 2001:DB8:ACAD:4::/64 [110/129]
via FE80::2, Serial0/0/0
OI 2001:DB8:ACAD:5::/64 [110/129]
via FE80::2, Serial0/0/0
OI 2001:DB8:ACAD:6::1/128 [110/64]
via FE80::2, Serial0/0/0
OI 2001:DB8:ACAD:23::/64 [110/128]
via FE80::2, Serial0/0/0
R2# show ipv6 route ospf
IPv6 Routing Table - default - 10 entries
Codes: C - Connected, L - Local, S - Static, U - Per-user Static route
B - BGP, R - RIP, I1 - ISIS L1, I2 - ISIS L2
IA - ISIS interarea, IS - ISIS summary, D - EIGRP, EX - EIGRP external
ND - ND Default, NDp - ND Prefix, DCE - Destination, NDr - Redirect
O - OSPF Intra, OI - OSPF Inter, OE1 - OSPF ext 1, OE2 - OSPF ext 2
ON1 - OSPF NSSA ext 1, ON2 - OSPF NSSA ext 2
OI 2001:DB8:ACAD::/62 [110/65]
via FE80::1, Serial0/0/0
O
2001:DB8:ACAD:4::/64 [110/65]
via FE80::3, Serial0/0/1
O
2001:DB8:ACAD:5::/64 [110/65]
via FE80::3, Serial0/0/1
R3# show ipv6 route ospf
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
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Lab – Troubleshooting Multiarea OSPFv2 and OSPFv3
IPv6 Routing Table - default - 10 entries
Codes: C - Connected, L - Local, S - Static, U - Per-user Static route
B - BGP, R - RIP, H - NHRP, I1 - ISIS L1
I2 - ISIS L2, IA - ISIS interarea, IS - ISIS summary, D - EIGRP
EX - EIGRP external, ND - ND Default, NDp - ND Prefix, DCE - Destination
NDr - Redirect, O - OSPF Intra, OI - OSPF Inter, OE1 - OSPF ext 1
OE2 - OSPF ext 2, ON1 - OSPF NSSA ext 1, ON2 - OSPF NSSA ext 2
OI 2001:DB8:ACAD::/62 [110/129]
via FE80::2, Serial0/0/1
O
2001:DB8:ACAD:6::1/128 [110/64]
via FE80::2, Serial0/0/1
OI 2001:DB8:ACAD:12::/64 [110/128]
via FE80::2, Serial0/0/1
b. Resolve any routing issues that still exist.
Instructor Note: All OSPFv3 routing issues should have been resolved.
Step 8: Verify IPv6 end-to-end connectivity.
From each router, ping all of the IPv6 interfaces on the other routers. If IPv6 end-to-end issues still exist,
continue troubleshooting to resolve any remaining issues.
Reflection
Why not just use the show running-config command to resolve all issues?
_______________________________________________________________________________________
Specific show commands give you the appropriate information that you need to verify settings without
showing a lot of extraneous information.
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
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Lab – Troubleshooting Multiarea OSPFv2 and OSPFv3
Router Interface Summary Table
Router Interface Summary
Router Model
Ethernet Interface #1
Ethernet Interface #2
Serial Interface #1
Serial Interface #2
1800
Fast Ethernet 0/0
(F0/0)
Fast Ethernet 0/1
(F0/1)
Serial 0/0/0 (S0/0/0)
Serial 0/0/1 (S0/0/1)
1900
Gigabit Ethernet 0/0
(G0/0)
Gigabit Ethernet 0/1
(G0/1)
Serial 0/0/0 (S0/0/0)
Serial 0/0/1 (S0/0/1)
2801
Fast Ethernet 0/0
(F0/0)
Fast Ethernet 0/1
(F0/1)
Serial 0/1/0 (S0/1/0)
Serial 0/1/1 (S0/1/1)
2811
Fast Ethernet 0/0
(F0/0)
Fast Ethernet 0/1
(F0/1)
Serial 0/0/0 (S0/0/0)
Serial 0/0/1 (S0/0/1)
2900
Gigabit Ethernet 0/0
(G0/0)
Gigabit Ethernet 0/1
(G0/1)
Serial 0/0/0 (S0/0/0)
Serial 0/0/1 (S0/0/1)
Note: To find out how the router is configured, look at the interfaces to identify the type of router and how many
interfaces the router has. There is no way to effectively list all the combinations of configurations for each router
class. This table includes identifiers for the possible combinations of Ethernet and Serial interfaces in the device.
The table does not include any other type of interface, even though a specific router may contain one. An
example of this might be an ISDN BRI interface. The string in parenthesis is the legal abbreviation that can be
used in Cisco IOS commands to represent the interface.
Device Configs
Router R1
R1#sh run
Building configuration...
Current configuration : 2041 bytes
!
version 15.2
service timestamps debug datetime msec
service timestamps log datetime msec
no service password-encryption
!
hostname R1
!
boot-start-marker
boot-end-marker
!
!
enable secret 4 06YFDUHH61wAE/kLkDq9BGho1QM5EnRtoyr8cHAUg.2
!
no aaa new-model
!
!
!
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
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Lab – Troubleshooting Multiarea OSPFv2 and OSPFv3
!
!
!
!
no ip domain lookup
ip cef
ipv6 unicast-routing
ipv6 cef
multilink bundle-name authenticated
interface Loopback0
ip address 209.165.200.225 255.255.255.252
!
interface Loopback1
ip address 192.168.1.1 255.255.255.0
ipv6 address 2001:DB8:ACAD:1::1/64
ipv6 ospf 1 area 1
ipv6 ospf network point-to-point
!
interface Loopback2
ip address 192.168.2.1 255.255.255.0
ipv6 address 2001:DB8:ACAD:2::1/64
ipv6 ospf 1 area 1
ipv6 ospf network point-to-point
!
interface Embedded-Service-Engine0/0
no ip address
shutdown
!
interface GigabitEthernet0/0
no ip address
shutdown
duplex auto
speed auto
!
interface GigabitEthernet0/1
no ip address
shutdown
duplex auto
speed auto
!
interface Serial0/0/0
ip address 192.168.12.1 255.255.255.252
ipv6 address FE80::1 link-local
ipv6 address 2001:DB8:ACAD:12::1/64
ipv6 ospf 1 area 0
clock rate 128000
!
interface Serial0/0/1
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
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Lab – Troubleshooting Multiarea OSPFv2 and OSPFv3
no ip address
shutdown
clock rate 2000000
!
router ospf 1
router-id 1.1.1.1
passive-interface Loopback1
passive-interface Loopback2
network 192.168.1.0 0.0.0.255 area 1
network 192.168.2.0 0.0.0.255 area 1
network 192.168.12.0 0.0.0.3 area 0
default-information originate
!
ip forward-protocol nd
!
no ip http server
no ip http secure-server
!
ip route 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 Loopback0
!
ipv6 router ospf 1
router-id 1.1.1.1
area 1 range 2001:DB8:ACAD::/62
!
!
!
!
control-plane
!
!
banner motd ^C
Unauthorized Access is Prohibited! ^C
!
line con 0
password cisco
logging synchronous
login
line aux 0
line 2
no activation-character
no exec
transport preferred none
transport input all
transport output pad telnet rlogin lapb-ta mop udptn v120 ssh
stopbits 1
line vty 0 4
password cisco
logging synchronous
login
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
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Lab – Troubleshooting Multiarea OSPFv2 and OSPFv3
transport input all
!
scheduler allocate 20000 1000
!
end
Router R2
R2#sh run
Building configuration...
Current configuration : 1847 bytes
!
version 15.2
service timestamps debug datetime msec
service timestamps log datetime msec
no service password-encryption
!
hostname R2
!
boot-start-marker
boot-end-marker
!
!
enable secret 4 06YFDUHH61wAE/kLkDq9BGho1QM5EnRtoyr8cHAUg.2
!
no aaa new-model
!
!
!
!
!
!
!
no ip domain lookup
ip cef
ipv6 unicast-routing
ipv6 cef
multilink bundle-name authenticated
!
interface Loopback6
ip address 192.168.6.1 255.255.255.0
ipv6 address 2001:DB8:ACAD:6::1/64
ipv6 ospf 1 area 3
!
interface Embedded-Service-Engine0/0
no ip address
shutdown
!
interface GigabitEthernet0/0
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
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Lab – Troubleshooting Multiarea OSPFv2 and OSPFv3
no ip address
shutdown
duplex auto
speed auto
!
interface GigabitEthernet0/1
no ip address
shutdown
duplex auto
speed auto
!
interface Serial0/0/0
ip address 192.168.12.2 255.255.255.252
ipv6 address FE80::2 link-local
ipv6 address 2001:DB8:ACAD:12::2/64
ipv6 ospf 1 area 0
!
interface Serial0/0/1
ip address 192.168.23.2 255.255.255.252
ipv6 address FE80::2 link-local
ipv6 address 2001:DB8:ACAD:23::2/64
ipv6 ospf 1 area 3
clock rate 128000
!
router ospf 1
router-id 2.2.2.2
passive-interface Loopback6
network 192.168.6.0 0.0.0.255 area 3
network 192.168.12.0 0.0.0.3 area 0
network 192.168.23.0 0.0.0.3 area 3
!
ip forward-protocol nd
!
no ip http server
no ip http secure-server
!
!
ipv6 router ospf 1
router-id 2.2.2.2
!
!
!
!
control-plane
!
!
banner motd ^C
Unauthorized Access is Prohibited! ^C
!
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
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Lab – Troubleshooting Multiarea OSPFv2 and OSPFv3
line con 0
password cisco
logging synchronous
login
line aux 0
line 2
no activation-character
no exec
transport preferred none
transport input all
transport output pad telnet rlogin lapb-ta mop udptn v120 ssh
stopbits 1
line vty 0 4
password cisco
logging synchronous
login
transport input all
!
scheduler allocate 20000 1000
!
end
Router R3
R3#sh run
Building configuration...
Current configuration : 1853 bytes
!
version 15.2
service timestamps debug datetime msec
service timestamps log datetime msec
no service password-encryption
!
hostname R3
!
boot-start-marker
boot-end-marker
!
!
enable secret 4 06YFDUHH61wAE/kLkDq9BGho1QM5EnRtoyr8cHAUg.2
!
no aaa new-model
!
!
!
!
!
!
!
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Lab – Troubleshooting Multiarea OSPFv2 and OSPFv3
no ip domain lookup
ip cef
ipv6 unicast-routing
ipv6 cef
multilink bundle-name authenticated
!
interface Loopback4
ip address 192.168.4.1 255.255.255.0
ipv6 address 2001:DB8:ACAD:4::1/64
ipv6 ospf 1 area 3
!
interface Loopback5
ip address 192.168.5.1 255.255.255.0
ipv6 address 2001:DB8:ACAD:5::1/64
ipv6 ospf 1 area 3
!
interface Embedded-Service-Engine0/0
no ip address
shutdown
!
interface GigabitEthernet0/0
no ip address
shutdown
duplex auto
speed auto
!
interface GigabitEthernet0/1
no ip address
shutdown
duplex auto
speed auto
!
interface Serial0/0/0
no ip address
shutdown
clock rate 2000000
!
interface Serial0/0/1
ip address 192.168.23.1 255.255.255.252
ipv6 address FE80::3 link-local
ipv6 address 2001:DB8:ACAD:23::1/64
ipv6 ospf 1 area 3
!
router ospf 1
router-id 3.3.3.3
passive-interface Loopback4
passive-interface Loopback5
network 192.168.4.0 0.0.0.255 area 3
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
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Lab – Troubleshooting Multiarea OSPFv2 and OSPFv3
network 192.168.5.0 0.0.0.255 area 3
network 192.168.23.0 0.0.0.3 area 3
!
ip forward-protocol nd
!
no ip http server
no ip http secure-server
!
!
ipv6 router ospf 1
router-id 3.3.3.3
!
!
!
!
control-plane
!
!
banner motd ^C
Unauthorized Access is Prohibited! ^C
!
line con 0
password cisco
logging synchronous
login
line aux 0
line 2
no activation-character
no exec
transport preferred none
transport input all
transport output pad telnet rlogin lapb-ta mop udptn v120 ssh
stopbits 1
line vty 0 4
password cisco
logging synchronous
login
transport input all
!
scheduler allocate 20000 1000
!
end
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 29 of 29
Digital Trolleys (Instructor Version)
Instructor Note: Red font color or Gray highlights indicate text that appears in the instructor copy only.
Objective
Use CLI commands to verify operational status of a multiarea OSPF network.
OSPF is configured in this activity both as a single-area topology and as a multiarea topology to review show
commands from the chapter curriculum.
Scenario
Your city has an aging digital trolley system based on a one-area design. All communications within this one area
are taking longer to process as trolleys are being added to routes serving the population of your growing city.
Trolley departures and arrivals are also taking a little longer, because each trolley must check large routing tables
to determine where to pick up and deliver residents from their source and destination streets.
A concerned citizen has come up with the idea of dividing the city into different areas for a more efficient way to
determine trolley routing information. It is thought that if the trolley maps are smaller, the system might be
improved because of faster and smaller updates to the routing tables.
Your city board approves and implements the new area-based, digital trolley system. But to ensure the new area
routes are more efficient, the city board needs data to show the results at the next open board meeting.
Complete the activity directions as stated below.
Save your work and explain the differences between the old, single area and new, multiarea system to another
group or the entire class.
Required Resources

Packet Tracer software

Word processing software
Directions
Step 1: Map the single-area city trolley routing topology.
a. Use Packet Tracer to map the old routing topology for the city. Cisco 1941 Integrated Services Routers
(ISRs) are preferred.
b. Create a core area and place one of the routers in the core area.
c.
Connect at least two routers to the core area router.
d. Choose to connect two more routers to the routers from Step 1c or create loopback addresses for the
LAN interfaces on the routers from Step 1c.
e. Address the connected links or interfaces using IPv4 and VLSM.
f.
Configure OSPF on each router for area 0 only.
g. Ping all routers to ensure full connectivity within the entire area.
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 1 of 6
Digital Trolleys
Step 2: Map the multiarea city trolley routing topology.
a. Use your cursor to highlight all devices from Step 1, and copy and paste them to another area of the
Packet Tracer desktop.
b. Assign at least three areas to your topology. One must be the backbone (or core area) and the other two
areas will be joined to the backbone area using current routers, which will now become area border
routers.
c.
Configure the appropriate routers to their new area assignments. Remove old area configuration
commands and assign new area commands to the appropriate interfaces.
d. Save each router’s changes as you make changes.
e. When complete, you should have three areas represented on the topology and all routers should be able
to ping each other throughout the network.
f.
Use the drawing tool and identify your areas by drawing circles or rectangles around the three areas.
g. Save your work.
Step 3: Verify the network for city council members.
a. Use at least three commands learned (or used in this chapter) to help the city council prove that the new
area, digital trolley routing topology works.
b. Save a copy of topology graphics and verification commands comparisons in table format to a word
processing file.
c.
Share your work with another group or the class. You may also want to add this activity and its files to a
portfolio for this course.
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 2 of 6
Digital Trolleys
Instructor Resource Example
The information listed in this section is only one depiction of what students could see as a result of this activity.
Other topology designs may vary per student groups.
Packet Tracer Single-area and Multiarea Topology Diagram Example
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Page 3 of 6
Digital Trolleys
Single-Area OSPF City Design
Multiarea OSPF City Design
R1# show ip protocols
R1# show ip protocols
Routing Protocol is "ospf 1"
Outgoing update filter list for all interfaces is not set
Incoming update filter list for all interfaces is not set
Router ID 1.1.1.1
Number of areas in this router is 1. 1 normal 0 stub 0 nssa
Maximum path: 4
Routing for Networks:
192.168.4.0 0.0.0.3 area 0
192.168.20.4 0.0.0.3 area 0
192.168.10.4 0.0.0.3 area 0
Routing Information Sources:
Gateway
Distance Last Update
1.1.1.1
110 00:03:33
2.2.2.2
110 00:02:58
3.3.3.3
110 00:02:58
4.4.4.4
110 00:02:58
5.5.5.5
110 00:02:58
6.6.6.6
110 00:03:03
7.7.7.7
110 00:02:58
Distance: (default is 110)
Routing Protocol is "ospf 1"
Outgoing update filter list for all interfaces is not set
Incoming update filter list for all interfaces is not set
Router ID 1.1.1.1
Number of areas in this router is 1. 1 normal 0 stub 0 nssa
Maximum path: 4
Routing for Networks:
192.168.4.0 0.0.0.3 area 0
192.168.20.4 0.0.0.3 area 0
192.168.10.4 0.0.0.3 area 0
Routing Information Sources:
Gateway
Distance Last Update
1.1.1.1
110 00:03:50
2.2.2.2
110 00:03:51
3.3.3.3
110 00:03:50
Distance: (default is 110)
R1#
R1#
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Page 4 of 6
Digital Trolleys
Single-Area OSPF City Design
R1# show ip ospf database
OSPF Router with ID (1.1.1.1) (Process ID 1)
Multiarea OSPF City Design
R1# show ip ospf database
OSPF Router with ID (1.1.1.1) (Process ID 1)
Router Link States (Area 0)
Link ID
count
1.1.1.1
6.6.6.6
3.3.3.3
7.7.7.7
5.5.5.5
2.2.2.2
4.4.4.4
Link ID
10.1.3.2
10.1.4.2
10.1.2.2
10.1.1.2
R1#
ADV Router
1.1.1.1
6.6.6.6
3.3.3.3
7.7.7.7
5.5.5.5
2.2.2.2
4.4.4.4
728
698
693
693
693
693
693
Age
Router Link States (Area 0)
Seq#
Checksum Link
0x80000005 0x001701 4
0x80000002 0x005ba8 1
0x80000007 0x00c181 4
0x80000002 0x0025d4 1
0x80000002 0x00917c 1
0x80000007 0x004e19 4
0x80000003 0x00c551 1
Net Link States (Area 0)
ADV Router
Age
Seq#
Checksum
6.6.6.6
698
0x80000001 0x00a70b
7.7.7.7
693
0x80000001 0x00a442
5.5.5.5
693
0x80000001 0x009920
4.4.4.4
693
0x80000001 0x002479
Link ID
count
2.2.2.2
3.3.3.3
1.1.1.1
Link ID
10.1.3.0
10.1.4.0
10.1.2.0
10.1.1.0
R1#
ADV Router
2.2.2.2
3.3.3.3
1.1.1.1
Seq#
Checksum Link
0x80000003 0x0020a2 2
0x80000003 0x00297d 2
0x80000005 0x00d443 4
Summary Net Link States (Area 0)
ADV Router Age
Seq#
Checksum
3.3.3.3
681
0x80000001 0x0089ba
3.3.3.3
681
0x80000002 0x007cc5
2.2.2.2
676
0x80000001 0x00b296
2.2.2.2
676
0x80000002 0x00bb8d
Single-Area OSPF City Design
R1# show ip ospf 1
Routing Process "ospf 1" with ID 1.1.1.1
Supports only single TOS(TOS0) routes
Supports opaque LSA
SPF schedule delay 5 secs, Hold time between two SPFs 10 secs
Minimum LSA interval 5 secs. Minimum LSA arrival 1 secs
Number of external LSA 0. Checksum Sum 0x000000
Number of opaque AS LSA 0. Checksum Sum 0x000000
Number of DCbitless external and opaque AS LSA 0
Number of DoNotAge external and opaque AS LSA 0
Number of areas in this router is 1. 1 normal 0 stub 0 nssa
External flood list length 0
Area BACKBONE(0)
Number of interfaces in this area is 2
Area has no authentication
SPF algorithm executed 3 times
Area ranges are
Number of LSA 11. Checksum Sum 0x0507ca
716
715
715
Age
Multiarea OSPF City Design
R1# show ip ospf 1
Routing Process "ospf 1" with ID 1.1.1.1
Supports only single TOS(TOS0) routes
Supports opaque LSA
SPF schedule delay 5 secs, Hold time between two SPFs 10 secs
Minimum LSA interval 5 secs. Minimum LSA arrival 1 secs
Number of external LSA 0. Checksum Sum 0x000000
Number of opaque AS LSA 0. Checksum Sum 0x000000
Number of DCbitless external and opaque AS LSA 0
Number of DoNotAge external and opaque AS LSA 0
Number of areas in this router is 1. 1 normal 0 stub 0 nssa
External flood list length 0
Area BACKBONE(0)
Number of interfaces in this area is 2
Area has no authentication
SPF algorithm executed 3 times
Area ranges are
Number of LSA 7. Checksum Sum 0x039304
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Page 5 of 6
Digital Trolleys
Number of opaque link LSA 0. Checksum Sum 0x000000
Number of DCbitless LSA 0
Number of indication LSA 0
Number of DoNotAge LSA 0
Flood list length 0
R1#
Number of opaque link LSA 0. Checksum Sum 0x000000
Number of DCbitless LSA 0
Number of indication LSA 0
Number of DoNotAge LSA 0
Flood list length 0
R1#
Identify elements of the model that map to IT-related content:

Backbone router

Border area router

Core area

OSPF verification commands
-
show ip protocols
-
show ip ospf database
-
show ip ospf
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Page 6 of 6
Classless EIGRP (Instructor Version)
Instructor Note: Red font color or Gray highlights indicate text that appears in the instructor copy only.
Objectives
Describe the basic features of EIGRP.
EIGRP is introduced to students through the informative video, Fundamental Configuration and Verification of
EIGRP. After viewing the video, students should be able to explain how classless routing occurs, what is involved
in auto-summarization of network addresses, and how EIGRP is configured.
Students are not expected to memorize the facts from the video, as it is being viewed to introduce students to the
concept of EIGRP as a distance vector routing protocol.
Scenario
EIGRP was introduced as a distance vector routing protocol in 1992. It was originally designed to work as a
proprietary protocol on Cisco devices only. In 2013, EIGRP became a multi-vendor routing protocol, meaning that
it can be used by other device vendors in addition to Cisco devices.
View the Fundamental Configuration and Verification of EIGRP video located at http://www.cisco.com/ELearning/bulk/subscribed/tac/netbits/iprouting/eigrp/01_fundamental_eigrp/start.htm . In order to view the video
you must have a cisco.com account. If you do not have a cisco.com account, please register to create one.
While viewing the video, pay close attention to the following concepts and terms:

Subnet mask reporting to routing tables for classful and classless networks

Auto-summarization of networks in routing tables

Autonomous system numbers

Wildcard masks

Passive interfaces

EIGRP configuration commands

EIGRP verification commands
Complete the reflection questions which accompany the PDF file for this activity. Save your work and be
prepared to share your answers with the class.
Resources
Internet access
Reflection
1. Explain classful routing protocols.
_______________________________________________________________________________________
Classful routing protocols do not include the subnet mask in the routing update.
2. Explain classless routing protocols.
_______________________________________________________________________________________
Classless routing protocols do include the subnet mask in the routing update.
3. What is network auto-summarization?
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Page 1 of 2
Classless EIGRP
__________________________________________________________________
Auto-summarization allows routing tables to be reduced in size by representing several subnetted networks
as one summarized network.
4. What is an autonomous system number?
__________________________________________________________________
An autonomous system number is used in EIGRP configuration to define all routers belonging to a specific
group to exchange EIGRP neighbor and update information.
5. What are wildcard masks?
__________________________________________________________________
Wildcard masks are the inverse of subnet masks. They indicate how many hosts are available within subnets
and are used as a part of the EIGRP configuration process to indicate specific, subnetted networks.
6. What is a passive interface?
__________________________________________________________________
A passive interface is a network link configured to not participate in the EIGRP reporting process.
7. Is EIGRP considered a distance-vector or a link-state routing protocol?
__________________________________________________________________
Like RIP, EIGRP is considered a distance vector routing protocol.
Identify elements of the model that map to IT-related content:

Auto-summarization

Classless routing

Wildcard masks

Passive interfaces

EIGRP routing protocol

Distance vector routing protocol
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Page 2 of 2
Lab – Configuring Basic EIGRP for IPv4 (Instructor Version)
Instructor Note: Red font color or Gray highlights indicate text that appears in the instructor copy only.
Topology
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Page 1 of 16
Lab – Configuring Basic EIGRP for IPv4
Addressing Table
Device
R1
Interface
IP Address
Subnet Mask
Default Gateway
G0/0
192.168.1.1
255.255.255.0
N/A
S0/0/0 (DCE)
10.1.1.1
255.255.255.252
N/A
S0/0/1
10.3.3.1
255.255.255.252
N/A
G0/0
192.168.2.1
255.255.255.0
N/A
S0/0/0
10.1.1.2
255.255.255.252
N/A
S0/0/1 (DCE)
10.2.2.2
255.255.255.252
N/A
G0/0
192.168.3.1
255.255.255.0
N/A
S0/0/0 (DCE)
10.3.3.2
255.255.255.252
N/A
S0/0/1
10.2.2.1
255.255.255.252
N/A
PC-A
NIC
192.168.1.3
255.255.255.0
192.168.1.1
PC-B
NIC
192.168.2.3
255.255.255.0
192.168.2.1
PC-C
NIC
192.168.3.3
255.255.255.0
192.168.3.1
R2
R3
Objectives
Part 1: Build the Network and Verify Connectivity
Part 2: Configure EIGRP Routing
Part 3: Verify EIGRP Routing
Part 4: Configure Bandwidth and Passive Interfaces
Background / Scenario
Enhanced Interior Gateway Routing Protocol (EIGRP) is a powerful distance vector routing protocol and is
relatively easy to configure for basic networks.
In this lab, you will configure EIGRP for the topology and networks shown above. You will modify bandwidth
and configure passive interfaces to allow EIGRP to function more efficiently.
Note: The routers used with CCNA hands-on labs are Cisco 1941 Integrated Services Routers (ISRs) with
Cisco IOS Release 15.2(4)M3 (universalk9 image). Other routers and Cisco IOS versions can be used.
Depending on the model and Cisco IOS version, the commands available and output produced might vary
from what is shown in the labs. Refer to the Router Interface Summary Table at the end of this lab for the
correct interface identifiers.
Note: Make sure that the routers have been erased and have no startup configurations. If you are unsure,
contact your instructor.
Instructor Note: Refer to the Instructor Lab Manual for the procedures to initialize and reload devices.
Required Resources

3 Routers (Cisco 1941 with Cisco IOS Release 15.2(4)M3 universal image or comparable)

3 PCs (Windows 7, Vista, or XP with terminal emulation program, such as Tera Term)

Console cables to configure the Cisco IOS devices via the console ports
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Page 2 of 16
Lab – Configuring Basic EIGRP for IPv4

Ethernet and serial cables as shown in the topology
Part 1: Build the Network and Verify Connectivity
In Part 1, you will set up the network topology and configure basic settings, such as the interface IP
addresses, device access, and passwords.
Step 1: Cable the network as shown in the topology.
Step 2: Configure PC hosts.
Step 3: Initialize and reload the routers as necessary.
Step 4: Configure basic settings for each router.
a. Disable DNS lookup.
b. Configure IP addresses for the routers, as listed in the Addressing Table.
c.
Configure device name as shown in the topology.
d. Assign cisco as the console and vty passwords.
e. Assign class as the privileged EXEC password.
f.
Configure logging synchronous to prevent console and vty messages from interrupting command entry.
g. Configure a message of the day.
h. Copy the running configuration to the startup configuration.
Step 5: Verify connectivity.
The routers should be able to ping one another, and each PC should be able to ping its default gateway. The
PCs will not be able to ping other PCs until EIGRP routing is configured. Verify and troubleshoot if necessary.
Part 2: Configure EIGRP Routing
Step 1: Enable EIGRP routing on R1. Use AS number 10.
R1(config)# router eigrp 10
Step 2: Advertise the directly connected networks on R1 using the wildcard mask.
R1(config-router)# network 10.1.1.0 0.0.0.3
R1(config-router)# network 192.168.1.0 0.0.0.255
R1(config-router)# network 10.3.3.0 0.0.0.3
Why is it a good practice to use wildcard masks when advertising networks? Could the mask have been
omitted from any of the network statements above? If so, which one(s)?
_______________________________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________________________
You should only advertise networks that you control. In earlier versions of EIGRP, classful boundaries were
assumed meaning that the whole network space was advertised. For example, when advertising the 10.1.1.0
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Page 3 of 16
Lab – Configuring Basic EIGRP for IPv4
network, the 10.0.0.0/8 could be assumed. The wildcard mask could have been omitted from the 192.168.1.0
network statement because EIGRP would automatically assume the 0.0.0.255 classful mask.
Step 3: Enable EIGRP routing and advertise the directly connected networks on R2 and R3.
You will see neighbor adjacency messages as interfaces are added to the EIGRP routing process. The
messages on R2 are displayed as an example.
*Apr 14 15:24:59.543: %DUAL-5-NBRCHANGE: EIGRP-IPv4 10: Neighbor 10.1.1.1
(Serial0/0/0) is up: new adjacency
Step 4: Verify end-to-end connectivity.
All devices should be able to ping each other if EIGRP is configured correctly.
Note: Depending on the operating system, it may be necessary to disable the firewall for the pings to the host
PCs to be successful.
Part 3: Verify EIGRP Routing
Step 1: Examine the EIGRP neighbor table.
On R1, issue the show ip eigrp neighbors command to verify that the adjacency has been established with
its neighboring routers.
R1# show ip eigrp neighbors
EIGRP-IPv4 Neighbors for AS(10)
H
Address
Interface
1
0
10.3.3.2
10.1.1.2
Se0/0/1
Se0/0/0
Hold Uptime
SRTT
(sec)
(ms)
13 00:24:58
8
13 00:29:23
7
RTO
Q
Cnt
100 0
100 0
Seq
Num
17
23
Step 2: Examine the IP EIGRP routing table.
R1# show ip route eigrp
Codes: L - local, C - connected, S - static, R - RIP, M - mobile, B - BGP
D - EIGRP, EX - EIGRP external, O - OSPF, IA - OSPF inter area
N1 - OSPF NSSA external type 1, N2 - OSPF NSSA external type 2
E1 - OSPF external type 1, E2 - OSPF external type 2
i - IS-IS, su - IS-IS summary, L1 - IS-IS level-1, L2 - IS-IS level-2
ia - IS-IS inter area, * - candidate default, U - per-user static route
o - ODR, P - periodic downloaded static route, H - NHRP, l - LISP
+ - replicated route, % - next hop override
Gateway of last resort is not set
D
D
D
10.0.0.0/8 is variably subnetted, 5 subnets, 2 masks
10.2.2.0/30 [90/2681856] via 10.3.3.2, 00:29:01, Serial0/0/1
[90/2681856] via 10.1.1.2, 00:29:01, Serial0/0/0
192.168.2.0/24 [90/2172416] via 10.1.1.2, 00:29:01, Serial0/0/0
192.168.3.0/24 [90/2172416] via 10.3.3.2, 00:27:56, Serial0/0/1
Why does R1 have two paths to the 10.2.2.0/30 network?
_______________________________________________________________________________________
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Page 4 of 16
Lab – Configuring Basic EIGRP for IPv4
EIGRP automatically does equal-cost load balancing. R1 has two ways to reach the 10.2.2.0/30 network.
Step 3: Examine the EIGRP topology table.
R1# show ip eigrp topology
EIGRP-IPv4 Topology Table for AS(10)/ID(192.168.1.1)
Codes: P - Passive, A - Active, U - Update, Q - Query, R - Reply,
r - reply Status, s - sia Status
P 192.168.3.0/24, 1 successors, FD is 2172416
via 10.3.3.2 (2172416/28160), Serial0/0/1
P 192.168.2.0/24, 1 successors, FD is 2172416
via 10.1.1.2 (2172416/28160), Serial0/0/0
P 10.2.2.0/30, 2 successors, FD is 2681856
via 10.1.1.2 (2681856/2169856), Serial0/0/0
via 10.3.3.2 (2681856/2169856), Serial0/0/1
P 10.3.3.0/30, 1 successors, FD is 2169856
via Connected, Serial0/0/1
P 192.168.1.0/24, 1 successors, FD is 2816
via Connected, GigabitEthernet0/0
P 10.1.1.0/30, 1 successors, FD is 2169856
via Connected, Serial0/0/0
Why are there no feasible successors listed in the R1 topology table?
_______________________________________________________________________________________
The feasibility condition (FC) has not been met.
Step 4: Verify the EIGRP routing parameters and networks advertised.
Issue the show ip protocols command to verify the EIGRP routing parameters used.
R1# show ip protocols
*** IP Routing is NSF aware ***
Routing Protocol is "eigrp 10"
Outgoing update filter list for all interfaces is not set
Incoming update filter list for all interfaces is not set
Default networks flagged in outgoing updates
Default networks accepted from incoming updates
EIGRP-IPv4 Protocol for AS(10)
Metric weight K1=1, K2=0, K3=1, K4=0, K5=0
NSF-aware route hold timer is 240
Router-ID: 192.168.1.1
Topology : 0 (base)
Active Timer: 3 min
Distance: internal 90 external 170
Maximum path: 4
Maximum hopcount 100
Maximum metric variance 1
Automatic Summarization: disabled
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Page 5 of 16
Lab – Configuring Basic EIGRP for IPv4
Maximum path: 4
Routing for Networks:
10.1.1.0/30
10.3.3.0/30
192.168.1.0
Routing Information Sources:
Gateway
Distance
Last Update
10.3.3.2
90
02:38:34
10.1.1.2
90
02:38:34
Distance: internal 90 external 170
Based on the output of issuing the show ip protocols command, answer the following questions.
What AS number is used? _____ 10
What networks are advertised?
_______________________________________________________________________________________
10.1.1.0/30, 10.3.3.0/30, and 192.168.1.0/24
What is the administrative distance for EIGRP? _________________________ 90 internal and 170 external
How many equal cost paths does EIGRP use by default? _____ 4
Part 4: Configure Bandwidth and Passive Interfaces
EIGRP uses a default bandwidth based on the type of interface in the router. In Part 4, you will modify the
bandwidth so that the link between R1 and R3 has a lower bandwidth than the link between R1/R2 and
R2/R3. In addition, you will set passive interfaces on each router.
Step 1: Observe the current routing settings.
a. Issue the show interface s0/0/0 command on R1.
R1# show interface s0/0/0
Serial0/0/0 is up, line protocol is up
Hardware is WIC MBRD Serial
Internet address is 10.1.1.1/30
MTU 1500 bytes, BW 1544 Kbit/sec, DLY 20000 usec,
reliability 255/255, txload 1/255, rxload 1/255
Encapsulation HDLC, loopback not set
Keepalive set (10 sec)
Last input 00:00:01, output 00:00:02, output hang never
Last clearing of "show interface" counters 03:43:45
Input queue: 0/75/0/0 (size/max/drops/flushes); Total output drops: 0
Queueing strategy: fifo
Output queue: 0/40 (size/max)
5 minute input rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec
5 minute output rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec
4050 packets input, 270294 bytes, 0 no buffer
Received 1554 broadcasts (0 IP multicasts)
0 runts, 0 giants, 0 throttles
1 input errors, 0 CRC, 0 frame, 0 overrun, 0 ignored, 1 abort
4044 packets output, 271278 bytes, 0 underruns
0 output errors, 0 collisions, 5 interface resets
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Page 6 of 16
Lab – Configuring Basic EIGRP for IPv4
4 unknown protocol drops
0 output buffer failures, 0 output buffers swapped out
12 carrier transitions
DCD=up DSR=up DTR=up RTS=up CTS=up
What is the default bandwidth for this serial interface?
____________________________________________________________________________________
Answers will vary based on serial card in router. Based on output here, bandwidth is 1544 Kbps.
b. How many routes are listed in the routing table to reach the 10.2.2.0/30 network? _______________ 2
R1# show ip route eigrp
Codes: L - local, C - connected, S - static, R - RIP, M - mobile, B - BGP
D - EIGRP, EX - EIGRP external, O - OSPF, IA - OSPF inter area
N1 - OSPF NSSA external type 1, N2 - OSPF NSSA external type 2
E1 - OSPF external type 1, E2 - OSPF external type 2
i - IS-IS, su - IS-IS summary, L1 - IS-IS level-1, L2 - IS-IS level-2
ia - IS-IS inter area, * - candidate default, U - per-user static route
o - ODR, P - periodic downloaded static route, H - NHRP, l - LISP
+ - replicated route, % - next hop override
Gateway of last resort is not set
D
D
D
10.0.0.0/8 is variably subnetted, 5 subnets, 2 masks
10.2.2.0/30 [90/2681856] via 10.3.3.2, 00:29:01, Serial0/0/1
[90/2681856] via 10.1.1.2, 00:29:01, Serial0/0/0
192.168.2.0/24 [90/2172416] via 10.1.1.2, 00:29:01, Serial0/0/0
192.168.3.0/24 [90/2172416] via 10.3.3.2, 00:27:56, Serial0/0/1
Step 2: Modify the bandwidth on the routers.
a. Modify the bandwidth on R1 for the serial interfaces.
R1(config)# interface s0/0/0
R1(config-if)# bandwidth 2000
R1(config-if)# interface s0/0/1
R1(config-if)# bandwidth 64
Issue show ip route command on R1. Is there a difference in the routing table? If so, what is it?
Codes: L - local, C - connected, S - static, R - RIP, M - mobile, B - BGP
D - EIGRP, EX - EIGRP external, O - OSPF, IA - OSPF inter area
N1 - OSPF NSSA external type 1, N2 - OSPF NSSA external type 2
E1 - OSPF external type 1, E2 - OSPF external type 2
i - IS-IS, su - IS-IS summary, L1 - IS-IS level-1, L2 - IS-IS level-2
ia - IS-IS inter area, * - candidate default, U - per-user static route
o - ODR, P - periodic downloaded static route, H - NHRP, l - LISP
+ - replicated route, % - next hop override
Gateway of last resort is not set
C
10.0.0.0/8 is variably subnetted, 5 subnets, 2 masks
10.1.1.0/30 is directly connected, Serial0/0/0
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Page 7 of 16
Lab – Configuring Basic EIGRP for IPv4
L
D
C
L
C
L
D
D
10.1.1.1/32 is directly connected, Serial0/0/0
10.2.2.0/30 [90/2681856] via 10.1.1.2, 00:03:09, Serial0/0/0
10.3.3.0/30 is directly connected, Serial0/0/1
10.3.3.1/32 is directly connected, Serial0/0/1
192.168.1.0/24 is variably subnetted, 2 subnets, 2 masks
192.168.1.0/24 is directly connected, GigabitEthernet0/0
192.168.1.1/32 is directly connected, GigabitEthernet0/0
192.168.2.0/24 [90/1794560] via 10.1.1.2, 00:03:09, Serial0/0/0
192.168.3.0/24 [90/2684416] via 10.1.1.2, 00:03:08, Serial0/0/0
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
After the change in bandwidth, there is only one route showing for the 10.2.2.0/30 network via 10.1.1.2
and S0/0/0. This is the preferred link because it is a faster link. Before the change in bandwidth, there
were two equal cost paths to the destination; therefore, there were two entries in the routing table.
b. Modify the bandwidth on the R2 and R3 serial interfaces.
R2(config)# interface s0/0/0
R2(config-if)# bandwidth 2000
R2(config-if)# interface s0/0/1
R2(config-if)# bandwidth 2000
R3(config)# interface s0/0/0
R3(config-if)# bandwidth 64
R3(config-if)# interface s0/0/1
R3(config-if)# bandwidth 2000
Step 3: Verify the bandwidth modifications.
a. Verify bandwidth modifications. Issue a show interface serial 0/0/x command, with x being the
appropriate serial interface on all three routers to verify that bandwidth is set correctly. R1 is shown as an
example.
R1# show interface s0/0/0
Serial0/0/0 is up, line protocol is up
Hardware is WIC MBRD Serial
Internet address is 10.1.1.1/30
MTU 1500 bytes, BW 2000 Kbit/sec, DLY 20000 usec,
reliability 255/255, txload 1/255, rxload 1/255
Encapsulation HDLC, loopback not set
Keepalive set (10 sec)
Last input 00:00:01, output 00:00:02, output hang never
Last clearing of "show interface" counters 04:06:06
Input queue: 0/75/0/0 (size/max/drops/flushes); Total output drops: 0
Queueing strategy: fifo
Output queue: 0/40 (size/max)
5 minute input rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec
5 minute output rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec
4767 packets input, 317155 bytes, 0 no buffer
Received 1713 broadcasts (0 IP multicasts)
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 8 of 16
Lab – Configuring Basic EIGRP for IPv4
0 runts, 0 giants, 0 throttles
1 input errors, 0 CRC, 0 frame, 0 overrun, 0 ignored, 1 abort
4825 packets output, 316451 bytes, 0 underruns
0 output errors, 0 collisions, 5 interface resets
4 unknown protocol drops
0 output buffer failures, 0 output buffers swapped out
12 carrier transitions
DCD=up DSR=up DTR=up RTS=up CTS=up
Based on your bandwidth configuration, try and determine what the R2 and R3 routing tables will look like
before you issue a show ip route command. Are their routing tables the same or different?
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
R2 routing table will be the same as before. It will still have 2 equal cost routes to the 10.3.3.0/30 network.
R3 routing table will now only have 1 route to the 10.1.1.0/30 network via R2.
Step 4: Configure G0/0 interface as passive on R1, R2, and R3.
A passive interface does not allow outgoing and incoming routing updates over the configured interface. The
passive-interface interface command causes the router to stop sending and receiving Hello packets over an
interface; however, the network associated with the interface is still advertised to other routers through the
non-passive interfaces. Router interfaces connected to LANs are typically configured as passive.
R1(config)# router eigrp 10
R1(config-router)# passive-interface g0/0
R2(config)# router eigrp 10
R2(config-router)# passive-interface g0/0
R3(config)# router eigrp 10
R3(config-router)# passive-interface g0/0
Step 5: Verify the passive interface configuration.
Issue a show ip protocols command on R1, R2, and R3 and verify that G0/0 has been configured as
passive.
R1# show ip protocols
*** IP Routing is NSF aware ***
Routing Protocol is "eigrp 10"
Outgoing update filter list for all interfaces is not set
Incoming update filter list for all interfaces is not set
Default networks flagged in outgoing updates
Default networks accepted from incoming updates
EIGRP-IPv4 Protocol for AS(10)
Metric weight K1=1, K2=0, K3=1, K4=0, K5=0
NSF-aware route hold timer is 240
Router-ID: 192.168.1.1
Topology : 0 (base)
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Page 9 of 16
Lab – Configuring Basic EIGRP for IPv4
Active Timer: 3 min
Distance: internal 90 external 170
Maximum path: 4
Maximum hopcount 100
Maximum metric variance 1
Automatic Summarization: disabled
Maximum path: 4
Routing for Networks:
10.1.1.0/30
10.3.3.0/30
192.168.1.0
Passive Interface(s):
GigabitEthernet0/0
Routing Information Sources:
Gateway
Distance
Last Update
10.3.3.2
90
00:48:09
10.1.1.2
90
00:48:26
Distance: internal 90 external 170
Reflection
You could have used only static routing for this lab. What is an advantage of using EIGRP?
_______________________________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________________________
EIGRP can automatically adjust for network topology changes such as adding networks, or networks going
down. EIGRP automatically picks the best path when the bandwidth of a link is modified, and it will
automatically load balance across multiple equal cost paths.
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Page 10 of 16
Lab – Configuring Basic EIGRP for IPv4
Router Interface Summary Table
Router Interface Summary
Router Model
Ethernet Interface #1
Ethernet Interface #2
Serial Interface #1
Serial Interface #2
1800
Fast Ethernet 0/0
(F0/0)
Fast Ethernet 0/1
(F0/1)
Serial 0/0/0 (S0/0/0)
Serial 0/0/1 (S0/0/1)
1900
Gigabit Ethernet 0/0
(G0/0)
Gigabit Ethernet 0/1
(G0/1)
Serial 0/0/0 (S0/0/0)
Serial 0/0/1 (S0/0/1)
2801
Fast Ethernet 0/0
(F0/0)
Fast Ethernet 0/1
(F0/1)
Serial 0/1/0 (S0/1/0)
Serial 0/1/1 (S0/1/1)
2811
Fast Ethernet 0/0
(F0/0)
Fast Ethernet 0/1
(F0/1)
Serial 0/0/0 (S0/0/0)
Serial 0/0/1 (S0/0/1)
2900
Gigabit Ethernet 0/0
(G0/0)
Gigabit Ethernet 0/1
(G0/1)
Serial 0/0/0 (S0/0/0)
Serial 0/0/1 (S0/0/1)
Note: To find out how the router is configured, look at the interfaces to identify the type of router and how many
interfaces the router has. There is no way to effectively list all the combinations of configurations for each router
class. This table includes identifiers for the possible combinations of Ethernet and Serial interfaces in the device.
The table does not include any other type of interface, even though a specific router may contain one. An
example of this might be an ISDN BRI interface. The string in parenthesis is the legal abbreviation that can be
used in Cisco IOS commands to represent the interface.
Device Configs
Router R1
R1#sh run
Building configuration...
Current configuration : 1455 bytes
version 15.2
service timestamps debug datetime msec
service timestamps log datetime msec
no service password-encryption
!
hostname R1
!
!
enable secret 4 06YFDUHH61wAE/kLkDq9BGho1QM5EnRtoyr8cHAUg.2
!
no aaa new-model
no ip domain lookup
ip cef
no ipv6 cef
multilink bundle-name authenticated
!
!
!
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Page 11 of 16
Lab – Configuring Basic EIGRP for IPv4
interface Embedded-Service-Engine0/0
no ip address
shutdown
!
interface GigabitEthernet0/0
ip address 192.168.1.1 255.255.255.0
duplex auto
speed auto
!
interface GigabitEthernet0/1
no ip address
shutdown
duplex auto
speed auto
!
interface Serial0/0/0
bandwidth 2000
ip address 10.1.1.1 255.255.255.252
clock rate 128000
!
interface Serial0/0/1
bandwidth 64
ip address 10.3.3.1 255.255.255.252
!
!
router eigrp 10
network 10.1.1.0 0.0.0.3
network 10.3.3.0 0.0.0.3
network 192.168.1.0
passive-interface GigabitEthernet0/0
!
ip forward-protocol nd
!
no ip http server
no ip http secure-server
!
control-plane
!
!
line con 0
password cisco
logging synchronous
login
line aux 0
line 2
no activation-character
no exec
transport preferred none
transport input all
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Page 12 of 16
Lab – Configuring Basic EIGRP for IPv4
transport output pad telnet rlogin lapb-ta mop udptn v120 ssh
stopbits 1
line vty 0 4
password cisco
logging synchronous
login
transport input all
!
scheduler allocate 20000 1000
!
end
Router R2
R2#sh run
Building configuration...
Current configuration : 1457 bytes
version 15.2
service timestamps debug datetime msec
service timestamps log datetime msec
no service password-encryption
!
hostname R2
!
boot-start-marker
boot-end-marker
!
!
enable secret 4 06YFDUHH61wAE/kLkDq9BGho1QM5EnRtoyr8cHAUg.2
!
no aaa new-model
!
!
!
no ip domain lookup
ip cef
no ipv6 cef
multilink bundle-name authenticated
!
!
interface Embedded-Service-Engine0/0
no ip address
shutdown
!
interface GigabitEthernet0/0
ip address 192.168.2.1 255.255.255.0
duplex auto
speed auto
!
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Page 13 of 16
Lab – Configuring Basic EIGRP for IPv4
interface GigabitEthernet0/1
no ip address
shutdown
duplex auto
speed auto
!
interface Serial0/0/0
bandwidth 2000
ip address 10.1.1.2 255.255.255.252
!
interface Serial0/0/1
bandwidth 2000
ip address 10.2.2.2 255.255.255.252
clock rate 128000
!
!
router eigrp 10
network 10.1.1.0 0.0.0.3
network 10.2.2.0 0.0.0.3
network 192.168.2.0
passive-interface GigabitEthernet0/0
!
ip forward-protocol nd
!
no ip http server
no ip http secure-server
!
control-plane
!
line con 0
password cisco
logging synchronous
login
line aux 0
line 2
no activation-character
no exec
transport preferred none
transport input all
transport output pad telnet rlogin lapb-ta mop udptn v120 ssh
stopbits 1
line vty 0 4
password cisco
logging synchronous
login
transport input all
!
scheduler allocate 20000 1000
!
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Page 14 of 16
Lab – Configuring Basic EIGRP for IPv4
end
Router R3
R3#sh run
Building configuration...
Current configuration : 1455 bytes
!
version 15.2
service timestamps debug datetime msec
service timestamps log datetime msec
no service password-encryption
!
hostname R3
!
boot-start-marker
boot-end-marker
!
!
enable secret 4 06YFDUHH61wAE/kLkDq9BGho1QM5EnRtoyr8cHAUg.2
!
no aaa new-model
!
!
no ip domain lookup
ip cef
no ipv6 cef
multilink bundle-name authenticated
!
!
interface Embedded-Service-Engine0/0
no ip address
shutdown
!
interface GigabitEthernet0/0
ip address 192.168.3.1 255.255.255.0
duplex auto
speed auto
!
interface GigabitEthernet0/1
no ip address
shutdown
duplex auto
speed auto
!
interface Serial0/0/0
bandwidth 64
ip address 10.3.3.2 255.255.255.252
clock rate 128000
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 15 of 16
Lab – Configuring Basic EIGRP for IPv4
!
interface Serial0/0/1
bandwidth 2000
ip address 10.2.2.1 255.255.255.252
!
!
router eigrp 10
network 10.2.2.0 0.0.0.3
network 10.3.3.0 0.0.0.3
network 192.168.3.0
passive-interface GigabitEthernet0/0
!
ip forward-protocol nd
!
no ip http server
no ip http secure-server
!
!
control-plane
!
!
line con 0
password cisco
logging synchronous
login
line aux 0
line 2
no activation-character
no exec
transport preferred none
transport input all
transport output pad telnet rlogin lapb-ta mop udptn v120 ssh
stopbits 1
line vty 0 4
password cisco
logging synchronous
login
transport input all
!
scheduler allocate 20000 1000
!
end
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 16 of 16
Lab - Configuring Basic EIGRP for IPv6 (Instructor Version)
Instructor Note: Red font color or Gray highlights indicate text that appears in the instructor copy only.
Topology
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Page 1 of 17
Lab - Configuring Basic EIGRP for IPv6
Addressing Table
Device
Interface
IP Address
Default Gateway
G0/0
2001:DB8:ACAD:A::1/64
FE80::1 link-local
N/A
S0/0/0 (DCE)
2001:DB8:ACAD:12::1/64
FE80::1 link-local
N/A
S0/0/1
2001:DB8:ACAD:13::1/64
FE80::1 link-local
N/A
G0/0
2001:DB8:ACAD:B::1/64
FE80::2 link-local
N/A
S0/0/0
2001:DB8:ACAD:12::2/64
FE80::2 link-local
N/A
S0/0/1 (DCE)
2001:DB8:ACAD:23::2/64
FE80::2 link-local
N/A
G0/0
2001:DB8:ACAD:C::1/64
FE80::3 link-local
N/A
S0/0/0 (DCE)
2001:DB8:ACAD:13::3/64
FE80::3 link-local
N/A
S0/0/1
2001:DB8:ACAD:23::3/64
FE80::3 link-local
N/A
PC-A
NIC
2001:DB8:ACAD:A::3/64
FE80::1
PC-B
NIC
2001:DB8:ACAD:B::3/64
FE80::2
PC-C
NIC
2001:DB8:ACAD:C::3/64
FE80::3
R1
R2
R3
Objectives
Part 1: Build the Network and Verify Connectivity
Part 2: Configure EIGRP for IPv6 Routing
Part 3: Verify EIGRP for IPv6 Routing
Part 4: Configure and Verify Passive Interfaces
Background / Scenario
EIGRP for IPv6 has the same overall operation and features as EIGRP for IPv4. However, there are a few
major differences between them:

EIGRP for IPv6 is configured directly on the router interfaces.

With EIGRP for IPv6, a router ID is required on each router or the routing process does not start.

The EIGRP for IPv6 routing process uses a shutdown feature.
© 2014 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 2 of 17
Lab - Configuring Basic EIGRP for IPv6
In this lab, you will configure the network with EIGRP routing for IPv6. You will also assign router IDs,
configure passive interfaces, verify the network is fully converged, and display routing information using CLI
show commands.
Note: The routers used with CCNA hands-on labs are Cisco 1941 Integrated Services Routers (ISRs) with
Cisco IOS Release 15.2(4)M3 (universalk9 image). Other routers and Cisco IOS versions can be used.
Depending on the model and Cisco IOS version, the commands available and output produced might vary
from what is shown in the labs. Refer to the Router Interface Summary Table at the end of this lab for the
correct interface identifiers.
Note: Make sure that the routers have been erased and have no startup configurations. If you are unsure,
contact your instructor.
Instructor Note: Refer to the Instructor Lab Manual for the procedures to initialize and reload devices.
Required Resources

3 Routers (Cisco 1941 with Cisco IOS Release 15.2(4)M3 universal image or comparable)

3 PCs (Windows 7, Vista, or XP with terminal emulation program, such as Tera Term)

Console cables to configure the Cisco IOS devices via the console ports

Ethernet and serial cables as shown in the topology
Part 1: Build the Network and Verify Connectivity
In Part 1, you will set up the network topology and configure basic settings, such as the interface IP
addresses, device access, and passwords.
Step 1: Cable the network as shown in the topology.
Step 2: Configure PC hosts.
Step 3: Initialize and reload the routers as necessary.
Step 4: Configure basic settings for each router.
a. Disable DNS lookup.
b. Configure IP addresses for the routers as listed in Addressing Table.
Note: Configure the FE80::x link-local address and the unicast address for each router interface.
c.
Configure the device name as shown in the topology.
d. Assign cisco as the console and vty passwords.
e. Assign class as the privileged EXEC password.
f.
Configure logging synchronous to prevent console and vty messages from interrupting command entry.
g. Configure a message of the day.
h. Copy the running configuration to the startup configuration.
Step 5: Verify connectivity.
The routers should be able to ping one another, and each PC should be able to ping its default gateway. The
PCs will not be able to ping other PCs until EIGRP routing is configured. Verify and troubleshoot if necessary.
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Page 3 of 17
Lab - Configuring Basic EIGRP for IPv6
Part 2: Configure EIGRP for IPv6 Routing
Step 1: Enable IPv6 routing on the routers.
R1(config)# ipv6 unicast-routing
Step 2: Assign a router ID to each router.
a. To begin the EIGRP for IPv6 routing configuration process, issue the ipv6 router eigrp 1 command,
where 1 is the AS number.
R1(config)# ipv6 router eigrp 1
b. EIGRP for IPv6 requires a 32-bit address for the router ID. Use the router-id command to configure the
router ID in the router configuration mode.
R1(config)# ipv6 router eigrp 1
R1(config-rtr)# eigrp router-id 1.1.1.1
R2(config)# ipv6 router eigrp 1
R2(config-rtr)# eigrp router-id 2.2.2.2
R3(config)# ipv6 router eigrp 1
R3(config-rtr)# eigrp router-id 3.3.3.3
Step 3: Enable EIGRP for IPv6 routing on each router.
The IPv6 routing process is shut down by default. Issue the no shutdown command to enable EIGRP for
IPv6 routing on all routers.
R1(config)# ipv6 router eigrp 1
R1(config-rtr)# no shutdown
R2(config)# ipv6 router eigrp 1
R2(config-rtr)# no shutdown
R3(config)# ipv6 router eigrp 1
R3(config-rtr)# no shutdown
Step 4: Configure EIGRP for IPv6 using AS 1 on the Serial and Gigabit Ethernet interfaces on
the routers.
a. Issue the ipv6 eigrp 1 command on the interfaces that participate in the EIGRP routing process. The AS
number is 1 as assigned in Step 2. The configuration for R1 is displayed below as an example.
R1(config)# interface g0/0
R1(config-if)# ipv6 eigrp 1
R1(config-if)# interface s0/0/0
R1(config-if)# ipv6 eigrp 1
R1(config-if)# interface s0/0/1
R1(config-if)# ipv6 eigrp 1
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Page 4 of 17
Lab - Configuring Basic EIGRP for IPv6
b. Assign EIGRP participating interfaces on R2 and R3. You will see neighbor adjacency messages as
interfaces are added to the EIGRP routing process. The messages on R1 are displayed below as an
example.
R1(config-if)#
*Apr 12 00:25:49.183: %DUAL-5-NBRCHANGE: EIGRP-IPv6 1: Neighbor FE80::2 (Serial0/0/0)
is up: new adjacency
*Apr 12 00:26:15.583: %DUAL-5-NBRCHANGE: EIGRP-IPv6 1: Neighbor FE80::3 (Serial0/0/1)
is up: new adjacency
What address is used to indicate the neighbor in the adjacency messages? _____________________
The link-local address (FE80::x) of the neighbor’s interface, which was assigned in Part 1 Step 4.
Step 5: Verify end-to-end connectivity.
Part 3: Verify EIGRP for IPv6 Routing
Step 1: Examine the neighbor adjacencies.
On R1, issue the show ipv6 eigrp neighbors command to verify that the adjacency has been established
with its neighboring routers. The link-local addresses of the neighboring routers are displayed in the
adjacency table.
R1# show ipv6 eigrp neighbors
EIGRP-IPv6 Neighbors for AS(1)
H
Address
Interface
1
0
Link-local address:
FE80::3
Link-local address:
FE80::2
Se0/0/1
Se0/0/0
Hold Uptime
SRTT
(sec)
(ms)
13 00:02:42
1
13 00:03:09
12
RTO
Q Seq
Cnt Num
100 0 7
100
0
9
Step 2: Examine the IPv6 EIGRP routing table.
Use the show ipv6 route eigrp command to display IPv6 specific EIGRP routes on all the routers.
R1# show ipv6 route eigrp
IPv6 Routing Table - default - 10 entries
Codes: C - Connected, L - Local, S - Static, U - Per-user Static route
B - BGP, R - RIP, I1 - ISIS L1, I2 - ISIS L2
IA - ISIS interarea, IS - ISIS summary, D - EIGRP, EX - EIGRP external
ND - ND Default, NDp - ND Prefix, DCE - Destination, NDr - Redirect
O - OSPF Intra, OI - OSPF Inter, OE1 - OSPF ext 1, OE2 - OSPF ext 2
ON1 - OSPF NSSA ext 1, ON2 - OSPF NSSA ext 2
D
2001:DB8:ACAD:B::/64 [90/2172416]
via FE80::2, Serial0/0/0
D
2001:DB8:ACAD:C::/64 [90/2172416]
via FE80::3, Serial0/0/1
D
2001:DB8:ACAD:23::/64 [90/2681856]
via FE80::2, Serial0/0/0
via FE80::3, Serial0/0/1
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Page 5 of 17
Lab - Configuring Basic EIGRP for IPv6
Step 3: Examine the EIGRP topology.
R1# show ipv6 eigrp topology
EIGRP-IPv6 Topology Table for AS(1)/ID(1.1.1.1)
Codes: P - Passive, A - Active, U - Update, Q - Query, R - Reply,
r - reply Status, s - sia Status
P 2001:DB8:ACAD:A::/64, 1 successors, FD is 28160
via Connected, GigabitEthernet0/0
P 2001:DB8:ACAD:C::/64, 1 successors, FD is 2172416
via FE80::3 (2172416/28160), Serial0/0/1
P 2001:DB8:ACAD:12::/64, 1 successors, FD is 2169856
via Connected, Serial0/0/0
P 2001:DB8:ACAD:B::/64, 1 successors, FD is 2172416
via FE80::2 (2172416/28160), Serial0/0/0
P 2001:DB8:ACAD:23::/64, 2 successors, FD is 2681856
via FE80::2 (2681856/2169856), Serial0/0/0
via FE80::3 (2681856/2169856), Serial0/0/1
P 2001:DB8:ACAD:13::/64, 1 successors, FD is 2169856
via Connected, Serial0/0/1
Compare the highlighted entries to the routing table. What can you conclude from the comparison?
______________________________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________________________
The topology table lists all the available routes to a destination. The routing table lists the best path to a
destination.
Step 4: Verify the parameters and current state of the active IPv6 routing protocol processes.
Issue the show ipv6 protocols command to verify the configured parameter. From the output, EIGRP is the
configured IPv6 routing protocol with 1.1.1.1 as the router ID for R1. This routing protocol is associated with
autonomous system 1 with three active interfaces: G0/0, S0/0/0, and S0/0/1.
R1# show ipv6 protocols
IPv6 Routing Protocol is "connected"
IPv6 Routing Protocol is "ND"
IPv6 Routing Protocol is "eigrp 1"
EIGRP-IPv6 Protocol for AS(1)
Metric weight K1=1, K2=0, K3=1, K4=0, K5=0
NSF-aware route hold timer is 240
Router-ID: 1.1.1.1
Topology : 0 (base)
Active Timer: 3 min
Distance: internal 90 external 170
Maximum path: 16
Maximum hopcount 100
Maximum metric variance 1
Interfaces:
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Page 6 of 17
Lab - Configuring Basic EIGRP for IPv6
GigabitEthernet0/0
Serial0/0/0
Serial0/0/1
Redistribution:
None
Part 4: Configure and Verify Passive Interfaces
A passive interface does not allow outgoing and incoming routing updates over the configured interface. The
passive-interface interface command causes the router to stop sending and receiving Hello packets over an
interface.
Step 1: Configure interface G0/0 as passive on R1 and R2.
R1(config)# ipv6 router eigrp 1
R1(config-rtr)# passive-interface g0/0
R2(config)# ipv6 router eigrp 1
R2(config-rtr)# passive-interface g0/0
Step 2: Verify the passive interface configuration.
Issue the show ipv6 protocols command on R1 and verify that G0/0 has been configured as passive.
R1# show ipv6 protocols
IPv6 Routing Protocol is "connected"
IPv6 Routing Protocol is "ND"
IPv6 Routing Protocol is "eigrp 1"
EIGRP-IPv6 Protocol for AS(1)
Metric weight K1=1, K2=0, K3=1, K4=0, K5=0
NSF-aware route hold timer is 240
Router-ID: 1.1.1.1
Topology : 0 (base)
Active Timer: 3 min
Distance: internal 90 external 170
Maximum path: 16
Maximum hopcount 100
Maximum metric variance 1
Interfaces:
Serial0/0/0
Serial0/0/1
GigabitEthernet0/0 (passive)
Redistribution:
None
Step 3: Configure the G0/0 passive interface on R3.
If a few interfaces are configured as passive, use the passive-interface default command to configure all the
interfaces on the router as passive. Use the no passive-interface interface command to allow EIGRP Hello
messages in and out of the router interface.
a. Configure all interfaces as passive on R3.
© 2014 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 7 of 17
Lab - Configuring Basic EIGRP for IPv6
R3(config)# ipv6 router eigrp 1
R3(config-rtr)# passive-interface default
R3(config-rtr)#
*Apr 13 00:07:03.267: %DUAL-5-NBRCHANGE: EIGRP-IPv6 1: Neighbor FE80::1 (Serial0/0/0)
is down: interface passive
*Apr 13 00:07:03.267: %DUAL-5-NBRCHANGE: EIGRP-IPv6 1: Neighbor FE80::2 (Serial0/0/1)
is down: interface passive
b. After you have issued the passive-interface default command, R3 no longer participates in the routing
process. What command can you use to verify it?
____________________________________________________________________________________
show ipv6 route eigrp or show ipv6 route
R3# show ipv6 route eigrp
IPv6 Routing Table - default - 7 entries
Codes: C - Connected, L - Local, S - Static, U - Per-user Static route
B - BGP, R - RIP, I1 - ISIS L1, I2 - ISIS L2
IA - ISIS interarea, IS - ISIS summary, D - EIGRP, EX - EIGRP external
ND - ND Default, NDp - ND Prefix, DCE - Destination, NDr - Redirect
O - OSPF Intra, OI - OSPF Inter, OE1 - OSPF ext 1, OE2 - OSPF ext 2
ON1 - OSPF NSSA ext 1, ON2 - OSPF NSSA ext 2
c.
What command can you use to display the passive interfaces on R3?
____________________________________________________________________________________
show ipv6 protocols
R3# show ipv6 protocols
IPv6 Routing Protocol is "connected"
IPv6 Routing Protocol is "ND"
IPv6 Routing Protocol is "eigrp 1"
EIGRP-IPv6 Protocol for AS(1)
Metric weight K1=1, K2=0, K3=1, K4=0, K5=0
NSF-aware route hold timer is 240
Router-ID: 3.3.3.3
Topology : 0 (base)
Active Timer: 3 min
Distance: internal 90 external 170
Maximum path: 16
Maximum hopcount 100
Maximum metric variance 1
Interfaces:
GigabitEthernet0/0 (passive)
Serial0/0/0 (passive)
Serial0/0/1 (passive)
Redistribution:
None
d. Configure the serial interfaces to participate in the routing process.
R3(config)# ipv6 router eigrp 1
R3(config-rtr)# no passive-interface s0/0/0
© 2014 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 8 of 17
Lab - Configuring Basic EIGRP for IPv6
R3(config-rtr)# no passive-interface s0/0/1
R3(config-rtr)#
*Apr 13 00:21:23.807: %DUAL-5-NBRCHANGE: EIGRP-IPv6 1: Neighbor FE80::1 (Serial0/0/0)
is up: new adjacency
*Apr 13 00:21:25.567: %DUAL-5-NBRCHANGE: EIGRP-IPv6 1: Neighbor FE80::2 (Serial0/0/1)
is up: new adjacency
e. The neighbor relationships have been established again with R1 and R2. Verify that only G0/0 has been
configured as passive. What command do you use to verify the passive interface?
____________________________________________________________________________________
show ipv6 protocols
R3# show ipv6 protocols
IPv6 Routing Protocol is "connected"
IPv6 Routing Protocol is "ND"
IPv6 Routing Protocol is "eigrp 1"
EIGRP-IPv6 Protocol for AS(1)
Metric weight K1=1, K2=0, K3=1, K4=0, K5=0
NSF-aware route hold timer is 240
Router-ID: 3.3.3.3
Topology : 0 (base)
Active Timer: 3 min
Distance: internal 90 external 170
Maximum path: 16
Maximum hopcount 100
Maximum metric variance 1
Interfaces:
Serial0/0/0
Serial0/0/1
GigabitEthernet0/0 (passive)
Redistribution:
None
Reflection
1. Where would you configure passive interfaces? Why?
_______________________________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________________________
Passive interfaces are usually configured on router interfaces that are not connected to other routers. Passive
interfaces limit the amount of unnecessary protocol traffic in the network because no router devices are
receiving the messages on the other side of the link.
2. What are some advantages with using EIGRP as the routing protocol in your network?
_______________________________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________________________
© 2014 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 9 of 17
Lab - Configuring Basic EIGRP for IPv6
EIGRP routing protocol can be used with almost any size network using IPv4 or IPv6. It also uses less CPU
than other dynamic routing protocols, such as OSPF. It requires little bandwidth for routing updates.
Router Interface Summary Table
Router Interface Summary
Router Model
Ethernet Interface #1
Ethernet Interface #2
Serial Interface #1
Serial Interface #2
1800
Fast Ethernet 0/0
(F0/0)
Fast Ethernet 0/1
(F0/1)
Serial 0/0/0 (S0/0/0)
Serial 0/0/1 (S0/0/1)
1900
Gigabit Ethernet 0/0
(G0/0)
Gigabit Ethernet 0/1
(G0/1)
Serial 0/0/0 (S0/0/0)
Serial 0/0/1 (S0/0/1)
2801
Fast Ethernet 0/0
(F0/0)
Fast Ethernet 0/1
(F0/1)
Serial 0/1/0 (S0/1/0)
Serial 0/1/1 (S0/1/1)
2811
Fast Ethernet 0/0
(F0/0)
Fast Ethernet 0/1
(F0/1)
Serial 0/0/0 (S0/0/0)
Serial 0/0/1 (S0/0/1)
2900
Gigabit Ethernet 0/0
(G0/0)
Gigabit Ethernet 0/1
(G0/1)
Serial 0/0/0 (S0/0/0)
Serial 0/0/1 (S0/0/1)
Note: To find out how the router is configured, look at the interfaces to identify the type of router and how many
interfaces the router has. There is no way to effectively list all the combinations of configurations for each router
class. This table includes identifiers for the possible combinations of Ethernet and Serial interfaces in the device.
The table does not include any other type of interface, even though a specific router may contain one. An
example of this might be an ISDN BRI interface. The string in parenthesis is the legal abbreviation that can be
used in Cisco IOS commands to represent the interface.
Device Configs
Router R1
R1# show run
Building configuration...
Current configuration : 1632 bytes
!
version 15.2
service timestamps debug datetime msec
service timestamps log datetime msec
no service password-encryption
!
hostname R1
!
boot-start-marker
boot-end-marker
!
!
enable secret 4 06YFDUHH61wAE/kLkDq9BGho1QM5EnRtoyr8cHAUg.2
!
no aaa new-model
© 2014 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 10 of 17
Lab - Configuring Basic EIGRP for IPv6
memory-size iomem 15
!
ip cef
!
!
!
!
!
!
ipv6 unicast-routing
ipv6 cef
multilink bundle-name authenticated
!
!
!
!
!
!
!
!
!
!
!
interface Embedded-Service-Engine0/0
no ip address
shutdown
!
interface GigabitEthernet0/0
no ip address
duplex auto
speed auto
ipv6 address FE80::1 link-local
ipv6 address 2001:DB8:ACAD:A::1/64
ipv6 eigrp 1
!
interface GigabitEthernet0/1
no ip address
shutdown
duplex auto
speed auto
!
interface Serial0/0/0
no ip address
ipv6 address FE80::1 link-local
ipv6 address 2001:DB8:ACAD:12::1/64
ipv6 eigrp 1
clock rate 128000
!
interface Serial0/0/1
© 2014 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 11 of 17
Lab - Configuring Basic EIGRP for IPv6
no ip address
ipv6 address FE80::1 link-local
ipv6 address 2001:DB8:ACAD:13::1/64
ipv6 eigrp 1
!
ip forward-protocol nd
!
no ip http server
no ip http secure-server
!
!
ipv6 router eigrp 1
passive-interface GigabitEthernet0/0
eigrp router-id 1.1.1.1
!
!
!
!
control-plane
!
!
!
line con 0
password cisco
login
line aux 0
line 2
no activation-character
no exec
transport preferred none
transport input all
transport output pad telnet rlogin lapb-ta mop udptn v120 ssh
stopbits 1
line vty 0 4
password cisco
login
transport input all
line vty 5 15
password cisco
login
transport input all
!
scheduler allocate 20000 1000
!
end
Router R2
R2# show run
Building configuration...
© 2014 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 12 of 17
Lab - Configuring Basic EIGRP for IPv6
Current configuration : 1633 bytes
!
version 15.2
service timestamps debug datetime msec
service timestamps log datetime msec
no service password-encryption
!
hostname R2
!
boot-start-marker
boot-end-marker
!
!
enable secret 4 06YFDUHH61wAE/kLkDq9BGho1QM5EnRtoyr8cHAUg.2
!
no aaa new-model
memory-size iomem 15
!
ip cef
!
!
!
!
!
!
ipv6 unicast-routing
ipv6 cef
multilink bundle-name authenticated
!
!
!
!
!
!
!
!
!
!
!
interface Embedded-Service-Engine0/0
no ip address
shutdown
!
interface GigabitEthernet0/0
no ip address
duplex auto
speed auto
ipv6 address FE80::2 link-local
© 2014 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 13 of 17
Lab - Configuring Basic EIGRP for IPv6
ipv6 address 2001:DB8:ACAD:B::1/64
ipv6 eigrp 1
!
interface GigabitEthernet0/1
no ip address
shutdown
duplex auto
speed auto
!
interface Serial0/0/0
no ip address
ipv6 address FE80::2 link-local
ipv6 address 2001:DB8:ACAD:12::2/64
ipv6 eigrp 1
!
interface Serial0/0/1
no ip address
ipv6 address FE80::2 link-local
ipv6 address 2001:DB8:ACAD:23::2/64
ipv6 eigrp 1
clock rate 2000000
!
ip forward-protocol nd
!
no ip http server
no ip http secure-server
!
!
ipv6 router eigrp 1
passive-interface GigabitEthernet0/0
eigrp router-id 2.2.2.2
!
!
!
!
control-plane
!
!
!
line con 0
password cisco
login
line aux 0
line 2
no activation-character
no exec
transport preferred none
transport input all
transport output pad telnet rlogin lapb-ta mop udptn v120 ssh
© 2014 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 14 of 17
Lab - Configuring Basic EIGRP for IPv6
stopbits 1
line vty 0 4
password cisco
login
transport input all
line vty 5 15
password cisco
login
transport input all
!
scheduler allocate 20000 1000
!
end
Router R3
R3# show run
Building configuration...
Current configuration : 1672 bytes
!
version 15.2
service timestamps debug datetime msec
service timestamps log datetime msec
no service password-encryption
!
hostname R3
!
boot-start-marker
boot-end-marker
!
!
enable secret 4 06YFDUHH61wAE/kLkDq9BGho1QM5EnRtoyr8cHAUg.2
!
no aaa new-model
memory-size iomem 15
!
ip cef
!
!
!
!
!
!
ipv6 unicast-routing
ipv6 cef
multilink bundle-name authenticated
!
!
!
© 2014 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 15 of 17
Lab - Configuring Basic EIGRP for IPv6
!
!
!
!
!
!
interface Embedded-Service-Engine0/0
no ip address
shutdown
!
interface GigabitEthernet0/0
no ip address
duplex auto
speed auto
ipv6 address FE80::3 link-local
ipv6 address 2001:DB8:ACAD:C::1/64
ipv6 eigrp 1
!
interface GigabitEthernet0/1
no ip address
shutdown
duplex auto
speed auto
!
interface Serial0/0/0
no ip address
ipv6 address FE80::3 link-local
ipv6 address 2001:DB8:ACAD:13::3/64
ipv6 eigrp 1
clock rate 2000000
!
interface Serial0/0/1
no ip address
ipv6 address FE80::3 link-local
ipv6 address 2001:DB8:ACAD:23::3/64
ipv6 eigrp 1
!
ip forward-protocol nd
!
no ip http server
no ip http secure-server
!
!
ipv6 router eigrp 1
passive-interface default
no passive-interface Serial0/0/0
no passive-interface Serial0/0/1
eigrp router-id 3.3.3.3
!
© 2014 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 16 of 17
Lab - Configuring Basic EIGRP for IPv6
!
!
!
control-plane
!
!
!
line con 0
password cisco
login
line aux 0
line 2
no activation-character
no exec
transport preferred none
transport input all
transport output pad telnet rlogin lapb-ta mop udptn v120 ssh
stopbits 1
line vty 0 4
password cisco
login
transport input all
line vty 5 15
password cisco
login
transport input all
!
scheduler allocate 20000 1000
!
end
© 2014 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 17 of 17
Portfolio RIP and EIGRP (Instructor Version)
Instructor Note: Red font color or Gray highlights indicate text that appears in the instructor copy only.
Objectives
Configure EIGRP for IPv4 in a small routed network (review).
The purpose of this activity is to review EIGRP routing protocol concepts and to compare/contrast RIP and EIGRP
as distance-vector routing protocols.
Scenario
You are preparing a portfolio file for comparison of RIP and EIGRP routing protocols.
Think of a network with three interconnected routers with each router providing a LAN for PCs, printers, and other
end devices. The graphic on this page depicts one example of a topology like this.
In this modeling activity scenario, you will be creating, addressing and configuring a topology, using verification
commands, and comparing/contrasting RIP and EIGRP routing protocol outputs.
Complete the PDF reflection questions. Save your work and be prepared to share your answers with the class.
Also save a copy of this activity for later use within this course or for portfolio reference.
Resources
Packet Tracer and word processing software programs
Directions
Step 1: WAN and LAN topology design
a. Use Packet Tracer to design a network with three routers (1941 model, suggested). If necessary, add NIC
cards to the routers to provide connectivity to the routers to provide for at least one LAN to each router.
Add at least one PC to each LAN.
b. Address the networks. You may use a flat addressing scheme or VLSM. Use only IPv4 networks for this
entire activity.
Step 2: Copy the topology
a. Highlight the entire topology by using your cursor.
b. Use Ctrl+C to make a copy of the highlighted topology.
c.
Use Ctrl+V to insert a full copy of the topology to the desktop of Packet Tracer. You will now have
displayed two exact, IPv4-addressed topologies with which to work for routing protocols configurations.
d. While highlighted, move the copied topology to a different location on the Packet Tracer desktop to create
room between the two for configuration purposes.
Step 3: Configure RIP and EIGRP on the separate topologies.
a. Configure the RIP routing protocol on the first topology and EIGRP on the second routing topology.
b. Once you have successfully configured RIP on one topology and EIGRP on the other, check to make
sure your PCs can ping each other.
c.
Save your work so no configuration information is lost.
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 1 of 4
Portfolio RIP and EIGRP
Step 4: Use verification commands to check output for the routing protocols.
a. To compare/contrast routing protocol information from the two topologies, issue the show ip route
command on R1 for topology 1 and 2.
b. Copy the output into a table in your word processing program file. Label each column with RIP or EIGRP
and place the output you received from the show ip route command.
c.
Issue the show ip protocols command on R1 for topology table 1 and 2. Create another table in your
word processing software file and place the output information below RIP or EIGRP.
d. Issue the show cdp neighbors command on R1’s topology 1. Copy the output to a third table with RIP
as the heading and issue the show ip eigrp neighbors command on R1’s topology 2. Copy the output
from this command in column 2 of table 3 under the heading EIGRP.
Reflection
1. Compare and contrast the output for the show ip route verification command.
_______________________________________________________________________________________
Answers will vary, but some answers may include: In both tables, the directly connected and link-local
addresses show the same information, including subnet mask information if a flat addressing scheme was
used. In the RIP table, routes to LANS are depicted by an R and an administrative distance/cost of 120/1 in all
routing entries. This is the default for the RIP routing protocol. For EIGRP, routing table entries are depicted
with a D and administrative distance is 90 for all LAN entries, but cost varies between the three LANs.
2. Compare and contrast the output for the show ip protocol verification command.
_______________________________________________________________________________________
Answers will vary but some answers may include: RIP and EIGRP are listed as the respective routing
protocols. RIP shows an update schedule (every 30 seconds), while EIGRP does not show an update
schedule. The metric weight and hop count limit is listed for EIGRP for bandwidth and delay calculations
purposes. There is a process ID listed for EIGRP and no process ID listed for RIP. Interfaces are listed for
RIP and no interfaces are listed for EIGRP. Administrative distance for RIP is shown as a value of 120 and for
EIGRP, 90.
3. Compare and contrast the show cdp neighbors command for the RIP topology and the show ip eigrp
neighbors command for the EIGRP topology.
__________________________________________________________________
Both output shows directly connected neighbors information. The RIP output shows what type of routers are
reporting the neighbor information and the EIGRP output does not. Interface connections are shown for both
by name (Ser 0/0/0 and Ser 0/0/1). The IPv4 address is shown for interface connections on EIGRP output
only.
4. After comparing and contrasting the RIP and EIGRP output, which do you find most informative? Support
your answer.
__________________________________________________________________
In almost all cases, students will mention EIGRP as the most informative; although, without any advance
configurations, the information is basically the same. One item students may mention, though, is that the
lower the administrative distance, the better the route; therefore, in this case, the EIGRP output would be
looked at as a more informative protocol.
Instructor Resource Example
The information listed in this section is only one depiction of what students could see as a result of this activity.
Other topology designs, addressing schemes, interface connections and router output comparisons may vary per
student groups.
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 2 of 4
Portfolio RIP and EIGRP
Blank Topology Example
Sample Router Output for RIP and EIGRP configurations:
R1# show ip route
Codes: L - local, C - connected, S - static, R - RIP, M - mobile, B - BGP
D - EIGRP, EX - EIGRP external, O - OSPF, IA - OSPF inter area
N1 - OSPF NSSA external type 1, N2 - OSPF NSSA external type 2
E1 - OSPF external type 1, E2 - OSPF external type 2, E - EGP
i - IS-IS, L1 - IS-IS level-1, L2 - IS-IS level-2, ia - IS-IS inter area
* - candidate default, U - per-user static route, o - ODR
P - periodic downloaded static route
R1# show ip route
Codes: L - local, C - connected, S - static, R - RIP, M - mobile, B - BGP
D - EIGRP, EX - EIGRP external, O - OSPF, IA - OSPF inter area
N1 - OSPF NSSA external type 1, N2 - OSPF NSSA external type 2
E1 - OSPF external type 1, E2 - OSPF external type 2, E - EGP
i - IS-IS, L1 - IS-IS level-1, L2 - IS-IS level-2, ia - IS-IS inter area
* - candidate default, U - per-user static route, o - ODR
P - periodic downloaded static route
Gateway of last resort is not set
Gateway of last resort is not set
C
L
C
L
R
C
L
R
R
192.168.1.0/24 is variably subnetted, 2 subnets, 2 masks
192.168.1.0/24 is directly connected, GigabitEthernet0/0
192.168.1.1/32 is directly connected, GigabitEthernet0/0
192.168.2.0/24 is variably subnetted, 2 subnets, 2 masks
192.168.2.0/24 is directly connected, Serial0/0/0
192.168.2.1/32 is directly connected, Serial0/0/0
192.168.3.0/24 [120/1] via 192.168.2.2, 00:00:25, Serial0/0/0
[120/1] via 192.168.4.1, 00:00:10, Serial0/0/1
192.168.4.0/24 is variably subnetted, 2 subnets, 2 masks
192.168.4.0/24 is directly connected, Serial0/0/1
192.168.4.2/32 is directly connected, Serial0/0/1
192.168.5.0/24 [120/1] via 192.168.2.2, 00:00:25, Serial0/0/0
192.168.6.0/24 [120/1] via 192.168.4.1, 00:00:10, Serial0/0/1
C
L
C
L
D
C
L
D
D
192.168.1.0/24 is variably subnetted, 2 subnets, 2 masks
192.168.1.0/24 is directly connected, GigabitEthernet0/0
192.168.1.1/32 is directly connected, GigabitEthernet0/0
192.168.2.0/24 is variably subnetted, 2 subnets, 2 masks
192.168.2.0/24 is directly connected, Serial0/0/0
192.168.2.1/32 is directly connected, Serial0/0/0
192.168.3.0/24 [90/2681856] via 192.168.2.2, 01:23:40, Serial0/0/0
[90/2681856] via 192.168.4.1, 01:01:12, Serial0/0/1
192.168.4.0/24 is variably subnetted, 2 subnets, 2 masks
192.168.4.0/24 is directly connected, Serial0/0/1
192.168.4.2/32 is directly connected, Serial0/0/1
192.168.5.0/24 [90/2170112] via 192.168.2.2, 01:23:29, Serial0/0/0
192.168.6.0/24 [90/2170112] via 192.168.4.1, 01:01:12, Serial0/0/1
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 3 of 4
Portfolio RIP and EIGRP
R1# show ip protocol
Routing Protocol is "rip"
Sending updates every 30 seconds, next due in 8 seconds
Invalid after 180 seconds, hold down 180, flushed after 240
Outgoing update filter list for all interfaces is not set
Incoming update filter list for all interfaces is not set
Redistributing: rip
Default version control: send version 1, receive any version
Interface
Send Recv Triggered RIP Key-chain
GigabitEthernet0/0 1 2 1
Serial0/0/0
1 21
Serial0/0/1
1 21
Automatic network summarization is in effect
Maximum path: 4
Routing for Networks:
192.168.1.0
192.168.2.0
192.168.4.0
Passive Interface(s):
Routing Information Sources:
Gateway
Distance
Last Update
192.168.2.2
120
00:00:19
192.168.4.1
120
00:00:08
Distance: (default is 120)
R1# show cdp neighbors
Capability Codes: R - Router, T - Trans Bridge, B - Source
Route Bridge
S - Switch, H - Host, I - IGMP, r - Repeater, P Phone
Device ID Local Intrfce Holdtme Capability Platform
Port ID
R2
Ser 0/0/0
172
R
C1900
Ser 0/0/0
R3
Ser 0/0/1
127
R
C1900
Ser 0/0/0
R1#
R1# show ip protocol
Routing Protocol is "eigrp 1 "
Outgoing update filter list for all interfaces is not set
Incoming update filter list for all interfaces is not set
Default networks flagged in outgoing updates
Default networks accepted from incoming updates
EIGRP metric weight K1=1, K2=0, K3=1, K4=0, K5=0
EIGRP maximum hopcount 100
EIGRP maximum metric variance 1
Redistributing: eigrp 1
Automatic network summarization is in effect
Automatic address summarization:
Maximum path: 4
Routing for Networks:
192.168.1.0
192.168.2.0
192.168.3.0
192.168.4.0
Routing Information Sources:
Gateway
Distance
Last Update
192.168.2.2 90
91539
192.168.4.1 90
1445980
Distance: internal 90 external 170
R1# show ip eigrp neighbors
IP-EIGRP neighbors for process 1
H Address
Interface
Hold Uptime SRTT RTO
Q Seq
(sec)
(ms)
Cnt Num
0 192.168.2.2 Se0/0/0
10 01:26:12 40 1000 0
11
1 192.168.4.1 Se0/0/1
14 01:03:38 40 1000 0
14
R1#
Identify elements of the model that map to IT-related content:

RIP routing protocol

Metrics

EIGRP routing protocol

Directly connected networks

Distance vector routing protocol

Link local addressing

Process ID for EIGRP

Routing tables

Administrative distance and cost

Neighbors
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 4 of 4
EIGRP – Back to the Future (Instructor Version)
Instructor Note: Red font color or Gray highlights indicate text that appears in the instructor copy only.
Objectives
Implement advanced EIGRP features to enhance operation in a small- to medium-sized business network.
EIGRP is revisited from previous content to provide the basis needed for this chapter’s content.
Scenario
Many of these bulleted concepts were mentioned in the previous chapter’s curriculum content and will be the
focus of this chapter:

Auto-summarization

Load balancing

Default routes

Hold-down timers
 Authentication
With a partner, write 10 EIGRP review questions based on the previous chapter’s curriculum content. Three of the
questions must focus on the bulleted items above. Ideally, Multiple Choice, True/False, or Fill in the Blank
question types will be designed. As you design your questions, make sure you record the curriculum section and
page numbers of the supporting content in case you need to refer back for answer verification.
Save your work and then meet with another group, or the entire class, and quiz them using the questions you
developed.
Resources

Word processing software program

Curriculum content from the previous chapter
Instructor Resources (previous-chapter representative example questions)
1. Fill in the blanks: If an EIGRP neighbor receives a ______ packet, it will ______ an
acknowledgment.
a. broadcast, broadcast
b. broadcast, unicast
c. multicast, unicast
d. unicast, multicast
2. By default, what metrics does EIGRP use to find the best network path? (choose all that apply)
a. MTU
b. Bandwidth
c. Load
d. Delay
e. Reliability
3. True or False: A router which receives a direct query from another router must acknowledge the
query.
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Page 1 of 2
EIGRP – Back to the Future
a. True
b. False
4. True or False: Multicast EIGRP packets for IPv6 are sent to FF02::10.
a. True
b. False
5. True or False: EIGRP authenticates and encrypts routing updates.
a. True
b. False
6.
Load Balancing: True or False: EIGRP supports equal cost load balancing as well as unequal
cost load balancing.
a. True
b. False
7. Timers: True or False: Hold times are used to declare an EIGRP route as operational or down.
a. True
b. False
8. Timers: True or False: By default, the hold time is three times the hello interval, or 15 seconds on
most networks
a. True
b. False
9. Timers: True or False: By default, the hold time is 180 seconds and the hello interval is 60seconds on low speed NBMA networks
a. True
b. False
10. EIGRP uses this algorithm to accomplish fast network convergence.
a. Bellman-Ford
b. Diffused update Algorithm (DUAL)
c. Dijkstra
Identify elements of the model that map to IT-related content:

Auto-summarization

DUAL

Load balancing

Hold-down timers

Hello interval

Authentication

Multicast

Unicast

Broadcast

Encryption
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 2 of 2
Lab – Configuring Advanced EIGRP for IPv4 Features (Instructor
Version)
Instructor Note: Red font color or Gray highlights indicate text that appears in the instructor copy only.
Topology
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Page 1 of 22
Lab – Configuring Advanced EIGRP for IPv4 Features
Addressing Table
Device
R1
Interface
IP Address
Subnet Mask
Default Gateway
G0/0
192.168.1.1
255.255.255.0
N/A
S0/0/0 (DCE)
192.168.12.1
255.255.255.252
N/A
S0/0/1
192.168.13.1
255.255.255.252
N/A
Lo1
192.168.11.1
255.255.255.252
N/A
Lo5
192.168.11.5
255.255.255.252
N/A
Lo9
192.168.11.9
255.255.255.252
N/A
Lo13
192.168.11.13
255.255.255.252
N/A
G0/0
192.168.2.1
255.255.255.0
N/A
S0/0/0
192.168.12.2
255.255.255.252
N/A
S0/0/1 (DCE)
192.168.23.1
255.255.255.252
N/A
Lo1
192.168.22.1
255.255.255.252
N/A
G0/0
192.168.3.1
255.255.255.0
N/A
S0/0/0 (DCE)
192.168.13.2
255.255.255.252
N/A
S0/0/1
192.168.23.2
255.255.255.252
N/A
Lo1
192.168.33.1
255.255.255.252
N/A
Lo5
192.168.33.5
255.255.255.252
N/A
Lo9
192.168.33.9
255.255.255.252
N/A
Lo13
192.168.33.13
255.255.255.252
N/A
PC-A
NIC
192.168.1.3
255.255.255.0
192.168.1.1
PC-B
NIC
192.168.2.3
255.255.255.0
192.168.2.1
PC-C
NIC
192.168.3.3
255.255.255.0
192.168.3.1
R2
R3
Objectives
Part 1: Build the Network and Configure Basic Device Settings
Part 2: Configure EIGRP and Verify Connectivity
Part 3: Configure Summarization for EIGRP

Configure EIGRP for automatic summarization.

Configure manual summarization for EIGRP.
Part 4: Configure and Propagate a Default Static Route
Part 5: Fine-Tune EIGRP

Configure bandwidth utilization for EIGRP.

Configure the hello interval and hold timer for EIGRP.
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Page 2 of 22
Lab – Configuring Advanced EIGRP for IPv4 Features
Part 6: Configure EIGRP Authentication
Background / Scenario
EIGRP has advanced features to allow changes related to summarization, default route propagation,
bandwidth utilization, metrics, and security.
In this lab, you will configure automatic and manual summarization for EIGRP, configure EIGRP route
propagation, fine-tune EIGRP metrics, and use MD5 authentication to secure EIGRP routing information.
Note: The routers used with CCNA hands-on labs are Cisco 1941 Integrated Services Routers (ISRs) with
Cisco IOS Release 15.2(4)M3 (universalk9 image). Other routers and Cisco IOS versions can be used.
Depending on the model and Cisco IOS version, the commands available and output produced might vary
from what is shown in the labs. Refer to the Router Interface Summary Table at this end of the lab for the
correct interface identifiers.
Note: Ensure that the routers have been erased and have no startup configurations. If you are unsure,
contact your instructor.
Instructor Note: Refer to the Instructor Lab Manual for the procedures to initialize and reload devices.
Required Resources

3 Routers (Cisco 1941 with Cisco IOS Release 15.2(4)M3 universal image or comparable)

3 PCs (Windows 7, Vista, or XP with terminal emulation program, such as Tera Term)

Console cables to configure the Cisco IOS devices via the console ports

Ethernet and serial cables as shown in the topology
Part 1: Build the Network and Configure Basic Device Settings
In Part 1, you will set up the network topology and configure basic settings on the PC hosts and routers.
Step 1: Cable the network as shown in the topology.
Step 2: Configure PC hosts.
Step 3: Initialize and reload the routers as necessary.
Step 4: Configure basic settings for each router.
a. Disable DNS lookup.
b. Configure device name as shown in the topology.
c.
Assign cisco as the console and vty passwords.
d. Assign class as the privileged EXEC password.
e. Configure logging synchronous to prevent console messages from interrupting command entry.
f.
Configure the IP address listed in the Addressing Table for all interfaces.
Note: Do NOT configure the loopback interfaces at this time.
g. Copy the running configuration to the startup configuration.
Part 2: Configure EIGRP and Verify Connectivity
In Part 2, you will configure basic EIGRP for the topology and set bandwidths for the serial interfaces.
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Page 3 of 22
Lab – Configuring Advanced EIGRP for IPv4 Features
Note: This lab provides minimal assistance with the actual commands necessary to configure EIGRP.
However, the required commands are provided in Appendix A. Test your knowledge by trying to configure the
devices without referring to the appendix.
Step 1: Configure EIGRP.
a. On R1, configure EIGRP routing with an autonomous system (AS) ID of 1 for all directly connected
networks. Write the commands used in the space below.
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
R1(config)# router
R1(config-router)#
R1(config-router)#
R1(config-router)#
eigrp 1
network 192.168.1.0
network 192.168.12.0 0.0.0.3
network 192.168.13.0 0.0.0.3
b. For the LAN interface on R1, disable the transmission of EIGRP hello packets. Write the command used
in the space below.
____________________________________________________________________________________
R1(config-router)# passive-interface g0/0
c.
On R1, configure the bandwidth for S0/0/0 to 1024 Kb/s and the bandwidth for S0/0/1 to 64 Kb/s. Write
the commands used in the space below. Note: The bandwidth command only affects the EIGRP metric
calculation, not the actual bandwidth of the serial link.
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
R1(config)# interface s0/0/0
R1(config-if)# bandwidth 1024
R1(config-if)# interface s0/0/1
R1(config-if)# bandwidth 64
d. On R2, configure EIGRP routing with an AS ID of 1 for all networks, disable the transmission of EIGRP
hello packets for the LAN interface, and configure the bandwidth for S0/0/0 to 1024 Kb/s.
e. On R3, configure EIGRP routing with an AS ID of 1 for all networks, disable the transmission of EIGRP
hello packets for the LAN interface, and configure the bandwidth for S0/0/0 to 64 Kb/s.
Step 2: Test connectivity.
All PCs should be able to ping one another. Verify and troubleshoot if necessary.
Note: It may be necessary to disable the PC firewall to ping between PCs.
Part 3: Configure Summarization for EIGRP
In Part 3, you will add loopback interfaces to R1, enable EIGRP automatic summarization on R1, and observe
the effects on the routing table for R2. You will also add loopback interfaces on R3.
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Page 4 of 22
Lab – Configuring Advanced EIGRP for IPv4 Features
Step 1: Configure EIGRP for automatic summarization.
a. Issue the show ip protocols command on R1. What is the default status of automatic summarization in
EIGRP?
R1# show ip protocols
*** IP Routing is NSF aware ***
Routing Protocol is "eigrp 1"
Outgoing update filter list for all interfaces is not set
Incoming update filter list for all interfaces is not set
Default networks flagged in outgoing updates
Default networks accepted from incoming updates
EIGRP-IPv4 Protocol for AS(1)
Metric weight K1=1, K2=0, K3=1, K4=0, K5=0
NSF-aware route hold timer is 240
Router-ID: 192.168.13.1
Topology : 0 (base)
Active Timer: 3 min
Distance: internal 90 external 170
Maximum path: 4
Maximum hopcount 100
Maximum metric variance 1
Automatic Summarization: disabled
Maximum path: 4
Routing for Networks:
192.168.1.0
192.168.12.0/30
192.168.13.0/30
Passive Interface(s):
GigabitEthernet0/0
Routing Information Sources:
Gateway
Distance
Last Update
192.168.12.2
90
00:30:16
192.168.13.2
90
00:30:16
Distance: internal 90 external 170
____________________________________________________________________________________
Automatic network summarization is disabled.
b. Configure the loopback addresses on R1.
c.
Add the appropriate network statements to the EIGRP process on R1. Record the commands used in the
space below.
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
R1(config)# router eigrp 1
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Page 5 of 22
Lab – Configuring Advanced EIGRP for IPv4 Features
R1(config-router)#
R1(config-router)#
R1(config-router)#
R1(config-router)#
network
network
network
network
192.168.11.0 0.0.0.3
192.168.11.4 0.0.0.3
192.168.11.8 0.0.0.3
192.168.11.12 0.0.0.3
d. On R2, issue the show ip route eigrp command. How are the loopback networks represented in the
output?
R2# show ip route eigrp
Codes: L - local, C - connected, S - static, R - RIP, M - mobile, B - BGP
D - EIGRP, EX - EIGRP external, O - OSPF, IA - OSPF inter area
N1 - OSPF NSSA external type 1, N2 - OSPF NSSA external type 2
E1 - OSPF external type 1, E2 - OSPF external type 2, E - EGP
i - IS-IS, L1 - IS-IS level-1, L2 - IS-IS level-2, ia - IS-IS inter area
* - candidate default, U - per-user static route, o - ODR
P - periodic downloaded static route
Gateway of last resort is not set
D
192.168.1.0/24 [90/3014400] via 192.168.12.1, 00:14:58, Serial0/0/0
D
192.168.3.0/24 [90/2172416] via 192.168.23.2, 00:11:18, Serial0/0/1
192.168.11.0/30 is subnetted, 4 subnets
D
192.168.11.0 [90/3139840] via 192.168.12.1, 00:00:14, Serial0/0/0
D
192.168.11.4 [90/3139840] via 192.168.12.1, 00:00:14, Serial0/0/0
D
192.168.11.8 [90/3139840] via 192.168.12.1, 00:00:14, Serial0/0/0
D
192.168.11.12 [90/3139840] via 192.168.12.1, 00:00:14, Serial0/0/0
192.168.13.0/30 is subnetted, 1 subnets
D
192.168.13.0 [90/41024000] via 192.168.23.2, 00:06:11, Serial0/0/1
[90/41024000] via 192.168.12.1, 00:06:11, Serial0/0/0
____________________________________________________________________________________
All subnetworks are listed in the routing table output.
e. On R1, issue the auto-summary command inside the EIGRP process.
R1(config)# router eigrp 1
R1(config-router)# auto-summary
R1(config-router)#
*Apr 14 01:14:55.463: %DUAL-5-NBRCHANGE: EIGRP-IPv4 1:
(Serial0/0/1) is resync: summary configured
*Apr 14 01:14:55.463: %DUAL-5-NBRCHANGE: EIGRP-IPv4 1:
(Serial0/0/0) is resync: summary configured
*Apr 14 01:14:55.463: %DUAL-5-NBRCHANGE: EIGRP-IPv4 1:
(Serial0/0/1) is resync: summary up, remove components
R1(config-router)#67: %DUAL-5-NBRCHANGE: EIGRP-IPv4 1:
(Serial0/0/0) is resync: summary up, remove components
*Apr 14 01:14:55.467: %DUAL-5-NBRCHANGE: EIGRP-IPv4 1:
(Serial0/0/0) is resync: summary up, remove components
*Apr 14 01:14:55.467: %DUAL-5-NBRCHANGE: EIGRP-IPv4 1:
(Serial0/0/1) is resync: summary up, remove components
Neighbor 192.168.13.2
Neighbor 192.168.12.2
Neighbor 192.168.13.2
Neighbor 192.168.12.2
Neighbor 192.168.12.2
Neighbor 192.168.13.2
How does the routing table on R2 change?
R2# show ip route eigrp
Codes: L - local, C - connected, S - static, R - RIP, M - mobile, B - BGP
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Page 6 of 22
Lab – Configuring Advanced EIGRP for IPv4 Features
D - EIGRP, EX - EIGRP external, O - OSPF, IA - OSPF inter area
N1 - OSPF NSSA external type 1, N2 - OSPF NSSA external type 2
E1 - OSPF external type 1, E2 - OSPF external type 2, E - EGP
i - IS-IS, L1 - IS-IS level-1, L2 - IS-IS level-2, ia - IS-IS inter area
* - candidate default, U - per-user static route, o - ODR
P - periodic downloaded static route
Gateway of last resort is not set
D
192.168.1.0/24 [90/3014400] via 192.168.12.1, 00:01:13, Serial0/0/0
D
192.168.3.0/24 [90/2172416] via 192.168.23.2, 00:15:58, Serial0/0/1
192.168.11.0/24 is subnetted, 1 subnets
D
192.168.11.0 [90/3139840] via 192.168.12.1, 00:01:13, Serial0/0/0
192.168.12.0/24 is variably subnetted, 3 subnets, 3 masks
D
192.168.12.0/24 [90/41536000] via 192.168.23.2, 00:01:13, Serial0/0/1
192.168.13.0/24 is variably subnetted, 2 subnets, 2 masks
D
192.168.13.0/24 [90/41024000] via 192.168.12.1, 00:01:13, Serial0/0/0
D
192.168.13.0/30 [90/41024000] via 192.168.23.2, 00:01:13, Serial0/0/1
____________________________________________________________________________________
The 192.168.11.0 networks are summarized at their classful boundary.
Step 2: Configure manual summarization for EIGRP.
a. Configure the loopback addresses on R3.
b. Add the appropriate network statements to the EIGRP process on R3.
c.
On R2, issue the show ip route eigrp command. How are the loopback networks from R3 represented in
the output?
R2# show ip route eigrp
Codes: L - local, C - connected, S - static, R - RIP, M - mobile, B - BGP
D - EIGRP, EX - EIGRP external, O - OSPF, IA - OSPF inter area
N1 - OSPF NSSA external type 1, N2 - OSPF NSSA external type 2
E1 - OSPF external type 1, E2 - OSPF external type 2
i - IS-IS, su - IS-IS summary, L1 - IS-IS level-1, L2 - IS-IS level-2
ia - IS-IS inter area, * - candidate default, U - per-user static route
o - ODR, P - periodic downloaded static route, H - NHRP, l - LISP
+ - replicated route, % - next hop override
Gateway of last resort is not set
D
D
D
D
D
D
192.168.1.0/24 [90/3014400] via 192.168.12.1, 00:11:50, Serial0/0/0
192.168.3.0/24 [90/2172416] via 192.168.23.2, 00:26:35, Serial0/0/1
192.168.11.0/24 is subnetted, 1 subnets
192.168.11.0 [90/3139840] via 192.168.12.1, 00:11:50, Serial0/0/0
192.168.12.0/24 is variably subnetted, 3 subnets, 3 masks
192.168.12.0/24 [90/41536000] via 192.168.23.2, 00:11:50, Serial0/0/1
192.168.13.0/24 is variably subnetted, 2 subnets, 2 masks
192.168.13.0/24 [90/41024000] via 192.168.12.1, 00:11:50, Serial0/0/0
192.168.13.0/30 [90/41024000] via 192.168.23.2, 00:11:50, Serial0/0/1
192.168.33.0/30 is subnetted, 3 subnets
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 7 of 22
Lab – Configuring Advanced EIGRP for IPv4 Features
D
D
D
D
192.168.33.0 [90/2297856] via 192.168.23.2, 00:00:19, Serial0/0/1
192.168.33.4 [90/2297856] via 192.168.23.2, 00:00:19, Serial0/0/1
192.168.33.8 [90/2297856] via 192.168.23.2, 00:00:19, Serial0/0/1
192.168.33.12 [90/2297856] via 192.168.23.2, 00:00:19, Serial0/0/1
____________________________________________________________________________________
All subnetworks are listed in the routing table.
d. Determine the summary EIGRP route for the loopback addresses on R3. Write the summary route in the
space below.
____________________________________________________________________________________
192.168.33.0 255.255.255.240
e. For the serial interfaces on R3, issue the ip summary-address eigrp 1 network address subnet mask
command to manually summarize the networks.
R3(config)# interface s0/0/0
R3(config-if)# ip summary-address eigrp 1 192.168.33.0 255.255.255.240
R3(config-if)# exit
R3(config)# interface s0/0/1
R3(config-if)# ip summary-address eigrp 1 192.168.33.0 255.255.255.240
*Apr 14 01:33:46.433: %DUAL-5-NBRCHANGE: EIGRP-IPv4 1: Neighbor 192.168.13.1
(Serial0/0/0) is resync: summary configured
*Apr 14 01:33:46.433: %DUAL-5-NBRCHANGE: EIGRP-IPv4 1: Neighbor 192.168.23.1
(Serial0/0/1) is resync: summary configured
How does the routing table on R2 change?
R2# show ip route eigrp
Codes: L - local, C - connected, S - static, R - RIP, M - mobile, B - BGP
D - EIGRP, EX - EIGRP external, O - OSPF, IA - OSPF inter area
N1 - OSPF NSSA external type 1, N2 - OSPF NSSA external type 2
E1 - OSPF external type 1, E2 - OSPF external type 2
i - IS-IS, su - IS-IS summary, L1 - IS-IS level-1, L2 - IS-IS level-2
ia - IS-IS inter area, * - candidate default, U - per-user static route
o - ODR, P - periodic downloaded static route, H - NHRP, l - LISP
+ - replicated route, % - next hop override
Gateway of last resort is not set
D
D
D
D
D
D
D
192.168.1.0/24 [90/3014400] via 192.168.12.1, 00:21:32, Serial0/0/0
192.168.3.0/24 [90/2172416] via 192.168.23.2, 00:36:17, Serial0/0/1
192.168.11.0/24 is subnetted, 1 subnets
192.168.11.0 [90/3139840] via 192.168.12.1, 00:21:32, Serial0/0/0
192.168.12.0/24 is variably subnetted, 3 subnets, 3 masks
192.168.12.0/24 [90/41536000] via 192.168.23.2, 00:21:32, Serial0/0/1
192.168.13.0/24 is variably subnetted, 2 subnets, 2 masks
192.168.13.0/24 [90/41024000] via 192.168.12.1, 00:21:32, Serial0/0/0
192.168.13.0/30 [90/41024000] via 192.168.23.2, 00:21:32, Serial0/0/1
192.168.33.0/28 is subnetted, 1 subnets
192.168.33.0 [90/2297856] via 192.168.23.2, 00:02:51, Serial0/0/1
____________________________________________________________________________________
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 8 of 22
Lab – Configuring Advanced EIGRP for IPv4 Features
The 192.168.33.0 networks are summarized with a /28 mask.
Part 4: Configure and Propagate a Default Static Route
In Part 4, you will configure a default static route on R2 and propagate the route to all other routers.
a. Configure the loopback address on R2.
b. Configure a default static route with an exit interface of Lo1.
R2(config)# ip route 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 Lo1
c.
Use the redistribute static command within the EIGRP process to propagate the default static route to
other participating routers.
R2(config)# router eigrp 1
R2(config-router)# redistribute static
d. Use the show ip protocols command on R2 to verify the static route is being distributed.
R2# show ip protocols
*** IP Routing is NSF aware ***
Routing Protocol is "eigrp 1"
Outgoing update filter list for all interfaces is not set
Incoming update filter list for all interfaces is not set
Default networks flagged in outgoing updates
Default networks accepted from incoming updates
Redistributing: static
EIGRP-IPv4 Protocol for AS(1)
Metric weight K1=1, K2=0, K3=1, K4=0, K5=0
NSF-aware route hold timer is 240
Router-ID: 192.168.23.1
Topology : 0 (base)
Active Timer: 3 min
Distance: internal 90 external 170
Maximum path: 4
Maximum hopcount 100
Maximum metric variance 1
Automatic Summarization: disabled
Maximum path: 4
Routing for Networks:
192.168.2.0
192.168.12.0/30
192.168.23.0/30
Passive Interface(s):
GigabitEthernet0/0
Routing Information Sources:
Gateway
Distance
Last Update
192.168.12.1
90
00:13:20
192.168.23.2
90
00:13:20
Distance: internal 90 external 170
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 9 of 22
Lab – Configuring Advanced EIGRP for IPv4 Features
e. On R1, issue the show ip route eigrp | include 0.0.0.0 command to view statements specific to the
default route. How is the static default route represented in the output? What is the administrative
distance (AD) for the propagated route?
R1# show ip route eigrp | include 0.0.0.0
Gateway of last resort is 192.168.12.2 to network 0.0.0.0
D*EX 0.0.0.0/0 [170/3139840] via 192.168.12.2, 00:06:27, Serial0/0/0
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
As an externally learned EIGRP route:
D*EX
0.0.0.0/0 [170/3139840] via 192.168.12.2, 00:06:27, Serial0/0/0
The administrative distance is 170 as it is an external EIGRP route.
Part 5: Fine-Tune EIGRP
In Part 5, you will configure the percentage of bandwidth that can be used by an EIGRP interface and change
the hello interval and hold timers for EIGRP interfaces.
Step 1: Configure bandwidth utilization for EIGRP.
a. Configure the serial link between R1 and R2 to allow only 75 percent of the link bandwidth for EIGRP
traffic.
R1(config)# interface s0/0/0
R1(config-if)# ip bandwidth-percent eigrp 1 75
R2(config)# interface s0/0/0
R2(config-if)# ip bandwidth-percent eigrp 1 75
b. Configure the serial link between R1 and R3 to allow 40 percent of the links bandwidth for EIGRP traffic.
Step 2: Configure the hello interval and hold timer for EIGRP.
a. On R2, use the show ip eigrp interfaces detail command to view the hello interval and hold timer for
EIGRP.
R2# show ip eigrp interfaces detail
EIGRP-IPv4 Interfaces for AS(1)
Xmit Queue
PeerQ
Mean
Pacing Time
Multicast
Pending
Interface
Se0/0/0
Un/Reliable
0/0
SRTT
1
Un/Reliable
0/15
Flow Timer
50
Routes
0
Peers
1
Un/Reliable
0/0
Hello-interval is 5, Hold-time is 15
Split-horizon is enabled
Next xmit serial <none>
Packetized sent/expedited: 29/1
Hello's sent/expedited: 390/2
Un/reliable mcasts: 0/0 Un/reliable ucasts: 35/39
Mcast exceptions: 0 CR packets: 0 ACKs suppressed: 0
Retransmissions sent: 0 Out-of-sequence rcvd: 0
Topology-ids on interface - 0
Interface BW percentage is 75
Authentication mode is not set
Se0/0/1
1
0/0
0/0
1
0/16
50
0
Hello-interval is 5, Hold-time is 15
Split-horizon is enabled
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 10 of 22
Lab – Configuring Advanced EIGRP for IPv4 Features
Next xmit serial <none>
Packetized sent/expedited: 34/5
Hello's sent/expedited: 382/2
Un/reliable mcasts: 0/0 Un/reliable ucasts: 31/42
Mcast exceptions: 0 CR packets: 0 ACKs suppressed: 2
Retransmissions sent: 0 Out-of-sequence rcvd: 0
Topology-ids on interface - 0
Authentication mode is not set
What is the default value for hello time? _________________ 5 seconds
What is the default value for hold time? _________________ 15 seconds
b. Configure S0/0/0 and S0/0/1 interfaces on R1 to use a hello interval of 60 seconds and a hold time of 180
seconds in that specific order.
R1(config)# interface s0/0/0
R1(config-if)# ip hello-interval eigrp 1 60
R1(config-if)# ip hold-time eigrp 1 180
R1(config)# interface s0/0/1
R1(config-if)# ip hello-interval eigrp 1 60
R1(config-if)# ip hold-time eigrp 1 180
c.
Configure the serial interfaces on R2 and R3 to use a hello interval of 60 seconds and a hold time of 180
seconds.
d. Use the show ip eigrp interfaces detail command on R2 to verify configuration.
R2# show ip eigrp interfaces detail
EIGRP-IPv4 Interfaces for AS(1)
Xmit Queue
PeerQ
Mean
Pacing Time
Multicast
Pending
Interface
Se0/0/0
Un/Reliable
0/0
SRTT
1
Un/Reliable
0/15
Flow Timer
50
Routes
0
Peers
1
Un/Reliable
0/0
Hello-interval is 60, Hold-time is 180
Split-horizon is enabled
Next xmit serial <none>
Packetized sent/expedited: 38/1
Hello's sent/expedited: 489/4
Un/reliable mcasts: 0/0 Un/reliable ucasts: 40/48
Mcast exceptions: 0 CR packets: 0 ACKs suppressed: 0
Retransmissions sent: 0 Out-of-sequence rcvd: 0
Topology-ids on interface - 0
Interface BW percentage is 75
Authentication mode is not set
Se0/0/1
1
0/0
Hello-interval is 60, Hold-time is 180
0/0
1
0/16
50
0
Split-horizon is enabled
Next xmit serial <none>
Packetized sent/expedited: 45/5
Hello's sent/expedited: 481/2
Un/reliable mcasts: 0/0 Un/reliable ucasts: 46/55
Mcast exceptions: 0 CR packets: 0 ACKs suppressed: 2
Retransmissions sent: 0 Out-of-sequence rcvd: 0
Topology-ids on interface - 0
Authentication mode is not set
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Page 11 of 22
Lab – Configuring Advanced EIGRP for IPv4 Features
Part 6: Configure EIGRP Authentication
In Part 6, you will create an authentication key on all routers and configure router interfaces to use MD5
authentication for EIGRP message authentication.
Step 1: Configure authentication keys.
a. On R1, use the key chain name command in global configuration mode to create a key chain with the
label EIGRP-KEYS.
R1(config)# key chain EIGRP-KEYS
R1(config-keychain)# key 1
R1(config-keychain-key)# key-string cisco
b. Complete the configuration on R2 and R3.
c.
Issue the show key chain command. You should have the same output on every router.
Step 2: Configure EIGRP link authentication.
a. Apply the following commands to active EIGRP authentication on the serial interfaces on R1.
R1# conf t
R1(config)# interface s0/0/0
R1(config-if)# ip authentication
R1(config-if)# ip authentication
R1(config-if)# interface s0/0/1
R1(config-if)# ip authentication
R1(config-if)# ip authentication
key-chain eigrp 1 EIGRP-KEYS
mode eigrp 1 md5
key-chain eigrp 1 EIGRP-KEYS
mode eigrp 1 md5
b. Activate EIGRP authentication on the serial interfaces on R2 and R3.
c.
On R2, use the show ip eigrp interfaces detail command to verify authentication.
R2# show ip eigrp interfaces detail
EIGRP-IPv4 Interfaces for AS(1)
Xmit Queue
PeerQ
Mean
Pacing Time
Multicast
Pending
Interface
Se0/0/0
Un/Reliable
0/0
SRTT
1
Un/Reliable
0/23
Flow Timer
50
Routes
0
Peers
1
Un/Reliable
0/0
Hello-interval is 60, Hold-time is 180
Split-horizon is enabled
Next xmit serial <none>
Packetized sent/expedited: 30/5
Hello's sent/expedited: 1163/5
Un/reliable mcasts: 0/0 Un/reliable ucasts: 25/34
Mcast exceptions: 0 CR packets: 0 ACKs suppressed: 0
Retransmissions sent: 0 Out-of-sequence rcvd: 0
Topology-ids on interface - 0
Authentication mode is md5, key-chain is "EIGRP-KEYS"
Se0/0/1
1
0/0
Hello-interval is 60, Hold-time is 180
0/0
2
0/15
50
0
Split-horizon is enabled
Next xmit serial <none>
Packetized sent/expedited: 31/1
Hello's sent/expedited: 1354/3
Un/reliable mcasts: 0/0
Un/reliable ucasts: 28/34
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 12 of 22
Lab – Configuring Advanced EIGRP for IPv4 Features
Mcast exceptions: 0
CR packets: 0
ACKs suppressed: 4
Retransmissions sent: 0 Out-of-sequence rcvd: 0
Topology-ids on interface - 0
Authentication mode is md5,
key-chain is "EIGRP-KEYS"
Reflection
1. What are the benefits of summarizing routes?
_______________________________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________________________
Summarization can be used to limit the number of routing advertisements and the size of routing tables.
2. When setting EIGRP timers, why is it important to make the hold time value equal to or greater than the hello
interval?
_______________________________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________________________
If the hold time is less than the hello interval, the neighbor adjacency will go down.
3. Why is it important to configure authentication for EIGRP?
_______________________________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________________________
Unauthenticated router updates create a security risk. Attackers could inject false route information into router
updates to redirect traffic to create routing loops or to send traffic across unsecure links.
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 13 of 22
Lab – Configuring Advanced EIGRP for IPv4 Features
Router Interface Summary Table
Router Interface Summary
Router Model
Ethernet Interface #1
Ethernet Interface #2
Serial Interface #1
Serial Interface #2
1800
Fast Ethernet 0/0
(F0/0)
Fast Ethernet 0/1
(F0/1)
Serial 0/0/0 (S0/0/0)
Serial 0/0/1 (S0/0/1)
1900
Gigabit Ethernet 0/0
(G0/0)
Gigabit Ethernet 0/1
(G0/1)
Serial 0/0/0 (S0/0/0)
Serial 0/0/1 (S0/0/1)
2801
Fast Ethernet 0/0
(F0/0)
Fast Ethernet 0/1
(F0/1)
Serial 0/1/0 (S0/1/0)
Serial 0/1/1 (S0/1/1)
2811
Fast Ethernet 0/0
(F0/0)
Fast Ethernet 0/1
(F0/1)
Serial 0/0/0 (S0/0/0)
Serial 0/0/1 (S0/0/1)
2900
Gigabit Ethernet 0/0
(G0/0)
Gigabit Ethernet 0/1
(G0/1)
Serial 0/0/0 (S0/0/0)
Serial 0/0/1 (S0/0/1)
Note: To find out how the router is configured, look at the interfaces to identify the type of router and how many
interfaces the router has. There is no way to effectively list all the combinations of configurations for each router
class. This table includes identifiers for the possible combinations of Ethernet and Serial interfaces in the device.
The table does not include any other type of interface, even though a specific router may contain one. An
example of this might be an ISDN BRI interface. The string in parenthesis is the legal abbreviation that can be
used in Cisco IOS commands to represent the interface.
Appendix A: Configuration Commands
Router R1
R1(config)# router eigrp 1
R1(config-router)# network 192.168.1.0
R1(config-router)# network 192.168.12.0 0.0.0.3
R1(config-router)# network 192.168.13.0 0.0.0.3
R1(config-router)# network 192.168.11.0 0.0.0.3
R1(config-router)# network 192.168.11.4 0.0.0.3
R1(config-router)# network 192.168.11.8 0.0.0.3
R1(config-router)# network 192.168.11.12 0.0.0.3
R1(config-router)# passive-interface g0/0
R1(config)# int s0/0/0
R1(config-if)# bandwidth 1024
R1(config-if)# int s0/0/1
R1(config-if)# bandwidth 64
Router R2
R2(config)# router
R2(config-router)#
R2(config-router)#
R2(config-router)#
R2(config-router)#
eigrp 1
network 192.168.2.0
network 192.168.12.0 0.0.0.3
network 192.168.23.0 0.0.0.3
passive-interface g0/0
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 14 of 22
Lab – Configuring Advanced EIGRP for IPv4 Features
R2(config)# int s0/0/0
R2(config-if)# bandwidth 1024
Router R3
R3(config)# router eigrp 1
R3(config-router)# network 192.168.3.0
R3(config-router)# network 192.168.13.0 0.0.0.3
R3(config-router)# network 192.168.23.0 0.0.0.3
R3(config-router)# network 192.168.33.0 0.0.0.3
R3(config-router)# network 192.168.33.4 0.0.0.3
R3(config-router)# network 192.168.33.8 0.0.0.3
R3(config-router)# network 192.168.33.12 0.0.0.3
R3(config-router)# passive-interface g0/0
R3(config)# int s0/0/0
R3(config-if)# bandwidth 64
Device Configs - R1, R2, and R3
Router R1
R1#show run
Building configuration...
Current configuration : 2378 bytes
!
version 15.2
service timestamps debug datetime msec
service timestamps log datetime msec
no service password-encryption
!
hostname R1
!
boot-start-marker
boot-end-marker
!
enable secret 4 06YFDUHH61wAE/kLkDq9BGho1QM5EnRtoyr8cHAUg.2
!
no aaa new-model
!
no ip domain lookup
ip cef
no ipv6 cef
!
multilink bundle-name authenticated
!
key chain EIGRP-KEYS
key 1
key-string cisco
!
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Page 15 of 22
Lab – Configuring Advanced EIGRP for IPv4 Features
!
redundancy
!
interface Loopback1
ip address 192.168.11.1 255.255.255.252
!
interface Loopback5
ip address 192.168.11.5 255.255.255.252
!
interface Loopback9
ip address 192.168.11.9 255.255.255.252
!
interface Loopback13
ip address 192.168.11.13 255.255.255.252
!
interface Embedded-Service-Engine0/0
no ip address
shutdown
!
interface GigabitEthernet0/0
ip address 192.168.1.1 255.255.255.0
duplex auto
speed auto
!
interface GigabitEthernet0/1
no ip address
shutdown
duplex auto
speed auto
!
interface Serial0/0/0
bandwidth 1024
ip address 192.168.12.1 255.255.255.252
ip authentication mode eigrp 1 md5
ip authentication key-chain eigrp 1 EIGRP-KEYS
ip bandwidth-percent eigrp 1 75
ip hello-interval eigrp 1 60
ip hold-time eigrp 1 180
clock rate 2000000
!
interface Serial0/0/1
bandwidth 64
ip address 192.168.13.1 255.255.255.252
ip authentication mode eigrp 1 md5
ip authentication key-chain eigrp 1 EIGRP-KEYS
ip bandwidth-percent eigrp 1 40
ip hello-interval eigrp 1 60
ip hold-time eigrp 1 180
!
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Page 16 of 22
Lab – Configuring Advanced EIGRP for IPv4 Features
router eigrp 1
network 192.168.1.0
network 192.168.11.0 0.0.0.3
network 192.168.11.4 0.0.0.3
network 192.168.11.8 0.0.0.3
network 192.168.11.12 0.0.0.3
network 192.168.12.0 0.0.0.3
network 192.168.13.0 0.0.0.3
auto-summary
passive-interface GigabitEthernet0/0
!
ip forward-protocol nd
!
no ip http server
no ip http secure-server
!
control-plane
!
!
line con 0
password cisco
logging synchronous
login
line aux 0
line 2
no activation-character
no exec
transport preferred none
transport input all
transport output pad telnet rlogin lapb-ta mop udptn v120 ssh
stopbits 1
line vty 0 4
password cisco
login
transport input all
!
scheduler allocate 20000 1000
!
end
Router R2
Building configuration...
Current configuration : 2223 bytes
!
version 15.2
service timestamps debug datetime msec
service timestamps log datetime msec
no service password-encryption
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Page 17 of 22
Lab – Configuring Advanced EIGRP for IPv4 Features
!
hostname R2
!
boot-start-marker
boot-end-marker
!
enable secret 4 06YFDUHH61wAE/kLkDq9BGho1QM5EnRtoyr8cHAUg.2
!
no aaa new-model
!
no ip domain lookup
ip cef
no ipv6 cef
!
multilink bundle-name authenticated
!
key chain EIGRP-KEYS
key 1
key-string cisco
!
!
redundancy
!
interface Loopback1
ip address 192.168.22.1 255.255.255.252
!
interface Embedded-Service-Engine0/0
no ip address
shutdown
!
interface GigabitEthernet0/0
ip address 192.168.2.1 255.255.255.0
duplex auto
speed auto
!
interface GigabitEthernet0/1
no ip address
shutdown
duplex auto
speed auto
!
interface Serial0/0/0
bandwidth 1024
ip address 192.168.12.2 255.255.255.252
ip authentication mode eigrp 1 md5
ip authentication key-chain eigrp 1 EIGRP-KEYS
ip bandwidth-percent eigrp 1 75
ip hello-interval eigrp 1 60
ip hold-time eigrp 1 180
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 18 of 22
Lab – Configuring Advanced EIGRP for IPv4 Features
!
interface Serial0/0/1
ip address 192.168.23.1 255.255.255.252
ip authentication mode eigrp 1 md5
ip authentication key-chain eigrp 1 EIGRP-KEYS
ip hello-interval eigrp 1 60
ip hold-time eigrp 1 180
clock rate 2000000
!
!
router eigrp 1
network 192.168.2.0
network 192.168.12.0 0.0.0.3
network 192.168.23.0 0.0.0.3
redistribute static
passive-interface GigabitEthernet0/0
!
ip forward-protocol nd
!
no ip http server
no ip http secure-server
!
ip route 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 Loopback1
!
!
!
!
control-plane
!
!
!
line con 0
password cisco
logging synchronous
login
line aux 0
line 2
no activation-character
no exec
transport preferred none
transport input all
transport output pad telnet rlogin lapb-ta mop udptn v120 ssh
stopbits 1
line vty 0 4
password cisco
login
transport input all
!
scheduler allocate 20000 1000
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Page 19 of 22
Lab – Configuring Advanced EIGRP for IPv4 Features
!
end
Router R3
R3#show run
Building configuration...
Current configuration : 2456 bytes
!
version 15.2
service timestamps debug datetime msec
service timestamps log datetime msec
no service password-encryption
!
hostname R3
!
boot-start-marker
boot-end-marker
!
!
enable secret 4 06YFDUHH61wAE/kLkDq9BGho1QM5EnRtoyr8cHAUg.2
!
no aaa new-model
memory-size iomem 15
!
no ip domain lookup
ip cef
no ipv6 cef
!
key chain EIGRP-KEYS
key 1
key-string cisco
!
!
redundancy
!
interface Loopback1
ip address 192.168.33.1 255.255.255.252
!
interface Loopback5
ip address 192.168.33.5 255.255.255.252
!
interface Loopback9
ip address 192.168.33.9 255.255.255.252
!
interface Loopback13
ip address 192.168.33.13 255.255.255.252
!
interface Embedded-Service-Engine0/0
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 20 of 22
Lab – Configuring Advanced EIGRP for IPv4 Features
no ip address
shutdown
!
interface GigabitEthernet0/0
ip address 192.168.3.1 255.255.255.0
duplex auto
speed auto
!
interface GigabitEthernet0/1
no ip address
shutdown
duplex auto
speed auto
!
interface Serial0/0/0
bandwidth 64
ip address 192.168.13.2 255.255.255.252
ip authentication mode eigrp 1 md5
ip authentication key-chain eigrp 1 EIGRP-KEYS
ip bandwidth-percent eigrp 1 40
ip hello-interval eigrp 1 60
ip hold-time eigrp 1 180
ip summary-address eigrp 1 192.168.33.0 255.255.255.240
clock rate 2000000
!
interface Serial0/0/1
ip address 192.168.23.2 255.255.255.252
ip authentication mode eigrp 1 md5
ip authentication key-chain eigrp 1 EIGRP-KEYS
ip summary-address eigrp 1 192.168.33.0 255.255.255.240
ip hello-interval eigrp 1 60
ip hold-time eigrp 1 180
ip summary-address eigrp 1 192.168.33.0 255.255.255.240
!
!
router eigrp 1
network 192.168.3.0
network 192.168.13.0 0.0.0.3
network 192.168.23.0 0.0.0.3
network 192.168.33.0 0.0.0.3
network 192.168.33.4 0.0.0.3
network 192.168.33.8 0.0.0.3
network 192.168.33.12 0.0.0.3
passive-interface GigabitEthernet0/0
!
ip forward-protocol nd
!
no ip http server
no ip http secure-server
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 21 of 22
Lab – Configuring Advanced EIGRP for IPv4 Features
!
control-plane
!
!
line con 0
password cisco
logging synchronous
login
line aux 0
line 2
no activation-character
no exec
transport preferred none
transport input all
transport output pad telnet rlogin lapb-ta mop udptn v120 ssh
stopbits 1
line vty 0 4
password cisco
login
transport input all
!
scheduler allocate 20000 1000
!
end
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Page 22 of 22
Lab – Troubleshooting Basic EIGRP for IPv4 and IPv6 (Instructor
Version)
Instructor Note: Red font color or Gray highlights indicate text that appears in the instructor copy only.
Topology
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Page 1 of 27
Lab – Troubleshooting Basic EIGRP for IPv4 and IPv6
Addressing Table
Device
EIGRP
Router ID
R1
1.1.1.1
Interface
IP Address
Default Gateway
G0/0
192.168.1.1/24
2001:DB8:ACAD:A::1/64
FE80::1 link-local
N/A
S0/0/0 (DCE)
192.168.12.1/30
2001:DB8:ACAD:12::1/64
FE80::1 link-local
N/A
S0/0/1
192.18.13.1/30
2001:DB8:ACAD:13::1/64
FE80::1 link-local
N/A
G0/0
192.168.2.1/24
2001:DB8:ACAD:B::2/64
FE80::2 link-local
N/A
S0/0/0
192.168.12.2/30
2001:DB8:ACAD:12::2/64
FE80::2 link-local
N/A
S0/0/1 (DCE)
192.168.23.1/30
2001:DB8:ACAD:23::2/64
FE80::2 link-local
N/A
G0/0
192.168.3.1/24
2001:DB8:ACAD:C::3/64
FE80::3 link-local
N/A
S0/0/0 (DCE)
192.168.13.2/30
2001:DB8:ACAD:13::3/64
FE80::3 link-local
N/A
S0/0/1
192.168.23.2/30
2001:DB8:ACAD:23::3/64
FE80::3 link-local
N/A
PC-A
NIC
192.168.1.3/24
2001:DB8:ACAD:A::A/64
192.168.1.1
FE80::1
PC-B
NIC
192.168.2.3/24
2001:DB8:ACAD:B::B/64
192.168.2.1
FE80::2
PC-C
NIC
192.168.3.3/24
2001:DB8:ACAD:C::C/64
192.168.3.1
FE80::3
R2
R3
2.2.2.2
3.3.3.3
Objectives
Part 1: Build the Network and Load Device Configurations
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Page 2 of 27
Lab – Troubleshooting Basic EIGRP for IPv4 and IPv6
Part 2: Troubleshoot Layer 3 Connectivity
Part 3: Troubleshoot EIGRP for IPv4
Part 4: Troubleshoot EIGRP for IPv6
Background / Scenario
The Enhanced Interior Gateway Routing Protocol (EIGRP) is an advanced distance vector routing protocol
developed by Cisco Systems. EIGRP routers discover neighbors and establish and maintain adjacencies with
neighbor routers using Hello packets. An EIGRP router assumes that as long as it is receiving Hello packets
from a neighboring router, that neighbor is up and its routes remain viable.
EIGRP for IPv4 runs over the IPv4 network layer, communicating with other EIGRP IPv4 peers, and
advertising only IPv4 routes. EIGRP for IPv6 has the same functionality as EIGRP for IPv4 but uses IPv6 as
the network layer protocol, communicating with EIGRP for IPv6 peers and advertising IPv6 routes.
In this lab, you will troubleshoot a network that runs EIGRP for IPv4 and EIGRP for IPv6 routing protocols.
This network is experiencing problems and you are tasked with finding the problems and correcting them.
Note: The routers used with CCNA hands-on labs are Cisco 1941 Integrated Services Routers (ISRs) with
Cisco IOS Release 15.2(4)M3 (universalk9 image). Other routers and Cisco IOS versions can be used.
Depending on the model and Cisco IOS version, the commands available and output produced might vary
from what is shown in the labs. Refer to the Router Interface Summary Table at the end of this lab for the
correct interface identifiers.
Note: Make sure that the routers have been erased and have no startup configurations. If you are unsure,
contact your instructor.
Instructor Note: Refer to the Instructor Lab Manual for the procedures to initialize and reload devices.
Required Resources

3 Router (Cisco 1941 with Cisco IOS Release 15.2(4)M3 universal image or comparable)

3 PCs (Windows 7, Vista, or XP with terminal emulation program, such as Tera Term)

Console cables to configure the Cisco IOS devices via the console ports

Ethernet and serial cables as shown in the topology
Part 1: Build the Network and Load Device Configurations
In Part 1, you will set up the network topology and configure basic settings on the PC hosts and routers.
Step 1: Cable the network as shown in the topology.
Step 2: Configure PC hosts.
Step 3: Load router configurations.
Load the following configurations into the appropriate router. All routers have the same passwords. The
privileged EXEC password is class, and the console and vty password is cisco.
Router R1 Configuration:
conf t
service password-encryption
hostname R1
enable secret class
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 3 of 27
Lab – Troubleshooting Basic EIGRP for IPv4 and IPv6
no ip domain lookup
ipv6 unicast-routing
interface GigabitEthernet0/0
ip address 192.168.1.1 255.255.255.0
duplex auto
speed auto
ipv6 address FE80::1 link-local
ipv6 address 2001:DB8:ACAD:A::1/64
ipv6 eigrp 1
no shutdown
interface Serial0/0/0
bandwidth 128
ip address 192.168.21.1 255.255.255.252
!ip address 192.168.12.1 255.255.255.252
ipv6 address FE80::1 link-local
ipv6 address 2001:DB8:ACAD:12::1/64
ipv6 eigrp 1
clock rate 128000
no shutdown
interface Serial0/0/1
!bandwidth 128
ip address 192.168.13.1 255.255.255.252
ipv6 address FE80::1 link-local
ipv6 address 2001:DB8:ACAD:31::1/64
!ipv6 address 2001:DB8:ACAD:13::1/64
ipv6 eigrp 1
no shutdown
router eigrp 1
network 192.168.1.0
network 192.168.12.0 0.0.0.3
network 192.168.13.0 0.0.0.3
passive-interface GigabitEthernet0/0
eigrp router-id 1.1.1.1
ipv6 router eigrp 1
! router-id 1.1.1.1
!passive-interface GigabitEthernet0/0
no shutdown
banner motd @
Unauthorized Access is Prohibited! @
line con 0
password cisco
logging synchronous
line vty 0 4
password cisco
login
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 4 of 27
Lab – Troubleshooting Basic EIGRP for IPv4 and IPv6
transport input all
end
Router R2 Configuration:
conf t
service password-encryption
hostname R2
enable secret class
no ip domain lookup
ipv6 unicast-routing
interface GigabitEthernet0/0
ip address 192.168.2.1 255.255.255.0
duplex auto
speed auto
ipv6 address FE80::2 link-local
ipv6 address 2001:DB8:ACAD:B::2/64
ipv6 eigrp 1
! no shutdown
interface Serial0/0/0
! bandwidth 128
ip address 192.168.12.2 255.255.255.252
ipv6 address FE80::2 link-local
ipv6 address 2001:DB8:ACAD:12::2/64
ipv6 eigrp 1
no shutdown
interface Serial0/0/1
bandwidth 128
ip address 192.168.23.1 255.255.255.0
!ip address 192.168.23.1 255.255.255.252
ipv6 address FE80::2 link-local
ipv6 address 2001:DB8:ACAD:23::2/64
ipv6 eigrp 1
clock rate 128000
no shutdown
router eigrp 1
! network 192.168.2.0 0.0.0.255
network 192.168.12.0 0.0.0.3
network 192.168.23.0 0.0.0.3
passive-interface GigabitEthernet0/0
eigrp router-id 2.2.2.2
ipv6 router eigrp 1
! router-id 2.2.2.2
no shutdown
passive-interface GigabitEthernet0/0
banner motd @
Unauthorized Access is Prohibited! @
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
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Lab – Troubleshooting Basic EIGRP for IPv4 and IPv6
line con 0
password cisco
login
logging synchronous
line vty 0 4
password cisco
login
transport input all
end
Router R3 Configuration:
conf t
service password-encryption
hostname R3
enable secret class
no ip domain lookup
! ipv6 unicast-routing
interface GigabitEthernet0/0
ip address 192.168.3.1 255.255.255.0
duplex auto
speed auto
ipv6 address FE80::3 link-local
ipv6 address 2001:DB8:ACAD:C::3/64
ipv6 eigrp 1
! no shutdown
interface Serial0/0/0
! bandwidth 128
ip address 192.168.13.2 255.255.255.252
ipv6 address FE80::3 link-local
ipv6 address 2001:DB8:ACAD:13::3/64
ipv6 eigrp 1
no shutdown
! clock rate 128000
interface Serial0/0/1
bandwidth 128
ip address 192.168.23.2 255.255.255.252
ipv6 address FE80::3 link-local
ipv6 address 2001:DB8:ACAD:23::3/64
ipv6 eigrp 1
no shutdown
router eigrp 1
network 192.168.3.0
network 192.168.13.0 0.0.0.3
! network 192.168.23.0 0.0.0.3
passive-interface GigabitEthernet0/0
eigrp router-id 3.3.3.3
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
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Lab – Troubleshooting Basic EIGRP for IPv4 and IPv6
!ipv6 router eigrp 1
! router-id 3.3.3.3
! passive-interface GigabitEthernet0/0
! no shutdown
banner motd @
Unauthorized Access is Prohibited! @
line con 0
password cisco
login
logging synchronous
line vty 0 4
password cisco
login
transport input all
end
Step 4: Save the running configuration for all routers.
Part 2: Troubleshoot Layer 3 Connectivity
In Part 2, you will verify that Layer 3 connectivity is established on all interfaces. You will need to test both
IPv4 and IPv6 connectivity for all device interfaces.
Note: All serial interfaces should be set with a bandwidth of 128 Kb/s. The clock rate on the DCE interface
should be set to 128000.
Step 1: Verify that the interfaces listed in the Addressing Table are active and configured with
correct IP address information.
a. Issue the show ip interface brief command on all routers to verify that the interfaces are in an up/up
state. Record your findings.
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
R1 - all interfaces are up/up
R2 - G0/0 is administratively down
R3 - G0/0 is administratively down
R1# show ip interface brief
Interface
Embedded-Service-Engine0/0
GigabitEthernet0/0
GigabitEthernet0/1
Serial0/0/0
Serial0/0/1
IP-Address
unassigned
192.168.1.1
unassigned
192.168.21.1
192.168.13.1
OK?
YES
YES
YES
YES
YES
Method
unset
manual
unset
manual
manual
Status
Protocol
administratively down down
up
up
administratively down down
up
up
up
up
R2# show ip interface brief
Interface
IP-Address
OK? Method Status
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Protocol
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Lab – Troubleshooting Basic EIGRP for IPv4 and IPv6
Embedded-Service-Engine0/0
GigabitEthernet0/0
GigabitEthernet0/1
Serial0/0/0
Serial0/0/1
unassigned
192.168.2.1
unassigned
192.168.12.2
192.168.23.1
YES
YES
YES
YES
YES
unset
manual
unset
manual
manual
administratively down down
administratively down down
administratively down down
up
up
up
up
OK?
YES
YES
YES
YES
YES
Method
unset
manual
unset
manual
manual
Status
Protocol
administratively down down
administratively down down
administratively down down
up
up
up
up
R3# show ip interface brief
Interface
Embedded-Service-Engine0/0
GigabitEthernet0/0
GigabitEthernet0/1
Serial0/0/0
Serial0/0/1
IP-Address
unassigned
192.168.3.1
unassigned
192.168.13.2
192.168.23.2
b. Issue the show run interface command to verify IP address assignments on all router interfaces.
Compare the interface IP addresses against the Addressing Table and verify the subnet mask
assignments. For IPv6, verify that the link-local address has been assigned. Record your findings.
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
R1 – S0/0/0 incorrect IPv4 address should be 192.168.12.1, S0/0/1 incorrect IPv6 address should be
2001:DB8:ACAD:13::1/64
R2 – S0/0/1 incorrect subnet mask should be 255.255.255.252
R3 – all IPs configured correctly
R1# show run interface s0/0/0
Building configuration...
Current configuration : 188 bytes
!
interface Serial0/0/0
bandwidth 128
ip address 192.168.21.1 255.255.255.252
ipv6 address FE80::1 link-local
ipv6 address 2001:DB8:ACAD:12::1/64
ipv6 eigrp 1
clock rate 128000
end
R1# show run interface s0/0/1
Building configuration...
Current configuration : 154 bytes
!
interface Serial0/0/1
ip address 192.168.13.1 255.255.255.252
ipv6 address FE80::1 link-local
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 8 of 27
Lab – Troubleshooting Basic EIGRP for IPv4 and IPv6
ipv6 address 2001:DB8:ACAD:31::1/64
ipv6 eigrp 1
end
R2# show run interface s0/0/1
Building configuration...
Current configuration : 186 bytes
!
interface Serial0/0/1
bandwidth 128
ip address 192.168.23.1 255.255.255.0
ipv6 address FE80::2 link-local
ipv6 address 2001:DB8:ACAD:23::2/64
ipv6 eigrp 1
clock rate 128000
end
c.
Issue the show interfaces interface-id command to verify bandwidth setting on the serial interfaces.
Record your findings.
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
R1 – S0/0/1 incorrect bandwidth of 1544 should be 128
R2 – S0/0/0 incorrect bandwidth of 1544 should be 128
R3 – S0/0/0 incorrect bandwidth of 1544 should be 128
R1# show interfaces s0/0/1
Serial0/0/1 is up, line protocol is up
Hardware is WIC MBRD Serial
Internet address is 192.168.13.1/30
MTU 1500 bytes, BW 1544 Kbit/sec, DLY 20000 usec,
reliability 255/255, txload 1/255, rxload 1/255
Encapsulation HDLC, loopback not set
Keepalive set (10 sec)
<output omitted>
R2# show interfaces s0/0/0
Serial0/0/0 is up, line protocol is up
Hardware is WIC MBRD Serial
Internet address is 192.168.12.2/30
MTU 1500 bytes, BW 1544 Kbit/sec, DLY 20000 usec,
reliability 255/255, txload 1/255, rxload 1/255
Encapsulation HDLC, loopback not set
Keepalive set (10 sec)
<output omitted>
R3# show interfaces s0/0/0
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 9 of 27
Lab – Troubleshooting Basic EIGRP for IPv4 and IPv6
Serial0/0/0 is up, line protocol is up
Hardware is WIC MBRD Serial
Internet address is 192.168.13.2/30
MTU 1500 bytes, BW 1544 Kbit/sec, DLY 20000 usec,
reliability 255/255, txload 1/255, rxload 1/255
Encapsulation HDLC, loopback not set
Keepalive set (10 sec)
<output omitted>
d. Issue the show controllers interface-id command to verify that clock rates have been set to 128 Kb/s on
all DCE serial interfaces. Issue the show interfaces interface-id command to verify bandwidth setting on
the serial interfaces. Record your findings.
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
R1 – clock rate correctly configured on S0/0/0
R2 – clock rate correctly configured on S0/0/1
R3 – clock rate incorrectly configured 2000000 on S0/0/0 should be 128000
R3# show controllers s0/0/0
Interface Serial0/0/0
Hardware is SCC
DCE V.35, clock rate 2000000
idb at 0x30FE4FB4, driver data structure at 0x29E7C30C
wic_info 0x30FE5EC4
<output omitted>
e. Resolve all problems found. Record the commands used to correct the issues.
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
R1(config)# interface s0/0/0
R1(config-if)# ip address 192.168.12.1 255.255.255.252
R1(config-if)# interface s0/0/1
R1(config-if)# bandwidth 128
R1(config-if)# no ipv6 address 2001:db8:acad:31::1/64
R1(config-if)# ipv6 address 2001:db8:acad:13::1/64
R1(config-if)# end
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 10 of 27
Lab – Troubleshooting Basic EIGRP for IPv4 and IPv6
R2(config)# interface g0/0
R2(config-if)# no shutdown
R2(config-if)# interface s0/0/0
R2(config-if)# bandwidth 128
R2(config-if)# interface s0/0/1
R2(config-if)# ip address 192.168.23.1 255.255.255.252
R2(config-if)# end
R3(config)# interface g0/0
R3(config-if)# no shutdown
R3(config-if)# interface s0/0/0
R3(config-if)# bandwidth 128
R3(config-if)# clock rate 128000
R3(config-if)# end
Step 2: Verify Layer 3 connectivity.
Use the ping command and verify that each router has network connectivity with the serial interfaces on the
neighbor routers. Verify that the PCs can ping their default gateways. If problems still exist, continue
troubleshooting Layer 3 issues.
Part 3: Troubleshoot EIGRP for IPv4
In Part 3, you will troubleshoot EIGRP for IPv4 problems and make the necessary changes needed to
establish EIGRP for IPv4 routes and end-to-end IPv4 connectivity.
Note: LAN (G0/0) interfaces should not advertise EIGRP routing information, but routes to these networks
should be contained in the routing tables.
Step 1: Test IPv4 end-to-end connectivity.
From each PC host, ping the other PC hosts in the topology to verify end-to-end connectivity.
Note: It may be necessary to disable the PC firewall before testing, to ping between PCs.
a. Ping from PC-A to PC-B. Were the pings successful? _____________ No
b. Ping from PC-A to PC-C. Were the pings successful? _____________ Yes
c.
Ping from PC-B to PC-C. Were the pings successful? _____________ No
Step 2: Verify that all interfaces are assigned to EIGRP for IPv4.
a. Issue the show ip protocols command to verify that EIGRP is running and that all networks are
advertised. This command also allows you to verify that the router ID is set correctly, and that the LAN
interfaces are set as passive interfaces. Record your findings.
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
R1 – router ID, advertised networks, and passive interface are all configure correctly
R2 – router ID is correct, network statement missing for 192.168.2.0 and g0/0 not set to passive
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 11 of 27
Lab – Troubleshooting Basic EIGRP for IPv4 and IPv6
R3 – router ID and passive interface are configured correctly, network statement missing for 192.168.23.0
R1# show ip protocols
*** IP Routing is NSF aware ***
Routing Protocol is "eigrp 1"
Outgoing update filter list for all interfaces is not set
Incoming update filter list for all interfaces is not set
Default networks flagged in outgoing updates
Default networks accepted from incoming updates
EIGRP-IPv4 Protocol for AS(1)
Metric weight K1=1, K2=0, K3=1, K4=0, K5=0
NSF-aware route hold timer is 240
Router-ID: 1.1.1.1
Topology : 0 (base)
Active Timer: 3 min
Distance: internal 90 external 170
Maximum path: 4
Maximum hopcount 100
Maximum metric variance 1
Automatic Summarization: disabled
Maximum path: 4
Routing for Networks:
192.168.1.0
192.168.12.0/30
192.168.13.0/30
Passive Interface(s):
GigabitEthernet0/0
Routing Information Sources:
Gateway
Distance
Last Update
192.168.12.2
90
00:19:19
192.168.13.2
90
00:19:20
Distance: internal 90 external 170
R2# show ip protocols
*** IP Routing is NSF aware ***
Routing Protocol is "eigrp 1"
Outgoing update filter list for all interfaces is not set
Incoming update filter list for all interfaces is not set
Default networks flagged in outgoing updates
Default networks accepted from incoming updates
EIGRP-IPv4 Protocol for AS(1)
Metric weight K1=1, K2=0, K3=1, K4=0, K5=0
NSF-aware route hold timer is 240
Router-ID: 2.2.2.2
Topology : 0 (base)
Active Timer: 3 min
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 12 of 27
Lab – Troubleshooting Basic EIGRP for IPv4 and IPv6
Distance: internal 90 external 170
Maximum path: 4
Maximum hopcount 100
Maximum metric variance 1
Automatic Summarization: disabled
Maximum path: 4
Routing for Networks:
192.168.12.0/30
192.168.23.0/30
Routing Information Sources:
Gateway
Distance
Last Update
192.168.12.1
90
00:13:23
Distance: internal 90 external 170
R3# sh ip protocols
*** IP Routing is NSF aware ***
Routing Protocol is "eigrp 1"
Outgoing update filter list for all interfaces is not set
Incoming update filter list for all interfaces is not set
Default networks flagged in outgoing updates
Default networks accepted from incoming updates
EIGRP-IPv4 Protocol for AS(1)
Metric weight K1=1, K2=0, K3=1, K4=0, K5=0
NSF-aware route hold timer is 240
Router-ID: 3.3.3.3
Topology : 0 (base)
Active Timer: 3 min
Distance: internal 90 external 170
Maximum path: 4
Maximum hopcount 100
Maximum metric variance 1
Automatic Summarization: disabled
Maximum path: 4
Routing for Networks:
192.168.3.0
192.168.13.0/30
Passive Interface(s):
GigabitEthernet0/0
Routing Information Sources:
Gateway
Distance
Last Update
192.168.13.1
90
00:14:25
Distance: internal 90 external 170
b. Make the necessary changes based on the output from the show ip protocols command. Record the
commands that were used to correct the issues.
____________________________________________________________________________________
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 13 of 27
Lab – Troubleshooting Basic EIGRP for IPv4 and IPv6
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
R2(config)# router
R2(config-router)#
R2(config-router)#
R2(config-router)#
eigrp 1
network 192.168.2.0 0.0.0.255
passive-interface g0/0
end
R3(config)# router eigrp 1
R3(config-router)# network 192.168.23.0 0.0.0.3
R3(config-router)# end
c.
Re-issue the show ip protocols command to verify that your changes had the desired effect.
Step 3: Verify EIGRP neighbor information.
a. Issue the show ip eigrp neighbor command to verify that EIGRP adjacencies have been established
between the neighboring routers.
R1# show ip eigrp neighbor
EIGRP-IPv4 Neighbors for AS(1)
H
Address
Interface
1
0
192.168.12.2
192.168.13.2
Se0/0/0
Se0/0/1
Hold Uptime
SRTT
(sec)
(ms)
10 00:27:21
5
12 00:47:18
1
RTO
Q
Cnt
1170 0
1140 0
Seq
Num
12
13
RTO
Seq
Num
14
20
RTO
Seq
Num
13
21
R2# show ip eigrp neighbor
EIGRP-IPv4 Neighbors for AS(1)
H
Address
Interface
1
0
192.168.23.2
192.168.12.1
Se0/0/1
Se0/0/0
Hold Uptime
SRTT
(sec)
(ms)
10 00:06:54
18
11 00:30:35
6
Q
Cnt
1170 0
1200 0
R3# show ip eigrp neighbor
EIGRP-IPv4 Neighbors for AS(1)
H
Address
Interface
1
0
192.168.23.1
192.168.13.1
Se0/0/1
Se0/0/0
Hold Uptime
SRTT
(sec)
(ms)
14 00:07:23
16
13 00:51:01
2
Q
Cnt
1170 0
1140 0
b. Resolve any outstanding problems that were discovered.
Instructor Note: All problems were resolved in Step 2b.
Step 4: Verify EIGRP for IPv4 routing information.
a. Issue the show ip route eigrp command to verify that each router has EIGRP for IPv4 routes to all nonadjoining networks.
R1# show ip route eigrp
Codes: L - local, C - connected, S - static, R - RIP, M - mobile, B - BGP
D - EIGRP, EX - EIGRP external, O - OSPF, IA - OSPF inter area
N1 - OSPF NSSA external type 1, N2 - OSPF NSSA external type 2
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 14 of 27
Lab – Troubleshooting Basic EIGRP for IPv4 and IPv6
E1 - OSPF external type 1, E2 - OSPF external type 2
i - IS-IS, su - IS-IS summary, L1 - IS-IS level-1, L2 - IS-IS level-2
ia - IS-IS inter area, * - candidate default, U - per-user static route
o - ODR, P - periodic downloaded static route, H - NHRP, l - LISP
+ - replicated route, % - next hop override
Gateway of last resort is not set
D
D
D
192.168.2.0/24 [90/20514560] via 192.168.12.2, 01:04:13, Serial0/0/0
192.168.3.0/24 [90/20514560] via 192.168.13.2, 01:04:13, Serial0/0/1
192.168.23.0/30 is subnetted, 1 subnets
192.168.23.0 [90/21024000] via 192.168.13.2, 01:04:14, Serial0/0/1
[90/21024000] via 192.168.12.2, 01:04:14, Serial0/0/0
R2# show ip route eigrp
Codes: L - local, C - connected, S - static, R - RIP, M - mobile, B - BGP
D - EIGRP, EX - EIGRP external, O - OSPF, IA - OSPF inter area
N1 - OSPF NSSA external type 1, N2 - OSPF NSSA external type 2
E1 - OSPF external type 1, E2 - OSPF external type 2
i - IS-IS, su - IS-IS summary, L1 - IS-IS level-1, L2 - IS-IS level-2
ia - IS-IS inter area, * - candidate default, U - per-user static route
o - ODR, P - periodic downloaded static route, H - NHRP, l - LISP
+ - replicated route, % - next hop override
Gateway of last resort is not set
D
D
D
192.168.1.0/24 [90/20514560] via 192.168.12.1, 01:04:42, Serial0/0/0
192.168.3.0/24 [90/20514560] via 192.168.23.2, 01:04:42, Serial0/0/1
192.168.13.0/30 is subnetted, 1 subnets
192.168.13.0 [90/21024000] via 192.168.23.2, 01:04:42, Serial0/0/1
[90/21024000] via 192.168.12.1, 01:04:42, Serial0/0/0
R3# show ip route eigrp
Codes: L - local, C - connected, S - static, R - RIP, M - mobile, B - BGP
D - EIGRP, EX - EIGRP external, O - OSPF, IA - OSPF inter area
N1 - OSPF NSSA external type 1, N2 - OSPF NSSA external type 2
E1 - OSPF external type 1, E2 - OSPF external type 2
i - IS-IS, su - IS-IS summary, L1 - IS-IS level-1, L2 - IS-IS level-2
ia - IS-IS inter area, * - candidate default, U - per-user static route
o - ODR, P - periodic downloaded static route, H - NHRP, l - LISP
+ - replicated route, % - next hop override
Gateway of last resort is not set
D
D
D
192.168.1.0/24 [90/20514560] via 192.168.13.1, 01:05:07, Serial0/0/0
192.168.2.0/24 [90/20514560] via 192.168.23.1, 01:05:07, Serial0/0/1
192.168.12.0/30 is subnetted, 1 subnets
192.168.12.0 [90/21024000] via 192.168.23.1, 01:05:07, Serial0/0/1
[90/21024000] via 192.168.13.1, 01:05:07, Serial0/0/0
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 15 of 27
Lab – Troubleshooting Basic EIGRP for IPv4 and IPv6
Are all EIGRP routes available? ________ yes
If any EIGRP for IPv4 routes are missing, what is missing?
____________________________________________________________________________________
All EIGRP routes are present.
b. If any routing information is missing, resolve these issues.
Instructor Note: All problems should have been resolved.
Step 5: Verify IPv4 end-to-end connectivity.
From each PC, verify that IPv4 end-to-end connectivity exists. PCs should be able to ping the other PC hosts
in the topology. If IPv4 end-to-end connectivity does not exist, then continue troubleshooting to resolve
remaining issues.
Note: It may be necessary to disable the PCs firewall.
Part 4: Troubleshoot EIGRP for IPv6
In Part 3, you will troubleshoot EIGRP for IPv6 problems and make the necessary changes needed to
establish EIGRP for IPv6 routes and end-to-end IPv6 connectivity.
Note: LAN (G0/0) interfaces should not advertise EIGRP routing information, but routes to these networks
should be contained in the routing tables.
Step 1: Test IPv6 end-to-end connectivity.
From each PC host, ping the IPv6 addresses of the other PC hosts in the topology to verify end-to-end
connectivity.
Step 2: Verify that IPv6 unicast routing has been enabled on all routers.
a. An easy way to verify that IPv6 routing has been enabled on a router is to use the show run | section
ipv6 unicast command. By adding this pipe to the show run command, the ipv6 unicast-routing
command is displayed if IPv6 routing has been enabled.
Note: The show run command can also be issued without any pipe, and then a manual search for the
ipv6 unicast-routing command can be done.
Issue the command on each router. Record your findings.
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
R3 does not have IPv6 unicast routing enabled.
b. If IPv6 unicast routing is not enabled on one or more routers, enable it now. Record the commands that
were used to correct the issues.
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
R3(config)# ipv6 unicast-routing
Step 3: Verify that all interfaces are assigned to EIGRP for IPv6.
a. Issue the show ipv6 protocols command and verify that the router ID is correct. This command also
allows you to verify that the LAN interfaces are set as passive interfaces.
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 16 of 27
Lab – Troubleshooting Basic EIGRP for IPv4 and IPv6
Note: If no output is generated from this command, then the EIGRP for IPv6 process has not been
configured.
Record your findings.
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
R1 – router ID is incorrect.and g0/0 not set to passive interface
R2 – router ID is incorrect
R3 – EIGRP had not been configured on this router
R1# show ipv6 protocols
IPv6 Routing Protocol is "connected"
IPv6 Routing Protocol is "ND"
IPv6 Routing Protocol is "eigrp 1"
EIGRP-IPv6 Protocol for AS(1)
Metric weight K1=1, K2=0, K3=1, K4=0, K5=0
NSF-aware route hold timer is 240
Router-ID: 192.168.21.1
Topology : 0 (base)
Active Timer: 3 min
Distance: internal 90 external 170
Maximum path: 16
Maximum hopcount 100
Maximum metric variance 1
Interfaces:
Serial0/0/0
Serial0/0/1
GigabitEthernet0/0
Redistribution:
None
R2# show ipv6 protocols
IPv6 Routing Protocol is "connected"
IPv6 Routing Protocol is "ND"
IPv6 Routing Protocol is "eigrp 1"
EIGRP-IPv6 Protocol for AS(1)
Metric weight K1=1, K2=0, K3=1, K4=0, K5=0
NSF-aware route hold timer is 240
Router-ID: 192.168.23.1
Topology : 0 (base)
Active Timer: 3 min
Distance: internal 90 external 170
Maximum path: 16
Maximum hopcount 100
Maximum metric variance 1
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 17 of 27
Lab – Troubleshooting Basic EIGRP for IPv4 and IPv6
Interfaces:
Serial0/0/0
Serial0/0/1
GigabitEthernet0/0 (passive)
Redistribution:
None
R3# show ipv6 protocols
IPv6 Routing Protocol is "connected"
IPv6 Routing Protocol is "ND"
b. Make the necessary configuration changes. Record the commands used to correct the issues.
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
R1(config)# ipv6 router eigrp 1
R1(config-rtr)# router-id 1.1.1.1
R1(config-rtr)# passive-interface g0/0
R2(config-rtr)# end
R2(config)# ipv6 router eigrp 1
R2(config-rtr)# router-id 2.2.2.2
R2(config-rtr)# end
R3(config)# ipv6 router eigrp 1
R3(config-rtr)# router-id 3.3.3.3
R3(config-rtr)# passive-interface g0/0
R3(config-rtr)# no shutdown
R3(config-rtr)# interface g0/0
R3(config-if)# ipv6 eigrp 1
R3(config-if)# interface s0/0/0
R3(config-if)# ipv6 eigrp 1
R3(config-if)# interface s0/0/1
R3(config-if)# ipv6 eigrp 1
R3(config-if)# end
c.
Re-issue the show ipv6 protocols command to verify that your changes are correct.
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Page 18 of 27
Lab – Troubleshooting Basic EIGRP for IPv4 and IPv6
Step 4: Verify that all routers have correct neighbor adjacency information.
a. Issue the show ipv6 eigrp neighbor command to verify that adjacencies have formed between
neighboring routers.
R1# show ipv6 eigrp neighbors
EIGRP-IPv6 Neighbors for AS(1)
H
Address
Interface
1
0
Link-local address:
FE80::3
Link-local address:
FE80::2
Se0/0/1
Se0/0/0
Hold Uptime
SRTT
(sec)
(ms)
13 00:13:38
17
14 00:17:30
RTO
Q Seq
Cnt Num
1182 0 7
16
1182
Hold Uptime
SRTT
(sec)
(ms)
13 00:14:36
27
RTO
0
20
R2# show ipv6 eigrp neighbors
EIGRP-IPv6 Neighbors for AS(1)
H
Address
Interface
1
0
Link-local address:
FE80::3
Link-local address:
FE80::1
Se0/0/1
Se0/0/0
12 00:18:33
Q Seq
Cnt Num
1182 0 8
17
1182
Hold Uptime
SRTT
(sec)
(ms)
12 00:07:39
24
RTO
0
22
R3# show ipv6 eigrp neighbors
EIGRP-IPv6 Neighbors for AS(1)
H
Address
Interface
1
0
Link-local address:
FE80::2
Link-local address:
FE80::1
Se0/0/1
Se0/0/0
12 00:07:44
19
Q Seq
Cnt Num
1182 0 21
1182
0
21
b. Resolve any EIGRP adjacency issues that still exist.
Instructor Note: All adjacency issues should have been resolved in earlier steps.
Step 5: Verify EIGRP for IPv6 routing information.
a. Issue the show ipv6 route eigrp command, and verify that EIGRP for IPv6 routes exist to all nonadjoining networks.
R1# show ipv6 route eigrp
IPv6 Routing Table - default - 10 entries
Codes: C - Connected, L - Local, S - Static, U - Per-user Static route
B - BGP, R - RIP, I1 - ISIS L1, I2 - ISIS L2
IA - ISIS interarea, IS - ISIS summary, D - EIGRP, EX - EIGRP external
ND - ND Default, NDp - ND Prefix, DCE - Destination, NDr - Redirect
O - OSPF Intra, OI - OSPF Inter, OE1 - OSPF ext 1, OE2 - OSPF ext 2
ON1 - OSPF NSSA ext 1, ON2 - OSPF NSSA ext 2
D
2001:DB8:ACAD:B::/64 [90/20514560]
via FE80::2, Serial0/0/0
D
2001:DB8:ACAD:C::/64 [90/20514560]
via FE80::3, Serial0/0/1
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Page 19 of 27
Lab – Troubleshooting Basic EIGRP for IPv4 and IPv6
D
2001:DB8:ACAD:23::/64 [90/21024000]
via FE80::2, Serial0/0/0
via FE80::3, Serial0/0/1
R2# show ipv6 route eigrp
IPv6 Routing Table - default - 10 entries
Codes: C - Connected, L - Local, S - Static, U - Per-user Static route
B - BGP, R - RIP, I1 - ISIS L1, I2 - ISIS L2
IA - ISIS interarea, IS - ISIS summary, D - EIGRP, EX - EIGRP external
ND - ND Default, NDp - ND Prefix, DCE - Destination, NDr - Redirect
O - OSPF Intra, OI - OSPF Inter, OE1 - OSPF ext 1, OE2 - OSPF ext 2
ON1 - OSPF NSSA ext 1, ON2 - OSPF NSSA ext 2
D
2001:DB8:ACAD:A::/64 [90/20514560]
via FE80::1, Serial0/0/0
D
2001:DB8:ACAD:C::/64 [90/20514560]
via FE80::3, Serial0/0/1
D
2001:DB8:ACAD:13::/64 [90/21024000]
via FE80::1, Serial0/0/0
via FE80::3, Serial0/0/1
R3# show ipv6 route eigrp
IPv6 Routing Table - default - 10 entries
Codes: C - Connected, L - Local, S - Static, U - Per-user Static route
B - BGP, R - RIP, I1 - ISIS L1, I2 - ISIS L2
IA - ISIS interarea, IS - ISIS summary, D - EIGRP, EX - EIGRP external
ND - ND Default, NDp - ND Prefix, DCE - Destination, NDr - Redirect
O - OSPF Intra, OI - OSPF Inter, OE1 - OSPF ext 1, OE2 - OSPF ext 2
ON1 - OSPF NSSA ext 1, ON2 - OSPF NSSA ext 2
D
2001:DB8:ACAD:A::/64 [90/20514560]
via FE80::1, Serial0/0/0
D
2001:DB8:ACAD:B::/64 [90/20514560]
via FE80::2, Serial0/0/1
D
2001:DB8:ACAD:12::/64 [90/21024000]
via FE80::1, Serial0/0/0
via FE80::2, Serial0/0/1
Are all EIGRP routes available? ________ yes
If any EIGRP for IPv6 routes are missing, what is missing?
____________________________________________________________________________________
All EIGRP for IPv6 routes are present.
b. Resolve any routing issues that still exist.
Instructor Note: All EIGRP for IPv6 routes issues should have been resolved.
Step 6: Test IPv6 end-to-end connectivity.
From each PC, verify that IPv6 end-to-end connectivity exists. PCs should be able to ping the other PC hosts
in the topology. If IPv6 end-to-end connectivity does not exist, then continue troubleshooting to resolve
remaining issues.
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Page 20 of 27
Lab – Troubleshooting Basic EIGRP for IPv4 and IPv6
Note: It may be necessary to disable the PCs firewall.
Reflection
Why would you troubleshoot EIGRP for IPv4 and EIGRP for IPv6 separately?
_______________________________________________________________________________________
EIGRP for IPv4 and EIGRP for IPv6 do not share routing information and their configuration is completely
independent. Troubleshooting these two protocols should be done independently.
Router Interface Summary Table
Router Interface Summary
Router Model
Ethernet Interface #1
Ethernet Interface #2
Serial Interface #1
Serial Interface #2
1800
Fast Ethernet 0/0
(F0/0)
Fast Ethernet 0/1
(F0/1)
Serial 0/0/0 (S0/0/0)
Serial 0/0/1 (S0/0/1)
1900
Gigabit Ethernet 0/0
(G0/0)
Gigabit Ethernet 0/1
(G0/1)
Serial 0/0/0 (S0/0/0)
Serial 0/0/1 (S0/0/1)
2801
Fast Ethernet 0/0
(F0/0)
Fast Ethernet 0/1
(F0/1)
Serial 0/1/0 (S0/1/0)
Serial 0/1/1 (S0/1/1)
2811
Fast Ethernet 0/0
(F0/0)
Fast Ethernet 0/1
(F0/1)
Serial 0/0/0 (S0/0/0)
Serial 0/0/1 (S0/0/1)
2900
Gigabit Ethernet 0/0
(G0/0)
Gigabit Ethernet 0/1
(G0/1)
Serial 0/0/0 (S0/0/0)
Serial 0/0/1 (S0/0/1)
Note: To find out how the router is configured, look at the interfaces to identify the type of router and how many
interfaces the router has. There is no way to effectively list all the combinations of configurations for each router
class. This table includes identifiers for the possible combinations of Ethernet and Serial interfaces in the device.
The table does not include any other type of interface, even though a specific router may contain one. An
example of this might be an ISDN BRI interface. The string in parenthesis is the legal abbreviation that can be
used in Cisco IOS commands to represent the interface.
Device Configs - Final
Router R1
R1#show run
Building configuration...
Current configuration : 1937 bytes
!
version 15.2
service timestamps debug datetime msec
service timestamps log datetime msec
service password-encryption
!
hostname R1
!
boot-start-marker
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Page 21 of 27
Lab – Troubleshooting Basic EIGRP for IPv4 and IPv6
boot-end-marker
!
enable secret 4 06YFDUHH61wAE/kLkDq9BGho1QM5EnRtoyr8cHAUg.2
!
no aaa new-model
memory-size iomem 15
!
ip cef
!
no ip domain lookup
ipv6 unicast-routing
ipv6 cef
multilink bundle-name authenticated
!
interface Embedded-Service-Engine0/0
no ip address
shutdown
!
interface GigabitEthernet0/0
ip address 192.168.1.1 255.255.255.0
duplex auto
speed auto
ipv6 address FE80::1 link-local
ipv6 address 2001:DB8:ACAD:A::1/64
ipv6 eigrp 1
!
interface GigabitEthernet0/1
no ip address
shutdown
duplex auto
speed auto
!
interface Serial0/0/0
bandwidth 128
ip address 192.168.12.1 255.255.255.252
ipv6 address FE80::1 link-local
ipv6 address 2001:DB8:ACAD:12::1/64
ipv6 eigrp 1
clock rate 128000
!
interface Serial0/0/1
bandwidth 128
ip address 192.168.13.1 255.255.255.252
ipv6 address FE80::1 link-local
ipv6 address 2001:DB8:ACAD:13::1/64
ipv6 eigrp 1
!
router eigrp 1
network 192.168.1.0
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Page 22 of 27
Lab – Troubleshooting Basic EIGRP for IPv4 and IPv6
network 192.168.12.0 0.0.0.3
network 192.168.13.0 0.0.0.3
passive-interface GigabitEthernet0/0
eigrp router-id 1.1.1.1
!
ip forward-protocol nd
!
no ip http server
no ip http secure-server
!
ipv6 router eigrp 1
passive-interface GigabitEthernet0/0
eigrp router-id 1.1.1.1
!
control-plane
!
banner motd ^C
Unauthorized Access is Prohibited! ^C
!
line con 0
password 7 13061E010803
login
logging synchronous
line aux 0
line 2
no activation-character
no exec
transport preferred none
transport input all
transport output pad telnet rlogin lapb-ta mop udptn v120 ssh
stopbits 1
line vty 0 4
password 7 060506324F41
login
transport input all
!
scheduler allocate 20000 1000
!
end
Router R2
R2# show run
Building configuration...
Current
!
version
service
service
configuration : 1937 bytes
15.2
timestamps debug datetime msec
timestamps log datetime msec
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Page 23 of 27
Lab – Troubleshooting Basic EIGRP for IPv4 and IPv6
service password-encryption
!
hostname R2
!
boot-start-marker
boot-end-marker
!
enable secret 4 06YFDUHH61wAE/kLkDq9BGho1QM5EnRtoyr8cHAUg.2
!
no aaa new-model
memory-size iomem 15
!
ip cef
!
no ip domain lookup
ipv6 unicast-routing
ipv6 cef
multilink bundle-name authenticated
!
interface Embedded-Service-Engine0/0
no ip address
shutdown
!
interface GigabitEthernet0/0
ip address 192.168.2.1 255.255.255.0
duplex auto
speed auto
ipv6 address FE80::2 link-local
ipv6 address 2001:DB8:ACAD:B::2/64
ipv6 eigrp 1
!
interface GigabitEthernet0/1
no ip address
shutdown
duplex auto
speed auto
!
interface Serial0/0/0
bandwidth 128
ip address 192.168.12.2 255.255.255.252
ipv6 address FE80::2 link-local
ipv6 address 2001:DB8:ACAD:12::2/64
ipv6 eigrp 1
!
interface Serial0/0/1
bandwidth 128
ip address 192.168.23.1 255.255.255.252
ipv6 address FE80::2 link-local
ipv6 address 2001:DB8:ACAD:23::2/64
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 24 of 27
Lab – Troubleshooting Basic EIGRP for IPv4 and IPv6
ipv6 eigrp 1
clock rate 128000
!
router eigrp 1
network 192.168.2.0
network 192.168.12.0 0.0.0.3
network 192.168.23.0 0.0.0.3
passive-interface GigabitEthernet0/0
eigrp router-id 2.2.2.2
!
ip forward-protocol nd
!
no ip http server
no ip http secure-server
!
ipv6 router eigrp 1
passive-interface GigabitEthernet0/0
eigrp router-id 2.2.2.2
!
control-plane
!
banner motd ^C
Unauthorized Access is Prohibited! ^C
!
line con 0
password 7 13061E010803
login
logging synchronous
line aux 0
line 2
no activation-character
no exec
transport preferred none
transport input all
transport output pad telnet rlogin lapb-ta mop udptn v120 ssh
stopbits 1
line vty 0 4
password 7 070C285F4D06
login
transport input all
!
scheduler allocate 20000 1000
!
end
Router R3
R3# show run
Building configuration...
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Page 25 of 27
Lab – Troubleshooting Basic EIGRP for IPv4 and IPv6
Current configuration : 1976 bytes
!
version 15.2
service timestamps debug datetime msec
service timestamps log datetime msec
service password-encryption
!
hostname R3
!
boot-start-marker
boot-end-marker
!
enable secret 4 06YFDUHH61wAE/kLkDq9BGho1QM5EnRtoyr8cHAUg.2
!
no aaa new-model
memory-size iomem 15
!
ip cef
!
no ip domain lookup
ipv6 unicast-routing
ipv6 cef
multilink bundle-name authenticated
!
interface Embedded-Service-Engine0/0
no ip address
shutdown
!
interface GigabitEthernet0/0
ip address 192.168.3.1 255.255.255.0
duplex auto
speed auto
ipv6 address FE80::3 link-local
ipv6 address 2001:DB8:ACAD:C::3/64
ipv6 eigrp 1
!
interface GigabitEthernet0/1
no ip address
shutdown
duplex auto
speed auto
!
interface Serial0/0/0
bandwidth 128
ip address 192.168.13.2 255.255.255.252
ipv6 address FE80::3 link-local
ipv6 address 2001:DB8:ACAD:13::3/64
ipv6 eigrp 1
clock rate 128000
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Page 26 of 27
Lab – Troubleshooting Basic EIGRP for IPv4 and IPv6
!
interface Serial0/0/1
bandwidth 128
ip address 192.168.23.2 255.255.255.252
ipv6 address FE80::3 link-local
ipv6 address 2001:DB8:ACAD:23::3/64
ipv6 eigrp 1
!
router eigrp 1
network 192.168.3.0
network 192.168.13.0 0.0.0.3
network 192.168.23.0 0.0.0.3
passive-interface GigabitEthernet0/0
eigrp router-id 3.3.3.3
!
ip forward-protocol nd
!
no ip http server
no ip http secure-server
!
ipv6 router eigrp 1
passive-interface GigabitEthernet0/0
eigrp router-id 3.3.3.3
!
control-plane
!
banner motd ^C
Unauthorized Access is Prohibited! ^C
!
line con 0
password 7 13061E010803
login
logging synchronous
line aux 0
line 2
no activation-character
no exec
transport preferred none
transport input all
transport output pad telnet rlogin lapb-ta mop udptn v120 ssh
stopbits 1
line vty 0 4
password 7 13061E010803
login
transport input all
!
scheduler allocate 20000 1000
!
end
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Page 27 of 27
Lab – Troubleshooting Advanced EIGRP (Instructor Version)
Instructor Note: Red font color or Gray highlights indicate text that appears in the instructor copy only.
Topology
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Page 1 of 18
Lab – Troubleshooting Advanced EIGRP
Addressing Table
Device
R1
Interface
IP Address
Subnet Mask
Default Gateway
G0/0
192.168.1.1
255.255.255.0
N/A
Lo1
172.16.11.1
255.255.255.0
N/A
Lo2
172.16.12.1
255.255.255.0
N/A
Lo3
172.16.13.1
255.255.255.0
N/A
Lo4
172.16.14.1
255.255.255.0
N/A
S0/0/0 (DCE)
192.168.12.1
255.255.255.252
N/A
S0/0/1
192.168.13.1
255.255.255.252
N/A
G0/0
192.168.2.1
255.255.255.0
N/A
Lo0
209.165.200.225
255.255.255.252
N/A
S0/0/0
192.168.12.2
255.255.255.252
N/A
S0/0/1 (DCE)
192.168.23.1
255.255.255.252
N/A
G0/0
192.168.3.1
255.255.255.0
N/A
Lo3
172.16.33.1
255.255.255.0
N/A
Lo4
172.16.34.1
255.255.255.0
N/A
Lo5
172.16.35.1
255.255.255.0
N/A
Lo6
172.16.36.1
255.255.255.0
N/A
S0/0/0 (DCE)
192.168.13.2
255.255.255.252
N/A
S0/0/1
192.168.23.2
255.255.255.252
N/A
PC-A
NIC
192.168.1.3
255.255.255.0
192.168.1.1
PC-B
NIC
192.168.2.3
255.255.255.0
192.168.2.1
PC-C
NIC
192.168.3.3
255.255.255.0
192.168.3.1
R2
R3
Objectives
Part 1: Build the Network and Load Device Configurations
Part 2: Troubleshoot EIGRP
Background / Scenario
The Enhanced Interior Gateway Routing Protocol (EIGRP) has advanced features to allow changes related to
summarization, default route propagation, bandwidth utilization, metrics, and security.
In this lab, you will troubleshoot a network that is running EIGRP. Advanced EIGRP features have been
implemented, but the network is now experiencing problems. You are tasked with finding and correcting the
network issues.
Note: The routers used with CCNA hands-on labs are Cisco 1941 Integrated Services Routers (ISRs) with
Cisco IOS, Release 15.2(4)M3 (universalk9 image). Other routers and Cisco IOS versions can be used.
Depending on the model and Cisco IOS version, the commands available and output produced might vary
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Page 2 of 18
Lab – Troubleshooting Advanced EIGRP
from what is shown in the labs. Refer to the Router Interface Summary Table at the end of this lab for the
correct interface identifiers.
Note: Ensure that the routers have been erased and have no startup configurations. If you are unsure,
contact your instructor.
Instructor Note: Refer to the Instructor Lab Manual for the procedures to initialize and reload devices.
Required Resources

3 Routers (Cisco 1941 with Cisco IOS Release 15.2(4)M3 universal image or comparable)

3 PCs (Windows 7, Vista, or XP with terminal emulation program, such as Tera Term)

Console cables to configure the Cisco IOS devices via the console ports

Ethernet cables as shown in the topology
Part 1: Build the Network and Load Device Configurations
Step 1: Cable the network as shown in the topology.
Step 2: Configure PC hosts.
Step 3: Load router configurations.
Load the following configurations into the appropriate router. All routers have the same passwords. The
privileged EXEC password is class, and cisco is the console and vty password.
Router R1 Configuration:
conf t
hostname R1
enable secret class
no ip domain lookup
key chain EIGRP-KEYS
key 1
key-string cisco123
! key-string Cisco123
line con 0
password cisco
login
logging synchronous
line vty 0 4
password cisco
login
banner motd @
Unauthorized Access is Prohibited! @
interface lo1
description Connection to Branch 11
ip add 172.16.11.1 255.255.255.0
interface lo2
description Connection to Branch 12
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Page 3 of 18
Lab – Troubleshooting Advanced EIGRP
ip add 172.16.12.1 255.255.255.0
interface lo3
description Connection to Branch 13
ip add 172.16.13.1 255.255.255.0
interface lo4
description Connection to Branch 14
ip add 172.16.14.1 255.255.255.0
interface g0/0
description R1 LAN Connection
ip add 192.168.1.1 255.255.255.0
no shutdown
interface s0/0/0
description Serial Link to R2
clock rate 128000
! bandwidth 128
ip add 192.168.12.1 255.255.255.252
ip authentication mode eigrp 1 md5
ip authentication key-chain eigrp 1 EIGRP-KEYS
ip hello-interval eigrp 1 30
ip hold-time eigrp 1 90
ip bandwidth-percent eigrp 1 40
! ip summary-address eigrp 1 172.16.8.0 255.255.248.0
no shutdown
interface s0/0/1
description Serial Link to R3
bandwidth 128
ip add 192.168.13.1 255.255.255.252
ip authentication mode eigrp 1 md5
ip authentication key-chain eigrp 1 EIGRP-KEYS
ip bandwidth-percent eigrp 1 40
! ip hello-interval eigrp 1 30
! ip hold-time eigrp 1 90
! ip summary-address eigrp 1 172.16.8.0 255.255.248.0
no shutdown
router eigrp 1
router-id 1.1.1.1
network 192.168.1.0 0.0.0.255
network 192.168.12.0 0.0.0.3
network 192.168.13.0 0.0.0.3
network 172.16.0.0 0.0.255.255
passive-interface g0/0
auto-summary
! no auto-summary
end
Router R2 Configuration:
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Page 4 of 18
Lab – Troubleshooting Advanced EIGRP
conf t
hostname R2
enable secret class
no ip domain lookup
key chain EIGRP-KEYS
key 1
key-string Cisco123
line con 0
password cisco
login
logging synchronous
line vty 0 4
password cisco
login
banner motd @
Unauthorized Access is Prohibited! @
interface g0/0
description R2 LAN Connection
ip add 192.168.2.1 255.255.255.0
no shutdown
interface s0/0/0
description Serial Link to R1
bandwidth 128
ip add 192.168.12.2 255.255.255.252
ip authentication mode eigrp 1 md5
ip authentication key-chain eigrp 1 EIGRP-KEYS
ip bandwidth-percent eigrp 1 40
ip hello-interval eigrp 1 30
ip hold-time eigrp 1 90
no shutdown
interface s0/0/1
description Serial Link to R3
bandwidth 128
! clock rate 128000
ip add 192.168.23.1 255.255.255.252
ip authentication mode eigrp 1 md5
! ip authentication key-chain eigrp 1 EIGRP-KEYS
ip bandwidth-percent eigrp 1 40
ip hello-interval eigrp 1 30
ip hold-time eigrp 1 90
no shutdown
interface lo0
ip add 209.165.200.225 255.255.255.252
description Connection to ISP
router eigrp 1
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router-id 2.2.2.2
network 192.168.2.0 0.0.0.255
network 192.168.12.0 0.0.0.3
network 192.168.23.0 0.0.0.3
passive-interface g0/0
! redistribute static
ip route 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 lo0
end
Router R3 Configuration:
conf t
hostname R3
enable secret class
no ip domain lookup
key chain EIGRP-KEYS
key 1
key-string Cisco123
line con 0
password cisco
login
logging synchronous
line vty 0 4
password cisco
login
banner motd @
Unauthorized Access is Prohibited! @
interface lo3
description Connection to Branch 33
ip add 172.16.33.1 255.255.255.0
interface lo4
description Connection to Branch 34
ip add 172.16.34.1 255.255.255.0
interface lo5
description Connection to Branch 35
ip add 172.16.35.1 255.255.255.0
interface lo6
description Connection to Branch 36
ip add 172.16.36.1 255.255.255.0
interface g0/0
description R3 LAN Connection
ip add 192.168.3.1 255.255.255.0
no shutdown
interface s0/0/0
description Serial Link to R1
ip add 192.168.13.2 255.255.255.252
ip authentication mode eigrp 1 md5
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ip authentication key-chain eigrp 1 EIGRP-KEYS
! ip bandwidth-percent eigrp 1 40
ip hello-interval eigrp 1 30
ip hold-time eigrp 1 90
! ip summary-address eigrp 1 172.16.32.0 255.255.248.0
clock rate 128000
bandwidth 128
no shutdown
interface s0/0/1
description Serial Link to R2
bandwidth 128
ip add 192.168.23.2 255.255.255.252
ip authentication mode eigrp 1 md5
ip authentication key-chain eigrp 1 eigrp-keys
! ip authentication key-chain eigrp 1 EIGRP-KEYS
! ip bandwidth-percent eigrp 1 40
ip hello-interval eigrp 1 30
ip hold-time eigrp 1 90
! ip summary-address eigrp 1 172.16.32.0 255.255.248.0
no shutdown
router eigrp 1
router-id 3.3.3.3
network 192.168.3.0 0.0.0.255
network 192.168.13.0 0.0.0.3
network 192.168.23.0 0.0.0.3
network 172.16.0.0 0.0.255.255
passive-interface g0/0
auto-summary
! no auto-summary
end
Step 4: Verify end-to-end connectivity.
Note: It may be necessary to disable the PC firewall to ping between PCs.
Step 5: Save the configuration on all routers.
Part 2: Troubleshoot EIGRP
In Part 2, verify that all routers have established neighbor adjacencies, and that all network routes are
available.
Additional EIGRP Requirements:

All serial interface clock rates should be set at 128 Kb/s and a matching bandwidth setting should be
available to allow EIGRP cost metrics to be calculated correctly.

Manual route summarization of the branch networks, simulated by using Loopback interfaces on R1 and
R3, should be utilized. The automatic summarization feature of EIGRP should not be used.
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
EIGRP should redistribute the static default route to the Internet. This is simulated by using Loopback
interface 0 on R2.

EIGRP should be configured to use no more than 40 percent of the available bandwidth on the serial
interfaces.

EIGRP Hello/Hold timer intervals should be set to 30/90 on all serial interfaces.

All serial interfaces should be configured with MD5 authentication, using key chain EIGRP-KEYS, with a
key-string of Cisco123.
List the commands used during your EIGRP troubleshooting process:
_______________________________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________________________
Answers may vary, but the list of commands can include:

show controllers,

show ip eigrp neighbor

show ip eigrp interfaces

show ip eigrp interface detail

show ip route

show ip route eigrp

show ip protocols

show run

show run | section router eigrp
List the changes made to resolve the EIGRP issues. If no problems were found on the device, then respond
with “no problems were found”.
R1 Router:
_______________________________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________________________
R1(config)# key chain EIGRP-KEYS
R1(config-keychain)# key 1
R1(config-keychain-key)# key-string Cisco123
R1(config-keychain-key)# interface s0/0/0
R1(config-if)# bandwidth 128
R1(config-if)# ip summary-address eigrp 1 172.16.8.0 255.255.248.0
R1(config-if)# interface s0/0/1
R1(config-if)# ip hello-interval eigrp 1 30
R1(config-if)# ip hold-time eigrp 1 90
R1(config-if)# ip summary-address eigrp 1 172.16.8.0 255.255.248.0
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R1(config-if)# router eigrp 1
R1(config-router)# no auto-summary
R2 Router:
_______________________________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________________________
R2(config)# interface s0/0/1
R2(config-if)# clock rate 128000
R2(config-if)# ip authentication key-chain eigrp 1 EIGRP-KEYS
R2(config-if)# router eigrp 1
R2(config-router)# redistribute static
R3 Router:
_______________________________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________________________
R3(config)# interface s0/0/0
R3(config-if)# ip summary-address eigrp 1 172.16.32.0 255.255.248.0
R3(config-if)# ip bandwidth-percent eigrp 1 40
R3(config-if)# interface s0/0/1
R3(config-if)# ip authentication key-chain eigrp 1 EIGRP-KEYS
R3(config-if)# ip summary-address eigrp 1 172.16.32.0 255.255.248.0
R3(config-if)# ip bandwidth-percent eigrp 1 40
R3(config-if)# router eigrp 1
R3(config-router)# no auto-summary
Reflection
1. How can the auto-summary command create routing issues in EIGRP?
_______________________________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________________________
Answers may vary, but auto summary may create routing issues by summarizing subnets in a network as a
classful route. This may cause traffic to be incorrectly routed. When working with the EIGRP routing protocol,
it is often preferable to manually summarize routes in EIGRP instead of allowing them to be automatically
summarized. This is why Cisco changed the default setting in IOS 15 to no auto-summary.
2. What advantages are provided by manually summarizing the branch routes (loopback interfaces on R1 and
R3) in this network?
_______________________________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________________________
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Lab – Troubleshooting Advanced EIGRP
Answers may vary, but manual summarization of these networks reduces the number of routes contained in
the routing tables and reduces EIGRP traffic by eliminating unnecessary updates of each branch route.
3. Why would you want to change the EIGRP Hello and Hold time intervals on an interface?
_______________________________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________________________
You may want to extend the time between EIGRP hellos on an interface with a low bandwidth clocking speed.
This reduces the amount of EIGRP traffic over that interface, providing more availability for data traffic.
Router Interface Summary Table
Router Interface Summary
Router Model
Ethernet Interface #1
Ethernet Interface #2
Serial Interface #1
Serial Interface #2
1800
Fast Ethernet 0/0
(F0/0)
Fast Ethernet 0/1
(F0/1)
Serial 0/0/0 (S0/0/0)
Serial 0/0/1 (S0/0/1)
1900
Gigabit Ethernet 0/0
(G0/0)
Gigabit Ethernet 0/1
(G0/1)
Serial 0/0/0 (S0/0/0)
Serial 0/0/1 (S0/0/1)
2801
Fast Ethernet 0/0
(F0/0)
Fast Ethernet 0/1
(F0/1)
Serial 0/1/0 (S0/1/0)
Serial 0/1/1 (S0/1/1)
2811
Fast Ethernet 0/0
(F0/0)
Fast Ethernet 0/1
(F0/1)
Serial 0/0/0 (S0/0/0)
Serial 0/0/1 (S0/0/1)
2900
Gigabit Ethernet 0/0
(G0/0)
Gigabit Ethernet 0/1
(G0/1)
Serial 0/0/0 (S0/0/0)
Serial 0/0/1 (S0/0/1)
Note: To find out how the router is configured, look at the interfaces to identify the type of router and how many
interfaces the router has. There is no way to effectively list all the combinations of configurations for each router
class. This table includes identifiers for the possible combinations of Ethernet and Serial interfaces in the device.
The table does not include any other type of interface, even though a specific router may contain one. An
example of this might be an ISDN BRI interface. The string in parenthesis is the legal abbreviation that can be
used in Cisco IOS commands to represent the interface.
Device Configs
Router R1 (Final)
R1#sh run
Building configuration...
Current configuration : 2626 bytes
!
version 15.2
service timestamps debug datetime msec
service timestamps log datetime msec
no service password-encryption
!
hostname R1
!
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boot-start-marker
boot-end-marker
!
!
enable secret 4 06YFDUHH61wAE/kLkDq9BGho1QM5EnRtoyr8cHAUg.2
!
no aaa new-model
memory-size iomem 15
!
ip cef
!
no ip domain lookup
no ipv6 cef
multilink bundle-name authenticated
!
!
key chain EIGRP-KEYS
key 1
key-string Cisco123
!
interface Loopback1
description Connection to Branch 11
ip address 172.16.11.1 255.255.255.0
!
interface Loopback2
description Connection to Branch 12
ip address 172.16.12.1 255.255.255.0
!
interface Loopback3
description Connection to Branch 13
ip address 172.16.13.1 255.255.255.0
!
interface Loopback4
description Connection to Branch 14
ip address 172.16.14.1 255.255.255.0
!
interface Embedded-Service-Engine0/0
no ip address
shutdown
!
interface GigabitEthernet0/0
description R1 LAN Connection
ip address 192.168.1.1 255.255.255.0
duplex auto
speed auto
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!
interface GigabitEthernet0/1
no ip address
shutdown
duplex auto
speed auto
!
interface Serial0/0/0
description Serial Link to R2
bandwidth 128
ip address 192.168.12.1 255.255.255.252
ip authentication mode eigrp 1 md5
ip authentication key-chain eigrp 1 EIGRP-KEYS
ip bandwidth-percent eigrp 1 40
ip hello-interval eigrp 1 30
ip hold-time eigrp 1 90
ip summary-address eigrp 1 172.16.8.0 255.255.248.0
clock rate 128000
!
interface Serial0/0/1
description Serial Link to R3
bandwidth 128
ip address 192.168.13.1 255.255.255.252
ip authentication mode eigrp 1 md5
ip authentication key-chain eigrp 1 EIGRP-KEYS
ip bandwidth-percent eigrp 1 40
ip hello-interval eigrp 1 30
ip hold-time eigrp 1 90
ip summary-address eigrp 1 172.16.8.0 255.255.248.0
!
!
router eigrp 1
network 172.16.0.0
network 192.168.1.0
network 192.168.12.0 0.0.0.3
network 192.168.13.0 0.0.0.3
passive-interface GigabitEthernet0/0
eigrp router-id 1.1.1.1
!
ip forward-protocol nd
!
no ip http server
no ip http secure-server
!
control-plane
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!
banner motd ^C
Unauthorized Access is Prohibited! ^C
!
line con 0
password cisco
login
logging synchronous
line aux 0
line 2
no activation-character
no exec
transport preferred none
transport input all
transport output pad telnet rlogin lapb-ta mop udptn v120 ssh
stopbits 1
line vty 0 4
password cisco
login
transport input all
!
scheduler allocate 20000 1000
!
end
Router R2 (Final)
R2#sh run
Building configuration...
Current configuration : 2220 bytes
!
version 15.2
service timestamps debug datetime msec
service timestamps log datetime msec
no service password-encryption
!
hostname R2
!
boot-start-marker
boot-end-marker
!
enable secret 4 06YFDUHH61wAE/kLkDq9BGho1QM5EnRtoyr8cHAUg.2
!
no aaa new-model
memory-size iomem 15
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Lab – Troubleshooting Advanced EIGRP
!
ip cef
!
no ip domain lookup
no ipv6 cef
multilink bundle-name authenticated
!
key chain EIGRP-KEYS
key 1
key-string Cisco123
!
interface Loopback0
description Connection to ISP
ip address 209.165.200.225 255.255.255.252
!
interface Embedded-Service-Engine0/0
no ip address
shutdown
!
interface GigabitEthernet0/0
description R2 LAN Connection
ip address 192.168.2.1 255.255.255.0
duplex auto
speed auto
!
interface GigabitEthernet0/1
no ip address
shutdown
duplex auto
speed auto
!
interface Serial0/0/0
description Serial Link to R1
bandwidth 128
ip address 192.168.12.2 255.255.255.252
ip authentication mode eigrp 1 md5
ip authentication key-chain eigrp 1 EIGRP-KEYS
ip bandwidth-percent eigrp 1 40
ip hello-interval eigrp 1 30
ip hold-time eigrp 1 90
!
interface Serial0/0/1
description Serial Link to R3
bandwidth 128
ip address 192.168.23.1 255.255.255.252
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ip authentication mode eigrp 1 md5
ip authentication key-chain eigrp 1 EIGRP-KEYS
ip bandwidth-percent eigrp 1 40
ip hello-interval eigrp 1 30
ip hold-time eigrp 1 90
clock rate 128000
!
!
router eigrp 1
network 192.168.2.0
network 192.168.12.0 0.0.0.3
network 192.168.23.0 0.0.0.3
redistribute static
passive-interface GigabitEthernet0/0
eigrp router-id 2.2.2.2
!
ip forward-protocol nd
!
no ip http server
no ip http secure-server
!
ip route 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 Loopback0
!
control-plane
!
banner motd ^C
Unauthorized Access is Prohibited! ^C
!
line con 0
password cisco
login
logging synchronous
line aux 0
line 2
no activation-character
no exec
transport preferred none
transport input all
transport output pad telnet rlogin lapb-ta mop udptn v120 ssh
stopbits 1
line vty 0 4
password cisco
login
transport input all
!
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Lab – Troubleshooting Advanced EIGRP
scheduler allocate 20000 1000
!
end
Router R3 (Final)
R3#sh run
Building configuration...
Current configuration : 2551 bytes
!
version 15.2
service timestamps debug datetime msec
service timestamps log datetime msec
no service password-encryption
!
hostname R3
!
boot-start-marker
boot-end-marker
!
enable secret 4 06YFDUHH61wAE/kLkDq9BGho1QM5EnRtoyr8cHAUg.2
!
no aaa new-model
memory-size iomem 15
!
ip cef
!
no ip domain lookup
no ipv6 cef
multilink bundle-name authenticated
!
key chain EIGRP-KEYS
key 1
key-string Cisco123
!
interface Loopback3
description Connection to Branch 33
ip address 172.16.33.1 255.255.255.0
!
interface Loopback4
description Connection to Branch 34
ip address 172.16.34.1 255.255.255.0
!
interface Loopback5
description Connection to Branch 35
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Lab – Troubleshooting Advanced EIGRP
ip address 172.16.35.1 255.255.255.0
!
interface Loopback6
description Connection to Branch 36
ip address 172.16.36.1 255.255.255.0
!
interface Embedded-Service-Engine0/0
no ip address
shutdown
!
interface GigabitEthernet0/0
description R3 LAN Connection
ip address 192.168.3.1 255.255.255.0
duplex auto
speed auto
!
interface GigabitEthernet0/1
no ip address
shutdown
duplex auto
speed auto
!
interface Serial0/0/0
description Serial Link to R1
bandwidth 128
ip address 192.168.13.2 255.255.255.252
ip authentication mode eigrp 1 md5
ip authentication key-chain eigrp 1 EIGRP-KEYS
ip bandwidth-percent eigrp 1 40
ip hello-interval eigrp 1 30
ip hold-time eigrp 1 90
ip summary-address eigrp 1 172.16.32.0 255.255.248.0
clock rate 128000
!
interface Serial0/0/1
description Serial Link to R2
bandwidth 128
ip address 192.168.23.2 255.255.255.252
ip authentication mode eigrp 1 md5
ip authentication key-chain eigrp 1 EIGRP-KEYS
ip bandwidth-percent eigrp 1 40
ip hello-interval eigrp 1 30
ip hold-time eigrp 1 90
ip summary-address eigrp 1 172.16.32.0 255.255.248.0
!
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router eigrp 1
network 172.16.0.0
network 192.168.3.0
network 192.168.13.0 0.0.0.3
network 192.168.23.0 0.0.0.3
passive-interface GigabitEthernet0/0
eigrp router-id 3.3.3.3
!
ip forward-protocol nd
!
no ip http server
no ip http secure-server
!
control-plane
!
banner motd ^C
Unauthorized Access is Prohibited! ^C
!
line con 0
password cisco
login
logging synchronous
line aux 0
line 2
no activation-character
no exec
transport preferred none
transport input all
transport output pad telnet rlogin lapb-ta mop udptn v120 ssh
stopbits 1
line vty 0 4
password cisco
login
transport input all
!
scheduler allocate 20000 1000
!
end
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 18 of 18
Tweaking EIGRP (Instructor Version)
Instructor Note: Red font color or Gray highlights indicate text that appears in the instructor copy only.
Objectives
Implement advanced EIGRP features to enhance operation in a small- to medium-sized business network.
This chapter will focus on some advanced methods to fine tune EIGRP network configurations. This modeling
activity will prove your mastery of some of these concepts. The purpose of this activity is to review EIGRP routing
protocol fine-tuning concepts.
Scenario
The purpose of this activity is to review EIGRP routing protocol fine-tuning concepts.
You will work with a partner to design one EIGRP topology. This topology will be the basis for two parts of the
activity. The first will use default settings for all configurations and the second will incorporate, at least, three of
the following fine-tuning EIGRP options:

Manual summary route

Default routes

Default routes propagation

Hello interval timer settings
Refer to the labs, Packet Tracer activities, and interactive activities to help you as you progress through this
modeling activity.
Directions are listed on the PDF file for this activity. Share your completed work with another group. You may
wish to save a copy of this activity to a portfolio.
Resources

Packet Tracer software or real network lab equipment

Word processing program
Directions
Step 1: Design a WAN and LAN topology.
a. Use Packet Tracer to design a network with two routers (1941 model, suggested). If necessary, add NICs
to the routers to provide connectivity to the routers to provide for, at least, two LANs for each router. Add,
at least, one PC to each LAN.
b. Address the networks using either an IPv4 or IPv6 addressing scheme. VLSM may or may not be used
per group discretion. If you use a full VLSM-addressed network, you will need to turn off autosummarization from the beginning of your configuration design.
c.
Configure the topology using basic EIGRP default settings.
d. Make sure all PCs can ping each other to prove connectivity. If not, work to make this so.
e. Save your work.
Step 2: Copy the topology.
a. Using your cursor, highlight the entire EIGRP-configured topology.
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Page 1 of 6
Tweaking EIGRP
b. Press Ctrl+C to copy the highlighted topology.
c.
Use Ctrl+V to paste a full copy of the topology to the Packet Tracer desktop. You will now have displayed
two exact EIGRP-configured topologies. You will use the topology copy to tweak the network.
d. While highlighted, move the copied topology to a different location on the Packet Tracer desktop to create
room between the two for configuration purposes.
Step 3: Configure fine-tuning features on the copied topology.
a. Choose three of the bulleted items from the Scenario section of this activity. Configure your changes on
the copied topology. Note: By changing the Hello interval times, network instability may occur. You
should be able to configure it; however, notice adjacencies status changing if you do choose this
configuration option.
b. Save your work to avoid losing your configuration.
Step 4: Use verification commands to compare and contrast your default and fine-tuned
configurations.
a. Use, at least, three output commands to compare and contrast the two topologies, and copy them to a
word processing software program. For example, some useful commands include:

show ip route

show running-configuration

show ip protocols, show ip eigrp neighbors
b. Share your work with another group. Explain how you changed the second topology from the first
configured example. Justify what happened when you configured the three EIGRP fine-tuning options.
Instructor Resource Example
The information listed in this section is only one depiction of what students could see as a result of this activity.
Other topology designs, addressing schemes, interface connections and router output comparisons may vary per
student group.
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 2 of 6
Tweaking EIGRP
Blank Topology Diagram Examples
Basic EIGRP
Fine-Tuned EIGRP
R1# show ip protocols
R1# show ip protocols
Routing Protocol is "eigrp 1 "
Outgoing update filter list for all interfaces is not set
Incoming update filter list for all interfaces is not set
Default networks flagged in outgoing updates
Default networks accepted from incoming updates
EIGRP metric weight K1=1, K2=0, K3=1, K4=0, K5=0
EIGRP maximum hopcount 100
EIGRP maximum metric variance 1
Redistributing: eigrp 1
Automatic network summarization is not in effect
Maximum path: 4
Routing for Networks:
192.168.2.0
192.168.1.0
Routing Information Sources:
Gateway
Distance
Last Update
192.168.2.2 90
7550
Distance: internal 90 external 170
R1#
Routing Protocol is "eigrp 1 "
Outgoing update filter list for all interfaces is not set
Incoming update filter list for all interfaces is not set
Default networks flagged in outgoing updates
Default networks accepted from incoming updates
EIGRP metric weight K1=1, K2=0, K3=1, K4=0, K5=0
EIGRP maximum hopcount 100
EIGRP maximum metric variance 1
Redistributing: eigrp 1, static
Automatic network summarization is not in effect
Maximum path: 4
Routing for Networks:
192.168.2.0
192.168.1.0
Routing Information Sources:
Gateway
Distance
Last Update
192.168.2.2 90
6693
Distance: internal 90 external 170
R1#
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Page 3 of 6
Tweaking EIGRP
Basic EIGRP
Fine-Tuned EIGRP
R1# show ip route
R1# show ip route
<output omitted>
<output omitted>
Gateway of last resort is not set
Gateway of last resort is 0.0.0.0 to network 0.0.0.0
192.168.1.0/24 is variably subnetted, 6 subnets, 2 masks
192.168.1.0/24 is variably subnetted, 6 subnets, 3 masks
C
192.168.1.0/27 is directly connected, GigabitEthernet0/0
D
192.168.1.0/26 is a summary, 00:15:17, Null0
L
192.168.1.1/32 is directly connected, GigabitEthernet0/0
C
192.168.1.0/27 is directly connected, GigabitEthernet0/0
C
192.168.1.32/27 is directly connected, GigabitEthernet0/1
L
192.168.1.1/32 is directly connected, GigabitEthernet0/0
L
192.168.1.33/32 is directly connected, GigabitEthernet0/1
C
192.168.1.32/27 is directly connected, GigabitEthernet0/1
D
192.168.1.64/27 [90/2170112] via 192.168.2.2, 00:14:26, Serial0/0/0
L
192.168.1.33/32 is directly connected, GigabitEthernet0/1
192.168.1.96/27 [90/2170112] via 192.168.2.2, 00:14:26, Serial0/0/0
D
D
192.168.2.0/24 is variably subnetted, 2 subnets, 2 masks
192.168.1.64/26 [90/2170112] via 192.168.2.2, 00:15:10, Serial0/0/0
192.168.2.0/24 is variably subnetted, 2 subnets, 2 masks
C
192.168.2.0/24 is directly connected, Serial0/0/0
C
192.168.2.0/24 is directly connected, Serial0/0/0
L
192.168.2.1/32 is directly connected, Serial0/0/0
L
192.168.2.1/32 is directly connected, Serial0/0/0
R1#
S* 0.0.0.0/0 is directly connected, Serial0/0/0
R1#
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 4 of 6
Tweaking EIGRP
Basic EIGRP
Fine-Tuned EIGRP
R1# show run
Building configuration...
R1# show run
Building configuration...
Current configuration : 779 bytes
!
version 15.1
<output omitted>
interface GigabitEthernet0/0
ip address 192.168.1.1 255.255.255.224
duplex auto
speed auto
!
interface GigabitEthernet0/1
ip address 192.168.1.33 255.255.255.224
duplex auto
speed auto
!
interface Serial0/0/0
ip address 192.168.2.1 255.255.255.0
clock rate 2000000
!
<output omitted>
!
router eigrp 1
network 192.168.2.0
network 192.168.1.0
no auto-summary
!
ip classless
!
<output omitted>
R1#
Current configuration : 1013 bytes
!
version 15.1
<output omitted>
interface GigabitEthernet0/0
ip address 192.168.1.1 255.255.255.224
ip summary-address eigrp 1 192.168.1.0 255.255.255.192
5
duplex auto
speed auto
!
interface GigabitEthernet0/1
ip address 192.168.1.33 255.255.255.224
ip summary-address eigrp 1 192.168.1.0 255.255.255.192
5
duplex auto
speed auto
!
interface Serial0/0/0
ip address 192.168.2.1 255.255.255.0
ip summary-address eigrp 1 192.168.1.0 255.255.255.192
5
clock rate 2000000
!
<output omitted>
!
router eigrp 1
redistribute static
network 192.168.2.0
network 192.168.1.0
no auto-summary
!
ip classless
ip route 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 Serial0/0/0
!
<output omitted>
R1#
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 5 of 6
Tweaking EIGRP
Identify elements of the model that map to IT-related content:

Manual summary route

Default routes

Default routes propagation

Hello-interval timer settings

EIGRP routing protocol verification commands

Auto-summarization
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 6 of 6
IOS Detection (Instructor Version)
Instructor Note: Red font color or Gray highlights indicate text that appears in the instructor copy only.
Objective
Manage IOS system image files to increase network reliability in a small- to medium-sized business network.
Students will compare and contrast different router and switch hardware capabilities and IOS software basics.
Groups of two students will be created for this activity.
Scenario
Your school or university has just received a donation of Cisco routers and switches. You transport them from
your shipping and receiving department to your Cisco networking lab and start sorting them into switch and router
groups.
After all the equipment has been sorted, you cannot wait to turn them on to see if they really work. Once you do
power them up, you find out that all of the equipment operating systems have been erased! Because computers
use different operating systems, you think that routers and switches also use different internetworking operating
systems (or IOS) as well.
One good thing you notice is that most of the routers are either models 1941 or 2911. The switch models are
either 2960 or 3560. You have worked with this type of equipment in the past and know you can research which
IOS is appropriate to purchase for each model. You also know that documenting hardware features, serial
numbers, and MAC addresses is very important to do whenever you add networking equipment to any network
topology.
Refer to the accompanying PDF for directions on how to proceed with this modeling activity. Save your work and
share the data you found with another group or the entire class.
Resources

Packet Tracer software

Internet connectivity
Directions
Step 1: Create a switch and router matrix for documenting hardware and software information.
a. Design a matrix to record information about your two router models, 1941 and 2911. Both models are
included in your Packet Tracer software. Record the following information in your matrix:
1) The system serial numbers of the equipment
2) The Cisco IOS type and version shown for each model
3) The name of the preferred system image file
4) How much NVRAM is present on the routers
5) How many and which types of interfaces are built in to the routers
b. Design a matrix to record information about your two switch models, 2960 and 3560, from Packet Tracer.
Record the following information in your matrix:
1) The system serial number for this type of equipment
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 1 of 3
IOS Detection
2) The Cisco IOS type and version shown for these models
3) The name of the preferred SW image
4) How much NVRAM is present on the models
5) How many and which types of interfaces are built in to the switches
Step 2: Open Packet Tracer.
a. Place one router and switch for each router and switch model you will research on the desktop.
b. Open the router or switch models on Packet Tracer and use the show version command to display
operating system and other information about your equipment.
c.
Read and record the information found in Step 2b to your matrix designs.
Step 3: Visit http://www.cisco.com for further model research content.
a. Sign in to your account at cisco.com. If you do not have an account, create one.
b. Research your router and switch models for additional feature sets available for the models.
c.
Note the physical hardware designs of the devices. Check if additional network cards can be installed; if
so, record what types of cards can be installed for your router and switch models.
d. Mention some of these facts below in your two matrix designs.
Step 4: Document the information you found to share with the class or another group of
students.
Instructor Resource Example
The information listed in this section is only one depiction of what students could see as a result of this activity.
Other designs may vary per student groups.
Cisco 1941 Router
System device serial number
FTX152433T9 (each unit will show a different serial number)
IOS type & version
C1900 Software (C1900-UNIVERSALK9-M), Version 15.1(4)M4
Preferred system image file
flash0:c1900-universalk9-mz.SPA.151-1.M4.bin
NVRAM default
255 (256)K preferred
Number and types of built-in router
interfaces
2 Gigabit Ethernet interfaces, with expandability options via WIC cards
Cisco 2911 Router
System device serial number
FTX1524MH47 (each unit will show a different serial number)
IOS type & version
C2900 Software (C2900-UNIVERSALK9-M), Version 15.1(4)M4
Preferred system image file
C2900 Software (C2900-UNIVERSALK9-M), Version 15.1(4)M4
NVRAM default
255 (256)K preferred
Number and types of built-in router
interfaces
3 Gigabit Ethernet interfaces, with expandability options via WIC cards
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 2 of 3
IOS Detection
Cisco 2960 Switch
System device serial number
FOC1033Z1EY
IOS type & version
C2960 Boot Loader (C2960-HBOOT-M) Version 12.2(25r)FX
Preferred system image file
Version 12.2 C2960-LANBASE-M
NVRAM default
63488K
Number and types of built-in router
interfaces
24 Fast Ethernet and 2 Gigabit Ethernet interfaces
Cisco 3560 Switch
System device serial number
CAT1037RJF7
IOS type & version
C3560 Software (C3560-ADVIPSERVICESK9-M), Version 12.2(37)SE1
Preferred system image file
Version 12.2(37)SE1 C3560-ADVIPSERVICESK
NVRAM default
63488K
Number and types of built-in router
interfaces
24 Fast Ethernet and 2 Gigabit Ethernet interfaces
Identify elements of the model that map to IT-related content:

IOS types

IOS names

Show version

NVRAM
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 3 of 3
Powerful Protocols (Instructor Version)
Instructor Note: Red font color or Gray highlights indicate text that appears in the instructor copy only.
Objective
A review of EIGRP and OSPF routing protocol configuration and verification commands.
Students will review EIGRP and OSPF commands to complete the end-of-course Capstone Projects.
Scenario
At the end of this course, you are asked to complete two Capstone Projects where you will create, configure, and
verify two network topologies using the two main routing protocols taught in this course, EIGRP and OSPF.
To make things easier, you decide to create a chart of configuration and verification commands to use for these
two design projects. To help devise the protocol charts, ask another student in the class to help you.
Refer to the PDF for this chapter for directions on how to create a design for this modeling project. When
complete, share your work with another group or with the class. You may also want to save the files created for
this project in a network portfolio for future reference.
Resources

Previous curriculum chapter content for EIGRP and OSPF

Word processing software
Directions
Step 1: Create a matrix for each routing protocol (EIGRP and OSPF).
a. Within each routing protocol matrix, design two sections.
1) one section for configuration commands
2) one section for verification or show commands
b. Use a word processing program to save your matrix designs, one for EIGRP and one for OSPF.
Step 2: Review the chapters in this curriculum.
a. Refer to the different sections and activities presented in the curriculum.
1) Content
2) Labs
3) Packet Tracer Activities
b. Record configuration commands for each protocol on their respective matrix. Note: Some commands are
universal, and some are used only for IPv4 or IPv6.
c.
Record verification commands used for each protocol on their respective matrix. Note: Some of these
commands are universal, and some are used only with IPv4or IPv6.
d. Leave extra, blank rows for the group or classroom portion of this activity.
Step 3: Meet as a class or with another group.
a. Compare configuration commands.
b. Compare verification commands.
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 1 of 8
Powerful Protocols
c.
Add any commands to each matrix mentioned in the full- or group-setting that you did not record in your
own group.
d. Save your work for use with the two Capstone projects which summarize this entire course.
Instructor Resource Example
The information listed in this section is only one depiction of what students could see as a result of this activity.
Other designs may vary per student groups.
EIGRP Configuration and Verification Commands (summary)
Configuration Command
Purpose
R1(config)# router eigrp 1
Enables the EIGRP routing
process on R1 using a process
ID of 1
R1(config-router)# network 172.16.1.0 0.0.0.255
R1(config-router)# network 172.16.3.0 0.0.0.3
R1(config-router)# network 192.168.10.4 0.0.0.3
Configures EIGRP to advertise
the specific directly connected
subnets
R1(config)# ipv6 unicast-routing
*Enables IPv6 routing on each
router
R1(config)# ipv6 router eigrp 1
R1(config-rtr)# no shutdown
*Configures EIGRP for IPv6
routing on each router
R1(config-rtr)# router-id 1.1.1.1
Manual assignment of a router ID
to that particular router
R1(config)# int g0/0
R1(config-if)# ipv6 eigrp 1
R1(config)# int s0/0/0
R1(config-if)# ipv6 eigrp 1
R1(config)# int s0/0/1
R1(config-if)# ipv6 eigrp 1
*Interface configuration
directions for assigning IPv6
EIGRP to an interface – must be
done on each interface using the
IPv6 EIGRP routing protocol
R1(config)# interface Serial0/0/0
R1(config-if)# ip summary-address eigrp 1 172.31.8.0
255.255.252.0
Allows R1 to send a manually
computed summary route
network address and prefix
through S0/0/0
R1(config)# interface Serial0/0/0
R1(config-if)# ipv6 summary-address eigrp 1
2001:DB8:ACAD:8::/62
Allows R1 to advertise a
manually computed IPv6
summary route network address
and prefix through S0/0/0
R1(config)# ip route 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 Serial0/1/0
Configures an IPv4 default route
R1(config)# router eigrp 1
R1(config-router)# redistribute static
Allows the EIGRP IPv4 default
route to be propagated
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 2 of 8
Powerful Protocols
R1(config)# ipv6 route ::/0 Serial0/1/0
Configures an IPv6 default route
R1(config)# ipv6 router eigrp 1
R1(config-rtr)# redistribute static
Allows the IPv6 default route to
be propagated
R1(config)# interface s0/0/0
R1(config-if)# ip hello-interval eigrp 1 10
Changes the EIGRP hello time
period to 10 seconds as
advertised out of s0/0/0
R1(config)# router eigrp 1
R1(config-router)# passive-interface gigabitethernet
0/0
Changes Gi0/0 to not send hello
packet for the EIGRP process to
its neighbors
R1(config)# interface s 0/0/0
R1(config-if)# bandwidth 64
Sets a particular bandwidth value
for a particular interface for
EIGRP DUAL calculations
R1(config)# interface s 0/0/1
R1(config-if)# ipv6 address fe80::1 link-local
R1(config-if)# exit
Sets a link-local address for a
router’s interface – in this case,
s0/0/1
R1(config)# router eigrp 1
R1(config-router)# auto-summary
Allows the EIGRP process to use
auto-summarization for the
routing table output
R1 (config)# key chain name-of-chain
R1 (config-keychain)# key key-id
R1 (config-keychain-key)# key-string key-string-text
Creates security parameters to
use for authentication with
EIGRP
R1(config)# interface type number
R1(config-if)# ip authentication mode eigrp as-number
md5
R1(config-if)# ip authentication key-chain eigrp asnumber name-of-chain
Verification Command
Configures actual authentication
using the keychain parameters
configured above
Purpose
R1# show ip route
Displays the known networks on
each router
R1# show ip eigrp neighbors
Displays the neighbors
discovered by EIGRP – neighbor
adjacencies
R1# show ip protocols
Shows parameters and other
information about the current
state of any active IPv4 routing
protocol processes
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 3 of 8
Powerful Protocols
R1# show ip eigrp topology
Displays successor paths and
the networks recorded in the
topology table
R1# show ipv6 eigrp neighbors
Verifies adjacencies with directlyconnected neighbors – link local
addresses
R1# show ipv6 route
Displays IPv6 EIGRP routes
R1# show ipv6 protocols
Verifies parameters and current
state of the active IPv6 routing
protocol processes
R1# show ip eigrp topology all-links
Shows entries in the routing table
for EIGRP only – also shows
successors and feasible
successors and FD
R1# show ip int brief
Shows link status on a particular
router using IPv4
R1# show ipv6 interface brief
Shows link status on a particular
router using IPv6
R1# show running-configuration
Displays configuration
information currently operating
on the router
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 4 of 8
Powerful Protocols
OSPF Configuration and Verification Commands (summary)
Configuration Command
R1(config)# router ospf 10
R1(config)# router ospf 10
R1(config-router)# router-id 1.1.1.1
R1(config-router)# end
R1(config)# router
R1(config-router)#
0
R1(config-router)#
R1(config-router)#
0
ospf 10
network 172.16.1.0 0.0.0.255 area
network 172.16.3.0 0.0.0.3 area 0
network 192.168.10.4 0.0.0.3 area
Purpose
Enters OSPF for the router using
10 as the process id
Assigns a router identification
address for use with OSPF 10
Configures OSPF 10 with network
addresses and prefixes – area #
indicates to which OSPF group
the networks will belong
R1# clear ip ospf process
Allows old OSPF information to
be cleared and new processes to
take effect – places old neighbors
in down state and allows new
adjacencies to be created
R1(config)# interface serial 0/0/1
R1(config-if)# bandwidth 1024
R1(config-if)# end
Adjusts the bandwidth for a
particular interface on a router –
used for IPv4 and IPv6
R1(config)# ipv6 unicast-routing
R1(config)# interface GigabitEthernet 0/0
R1(config-if)# description R1 LAN
R1(config-if)# ipv6 address 2001:DB8:CAFE:1::1/64
R1(config-if)# no shut
Allows IPv6 OSPF to be used for
OSPFv3 for one interface (Gi0/0)
– must be configured for each
interface on the router
R1(config)# interface GigabitEthernet 0/0
R1(config-if)# ipv6 ospf 10 area 0
R1(config-if)# nd
Assigns OSPFv3 for IPv6 for
processes and areas on specific
interfaces – must be configured
per interface on the router
R1(config)# interface GigabitEthernet 0/0
R1(config-if)# ipv6 address fe80::1 link-local
R1(config-if)# exit
IPv6 command which assigns a
Link Local network address to an
interface – configured per
interface
R1(config)# ipv6 router ospf 10
R1(config-rtr)# router-id 1.1.1.1
R1(config-rtr)# auto-cost reference-bandwidth 1000
% OSPFv3-1-IPv6: Reference bandwidth is changed.
Please ensure reference bandwidth is
consistent across all routers.
IPv6 commands which assign a
router ID and bandwidth to a
particular OSPF process and
router – configured separately per
router
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 5 of 8
Powerful Protocols
R1(config-rtr)# end
R1# clear ipv6 ospf process
Allows a reset of the IPv6 OSPF
processes so that new
information can be propagated on
the router for OSPF
R1(config)# interface GigabitEthernet 0/0
R1(config-if)# ip ospf priority 255
R1(config-if)# end
Changes the interface/link priority
to a higher or lower number for
DR/BDR election – changing to 0,
leaves that router’s interface out
of the election process.
Changing the priority to 255
makes it the highest priority
available to the election process
R1(config)# ip route 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 loopback 0
209.165.200.226
R1(config)# router ospf 10
R1(config-router)# default-information originate
R1(config-router)# end
Sets an IPv4 OSPF default route
for a router, assigns that route to
the OSPF 10 process and
propagates the route
R1(config)# ipv6 route 0::/0 loopback0
2001:DB8:FEED:1::2
R1(config)# ipv6 router ospf 10
R1(config-rtr)# default-information originate
R1(config-rtr)# end
Enables OSPFv3 for IPv6 on an
interface for the router –
propagates the information
R1(config)# interface Serial 0/0/0
R1(config-if)# ipv6 ospf hello-interval 5
R1(config-if)# ipv6 ospf dead-interval 20
R1(config-if)# end
Changes IPv6 Hello and Dead
timer intervals to lower or higher
values for link reporting and
neighbor adjacencies using
OSPFv3
R1(config)# router ospf 10
R1(config-router)# area 0 authentication messagedigest
R1(config-router)# exit
Enables area authentication
R1(config)# interface GigabitEthernet 0/0
R1(config-if)# ip ospf message-digest-key 1 md5
CISCO-123
R1(config-if)# exit
Sets values per interface for
authentication type and password
or key
R1(config)# router ospf 10
R1(config-router)# area 1 range 10.1.0.0
255.255.252.0
R1(config-router)# exit
Summarizes OSPF routes into a
range for OSPF inter-area
configurations – used to create
Null routes for packets processing
and discard
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 6 of 8
Powerful Protocols
Verification Command
R1# show ip ospf neighbor command.
Purpose
Shows the Adjacency database
and Neighbor table
Lists all neighbor routers to which
a router has established
bidirectional communication.
This table is unique for each
router.
R1# show ip ospf database
Shows the Link-state database
and topology table - Lists
information about all other routers
in the network and shows the
network topology.
Also shows area numbers and
link IDs within the areas
R1# show ip protocols
Displays the router ID, networks
recognized for routing, the
gateway, distance and last
update information for the router
and its protocols
R1# show ip ospf interface serial 0/0/0
Displays status of the interface
(or link), bandwidth, the internet
address of the interface, status of
the protocol (up or down), router
ID, network type (for example,
point-to-point), cost of the
interface/link, hello, dead, wait
and transmit intervals in seconds,
and neighbors adjacencies
Shows priority setting
Also shows the interface’s DR or
BDR with their accompanying
addresses and router IDs
R1# show ip ospf
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Verifies the router’s OSPF
process in its entirety
Page 7 of 8
Powerful Protocols
R1# show ip ospf interface brief
Verifies the interfaces/links a
particular router, the network
assigned to the interfaces, cost,
state and number of neighbors on
that interface
R1# show ipv6 interface brief
IPv6 command which lists the
interfaces participating with
OSPF, their Link Local address
and their IPv6 address – also lists
the status of the interfaces (up or
down)
R1# show ipv6 protocols
IPv6 command which shows the
process number, router ID,
number of areas, etc.
R1# show ipv6 route ospf
Shows IPv6 routing table
information – includes type of
route (OSPF), IPv6 address/prefix
of network being reported, and
which interface reported the
information
R2# show ipv6 route static
Displays only static routes for
IPv6 as reported through the
routing table
Identify elements of the model that map to IT-related content:

EIGRP IPv4 configuration commands

EIGRP IPv4 verification commands

OSPF IPv6 configuration commands

OSPF IPv6 verification commands
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 8 of 8
EIGRP Capstone Project
(Instructor Version)
Instructor Note: Red font color or Gray highlights indicate text that appears in the instructor copy only.
Objectives
In this Capstone Project activity, you will demonstrate your ability to:

Design, configure, verify, and secure EIGRP, IPv4 or IPv6 on a network

Design a VLSM addressing scheme for the devices connected to the LANs
 Present your design using network documentation from your Capstone Project network
Instructor Note: This activity is best completed in groups of 2-3 students.
Scenario
You are a network engineer for your small- to medium-sized business. You and your team have been asked to
design an IPv4 or IPv6 network that uses the EIGRP routing protocol.
The network consists of four branches that is connected to a headquarters router. The headquarters then
connects to an ISP router.
Your job is to create an EIGRP-based, VLSM addressed network scheme using IPv4 or IPv6 to accommodate the
number of hosts requested for this Capstone Project.
Required Resources

Packet Tracer software

Word processing or presentation software
Step 1: Design the network topology.
a. Network equipment:
1) Six routers
(a) Four branch routers
(b) One headquarters router
(c) One ISP router
2) Switches to support the LANS
b. LANs:
1) Two LANs per branch router
(a) Two LANs with 500 hosts
(b) One LAN serving 120 hosts
(c) One LAN with 200 hosts
(d) Two LANS with 80 hosts
(e) One LAN with 60 hosts
(f) One LAN with 30 hosts
2) One, three-host LAN assigned to the ISP router for server connectivity (DNS, Web, and TFTP).
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 1 of 18
OSPF Capstone Project (Instructor Version)
Instructor Note: Red font color or Gray highlights indicate text that appears in the instructor copy only.
Objectives




Configure basic OSPFv2 to enable internetwork communications in a small- to medium-sized IPv4 business
network.
Implement advanced OSPF features to enhance operation in a small- to medium-sized business network.
Implement multiarea OSPF for IPv4 to enable internetwork communications in a small- to medium-sized
business network.
Configure basic OSPFv3 to enable internetwork communications in a small- to medium-sized IPv6 business
network.
Instructor Notes:
 Students should be able to design, configure, and secure OSPF in a network.
 Documentation is a large factor of this project and students must be able to explain their network design and
verification through the use of show commands.
 This activity is:
- Best completed in groups of 2-3 students
- Suggested to be a graded assignment after completing all of the OSPF Chapters
Scenario
Your company has made the decision to implement the OSPF routing protocol on its network. You have decided
that you need to review the concepts related to OSPF in order to make a smooth transition to this protocol.
Create a network using Packet Tracer. Configure the network with these OSPF routing protocol options:







Multiarea OSPFv2
Single-area OSPFv3
Bandwidth
Cost
Authentication
Default routes
DR and BDR elections for segments
Required Resources


Packet Tracer
Student/group-created rubric for assessment of the assignment
Step 1: Design and build a network from scratch.
a. Your design must include three routers connected to a multi-access network in area 0 for use with IPv4.
1) Enable authentication.
2) Establish the DR and BDR using the router id command.
Step 2: Add one additional router with two connections to area 0, representing another OSPF
area.
Step 3: Configure the bandwidth or cost to favor one route.
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Page 1 of 10
OSPF Capstone Project
Step 4: Add a network containing end devices and a passive OSPF interface.
Step 5: Add a route to a default network such as the Internet.
Step 6: Add an IPv6 addressing scheme on the routers and configure OSPFv3.
a. Enable IPv6 unicast routing.
b. Establish the DR and BDR using the router id command.
c.
Do not configure timers, bandwidth, cost, default routes, or authentication.
Instructor-Sample Rubric
The example rubric includes a total of 100 points for the points earned category, if minimum standards are met.
Instructors may wish to consider adding bonus points for additional/advanced work in any requirement category.
Requirement
Physical Topology
 A minimum three routers are present in area 0.
 One router exists in another area.
 One Internet connection with one PC exists in the
topology.
Logical Addressing and Connectivity
 IPv4 and IPv6 networks should have full
connectivity. Connectivity is verified with pings to
every IP, including the Internet.
OSPF Requirement 1
 Two OSPFv2 areas exist.
 Two OSPFv3 areas exist.
OSPF Requirement 2
 OSPF authentication and passive interfaces are
used to secure the protocol.
OSPF Requirement 3
 Router IDs are used for the election of the DR and
BDR.
OSPF Requirement 4
 The OSPF cost is changed to manipulate
preferred routes.
OSPF Requirement 5
 Static routes and default information originate are
used to reach the Internet.
Points Earned
(10 suggested)
(20 suggested)
(20 suggested)
(20 suggested)
(10 suggested)
(10 suggested)
(10 suggested)
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 2 of 10
OSPF Capstone Project
Instructor Topology Example Solution
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 3 of 10
OSPF Capstone Project
Suggested Addressing Table
IPv4 Address
Device
Subnet Mask
Default Gateway
Interface
IPv6 Address/Prefix
R1
R2
R3
A2
L3
G0/0
G0/2
G0/0
G0/2
Link-local
G0/0
G0/2
S0/0/0
G0/0
G0/2
S0/0/0
Link-local
G0/0
G0/2
G0/0
G0/2
Link-local
G0/0
G0/2
G0/0
G0/2
Link-local
NIC
NIC
172.16.1.1
255.255.255.0
10.0.0.1
255.255.255.0
2001:DB8:1:11::1/64
2001:DB8:1:123::1/64
FE80::1
172.16.2.1
255.255.255.0
10.0.0.2
255.255.255.0
64.104.73.242
255.255.255.240
2001:DB8:1:22::1/64
2001:DB8:1:123::2/64
2001:DB8:1:2::1/64
FE80::2
172.16.0.1
255.255.255.0
10.0.0.2
255.255.255.0
2001:DB8:1:33::1/64
2001:DB8:1:123::3/64
FE80::3
172.16.2.2
255.255.255.0
172.16.1.2
255.255.255.0
2001:DB8:1:22::2/64
2001:DB8:1:11::2/64
FE80::A
172.16.0.1
255.255.255.0
2001:DB8:1:33::1/64
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Router ID
10.1.1.1
10.2.2.2
10.3.3.3
2.2.2.2
172.16.0.1
FE80::3
Page 4 of 10
OSPF Capstone Project
Device Configurations After Completion of the Activity
R1# show run
Building configuration...
Current configuration : 1291 bytes
!
version 15.1
no service timestamps log datetime msec
no service timestamps debug datetime msec
no service password-encryption
!
hostname R1
!
ipv6 unicast-routing
!
license udi pid CISCO2911/K9 sn FTX1524UZ5Y
!
spanning-tree mode pvst
!
interface GigabitEthernet0/0
ip address 172.16.1.1 255.255.255.0
ip ospf message-digest-key 1 md5 Area2
duplex auto
speed auto
ipv6 address FE80::1 link-local
ipv6 address 2001:DB8:1:11::1/64
ipv6 ospf 1 area 2
!
interface GigabitEthernet0/1
no ip address
duplex auto
speed auto
shutdown
!
interface GigabitEthernet0/2
ip address 10.0.0.1 255.255.255.0
ip ospf message-digest-key 1 md5 Area0
duplex auto
speed auto
ipv6 address FE80::1 link-local
ipv6 address 2001:DB8:1:123::1/64
ipv6 ospf 1 area 0
!
interface Serial0/0/0
no ip address
shutdown
!
interface Serial0/0/1
no ip address
shutdown
!
interface Vlan1
no ip address
shutdown
!
router ospf 1
router-id 10.1.1.1
log-adjacency-changes
area 0 authentication message-digest
area 2 authentication message-digest
network 10.0.0.0 0.0.0.255 area 0
network 172.16.1.0 0.0.0.255 area 2
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 5 of 10
OSPF Capstone Project
!
ipv6 router ospf 1
router-id 10.1.1.1
log-adjacency-changes
!
ip classless
!
line con 0
!
line aux 0
!
line vty 0 4
login
!
end
R2# show run
Building configuration...
Current configuration : 1494 bytes
!
version 15.1
no service timestamps log datetime msec
no service timestamps debug datetime msec
no service password-encryption
!
hostname R2
!
ipv6 unicast-routing
!
license udi pid CISCO2911/K9 sn FTX1524GRRS
!
spanning-tree mode pvst
!
interface GigabitEthernet0/0
ip address 172.16.2.1 255.255.255.0
ip ospf message-digest-key 1 md5 Area2
duplex auto
speed auto
ipv6 address FE80::2 link-local
ipv6 address 2001:DB8:1:22::1/64
ipv6 ospf 1 area 2
!
interface GigabitEthernet0/1
no ip address
duplex auto
speed auto
shutdown
!
interface GigabitEthernet0/2
ip address 10.0.0.2 255.255.255.0
ip ospf message-digest-key 1 md5 Area0
duplex auto
speed auto
ipv6 address FE80::2 link-local
ipv6 address 2001:DB8:1:123::2/64
ipv6 ospf 1 area 0
!
interface Serial0/0/0
ip address 64.104.73.242 255.255.255.240
ipv6 address FE80::2 link-local
ipv6 address 2001:DB8:1:2::1/64
ipv6 ospf 1 area 0
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 6 of 10
OSPF Capstone Project
!
interface Serial0/0/1
no ip address
shutdown
!
interface Vlan1
no ip address
shutdown
!
router ospf 1
router-id 10.2.2.2
log-adjacency-changes
area 0 authentication message-digest
area 2 authentication message-digest
passive-interface Serial0/0/0
network 10.0.0.0 0.0.0.255 area 0
network 172.16.2.0 0.0.0.255 area 2
default-information originate
!
ipv6 router ospf 1
router-id 10.2.2.2
log-adjacency-changes
!
ip classless
ip route 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 Serial0/0/0
!
line con 0
!
line aux 0
!
line vty 0 4
login
!
end
R3# show run
Building configuration...
Current configuration : 1291 bytes
!
version 15.1
no service timestamps log datetime msec
no service timestamps debug datetime msec
no service password-encryption
!
hostname R3
!
ipv6 unicast-routing
!
license udi pid CISCO2911/K9 sn FTX15247W10
!
spanning-tree mode pvst
!
interface GigabitEthernet0/0
ip address 172.16.0.1 255.255.255.0
ip ospf message-digest-key 1 md5 Area0
duplex auto
speed auto
ipv6 address FE80::3 link-local
ipv6 address 2001:DB8:1:33::1/64
ipv6 ospf 1 area 0
!
interface GigabitEthernet0/1
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Page 7 of 10
OSPF Capstone Project
no ip address
duplex auto
speed auto
shutdown
!
interface GigabitEthernet0/2
ip address 10.0.0.3 255.255.255.0
ip ospf message-digest-key 1 md5 Area0
duplex auto
speed auto
ipv6 address FE80::3 link-local
ipv6 address 2001:DB8:1:123::3/64
ipv6 ospf 1 area 0
!
interface Serial0/0/0
no ip address
shutdown
!
interface Serial0/0/1
no ip address
shutdown
!
interface Vlan1
no ip address
shutdown
!
router ospf 1
router-id 10.3.3.3
log-adjacency-changes
area 0 authentication message-digest
passive-interface GigabitEthernet0/0
network 10.0.0.0 0.0.0.255 area 0
network 172.16.0.0 0.0.0.255 area 0
!
ipv6 router ospf 1
router-id 10.3.3.3
log-adjacency-changes
!
ip classless
!
line con 0
!
line aux 0
!
line vty 0 4
login
!
end
A2# show run
Building configuration...
Current configuration : 1157 bytes
!
version 15.1
no service timestamps log datetime msec
no service timestamps debug datetime msec
no service password-encryption
!
hostname A2
!
ipv6 unicast-routing
!
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 8 of 10
OSPF Capstone Project
license udi pid CISCO2911/K9 sn FTX1524DVBW
!
spanning-tree mode pvst
!
interface GigabitEthernet0/0
ip address 172.16.2.2 255.255.255.0
ip ospf message-digest-key 1 md5 Area2
ip ospf cost 2000
duplex auto
speed auto
ipv6 address FE80::A link-local
ipv6 address 2001:DB8:1:22::2/64
ipv6 ospf 1 area 2
!
interface GigabitEthernet0/1
ip address 172.16.1.2 255.255.255.0
ip ospf message-digest-key 1 md5 Area2
ip ospf cost 1000
duplex auto
speed auto
ipv6 address FE80::A link-local
ipv6 address 2001:DB8:1:11::2/64
ipv6 ospf 1 area 2
!
interface GigabitEthernet0/2
no ip address
duplex auto
speed auto
shutdown
!
interface Vlan1
no ip address
shutdown
!
router ospf 1
router-id 2.2.2.2
log-adjacency-changes
area 2 authentication message-digest
network 172.16.2.0 0.0.0.255 area 2
!
ipv6 router ospf 1
router-id 2.2.2.2
log-adjacency-changes
!
ip classless
!
line con 0
!
line aux 0
!
line vty 0 4
login
!
End
Show IP Route
R1>en
R1# show ip route
Codes: L - local, C - connected, S - static, R - RIP, M - mobile, B - BGP
D - EIGRP, EX - EIGRP external, O - OSPF, IA - OSPF inter area
N1 - OSPF NSSA external type 1, N2 - OSPF NSSA external type 2
E1 - OSPF external type 1, E2 - OSPF external type 2, E - EGP
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Page 9 of 10
OSPF Capstone Project
i - IS-IS, L1 - IS-IS level-1, L2 - IS-IS level-2, ia - IS-IS inter area
* - candidate default, U - per-user static route, o - ODR
P - periodic downloaded static route
Gateway of last resort is 10.0.0.2 to network 0.0.0.0
10.0.0.0/8 is variably subnetted, 2 subnets, 2 masks
10.0.0.0/24 is directly connected, GigabitEthernet0/2
10.0.0.1/32 is directly connected, GigabitEthernet0/2
172.16.0.0/16 is variably subnetted, 4 subnets, 2 masks
O
172.16.0.0/24 [110/2] via 10.0.0.3, 00:02:18, GigabitEthernet0/2
C
172.16.1.0/24 is directly connected, GigabitEthernet0/0
L
172.16.1.1/32 is directly connected, GigabitEthernet0/0
O IA
172.16.2.0/24 [110/2] via 10.0.0.2, 00:02:18, GigabitEthernet0/2
O*E2 0.0.0.0/0 [110/1] via 10.0.0.2, 00:02:18, GigabitEthernet0/2
C
L
Show IP Protocols
R1# show ip protocols
Routing Protocol is "ospf 1"
Outgoing update filter list for all interfaces is not set
Incoming update filter list for all interfaces is not set
Router ID 10.1.1.1
Number of areas in this router is 2. 2 normal 0 stub 0 nssa
Maximum path: 4
Routing for Networks:
10.0.0.0 0.0.0.255 area 0
172.16.1.0 0.0.0.255 area 2
Routing Information Sources:
Gateway
Distance
Last Update
10.1.1.1
110
00:08:18
10.2.2.2
110
00:07:29
10.3.3.3
110
00:07:38
Distance: (default is 110)
Show IP OSPF Neighbor
R1# show ip ospf neighbor
Neighbor ID
10.3.3.3
10.2.2.2
Pri
1
1
State
FULL/DR
FULL/BDR
Dead Time
00:00:33
00:00:33
Address
10.0.0.3
10.0.0.2
Interface
GigabitEthernet0/2
GigabitEthernet0/2
Show IP Interface Brief
R1# show ip int brief
Interface
IP-Address
OK? Method Status
Protocol
GigabitEthernet0/0
172.16.1.1
YES manual up
up
GigabitEthernet0/1
unassigned
YES unset
GigabitEthernet0/2
10.0.0.1
YES manual up
Serial0/0/0
unassigned
YES unset
administratively down down
Serial0/0/1
unassigned
YES unset
administratively down down
Vlan1
unassigned
YES unset
administratively down down
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
administratively down down
up
Page 10 of 10
EIGRP Capstone Project
(Instructor Version)
Instructor Note: Red font color or Gray highlights indicate text that appears in the instructor copy only.
Objectives
In this Capstone Project activity, you will demonstrate your ability to:

Design, configure, verify, and secure EIGRP, IPv4 or IPv6 on a network

Design a VLSM addressing scheme for the devices connected to the LANs
 Present your design using network documentation from your Capstone Project network
Instructor Note: This activity is best completed in groups of 2-3 students.
Scenario
You are a network engineer for your small- to medium-sized business. You and your team have been asked to
design an IPv4 or IPv6 network that uses the EIGRP routing protocol.
The network consists of four branches that is connected to a headquarters router. The headquarters then
connects to an ISP router.
Your job is to create an EIGRP-based, VLSM addressed network scheme using IPv4 or IPv6 to accommodate the
number of hosts requested for this Capstone Project.
Required Resources

Packet Tracer software

Word processing or presentation software
Step 1: Design the network topology.
a. Network equipment:
1) Six routers
(a) Four branch routers
(b) One headquarters router
(c) One ISP router
2) Switches to support the LANS
b. LANs:
1) Two LANs per branch router
(a) Two LANs with 500 hosts
(b) One LAN serving 120 hosts
(c) One LAN with 200 hosts
(d) Two LANS with 80 hosts
(e) One LAN with 60 hosts
(f) One LAN with 30 hosts
2) One, three-host LAN assigned to the ISP router for server connectivity (DNS, Web, and TFTP).
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Page 1 of 18
EIGRP Capstone Project
Step 2: Devise the network addressing scheme.
a. Use any RFC 1918 Class B address that will accommodate the specifications listed in Step 1.
b. ISPs LAN connection will use a different IPv4 network number to indicate Internet or telecommunications
connectivity to the servers.
c.
Use VLSM efficiently to conserve addresses and allow for scalability.
d. Apply the network address scheme to hosts and LAN and WAN interfaces.
Step 3: Implement the EIGRP routing protocol on your network
a. Requirements:
1) Advertise directly connected networks using the wildcard mask.
2) Disable automatic summarization.
3) Disable routing updates from being sent across the LAN interfaces.
4) Implement one, named extended ACL on the network.
b. Recommendations (choose two):
1) Selectively implement EIGRP summary routes.
2) Modify the EIGRP hello-timers.
3) Modify the bandwidth of the interfaces.
Step 4: Configure basic security
a. Restrict access to the console connection.
b. Configure encrypted passwords.
c.
Restrict access to the VTY connections.
d. Configure a banner warning.
Step 5: Backup the configurations of each router to the TFTP server.
Step 6: Verify the network.
a. Validate connectivity by pinging all devices.
b. Use five show commands to verify EIGRP configuration.
Step 7: Present your Capstone Project to the class and be able to answer questions from your
peers and Instructor.
Instructor notes: This Modeling Activity is suggested to be a graded assignment after completing Chapters 1-11.
Students should be able to show how small networks are designed, configured, verified and secured.
Documentation is a large factor of this project and students must be able to explain their network design and
verification through the use of show commands.
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 2 of 18
EIGRP Capstone Project
Instructor-Sample Solutions
Topology (this example topology can be used with IPv4 or IPv6 addressing)
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 3 of 18
EIGRP Capstone Project
Instructor Rubric Example
Requirement
Network Topology

Six routers

Nine LANs

Network switches, as necessary
Network Addressing

Class B, IPv4 with VLSM applied correctly to
networks

IPv6 applied correctly to networks
EIGRP Configuration

Wildcard masks used

Auto-summary disabled

LAN EIGRP routing updates disabled

One extended, named ACL configured and
operational
Network Security

Encrypted passwords

Console access secured

VTY lines secured

Warning banner present
Points
10
20
10
10
Router configurations backed up to the TFTP server
5
Full network connectivity is present and verified
15
Capstone Project presentation
30
Sample Outputs (IPv4)
Show IP Route
HQ# show ip route
Codes: L - local, C - connected, S - static, R - RIP, M - mobile, B - BGP
D - EIGRP, EX - EIGRP external, O - OSPF, IA - OSPF inter area
N1 - OSPF NSSA external type 1, N2 - OSPF NSSA external type 2
E1 - OSPF external type 1, E2 - OSPF external type 2, E - EGP
i - IS-IS, L1 - IS-IS level-1, L2 - IS-IS level-2, ia - IS-IS inter area
* - candidate default, U - per-user static route, o - ODR
P - periodic downloaded static route
Gateway of last resort is 0.0.0.0 to network 0.0.0.0
D
D
172.31.0.0/16 is variably subnetted, 15 subnets, 7 masks
172.31.0.0/21 is a summary, 00:15:26, Null0
172.31.0.0/23 [90/2170112] via 172.31.7.2, 00:15:26, Serial0/0/0
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 4 of 18
EIGRP Capstone Project
D
D
D
D
D
C
L
C
L
C
L
C
L
C
L
S*
HQ#
172.31.2.0/23 [90/2170112] via 172.31.7.2, 00:15:26, Serial0/0/0
172.31.4.0/23 [90/2170112] via 172.31.7.10, 00:15:28, Serial0/1/0
[90/2170112] via 172.31.7.6, 00:15:24, Serial0/0/1
172.31.6.0/25 [90/2170112] via 172.31.7.10, 00:15:28, Serial0/1/0
172.31.6.128/26 [90/2170112] via 172.31.7.14, 00:15:25, Serial0/1/1
172.31.6.192/27 [90/2170112] via 172.31.7.14, 00:15:25, Serial0/1/1
172.31.7.0/30 is directly connected, Serial0/0/0
172.31.7.1/32 is directly connected, Serial0/0/0
172.31.7.4/30 is directly connected, Serial0/0/1
172.31.7.5/32 is directly connected, Serial0/0/1
172.31.7.8/30 is directly connected, Serial0/1/0
172.31.7.9/32 is directly connected, Serial0/1/0
172.31.7.12/30 is directly connected, Serial0/1/1
172.31.7.13/32 is directly connected, Serial0/1/1
209.165.200.0/24 is variably subnetted, 2 subnets, 2 masks
209.165.200.0/27 is directly connected, Serial0/2/1
209.165.200.2/32 is directly connected, Serial0/2/1
0.0.0.0/0 is directly connected, Serial0/2/1
ISP# show ip route
Codes: L - local, C - connected, S - static, R - RIP, M - mobile, B - BGP
D - EIGRP, EX - EIGRP external, O - OSPF, IA - OSPF inter area
N1 - OSPF NSSA external type 1, N2 - OSPF NSSA external type 2
E1 - OSPF external type 1, E2 - OSPF external type 2, E - EGP
i - IS-IS, L1 - IS-IS level-1, L2 - IS-IS level-2, ia - IS-IS inter area
* - candidate default, U - per-user static route, o - ODR
P - periodic downloaded static route
Gateway of last resort is 209.165.200.2 to network 0.0.0.0
172.31.0.0/21 is subnetted, 1 subnets
172.31.0.0/21 [90/2681856] via 209.165.200.2, 00:00:25, Serial0/0/0
192.0.2.0/24 is variably subnetted, 2 subnets, 2 masks
C
192.0.2.0/24 is directly connected, GigabitEthernet0/0
L
192.0.2.254/32 is directly connected, GigabitEthernet0/0
209.165.200.0/24 is variably subnetted, 2 subnets, 2 masks
C
209.165.200.0/27 is directly connected, Serial0/0/0
L
209.165.200.1/32 is directly connected, Serial0/0/0
D*EX 0.0.0.0/0 [170/7289856] via 209.165.200.2, 00:00:25, Serial0/0/0
ISP#
D
Branch1# show ip route
Codes: L - local, C - connected, S - static, R - RIP, M - mobile, B - BGP
D - EIGRP, EX - EIGRP external, O - OSPF, IA - OSPF inter area
N1 - OSPF NSSA external type 1, N2 - OSPF NSSA external type 2
E1 - OSPF external type 1, E2 - OSPF external type 2, E - EGP
i - IS-IS, L1 - IS-IS level-1, L2 - IS-IS level-2, ia - IS-IS inter area
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 5 of 18
EIGRP Capstone Project
* - candidate default, U - per-user static route, o - ODR
P - periodic downloaded static route
Gateway of last resort is 172.31.7.1 to network 0.0.0.0
172.31.0.0/16 is variably subnetted, 13 subnets, 6 masks
172.31.0.0/23 is directly connected, GigabitEthernet0/0
172.31.1.254/32 is directly connected, GigabitEthernet0/0
172.31.2.0/23 is directly connected, GigabitEthernet0/1
172.31.3.254/32 is directly connected, GigabitEthernet0/1
172.31.4.0/23 [90/2682112] via 172.31.7.1, 00:20:57, Serial0/0/0
172.31.6.0/25 [90/2682112] via 172.31.7.1, 00:20:57, Serial0/0/0
172.31.6.128/26 [90/2682112] via 172.31.7.1, 00:20:57, Serial0/0/0
172.31.6.192/27 [90/2682112] via 172.31.7.1, 00:20:57, Serial0/0/0
172.31.7.0/30 is directly connected, Serial0/0/0
172.31.7.2/32 is directly connected, Serial0/0/0
172.31.7.4/30 [90/2681856] via 172.31.7.1, 00:20:57, Serial0/0/0
172.31.7.8/30 [90/2681856] via 172.31.7.1, 00:20:57, Serial0/0/0
172.31.7.12/30 [90/2681856] via 172.31.7.1, 00:20:57, Serial0/0/0
192.0.2.0/24 [90/2682112] via 172.31.7.1, 00:01:37, Serial0/0/0
209.165.200.0/27 is subnetted, 1 subnets
D
209.165.200.0/27 [90/2681856] via 172.31.7.1, 00:20:57, Serial0/0/0
D*EX 0.0.0.0/0 [170/7289856] via 172.31.7.1, 00:20:57, Serial0/0/0
C
L
C
L
D
D
D
D
C
L
D
D
D
D
Show Access Lists
HQ# show access-lists
Extended IP access list WEB_ACCESS
10 permit tcp host 172.31.0.1 host 192.0.2.3
20 permit tcp host 172.31.0.1 host 192.0.2.3
30 permit tcp host 172.31.4.1 host 192.0.2.3
40 permit tcp host 172.31.4.1 host 192.0.2.3
50 deny tcp any host 192.0.2.3 eq www
60 deny tcp any host 192.0.2.3 eq 443
70 permit ip any any
eq
eq
eq
eq
www
443
www
443
Branch1# show access-lists
Standard IP access list NO_ACCESS
10 permit host 172.31.0.1
20 permit host 172.31.2.1
Show IP Protocol
HQ# show ip protocol
Routing Protocol is "eigrp 100"
Outgoing update filter list for all interfaces is not set
Incoming update filter list for all interfaces is not set
Default networks flagged in outgoing updates
Default networks accepted from incoming updates
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 6 of 18
EIGRP Capstone Project
EIGRP metric weight K1=1, K2=0, K3=1, K4=0, K5=0
EIGRP maximum hopcount 100
EIGRP maximum metric variance 1
Redistributing: eigrp 100, static
Automatic network summarization is not in effect
Maximum path: 4
Routing for Networks:
172.31.7.0/30
172.31.7.4/30
172.31.7.8/30
172.31.7.12/30
209.165.200.0/27
Routing Information Sources:
Gateway
Distance
Last Update
172.31.7.14
90
5099
172.31.7.10
90
6890
172.31.7.2
90
8081
172.31.7.6
90
9139
Distance: internal 90 external 170
Branch1# show ip protocol
Routing Protocol is "eigrp 100"
Outgoing update filter list for all interfaces is not set
Incoming update filter list for all interfaces is not set
Default networks flagged in outgoing updates
Default networks accepted from incoming updates
EIGRP metric weight K1=1, K2=0, K3=1, K4=0, K5=0
EIGRP maximum hopcount 100
EIGRP maximum metric variance 1
Redistributing: eigrp 100
Automatic network summarization is not in effect
Maximum path: 4
Routing for Networks:
172.31.0.0/23
172.31.2.0/23
172.31.7.0/30
Passive Interface(s):
GigabitEthernet0/0
GigabitEthernet0/1
Routing Information Sources:
Gateway
Distance
Last Update
172.31.7.1
90
8082
Distance: internal 90 external 170
Show ip eigrp topology
HQ# show ip eigrp topology
IP-EIGRP Topology Table for AS 100
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 7 of 18
EIGRP Capstone Project
Codes: P - Passive, A - Active, U - Update, Q - Query, R - Reply,
r - Reply status
P 172.31.7.12/30, 1 successors, FD is 2169856
via Connected, Serial0/1/1
P 172.31.7.8/30, 1 successors, FD is 2169856
via Connected, Serial0/1/0
P 172.31.7.0/30, 1 successors, FD is 2169856
via Connected, Serial0/0/0
P 172.31.7.4/30, 1 successors, FD is 2169856
via Connected, Serial0/0/1
P 172.31.6.128/26, 1 successors, FD is 2170112
via 172.31.7.14 (2170112/2816), Serial0/1/1
P 172.31.6.192/27, 1 successors, FD is 2170112
via 172.31.7.14 (2170112/2816), Serial0/1/1
P 172.31.6.0/25, 1 successors, FD is 2170112
via 172.31.7.10 (2170112/2816), Serial0/1/0
P 172.31.4.0/23, 2 successors, FD is 2170112
via 172.31.7.10 (2170112/2816), Serial0/1/0
via 172.31.7.6 (2170112/2816), Serial0/0/1
P 172.31.0.0/23, 1 successors, FD is 2170112
via 172.31.7.2 (2170112/2816), Serial0/0/0
P 172.31.2.0/23, 1 successors, FD is 2170112
via 172.31.7.2 (2170112/2816), Serial0/0/0
P 0.0.0.0/0, 1 successors, FD is 6777856
via Rstatic (6777856/0)
P 209.165.200.0/27, 1 successors, FD is 2169856
via Connected, Serial0/2/1
P 172.31.0.0/21, 1 successors, FD is 2169856
via Summary (2169856/0), Null0
Branch1# show ip eigrp topology
IP-EIGRP Topology Table for AS 100
Codes: P - Passive, A - Active, U - Update, Q - Query, R - Reply,
r - Reply status
P 172.31.0.0/23, 1 successors, FD is 2816
via Connected, GigabitEthernet0/0
P 172.31.2.0/23, 1 successors, FD is 2816
via Connected, GigabitEthernet0/1
P 172.31.7.0/30, 1 successors, FD is 1340928
via Connected, Serial0/0/0
P 172.31.7.12/30, 1 successors, FD is 2681856
via 172.31.7.1 (2681856/2169856), Serial0/0/0
P 172.31.7.8/30, 1 successors, FD is 2681856
via 172.31.7.1 (2681856/2169856), Serial0/0/0
P 172.31.7.4/30, 1 successors, FD is 2681856
via 172.31.7.1 (2681856/2169856), Serial0/0/0
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 8 of 18
EIGRP Capstone Project
P 172.31.6.128/26, 1 successors, FD is 2682112
via 172.31.7.1 (2682112/2170112), Serial0/0/0
P 172.31.6.192/27, 1 successors, FD is 2682112
via 172.31.7.1 (2682112/2170112), Serial0/0/0
P 172.31.6.0/25, 1 successors, FD is 2682112
via 172.31.7.1 (2682112/2170112), Serial0/0/0
P 172.31.4.0/23, 1 successors, FD is 2682112
via 172.31.7.1 (2682112/2170112), Serial0/0/0
P 0.0.0.0/0, 1 successors, FD is 7289856
via 172.31.7.1 (7289856/6777856), Serial0/0/0
P 209.165.200.0/27, 1 successors, FD is 2681856
via 172.31.7.1 (2681856/2169856), Serial0/0/0
TFTP Configuration (may be used with IPv4 and IPv6 projects)
Sample Outputs (IPv6)
Show IPv6 Interface
HQ# show ipv6 interface
Serial0/0/0 is up, line protocol is up
IPv6 is enabled, link-local address is FE80::260:3EFF:FE77:E701
No Virtual link-local address(es):
Global unicast address(es):
2001:DB8:ACAD:9::, subnet is 2001:DB8:ACAD:9::/127
Joined group address(es):
FF02::1
FF02::2
FF02::A
FF02::1:FF00:0
FF02::1:FF77:E701
MTU is 1500 bytes
ICMP error messages limited to one every 100 milliseconds
ICMP redirects are enabled
ICMP unreachables are sent
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 9 of 18
EIGRP Capstone Project
ND DAD is enabled, number of DAD attempts: 1
ND reachable time is 30000 milliseconds
Hosts use stateless autoconfig for addresses.
Serial0/0/1 is up, line protocol is up
IPv6 is enabled, link-local address is FE80::260:3EFF:FE77:E702
No Virtual link-local address(es):
Global unicast address(es):
2001:DB8:ACAD:9::2, subnet is 2001:DB8:ACAD:9::2/127
Joined group address(es):
FF02::1
FF02::2
FF02::A
FF02::1:FF00:2
FF02::1:FF77:E702
MTU is 1500 bytes
ICMP error messages limited to one every 100 milliseconds
ICMP redirects are enabled
ICMP unreachables are sent
ND DAD is enabled, number of DAD attempts: 1
ND reachable time is 30000 milliseconds
Hosts use stateless autoconfig for addresses.
Serial0/1/0 is up, line protocol is up
IPv6 is enabled, link-local address is FE80::2D0:BCFF:FE0E:5201
No Virtual link-local address(es):
Global unicast address(es):
2001:DB8:ACAD:9::4, subnet is 2001:DB8:ACAD:9::4/127
Joined group address(es):
FF02::1
FF02::2
FF02::A
FF02::1:FF00:4
FF02::1:FF0E:5201
MTU is 1500 bytes
ICMP error messages limited to one every 100 milliseconds
ICMP redirects are enabled
ICMP unreachables are sent
ND DAD is enabled, number of DAD attempts: 1
ND reachable time is 30000 milliseconds
Hosts use stateless autoconfig for addresses.
Serial0/1/1 is up, line protocol is up
IPv6 is enabled, link-local address is FE80::2D0:BCFF:FE0E:5202
No Virtual link-local address(es):
Global unicast address(es):
2001:DB8:ACAD:9::6, subnet is 2001:DB8:ACAD:9::6/127
Joined group address(es):
FF02::1
FF02::2
FF02::A
FF02::1:FF00:6
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 10 of 18
EIGRP Capstone Project
FF02::1:FF0E:5202
MTU is 1500 bytes
ICMP error messages limited to one every 100 milliseconds
ICMP redirects are enabled
ICMP unreachables are sent
ND DAD is enabled, number of DAD attempts: 1
ND reachable time is 30000 milliseconds
Hosts use stateless autoconfig for addresses.
Serial0/2/1 is up, line protocol is up
IPv6 is enabled, link-local address is FE80::202:4AFF:FE35:602
No Virtual link-local address(es):
Global unicast address(es):
2001:DB8:ABCD::, subnet is 2001:DB8:ABCD::/127
Joined group address(es):
FF02::1
FF02::2
FF02::A
FF02::1:FF00:0
FF02::1:FF35:602
MTU is 1500 bytes
ICMP error messages limited to one every 100 milliseconds
ICMP redirects are enabled
ICMP unreachables are sent
ND DAD is enabled, number of DAD attempts: 1
ND reachable time is 30000 milliseconds
Hosts use stateless autoconfig for addresses.
Vlan1 is administratively down, line protocol is down
Internet protocol processing disabled
ISP# show ipv6 interface
GigabitEthernet0/0 is up, line protocol is up
IPv6 is enabled, link-local address is FE80::260:2FFF:FE66:401
No Virtual link-local address(es):
Global unicast address(es):
2001:DB8:CAFE:1::, subnet is 2001:DB8:CAFE:1::/64
Joined group address(es):
FF02::1
FF02::2
FF02::1:FF00:0
FF02::1:FF66:401
MTU is 1500 bytes
ICMP error messages limited to one every 100 milliseconds
ICMP redirects are enabled
ICMP unreachables are sent
ND DAD is enabled, number of DAD attempts: 1
ND reachable time is 30000 milliseconds
ND advertised reachable time is 0 milliseconds
ND advertised retransmit interval is 0 milliseconds
ND router advertisements are sent every 200 seconds
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 11 of 18
EIGRP Capstone Project
ND router advertisements live for 1800 seconds
ND advertised default router preference is Medium
Hosts use stateless autoconfig for addresses.
Serial0/0/0 is up, line protocol is up
IPv6 is enabled, link-local address is FE80::260:3EFF:FE10:B901
No Virtual link-local address(es):
Global unicast address(es):
2001:DB8:ABCD::1, subnet is 2001:DB8:ABCD::/127
Joined group address(es):
FF02::1
FF02::2
FF02::1:FF00:1
FF02::1:FF10:B901
MTU is 1500 bytes
ICMP error messages limited to one every 100 milliseconds
ICMP redirects are enabled
ICMP unreachables are sent
ND DAD is enabled, number of DAD attempts: 1
ND reachable time is 30000 milliseconds
Hosts use stateless autoconfig for addresses.
Vlan1 is administratively down, line protocol is down
Internet protocol processing disabled
Branch1# show ipv6 interface
GigabitEthernet0/0 is up, line protocol is up
IPv6 is enabled, link-local address is FE80::201:C9FF:FE85:3A01
No Virtual link-local address(es):
Global unicast address(es):
2001:DB8:ACAD:1:FFFF:FFFF:FFFF:FFFF, subnet is 2001:DB8:ACAD:1::/64
Joined group address(es):
FF02::1
FF02::2
FF02::A
FF02::1:FF85:3A01
FF02::1:FFFF:FFFF
MTU is 1500 bytes
ICMP error messages limited to one every 100 milliseconds
ICMP redirects are enabled
ICMP unreachables are sent
ND DAD is enabled, number of DAD attempts: 1
ND reachable time is 30000 milliseconds
ND advertised reachable time is 0 milliseconds
ND advertised retransmit interval is 0 milliseconds
ND router advertisements are sent every 200 seconds
ND router advertisements live for 1800 seconds
ND advertised default router preference is Medium
Hosts use stateless autoconfig for addresses.
GigabitEthernet0/1 is up, line protocol is up
IPv6 is enabled, link-local address is FE80::201:C9FF:FE85:3A02
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 12 of 18
EIGRP Capstone Project
No Virtual link-local address(es):
Global unicast address(es):
2001:DB8:ACAD:2:FFFF:FFFF:FFFF:FFFF, subnet is 2001:DB8:ACAD:2::/64
Joined group address(es):
FF02::1
FF02::2
FF02::A
FF02::1:FF85:3A02
FF02::1:FFFF:FFFF
MTU is 1500 bytes
ICMP error messages limited to one every 100 milliseconds
ICMP redirects are enabled
ICMP unreachables are sent
ND DAD is enabled, number of DAD attempts: 1
ND reachable time is 30000 milliseconds
ND advertised reachable time is 0 milliseconds
ND advertised retransmit interval is 0 milliseconds
ND router advertisements are sent every 200 seconds
ND router advertisements live for 1800 seconds
ND advertised default router preference is Medium
Hosts use stateless autoconfig for addresses.
Serial0/0/0 is up, line protocol is up
IPv6 is enabled, link-local address is FE80::202:17FF:FEE2:A401
No Virtual link-local address(es):
Global unicast address(es):
2001:DB8:ACAD:9::1, subnet is 2001:DB8:ACAD:9::/127
Joined group address(es):
FF02::1
FF02::2
FF02::A
FF02::1:FF00:1
FF02::1:FFE2:A401
MTU is 1500 bytes
ICMP error messages limited to one every 100 milliseconds
ICMP redirects are enabled
ICMP unreachables are sent
ND DAD is enabled, number of DAD attempts: 1
ND reachable time is 30000 milliseconds
Hosts use stateless autoconfig for addresses.
Vlan1 is administratively down, line protocol is down
Internet protocol processing disabled
Show IPv6 Route
HQ# show ipv6 route
IPv6 Routing Table - 17 entries
Codes: C - Connected, L - Local, S - Static, R - RIP, B - BGP
U - Per-user Static route, M - MIPv6
I1 - ISIS L1, I2 - ISIS L2, IA - ISIS interarea, IS - ISIS summary
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 13 of 18
EIGRP Capstone Project
S
C
L
D
D
D
D
D
C
L
C
L
C
L
C
L
L
O - OSPF intra, OI - OSPF inter, OE1 - OSPF ext 1, OE2 - OSPF ext 2
ON1 - OSPF NSSA ext 1, ON2 - OSPF NSSA ext 2
D - EIGRP, EX - EIGRP external
::/0 [1/0]
via ::, Serial0/2/1
2001:DB8:ABCD::/127 [0/0]
via ::, Serial0/2/1
2001:DB8:ABCD::/128 [0/0]
via ::, Serial0/2/1
2001:DB8:ACAD::/60 [5/2169856]
via ::, Null0
2001:DB8:ACAD::/61 [90/2170112]
via FE80::2D0:FFFF:FE73:E101, Serial0/0/1
2001:DB8:ACAD::/62 [90/2170112]
via FE80::202:17FF:FEE2:A401, Serial0/0/0
2001:DB8:ACAD:5::/64 [90/2170112]
via FE80::20D:BDFF:FE23:9801, Serial0/1/0
2001:DB8:ACAD:6::/64 [90/2170112]
via FE80::20D:BDFF:FE23:9801, Serial0/1/0
2001:DB8:ACAD:9::/127 [0/0]
via ::, Serial0/0/0
2001:DB8:ACAD:9::/128 [0/0]
via ::, Serial0/0/0
2001:DB8:ACAD:9::2/127 [0/0]
via ::, Serial0/0/1
2001:DB8:ACAD:9::2/128 [0/0]
via ::, Serial0/0/1
2001:DB8:ACAD:9::4/127 [0/0]
via ::, Serial0/1/0
2001:DB8:ACAD:9::4/128 [0/0]
via ::, Serial0/1/0
2001:DB8:ACAD:9::6/127 [0/0]
via ::, Serial0/1/1
2001:DB8:ACAD:9::6/128 [0/0]
via ::, Serial0/1/1
FF00::/8 [0/0]
via ::, Null0
Branch1# show ipv6 route
IPv6 Routing Table - 17 entries
Codes: C - Connected, L - Local, S - Static, R - RIP, B - BGP
U - Per-user Static route, M - MIPv6
I1 - ISIS L1, I2 - ISIS L2, IA - ISIS interarea, IS - ISIS summary
O - OSPF intra, OI - OSPF inter, OE1 - OSPF ext 1, OE2 - OSPF ext 2
ON1 - OSPF NSSA ext 1, ON2 - OSPF NSSA ext 2
D - EIGRP, EX - EIGRP external
EX ::/0 [170/7289856]
via FE80::260:3EFF:FE77:E701, Serial0/0/0
D
2001:DB8:ABCD::/127 [90/2681856]
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 14 of 18
EIGRP Capstone Project
D
D
D
C
L
C
L
D
D
C
L
D
D
D
L
via FE80::260:3EFF:FE77:E701, Serial0/0/0
2001:DB8:ACAD::/60 [90/2682112]
via FE80::260:3EFF:FE77:E701, Serial0/0/0
2001:DB8:ACAD::/61 [90/2682112]
via FE80::260:3EFF:FE77:E701, Serial0/0/0
2001:DB8:ACAD::/62 [5/2816]
via ::, Null0
2001:DB8:ACAD:1::/64 [0/0]
via ::, GigabitEthernet0/0
2001:DB8:ACAD:1:FFFF:FFFF:FFFF:FFFF/128 [0/0]
via ::, GigabitEthernet0/0
2001:DB8:ACAD:2::/64 [0/0]
via ::, GigabitEthernet0/1
2001:DB8:ACAD:2:FFFF:FFFF:FFFF:FFFF/128 [0/0]
via ::, GigabitEthernet0/1
2001:DB8:ACAD:5::/64 [90/2682112]
via FE80::260:3EFF:FE77:E701, Serial0/0/0
2001:DB8:ACAD:6::/64 [90/2682112]
via FE80::260:3EFF:FE77:E701, Serial0/0/0
2001:DB8:ACAD:9::/127 [0/0]
via ::, Serial0/0/0
2001:DB8:ACAD:9::1/128 [0/0]
via ::, Serial0/0/0
2001:DB8:ACAD:9::2/127 [90/2681856]
via FE80::260:3EFF:FE77:E701, Serial0/0/0
2001:DB8:ACAD:9::4/127 [90/2681856]
via FE80::260:3EFF:FE77:E701, Serial0/0/0
2001:DB8:ACAD:9::6/127 [90/2681856]
via FE80::260:3EFF:FE77:E701, Serial0/0/0
FF00::/8 [0/0]
via ::, Null0
Show IPv6 Protocols
HQ# show ipv6 protocol
IPv6 Routing Protocol is "connected"
IPv6 Routing Protocol is "static
IPv6 Routing Protocol is "eigrp 100"
EIGRP metric weight K1=1, K2=0, K3=1, K4=0, K5=0
EIGRP maximum hopcount 100
EIGRP maximum metric variance 1
Interfaces:
Serial0/0/0
Serial0/0/1
Serial0/1/0
Serial0/1/1
Serial0/2/1
Redistributing: eigrp 100, static
Address Summarization:
2001:DB8:ACAD::/60 for Serial0/2/1
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 15 of 18
EIGRP Capstone Project
Maximum path: 16
Distance: internal 90 external 170
Branch1#show ipv6 protocol
IPv6 Routing Protocol is "connected"
IPv6 Routing Protocol is "static
IPv6 Routing Protocol is "eigrp 100"
EIGRP metric weight K1=1, K2=0, K3=1, K4=0, K5=0
EIGRP maximum hopcount 100
EIGRP maximum metric variance 1
Interfaces:
GigabitEthernet0/0
GigabitEthernet0/1
Serial0/0/0
Redistributing: eigrp 100
Address Summarization:
2001:DB8:ACAD::/62 for Serial0/0/0
Maximum path: 16
Distance: internal 90 external 170
Show IPv6 EIGRP Topology
HQ# show ipv6 eigrp topology
IPv6-EIGRP Topology Table for AS 100/ID(1.1.1.1)
Codes: P - Passive, A - Active, U - Update, Q - Query, R - Reply,
r - Reply status
P 2001:DB8:ACAD:9::4/127, 1 successors, FD is 2169856
via Connected, Serial0/1/0
P 2001:DB8:ACAD:9::6/127, 1 successors, FD is 2169856
via Connected, Serial0/1/1
P 2001:DB8:ACAD:9::/127, 1 successors, FD is 2169856
via Connected, Serial0/0/0
P 2001:DB8:ACAD:5::/64, 1 successors, FD is 2170112
via FE80::20D:BDFF:FE23:9801 (2170112/2816),
P 2001:DB8:ACAD:6::/64, 1 successors, FD is 2170112
via FE80::20D:BDFF:FE23:9801 (2170112/2816),
P 2001:DB8:ACAD:9::2/127, 1 successors, FD is 2169856
via Connected, Serial0/0/1
P 2001:DB8:ACAD::/61, 1 successors, FD is 2170112
via FE80::2D0:FFFF:FE73:E101 (2170112/2816),
P 2001:DB8:ACAD::/62, 1 successors, FD is 2170112
via FE80::202:17FF:FEE2:A401 (2170112/2816),
P 2001:DB8:ACAD::/60, 1 successors, FD is 2169856
via Summary (2169856/0), Null0
P ::/0, 1 successors, FD is 6777856
via Rstatic (6777856/0)
P 2001:DB8:ABCD::/127, 1 successors, FD is 2169856
via Connected, Serial0/2/1
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Serial0/1/0
Serial0/1/0
Serial0/0/1
Serial0/0/0
Page 16 of 18
EIGRP Capstone Project
Branch1# show ipv6 eigrp topology
IPv6-EIGRP Topology Table for AS 100/ID(2.2.2.2)
Codes: P - Passive, A - Active, U - Update, Q - Query, R - Reply,
r - Reply status
P 2001:DB8:ACAD:1::/64, 1 successors, FD is 2816
via Connected, GigabitEthernet0/0
P 2001:DB8:ACAD:2::/64, 1 successors, FD is 2816
via Connected, GigabitEthernet0/1
P 2001:DB8:ACAD:9::/127, 1 successors, FD is 1340928
via Connected, Serial0/0/0
P 2001:DB8:ACAD::/62, 1 successors, FD is 2816
via Summary (2816/0), Null0
P 2001:DB8:ACAD:9::4/127, 1 successors, FD is 2681856
via FE80::260:3EFF:FE77:E701 (2681856/2169856),
P 2001:DB8:ACAD:9::6/127, 1 successors, FD is 2681856
via FE80::260:3EFF:FE77:E701 (2681856/2169856),
P 2001:DB8:ACAD:5::/64, 1 successors, FD is 2682112
via FE80::260:3EFF:FE77:E701 (2682112/2170112),
P 2001:DB8:ACAD:6::/64, 1 successors, FD is 2682112
via FE80::260:3EFF:FE77:E701 (2682112/2170112),
P 2001:DB8:ACAD:9::2/127, 1 successors, FD is 2681856
via FE80::260:3EFF:FE77:E701 (2681856/2169856),
P 2001:DB8:ACAD::/61, 1 successors, FD is 2682112
via FE80::260:3EFF:FE77:E701 (2682112/2170112),
P 2001:DB8:ACAD::/60, 1 successors, FD is 2682112
via FE80::260:3EFF:FE77:E701 (2682112/2170112),
P ::/0, 1 successors, FD is 7289856
via FE80::260:3EFF:FE77:E701 (7289856/6777856),
P 2001:DB8:ABCD::/127, 1 successors, FD is 2681856
via FE80::260:3EFF:FE77:E701 (2681856/2169856),
Serial0/0/0
Serial0/0/0
Serial0/0/0
Serial0/0/0
Serial0/0/0
Serial0/0/0
Serial0/0/0
Serial0/0/0
Serial0/0/0
Show IPv6 Access Lists
HQ# show ipv6 access-list
IPv6 access list WEB_ACCESS
permit tcp host 2001:DB8:ACAD::1 host 2001:DB8:CAFE:1::3
permit tcp host 2001:DB8:ACAD::1 host 2001:DB8:CAFE:1::3
permit tcp host 2001:DB8:ACAD::3 host 2001:DB8:CAFE:1::3
permit tcp host 2001:DB8:ACAD::3 host 2001:DB8:CAFE:1::3
permit tcp host 2001:DB8:ACAD::5 host 2001:DB8:CAFE:1::3
permit tcp host 2001:DB8:ACAD::5 host 2001:DB8:CAFE:1::3
permit tcp host 2001:DB8:ACAD::7 host 2001:DB8:CAFE:1::3
permit tcp host 2001:DB8:ACAD::7 host 2001:DB8:CAFE:1::3
deny tcp any host 2001:DB8:CAFE:1::3 eq www
deny tcp any host 2001:DB8:CAFE:1::3 eq 443
permit ipv6 any any
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
eq
eq
eq
eq
eq
eq
eq
eq
www
443
www
443
www
443
www
443
Page 17 of 18
EIGRP Capstone Project
Branch1# show ipv6 access-list
IPv6 access list NO_ACCESS
permit tcp host 2001:DB8:ACAD::1 host 2001:DB8:ACAD:1:FFFF:FFFF:FFFF:FFFF eq
telnet
permit tcp host 2001:DB8:ACAD::2 host 2001:DB8:ACAD:2:FFFF:FFFF:FFFF:FFFF eq
telnet
deny tcp any host 2001:DB8:ACAD:2:FFFF:FFFF:FFFF:FFFF eq telnet
deny tcp any host 2001:DB8:ACAD:1:FFFF:FFFF:FFFF:FFFF eq telnet
© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public.
Page 18 of 18
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