3rd Grade SC Standards

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SCCCR Standards – 3rd Grade Math
Algebraic Thinking and Operations
3.ATO.1 Use concrete objects, drawings and symbols to represent multiplication facts of
two single-digit whole numbers and explain the relationship between the factors (i.e., 0 –
10) and the product.
3.ATO.2 Use concrete objects, drawings and symbols to represent division without
remainders and explain the relationship among the whole number quotient (i.e., 0 – 10),
divisor (i.e., 0 – 10), and dividend.
3.ATO.3 Solve real-world problems involving equal groups, area/array, and number line
models using basic multiplication and related division facts. Represent the problem
situation using an equation with a symbol for the unknown.
3.ATO.4 Determine the unknown whole number in a multiplication or division equation
relating three whole numbers when the unknown is a missing factor, product, dividend,
divisor, or quotient.
3.ATO.5 Apply properties of operations (i.e., Commutative Property of Multiplication,
Associative Property of Multiplication, Distributive Property) as strategies to multiply and
divide and explain the reasoning.
3.ATO.6 Understand division as a missing factor problem.
3.ATO.7 Demonstrate fluency with basic multiplication and related division facts of
products and dividends through 100.
3.ATO.8 Solve two-step real-world problems using addition, subtraction, multiplication
and division of whole numbers and having whole number answers. Represent these
problems using equations with a letter for the unknown quantity.
3.ATO.9 Identify a rule for an arithmetic pattern (e.g., patterns in the addition table or
multiplication table).
Number Sense and Base Ten
3.NSBT.1 Use place value understanding to round whole numbers to the nearest 10 or
100.
3.NSBT.2 Add and subtract whole numbers fluently to 1,000 using knowledge of place
value and properties of operations.
3.NSBT.3 Multiply one-digit whole numbers by multiples of 10 in the range 10 – 90, using
knowledge of place value and properties of operations.
3.NSBT.4 Read and write numbers through 999,999 in standard form and equations in
expanded form.
3.NSBT.5 Compare and order numbers through 999,999 and represent the comparison
using the symbols >, =, or <.
Number Sense - Fractions
3.NSF.1 Develop an understanding of fractions (i.e., denominators 2, 3, 4, 6, 8, 10) as
numbers.
• a. A fraction 1/𝑏 (called a unit fraction) is the quantity formed by one part when a
whole is partitioned into 𝑏 equal parts;
b. A fraction 𝑎/𝑏 is the quantity formed by 𝑎 parts of size 1/𝑏;
• c. A fraction is a number that can be represented on a number line based on counts
of a unit fraction;
d. A fraction can be represented using set, area, and linear models.
SCCCR Standards – 3rd Grade Math
Number Sense – Fractions - Continued
3.NSF.2 Explain fraction equivalence (i.e., denominators 2, 3, 4, 6, 8, 10) by demonstrating
an understanding that:
a. two fractions are equal if they are the same size, based on the same whole, or at the
same point on a number line;
b. fraction equivalence can be represented using set, area, and linear models;
c. whole numbers can be written as fractions (e.g., 4= 4/1 and 1= 4/4);
d. fractions with the same numerator or same denominator can be compared by
reasoning about their size based on the same whole.
3.NSF.3 Develop an understanding of mixed numbers (i.e., denominators 2, 3, 4, 6, 8, 10)
as iterations of unit fractions on a number line.
Geometry
3.G.1 Understand that shapes in different categories (e.g., rhombus, rectangle, square,
and other 4-sided shapes) may share attributes (e.g., 4-sided figures) and the shared
attributes can define a larger category (e.g., quadrilateral). Recognize rhombuses,
rectangles, and squares as examples of quadrilaterals, and draw examples of
quadrilaterals that do not belong to any of these subcategories.
3.G.2 Partition two-dimensional shapes into 2, 3, 4, 6, or 8 parts with equal areas and
express the area of each part using the same unit fraction. Recognize that equal parts of
identical wholes need not have the same shape.
3.G.3 Use a right angle as a benchmark to identify and sketch acute and obtuse angles.
3.G.4 Identify a three-dimensional shape (i.e., right rectangular prism, right triangular
prism, pyramid) based on a given two-dimensional net and explain the relationship
between the shape and the net.
Measurement and Data Analysis
3.MDA.1 Use analog and digital clocks to determine and record time to the nearest
minute, using a.m. and p.m.; measure time intervals in minutes; and solve problems
involving addition and subtraction of time intervals within 60 minutes.
3.MDA.2 Estimate and measure liquid volumes (capacity) in customary units (i.e., c., pt.,
qt., gal.) and metric units (i.e., mL, L) to the nearest whole unit.
3.MDA.3 Collect, organize, classify, and interpret data with multiple categories and draw
a scaled picture graph and a scaled bar graph to represent the data.
3.MDA.4 Generate data by measuring length to the nearest inch, half-inch and quarterinch and organize the data in a line plot using a horizontal scale marked off in
appropriate units.
3.MDA.5 Understand the concept of are measurement.
a. Recognize area as an attribute of plane figures;
b. Measure area by building arrays and counting standard unit squares;
c. Determine the area of a rectilinear polygon and relate to multiplications and
addition.
3.MDA.6 Solve real-world and mathematical problems involving perimeters of polygons,
including finding the perimeter given the side lengths, finding an unknown side length,
and exhibiting rectangles with the same perimeter and different areas or with the same
area and different perimeters.
SCCCR Standards – 3rd Grade ELA
Inquiry-Based Literacy Standards (I)
Standard 1: Formulate relevant, self-generated questions based on
interests and/or needs that can be investigated.
1.1 Formulate questions to focus thinking on an idea to narrow and direct further inquiry.
Standard 2: Transact with texts to formulate questions, propose
explanations, and consider alternative views and multiple perspectives.
2.1 Explore topics of interest to formulate logical questions; build knowledge; generate
possible explanations; consider alternative views.
Standard 3: Construct knowledge, applying disciplinary concepts and
tools, to build deeper understanding of the world through exploration,
collaboration, and analysis.
3.1 Develop a plan of action for collecting relevant information from primary and
secondary sources.
3.2 Organize and categorize important information; collaborate to validate or revise
thinking; report relevant findings.
Standard 4: Synthesize integrated information to share learning and/or
take action.
4.1 Draw logical conclusions from relationships and patterns discovered during the
inquiry process.
4.2 Reflect on findings to build deeper understanding and determine next steps.
4.3 Determine appropriate tools and develop plan to communicate findings and/or
take informed action.
Standard 5: Reflect throughout the inquiry process to assess metacognition, broaden
understanding, and guide actions, both individually and collaboratively.
5.1 Acknowledge and value individual and collective thinking.
5.2 Employ past and present learning in order to monitor and guide inquiry.
5.3 Assess the process and determine strategies to revise the plan and apply learning for
future inquiry.
Fundamentals of Reading
• Integrate an information (cueing) system that includes meaning (semantics),
structure (syntax), visual (graphophonic), and pragmatics (schematic) to make
meaning from text.
• Gain understanding by applying reading strategies of monitoring, searching,
confirming, cross-checking, rereading, and self-correcting.
• Employ comprehension strategies before, during, and after reading text using
schema, annotating, questioning, visualizing, drawing inferences, determining
importance, summarizing, and synthesizing.
• Use metacognition to monitor meaning and adjust strategies while reading.
• Notice and analyze the styles and techniques authors use to help readers construct
meaning.
SCCCR Standards – 3rd Grade ELA
Reading - Literary Text (RL)
Principles of Reading
Standard 1: Demonstrate understanding of the organization and basic features of print.
Standard 2: Demonstrate understanding of spoken words, syllables, and
sounds.
Standard 3: Know and apply grade-level phonics and word analysis skills in decoding
words.
3.1 Identify and know the meaning of the most common prefixes and derivational
suffixes.
3.6 Read grade-appropriate irregularly spelled words.
Standard 4: Read with sufficient accuracy and fluency to support comprehension.
4.2 Read grade-level prose and poetry orally with accuracy, appropriate rate, expression,
intonation, and phrasing on successive readings.
Meaning and Context
Standard 5: Determine meaning and develop logical interpretations by making
predictions, inferring, drawing conclusions, analyzing, synthesizing, providing evidence,
and investigating multiple interpretations.
5.1 Ask and answer literal and inferential questions to determine meaning; refer explicitly
to the text to support inferences and conclusions.
Standard 6: Summarize key details and ideas to support analysis of thematic
development.
6.1 Determine the theme by recalling key details that support the theme.
Standard 7: Analyze the relationship among ideas, themes, or topics in multiple media,
formats, and in visual, auditory, and kinesthetic modalities.
7.1 Explain how illustrations contribute to create mood or emphasize aspects of character
or setting.
7.2 Compare and contrast how an author uses characters to develop theme and plot in
different texts within a series.
Standard 8: Analyze characters, settings, events, and ideas as they develop and interact
within a particular context.
a.1 Use text evidence to:
a. describe characters’ traits, motivations, and feelings and explain how their actions
contribute to the development of the plot; and
b. b. explain the influence of cultural and historical context on characters, setting, and
plot development.
SCCCR Standards – 3rd Grade ELA
Reading - Literary Text (RL)- Continued
Language, Craft, and Structure
Standard 9: Interpret and analyze the author’s use of words, phrases, and conventions,
and how their relationships shape meaning and tone in print and multimedia texts.
9.1 Identify and explain how the author uses idioms, metaphor, or personification to
shape meaning and style.
9.2 Explain how the author’s choice of words, illustrations, and conventions combine to
create mood, contribute to meaning, and emphasize aspects of a character or
setting.
Standard 10: Apply a range of strategies to determine and deepen the meaning of
known, unknown, and multiple-meaning words, phrases, and jargon; acquire and use
general academic and domain-specific vocabulary.
10.1 Use paragraph-level context to determine the meaning of words and phrases.
10.2 Determine the meaning of a word when an affix is added to a base word.
10.5 Consult print and multimedia resources to find the pronunciation and determine or
clarify the precise meaning of key words or phrases.
10.6 Acquire and use general academic and domain-specific words and phrases that
signal spatial and temporal relationships; demonstrate an understanding of nuances.
Standard 11: Analyze and provide evidence of how the author’s choice of point of
view, perspective, and purpose shape content, meaning, and style.
11.1 Explain the differences between first and third person points of view.
11.2 Compare and contrast the reader’s point of view to that of the narrator or a
character.
Standard 12: Analyze and critique how the author uses structures in print and
multimedia texts to shape meaning and impact the reader.
12.1 Identify text structures of various genres using the terms paragraph, chapter,
scene, and stanza; describe how each part transitions.
12.2 Identify crafted text structures such as a collection of photographs or poetry texts,
texts with a series of short memoirs, an inanimate voice text, and a framing question
text.
Range and Complexity
Standard 13: Read independently and comprehend a variety of texts for the purposes
of reading for enjoyment, acquiring new learning, and building stamina; reflect on and
respond to increasingly complex text over time.
13.1 Engage in whole and small group reading with purpose and understanding.
13.2 Read independently for sustained periods of time to build stamina.
13.3 Read and respond according to task and purpose to become self-directed,
critical readers and thinkers.
SCCCR Standards – 3rd Grade ELA
Reading Informational Text (RI)
Principles of Reading
Standard 1: Demonstrate understanding of the organization and basic features of print.
Standard 2: Demonstrate understanding of spoken words, syllables, and
sounds.
Standard 3: Know and apply grade-level phonics and word analysis skills in decoding
words.
3.1 Identify and know the meaning of the most common prefixes and derivational
suffixes.
3.6 Read grade-appropriate irregularly spelled words.
Standard 4: Read with sufficient accuracy and fluency to support comprehension.
4.2 Read grade-level prose and poetry orally with accuracy, appropriate rate,
expression, intonation, and phrasing on successive readings.
Meaning and Context
Standard 5: Determine meaning and develop logical interpretations by making
predictions, inferring, drawing conclusions, analyzing, synthesizing, providing
evidence and investigating multiple interpretations.
5.1 Ask and answer literal and inferential questions to determine meaning; refer
explicitly to the text to support inferences and conclusions.
Standard 6: Summarize key details and ideas to support analysis of central ideas.
6.1 Summarize multi-paragraph texts using key details to support the central idea.
Standard 7: Research events, topics, ideas, or concepts through multiple media,
formats, and in visual, auditory, and kinesthetic modalities.
7.1 Compare and contrast diverse texts on the same topic, idea, or concept.
Language, Craft, and Structure
Standard 8: Interpret and analyze the author’s use of words, phrases, text features,
conventions, and structures, and how their relationships shape meaning and tone in
print and multimedia texts.
8.1 Explain how the author uses words and phrases to inform, explain, or describe.
8.2 Use knowledge of appendices, timelines, maps, and charts to locate information
and gain meaning; explain how these features contribute to a text.
SCCCR Standards – 3rd Grade ELA
Reading Informational Text (RI) - continued
Standard 9: Apply a range of strategies to determine the meaning of
known, unknown, and multiple meaning words, phrases, and jargon;
acquire and use general academic and domain-specific vocabulary.
9.1 Use paragraph-level context to determine the meaning of words and phrases.
9.2 Determine the meaning of a word when an affix is added to a base word.
9.4 Consult print and multimedia resources to find the pronunciation and determine or
clarify the precise meaning of key words or phrases.
9.5 Acquire and use general academic and domain-specific words and phrases that
signal spatial and temporal relationships; demonstrate an understanding of nuances.
Standard 10: Analyze and provide evidence of how the author’s choice of purpose
and perspective shapes content, meaning, and style.
10.1 State the author’s purpose; distinguish one’s own perspective from that of the
author.
Standard 11: Analyze and critique how the author uses structures in print and
multimedia texts to craft informational and argument writing.
11.1 Identify problem and solution, description, and question and answer structures to
locate information and gain meaning.
11.2 Describe the structures an author uses to support specific points.
Range and Complexity
Standard 12: Read independently and comprehend a variety of texts for the purposes
of reading for enjoyment, acquiring new learning, and building stamina; reflect on
and respond to increasingly complex text over time.
12.1 Engage in whole and small group reading with purpose and understanding.
12.2 Read independently for sustained periods of time.
12.3 Read and respond according to task and purpose to become self-directed,
critical readers and thinkers.
Writing (W)
Fundamentals of Writing
• Employ a recursive writing process that includes planning, drafting, revising, editing,
rewriting, publishing, and reflecting.
• Interact and collaborate with peers and adults to develop and strengthen writing.
• Produce writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate
to task, purpose, discipline, and audience.
• Use clear and coherent written language to accomplish a purpose such as
learning, enjoyment, argument, and the exchange of information.
• Monitor progress throughout the writing process and adjust strategies as needed
from independence to collaboration within a writing community.
• Incorporate authors’ craft techniques observed from wide reading of anchor and
mentor texts across disciplines to inform, explain, convince/argue, and entertain.
SCCCR Standards – 3rd Grade ELA
Writing (W) continued
Meaning, Context, and Craft
Standard 1: Write arguments to support claims with clear reasons and relevant
evidence.
1.1 Write opinion pieces that:
a. introduce the topic or text, state an opinion, and create an organizational
structure that includes reasons;
b. . use information from multiple print and multimedia sources;
c. organize supporting reasons logically;
d. use transitional words or phrases to connect opinions and reasons;
e. develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, and editing
building on personal ideas and the ideas of others;
f. use paraphrasing and original language to avoid plagiarism; and
g. provide a concluding statement or section.
Standard 2: Write informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey complex
ideas and information clearly and accurately through the effective selection,
organization, and analysis of content.
2.1 Write informative/explanatory texts that:
a. introduce a topic and group related information together;
b. use information from multiple print and multimedia sources;
c. include illustrations to aid comprehension;
d. develop the topic with facts, definitions, and details;
e. develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, and editing
building on personal ideas and the ideas of others;
f. use paraphrasing and original language to avoid plagiarism;
g. use transition words and phrases to connect ideas within categories of information;
h. develop a style and tone authentic to the purpose; and
i. provide a concluding statement or section.
Standard 3: Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using
effective techniques, well-chosen details, and well-structured event sequences.
3.1 Gather ideas from texts, multimedia, and personal experience to write narratives
that:
a. develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique,
descriptive details, and clear event sequences;
b. establish a situation and introduce a narrator and/or characters;
c. organize an event sequence that unfolds naturally;
d. use dialogue and descriptions of actions, thoughts, and feelings to develop
experiences and events or show the response of characters to situations;
SCCCR Standards – 3rd Grade ELA
Writing (W) - continued
e. develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, and editing
building on personal ideas and the ideas of others;
f. use temporal words and phrases to signal event order;
g. use imagery, precise words, and sensory details to develop characters and
convey experiences and events; and
h. provide a sense of closure.
Language
Standard 4: Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar
and usage when writing or speaking.
4.1 When writing:
a. show knowledge of the function of nouns, pronouns, verbs, adjectives, and
adverbs;
b. form and use regular and irregular plural nouns; use abstract nouns;
c. form and use regular and irregular verbs;
d. form and use the simple verb tenses;
e. ensure subject-verb and pronoun-antecedent agreement;
f. form and use comparative and superlative adjectives and adverbs, and choose
between them depending on what is to be modified;
g. g. form and use prepositional phrases;
h. h. use coordinating and subordinating conjunctions; and produce simple,
compound, and complex sentences.
Standard 5: Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English form and
use the progressive verb tenses;
5.1 Capitalize appropriate words in titles, historical periods, company names, product
names, and special events.
5.2 Use:
a. apostrophes to form contractions and singular and plural possessives;
b. quotation marks to mark direct speech; and
c. commas in locations and addresses, to mark direct speech, and with coordinating
adjectives.
5.3 Use conventional spelling for high- frequency words, previously studied words, and
for adding suffixes to base words.
5.4 Use spelling patterns and generalizations.
5.5 Consult print and multimedia sources to check and correct spellings.
Range and Complexity
Standard 6: Write independently, legibly, and routinely for a variety of tasks, purposes,
and audiences over short and extended time frames.
6.1 Write routinely and persevere in writing tasks:
a. over short and extended time frames;
b. for a range of domain-specific tasks;
c. for a variety of purposes and audiences; and
d. by adjusting the writing process for the task, increasing the length and complexity.
SCCCR Standards – 3rd Grade ELA
Writing (W) - Continued
6.4 Demonstrate effective keyboarding skills.
6.5 Connect upper- and lower-case letters efficiently and proportionately in cursive
handwriting.
Communication (C)
Fundamentals of Communication
• Employ a reciprocal communication process that includes planning, drafting,
revising, editing, reviewing, presenting, and reflecting.
• Communicate using style, language, and nonverbal cues appropriate to task,
purpose, and audience.
• Use active and attentive communication skills, building on other’s ideas to explore,
learn, enjoy, argue, and exchange information.
• Monitor delivery and reception throughout the communication process and adjust
approach and strategies as needed.
• Adjust speech, using standard English when indicated or appropriate, in a variety of
contexts and tasks for presenting or participating in the social exchange of ideas.
• Acquire vocabulary from multiple forms of communication; use newly acquired
vocabulary to appropriately communicate in a variety of situations and contexts.
Meaning and Context
Standard 1: Interact with others to explore ideas and concepts, communicate
meaning, and develop logical interpretations through collaborative conversations;
build upon the ideas of others to clearly express one’s own views while respecting
diverse perspectives.
1.1 Explore and create meaning through conversation and interaction with peers and
adults.
1.2 Participate in discussions; ask questions to acquire information concerning a topic,
text, or issue.
1.3 Apply techniques of articulation, adequate volume, eye contact, facial
expressions, posture, gestures, and space; take one’s own turn in a respectful way.
1.4 Engage in focused conversations about grade appropriate topics and texts; build
on ideas of others to clarify thinking and express new thoughts.
1.5 Explain personal ideas and build on the ideas of others by responding and relating
to comments made in multiple exchanges.
Standard 2: Articulate ideas, claims, and perspectives in a logical sequence using
information, findings, and credible evidence from sources.
2.1 Recall information from experiences and gather information from print and
multimedia sources; take brief notes from sources, categorize, and organize.
2.2 Report on a topic or text, tell a story, or recount an experience with appropriate
facts and relevant, descriptive details.
2.4 Speak clearly at an understandable pace, adapting speech to a variety of
contexts and tasks; use standard English when indicated or appropriate.
SCCCR Standards – 3rd Grade ELA
Communication (C) - Continued
Standard 3: Communicate information through strategic use of multiple modalities and
multimedia to enrich understanding when presenting ideas and information.
3.1 Compare how ideas and topics are depicted in a variety of media and formats.
3.2 Create presentations using video, photos, and other multimedia elements to
support communication and clarify ideas, thoughts, and feelings.
Language, Craft, and Structure
Standard 4: Critique how a speaker addresses content and uses craft techniques that
stylistically and structurally inform, engage, and impact audience and convey
messages.
4.1 Identify the presentation style a speaker uses to present content.
4.2 Determine if the presentation has a purposeful organizational strategy, with
appropriate transitions.
4.3 Identify why the speaker:
a. uses intonation and word stress;
b. includes media;
c. addresses the audience;
d. determines word choice; and
e. incorporates figurative language and literary devices.
Standard 5: Incorporate craft techniques to engage and impact audience and
convey messages.
5.1 Set a purpose and integrate craft techniques to create presentations.
5.2 Employ metaphor, imagery, personification, and hyperbole when appropriate to
impact the audience.
SCCCR Standards – 3rd Grade Science
Science – Science and Engineering Practices
Standard 3.S.1: The student will use the science and engineering practices, including
the processes and skills of scientific inquiry, to develop understandings of science
content.
3.S.1A. Conceptual Understanding: The practices of science and engineering support
the development of science concepts, develop the habits of mind that are necessary
for scientific thinking, and allow students to engage in science in ways that are similar
to those used by scientists and engineers.
Performance Indicators: Students who demonstrate this understanding can:
3.S.1A.1 Ask questions that can be (1) answered using scientific investigations or (2)
used to refine models, explanations, or designs.
3.S.1A.2 Develop, use, and refine models to (1) understand or represent phenomena,
processes, and relationships, (2) test devices or solutions, or (3) communicate ideas to
others.
3.S.1A.3 Plan and conduct scientific investigations to answer questions, test
predictions and develop explanations: (1) formulate scientific questions and predict
possible outcomes, (2) identify materials, procedures, and variables, (3) select and use
appropriate tools or instruments to collect qualitative and quantitative data, and (4)
record and represent data in an appropriate form. Use appropriate safety
procedures.
3.S.1A.4 Analyze and interpret data from observations, measurements, or
investigations to understand patterns and meanings.
3.S.1A.5 Use mathematical and computational thinking to (1) express quantitative
observations using appropriate English or metric units, (2) collect and analyze data, or
(3) understand patterns, trends and relationships.
3.S.1A.6 Construct explanations of phenomena using (1) scientific evidence and
models, (2) conclusions from scientific investigations, (3) predictions based on
observations and measurements, or (4) data communicated in graphs, tables, or
diagrams.
3.S.1A.7 Construct scientific arguments to support claims, explanations, or designs
using evidence from observations, data, or informational texts.
3.S.1A.8 Obtain and evaluate informational texts, observations, data collected, or
discussions to (1) generate and answer questions, (2) understand phenomena, (3)
develop models, or (4) support explanations, claims, or designs. Communicate
observations and explanations using the conventions and expectations of oral and
written language.
SCCCR Standards – 3rd Grade Science
Science – Science and Engineering Practices- Continued
3.S.1B. Conceptual Understanding: Technology is any modification to the natural
world created to fulfill the wants and needs of humans. The engineering design
process involves a series of iterative steps used to solve a problem and often leads to
the development of a new or improved technology.
Performance Indicators: Students who demonstrate this understanding can:
3.S.1B.1 Construct devices or design solutions to solve specific problems or needs: (1)
ask questions to identify problems or needs, (2) ask questions about the criteria and
constraints of the devices or solutions, (3) generate and communicate ideas for
possible devices or solutions, (4) build and test devices or solutions, (5) determine if the
devices or solutions solved the problem and refine the design if needed, and (6)
communicate the results.
SCCCR Standards – 3rd Grade Science
PHYSICAL SCIENCE: PROPERTIES AND CHANGES IN MATTER
Standard 3.P.2: The student will demonstrate an understanding of the properties used
to classify matter and how heat energy can change matter from one state to another.
3.P.2A. Conceptual Understanding: Matter exists in several different states and is
classified based on observable and measurable properties. Matter can be changed
from one state to another when heat (thermal energy) is added or removed.
Performance Indicators: Students who demonstrate this understanding can:
3.P.2A.1 Analyze and interpret data from observations and measurements to describe
and compare the physical properties of matter (including length, mass, temperature,
and volume of liquids).
3.P.2A.2 Construct explanations using observations and measurements to describe
how matter can be classified as a solid, liquid or gas.
3.P.2A.3 Plan and conduct scientific investigations to determine how changes in heat
(increase or decrease) change matter from one state to another (including melting,
freezing, condensing, boiling, and evaporating).
3.P.2A.4 Obtain and communicate information to compare how different processes
(including burning, friction, and electricity) serve as sources of heat energy.
3.P.2A.5 Define problems related to heat transfer and design devices or solutions that
facilitate (conductor) or inhibit (insulator) the transfer of heat.
SCCCR Standards – 3rd Grade Science
Physical Science: Energy Transfer – Electricity and
Magnetism
Standard 3.P.3: The student will demonstrate an understanding of how electricity
transfers energy and how magnetism can result from electricity.
3.P.3A. Conceptual Understanding: Energy can be transferred from place to place by
electric currents. Electric currents flowing through a simple circuit can be used to
produce motion, sound, heat, or light. Some materials allow electricity to flow through
a circuit and some do not.
Performance Indicators: Students who demonstrate this understanding can:
3.P.3A.1 Obtain and communicate information to develop models showing how
electrical energy can be transformed into other forms of energy (including motion,
sound, heat, or light).
3.P.3A.2 Develop and use models to describe the path of an electric current in a
complete simple circuit as it accomplishes a task (such as lighting a bulb or making a
sound).
3.P.3A.3 Analyze and interpret data from observations and investigations to classify
different materials as either an insulator or conductor of electricity.
3.P.3B. Conceptual Understanding: Magnets can exert forces on other magnets or
magnetizable materials causing energy transfer between them, even when the
objects are not touching. An electromagnet is produced when an electric current
passes through a coil of wire wrapped around an iron core. Magnets and
electromagnets have unique properties.
Performance Indicators: Students who demonstrate this understanding can:
3.P.3B.1 Develop and use models to describe and compare the properties of magnets
and electromagnets (including polarity, attraction, repulsion, and strength).
3.P.3B.2 Plan and conduct scientific investigations to determine the factors that affect
the strength of an electromagnet.
SCCCR Standards – 3rd Grade Science
Earth Science: Earth’s Materials and Processes
Standard 3.E.4: The student will demonstrate an understanding of the composition of
Earth and the processes that shape features of Earth’s surface.
3.E.4A. Conceptual Understanding: Earth is made of materials (including rocks,
minerals, soil, and water) that have distinct properties. These materials provide
resources for human activities.
Performance Indicators: Students who demonstrate this understanding can:
3.E.4A.1 Analyze and interpret data from observations and measurements to describe
and compare different Earth materials (including rocks, minerals, and soil) and classify
each type of material based on its distinct physical properties.
3.E.4A.2 Develop and use models to describe and classify the pattern distribution of
land and water features on Earth.
3.E.4A.3 Obtain and communicate information to exemplify how humans obtain, use,
and protect renewable and nonrenewable Earth resources.
3.E.4B. Conceptual Understanding: Earth’s surface has changed over time by natural
processes and by human activities. Humans can take steps to reduce the impact of
these changes.
Performance Indicators: Students who demonstrate this understanding can:
3.E.4B.1 Develop and use models to describe the characteristics of Earth’s continental
landforms and classify landforms as volcanoes, mountains, valleys, canyons, plains,
and islands.
3.E.4B.2 Plan and conduct scientific investigations to determine how natural processes
(including weathering, erosion, and gravity) shape Earth’s surface.
3.E.4B.3 Obtain and communicate information to explain how natural events (such as
fires, landslides, earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, or floods) and human activities (such
as farming, mining, or building) impact the environment.
3.E.4B.4 Define problems caused by a natural event or human activity and design
devices or solutions to reduce the impact on the environment.
SCCCR Standards – 3rd Grade Science
Life Science: Environments and Habitats
Standard 3.L.5: The student will demonstrate an understanding of how the
characteristics and changes in environments and habitats affect the diversity of
organisms.
3.L.5A. Conceptual Understanding: The characteristics of an environment (including
physical characteristics, temperature, availability of resources, or the kinds and
numbers of organisms present) influence the diversity of organisms that live there.
Organisms can survive only in environments where their basic needs are met. All
organisms need energy to live and grow. This energy is obtained from food. The role
an organism serves in an ecosystem can be described by the way in which it gets its
energy.
Performance Indicators: Students who demonstrate this understanding can:
3.L.5A.1 Analyze and interpret data about the characteristics of environments
(including salt and fresh water, deserts, grasslands, forests, rain forests, and polar
lands) to describe how the environment supports a variety of organisms.
3.L.5A.2 Develop and use a food chain model to classify organisms as producers,
consumers, and decomposers and to describe how organisms obtain energy.
Performance Indicators: Students who demonstrate this understanding can:
3.L.5B. Conceptual Understanding: When the environment or habitat changes, some
plants and animals survive and reproduce, some move to new locations, and some
die. Fossils can be used to infer characteristics of environments from long ago.
Performance Indicators: Students who demonstrate this understanding can:
3.L.5B.1 Obtain and communicate information to explain how changes in habitats
(such as those that occur naturally or those caused by organisms) can be beneficial
or harmful to the organisms that live there.
3.L.5B.2 Develop and use models to explain how changes in a habitat cause plants
and animals to respond in different ways (such as hibernating, migrating, responding
to light, death, or extinction).
3.L.5B.3 Construct scientific arguments using evidence from fossils of plants and
animals that lived long ago to infer the characteristics of early environments.
SCCCR Standards – 3rd Grade Social Studies
Social Studies - Regions
Standard 3-1: The student will demonstrate an understanding of places, regions, and
the role of human systems in South Carolina.
Enduring Understanding
People utilize, adapt to, and modify the physical environment to meet their needs.
They also create regions based on physical and human characteristics to help them
interpret Earth’s complexity. To understand how and why people interact with the
physical environment, the student will utilize the knowledge and skills set forth in the
following indicators:
Indicators
3-1.1 Categorize the six landform regions of South Carolina—the Blue Ridge, the
Piedmont, the Sand Hills, the Inner Coastal Plain, the Outer Coastal Plain, and the
Coastal Zone—according to their climate, physical features, and natural resources.
3-1.2 Describe the location and characteristics of significant features of South
Carolina, including landforms; river systems such as the Pee Dee River Basin, the
Santee River Basin, the Edisto River Basin, and the Savannah River Basin; major cities;
and climate regions.
3-1.3 Explain interactions between people and the physical landscape of South
Carolina over time, including the effects on population distribution, patterns of
migration, access to natural resources, and economic development.
Social Studies Literacy Skills for the Twenty-First Century
•Interpret information from a variety of social studies resources.*
•Identify maps, mental maps, and geographic models as representations of
spatial relationships.
•Find and describe the location and condition of places.
•Understand that people make choices based on the scarcity of resources.
•Share thoughts and ideas willingly.
•Use visual elements as aids to understand where, when, why, and how.
* Social studies resources include the following: texts, calendars, timelines,
maps, mental maps, charts, tables, graphs, flow charts, diagrams,
photographs, illustrations, paintings, cartoons, architectural drawings,
documents, letters, censuses, artifacts, models, geographic models, aerial
photographs, satellite-produced images, and geographic information
systems.
SCCCR Standards – 3rd Grade Social Studies
Exploration and Settlement of South Carolina
Standard 3-2: The student will demonstrate an understanding of the exploration and
settlement of South Carolina.
Enduring Understanding
The inhabitants of the early Carolina colony included native, immigrant, and enslaved
peoples. To understand how these various groups interacted to form a new and
unique culture, the student will utilize the knowledge and skills set forth in the following
indicators:
Indicators
3-2.1 Compare the culture, governance, and physical environment of the major
Native American tribal groups of South Carolina, including the Cherokee, Catawba,
and Yemassee.
3-2.2 Summarize the motives, activities, and accomplishments of the exploration of
South Carolina by the Spanish, French, and English.
3-2.3 Describe the initial contact, cooperation, and conflict between the Native
Americans and European settlers in South Carolina.
3-2.4 Summarize the development of the Carolina colony under the Lords Proprietors
and the royal colonial government, including settlement from and trade with
Barbados and the influence of other immigrant groups.
3-2.5 Explain the role of Africans in the developing the culture and economy of South
Carolina, including the growth of the slave trade; contributions to the plantation
economy; the daily lives of enslaved people; the development of the Gullah culture;
and the resistance to slavery.
Social Studies Literacy Skills for the Twenty-First Century
•Identify cause-and-effect relationships.
•Interpret information from a variety of social studies resources.*
•Identify maps, mental maps, and geographic models as representations of
spatial relationships.
•Find and describe the location and condition of places.
•Distinguish between wants and needs and between consumers and
producers.
•Use visual elements as aids to understand where, when, why, and how.
* Social studies resources include the following: texts, calendars, timelines,
maps, mental maps, charts, tables, graphs, flow charts, diagrams,
photographs, illustrations, paintings, cartoons, architectural drawings,
documents, letters, censuses, artifacts, models, geographic models, aerial
photographs, satellite-produced images, and geographic information
systems.
SCCCR Standards – 3rd Grade Social Studies
American Revolution
Standard 3:3 The student will demonstrate an understanding of the American
Revolution and South Carolina’s role in the development of the new American nation.
Enduring Understanding
People establish governments to provide stability and ensure the protection of their
rights as citizens. To understand the causes and results of the American Revolution on
South Carolina, the student will utilize the knowledge and skills set forth in the following
indicators:
Indicators
3-3.1 Summarize the causes of the American Revolution, including Britain’s passage
of the Stamp Act, the Tea Act, and the Intolerable Acts; the rebellion of the colonists;
and the writing of the Declaration of Independence.
3-3.2 Compare the perspectives of South Carolinians during the American Revolution,
including Patriots, Loyalists, women, enslaved and free Africans, and Native
Americans.
3-3.3 Summarize the course of the American Revolution in South Carolina, including
the role of William Jasper and Fort Moultrie; the occupation of Charles Town by the
British; the partisan warfare of Thomas Sumter, Andrew Pickens, and Francis Marion;
and the battles of Cowpens and Kings Mountain.
3-3.4 Summarize the effects of the American Revolution, including the establishment
of state and national governments.
3-3.5 Outline the structure of state government, including the branches of
government (legislative, executive, and judicial), the representative bodies of each
branch (general assembly, governor, and supreme court), and their basic powers.
Social Studies Literacy Skills for the Twenty-First Century
•Distinguish between past, present, and future time.
•Identify cause-and-effect relationships.
•Interpret information from a variety of social studies resources.*
•Share thoughts and ideas willingly.
•Use visual elements as aids to understand where, when, why, and how.
* Social studies resources include the following: texts, calendars, timelines, maps,
mental maps, charts, tables, graphs, flow charts, diagrams, photographs,
illustrations, paintings, cartoons, architectural drawings, documents, letters,
censuses, artifacts, models, geographic models, aerial photographs, satelliteproduced images, and geographic information systems.
SCCCR Standards – 3rd Grade Social Studies
Antebellum, Cause and Effects of the Civil War and Impact of
Reconstruction in South Carolina.
Standard 3-4: The student will demonstrate an understanding of life in the antebellum
period, the causes and effects of the Civil War, and the impact of Reconstruction in
South Carolina.
Enduring Understanding
South Carolina played a key role before, during, and after the Civil War, and those
events, in turn, greatly affected the state. To understand South Carolina’s involvement
in and experience during this tumultuous time, the student will utilize the knowledge
and skills set forth in the following indicators:
Indicators
3-4.1 Compare the economic conditions for various classes of people in South
Carolina, including the elite, the middle class, the lower class, the independent
farmers, and the enslaved and free African Americans.
3-4.2 Summarize the development of slavery in antebellum South Carolina, including
the invention of the cotton gin and the subsequent expansion of and economic
dependence on slavery.
3-4.3 Explain the reasons for South Carolina’s secession from the Union, including the
abolitionist movement and the concept of states’ rights.
3-4.4 Summarize the course of the Civil War in South Carolina, including the Secession
Convention, the firing on Fort Sumter, the Union blockade of Charleston, the
significance of the Hunley submarine, and General William T. Sherman’s march
through the state.
3-4.5 Explain how the destruction caused by the Civil War affected the economy and
daily lives of South Carolinians, including the scarcity of food, clothing, and living
essentials and the continuing racial tensions.
3-4.6 Summarize the positive and negative effects of Reconstruction on South
Carolina, including the development of public education; the establishment of
sharecropping; racial advancements and tensions; and the attempts to rebuild towns,
factories, and farms.
Social Studies Literacy Skills for the Twenty-First Century
•Identify cause-and-effect relationships.
•Interpret information from a variety of social studies resources.*
•Find and describe the location and condition of places.
•Work in teams to learn collaboratively.
•Use visual elements as aids to understand where, when, why, and how.
* Social studies resources include the following: texts, calendars, timelines, maps,
mental maps, charts, tables, graphs, flow charts, diagrams, photographs,
illustrations, paintings, cartoons, architectural drawings, documents, letters,
censuses, artifacts, models, geographic models, aerial photographs, satelliteproduced images, and geographic information systems.
SCCCR Standards – 3rd Grade Social Studies
Major Developments in South Carolina in the late 19th Century
Standard 3-5: The student will demonstrate an understanding of the major
developments in South Carolina in the late nineteenth and twentieth centuries.
Enduring Understanding
South Carolina experienced major economic, political, and social changes during the
late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. To understand the effects of these
changes, the student will utilize the knowledge and skills set forth in the following
indicators:
Indicators
3-5.1 Summarize the social and economic impact of developments in agriculture,
industry and technology, including the creation of Jim Crow laws, the rise and fall of
textile markets, and the expansion of the railroad.
3-5.2 Explain the causes and impact of emigration from South Carolina and internal
migration from rural areas to the cities, including discrimination and unemployment;
poor sanitation and transportation services; and the lack of electricity and other
modern conveniences in rural locations.
3-5.3 Explain the effects of the Great Depression on daily life in South Carolina,
including the widespread poverty and unemployment and the efforts of the federal
government to create jobs through a variety of New Deal programs.
3-5.4 Summarize the social and economic impact of World War II and the Cold War
on South Carolina, including the end of the Great Depression, improvements in
modern conveniences, increased opportunities for women and African Americans,
and the significance of the opening and eventual closing of military bases.
3-5.5 Summarize the development of economic, political, and social opportunities of
African Americans in South Carolina, including the end of Jim Crow laws; the
desegregation of schools (Briggs v. Elliott) and other public facilities; and efforts to
achieve the right to vote.
3-5.6 Describe the growth of tourism and its impact on the economy of South
Carolina, including the development of historic sites, state parks, and resorts and the
expanding transportation systems that allow for greater access to our state.
Social Studies Literacy Skills for the Twenty-First Century
•Distinguish between past, present, and future time.
•Identify cause-and-effect relationships.
•Interpret information from a variety of social studies resources.*
•Find and describe the location and condition of places.
•Understand that people make choices based on the scarcity of resources.
•Use visual elements as aids to understand where, when, why, and how.
* Social studies resources include the following: texts, calendars, timelines, maps,
mental maps, charts, tables, graphs, flow charts, diagrams, photographs,
illustrations, paintings, cartoons, architectural drawings, documents, letters,
censuses, artifacts, models, geographic models, aerial photographs, satelliteproduced images, and geographic information systems.
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Thank you to the following for the use of their
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For a complete listing of standards please refer to
the website:
http://ed.sc.gov/agency/ccr/Standards-Learning/
South Carolina Department of Education
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