DNABiologyBINGOFREE

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A great review game with a twist!
DNA BINGO is played just like regular BINGO games. Boxes get filled with
terminology from a DNA and Protein Synthesis unit. Students choose from
a word bank to fill in the boxes themselves. Make sure to remind them to
fill in the boxes with words that they are sure that they know!
After students fill their boxes, the teacher gives clues to “call” terms in the
game. In order to mark a box, students not only have to recognize what
term the clue is referring to, but also have to have chosen that term for
their BINGO card. You will frequently hear students groan when they hear
a term they know, but they did not put on their card!
Multiple clues are given for each term so you can play several games, giving the same term again, but with a different clue!
Various games to play:
-Standard BINGO: 5 boxes in a row (horizontal, vertical, or diagonal)
-Four Corners: only mark the four corners of the board
-Postage Stamp: only mark the four boxes at the top right of the
game board, like where a stamp is placed on an envelope
-Uppercase T: All 5 boxes across the top row, and the remaining 4
boxes down the center “N” row, creating a capital T
-Lowercase t: All 5 boxes across the center row, including the free
space, and the remaining 4 boxes down the “N” row, creating a lower
case t
-Picture Frame: All 16 boxes that surround the outside of the game
board
DNA
tRNA
Missense Mutation
Watson & Crick
RNA
rRNA
Nonsense Mutation
Hershey & Chase
Protein
Ribosome
Substitution
Nucleotide
Amino Acid
Codon
Addition
Hydrogen Bonds
DNA Polymerase
Anti-Codon
Deletion
Purine
Helicase
Start Codon
Frame shift
Pyrimidine
Transcription
Stop Codon
Inversion
Translation
Semiconservative
Translocation
Replication
Mutation
RNA Polymerase
mRNA
Silent Mutation
Chargaff
B
I
N
Free Space
G
O
DNA Bingo
1. DNA
a. The shortened version of the words deoxyribonucleic acid
b. Our genetic code
c. Made of DNA nucleotides
d. Contains the bases adenine, guanine, thymine, and cytosine
e. Is held in our nucleus
f. This molecule is double-stranded
g. This molecule is made of nucleotides which contain the sugar deoxyribose
2. RNA
a. This acronym stands for ribonucleic acid
b. This molecule has 3 different types used in protein synthesis
c. Contains the bases adenine, guanine, cytosine, and uracil
d. This molecule is single stranded
e. This molecule can be found both inside and outside of the nucleus
f. This general molecule is made of nucleotides which contain the sugar ribose
3. Protein
a. The monomers of these molecules are amino acids
b. This biological molecule is used to carry out our genetic code
c. Enzymes are this type of molecule
d. These types of molecules have primary, secondary, and tertiary structures. Sometimes they
have quaternary structures.
4. Amino Acid
a. These are the monomers of proteins
b. These contain an R group which makes them different from one another
c. There are 20 different types of these
d. A single codon codes for one of these
e. These link together via peptide bonds in ribosomes
5. DNA Polymerase
a. This enzyme creates a polymer of DNA
b. This enzyme is used to add new strands of DNA to the template strand
c. This enzyme is used in conjunction with Helicase during DNA replication
d. This enzyme pairs T’s to A’s
6. Helicase
a. This enzyme is used in conjunction with DNA Polymerase during DNA replication
b. This enzyme unwinds the DNA double helix
c. This enzyme will be found at a replication fork
d. This enzyme only breaks hydrogen bonds between DNA base pairs
7. Transcription
a. This is the process by which DNA is coded into RNA
b. This process occurs in the nucleus and involves both DNA and RNA
c. This process only opens a portion of the DNA called a gene
d. This process only involves one enzyme
e. This process creates RNA
8. Translation
a. This process creates proteins
b. This process occurs in the cytoplasm
c. This process involves ribosomes
d. This process is where peptide bonds are formed between amino acids
e. This process involves tRNA
9. Replication
a. This is the process by which DNA is copied
b. This process occurs only in the nucleus and involves only DNA
c. This process involves 2 enzymes
d. This process is considered semiconservative
e. This process extends down the entire length of the chromosome
f. This process is required prior to cell division
10. mRNA
a. This type of RNA is used as a “messenger” of the genetic code
b. This type of RNA is in the shape of a straight strand
c. This type of RNA contains codons
d. This type of RNA matches up with anticodons
11. tRNA
a. This type of RNA is in the shape of a lowercase t
b. This type of RNA carries amino acids to the ribosome
c. This type of RNA contains an anti-codon
d. The first letter in this acronym stands for “transfer”
12. rRNA
a. This type of RNA is found in ribosomes
b. This type of RNA is globular in shape
c. The first letter in this acronym stands for “ribosomal”
13. Ribosome
a. This is a protein/RNA complex with large and small subunits
b. This can be found floating free in the cytoplasm or attached to the Rough ER
c. This is the site of protein synthesis
d. This organelle is found in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes
e. Translation begins when mRNA and tRNA attach to this
14. Codon
a. This is a set of 3 nucleotides on mRNA
b. We can make 64 of these
c. 61 of these code for amino acids
d. 3 of these code for “stops”
15. Anti-codon
a. This is a set of 3 nucleotides on tRNA
b. If mRNA reads AUG, this will read UAC
c. This forms hydrogen bonds with mRNA in the ribosome
16. Start Codon
a. This always reads: AUG
b. This begins every polypeptide chain
c. This codes for methionine
d. If a missense mutation occurs in this codon, the protein will never be translated
17. Stop Codon
a. UAG, UAA, and UGA are the only 3 types of these
b. 3 of these exist in the genetic code
c. A nonsense mutation creates a premature one of these
d. This ends translation
e. This does not code for an amino acid
18. Semiconservative
a. One new strand pairs with one old strand
b. A portion of this word means “partially”
c. This is a term used to describe DNA replication
19. Mutation
a. A change in the DNA sequence
b. Can be a single nucleotide or a large chromosomal change to the DNA
c. Silent, missense, and nonsense are examples of these
20. Silent
a. This is a type of substitution mutation which does not change the amino acid sequence
b. This type of substitution mutation is not shown on the genetic level
c. This type of substitution mutation is a result of the redundancy of the genetic code (“wobble”
hypothesis)
21. Missense
a. This type of substitution mutation changes a single amino acid
b. Sickle cell anemia is an example of this type of substitution mutation
c. This type of substitution mutation produces a change in a protein, but does not produce a
frame shift mutation
22. Nonsense
a. This substitution mutation produces a stop codon
b. This type of substitution mutation will produce a shortened/truncated protein
c. This type of substitution mutation prevents any other amino acids from being added after the
location where the mutation occurs.
23. Substitution
a. This mutation occurs when one DNA nucleotide is exchanged for another.
b. An example of this type of mutation is A becoming G
c. This type of mutation can produce a silent, missense, or nonsense mutation
d. This type of mutation can commonly occur because it does not alter the number of nucleotides in a sequence
24. Deletion
a. This mutation removes a nucleotide from a DNA sequence
b. This mutation will make the DNA sequence and RNA sequence shorter than the original
c. CATCATCATCAT turns to CATATCATCAT (write on the board)
25. Addition
a. This mutation inserts a nucleotide into a DNA sequence
b. This mutation will make the DNA sequence and RNA sequence longer than the original
c. CATCATCATCAT turns to CATCATTCATCAT (write on the board)
26. Frame shift
a. This type of mutation occurs because of an addition or deletion mutation
b. This type of mutation changes all other amino acids that come after it
c. This mutation causes a shift in the “reading frame”
27. Inversion
a. This is a chromosomal mutation where a portion of the chromosome is flipped upside down
b. This is a chromosomal mutation which keeps the genetic information involved in the mutation
on the same chromosome
c. *Draw this mutation on the board
28. Translocation
a. This is a chromosomal mutation in which portions of 2 different chromosomes switch places
b. Philadelphia chromosome, which is involved in leukemia is an example of this type of chromosomal mutation
c. Crossing over during meiosis is a desired form of this type of mutation, occurring between homologous pairs
c. *Draw this mutation on the board
29. RNA Polymerase
a. This enzyme is used in Transcription
b. This enzyme creates a polymer of RNA
c. This enzyme both opens the double helix and creates a nucleic acid polymer
d. This enzyme is the only enzyme used in Transcription
e. This enzyme attaches A’s on DNA to U’s on RNA
30. Chargaff
a. This person came up with: A=T, G=C
b. This American biochemist discovered a quantity pattern in the DNA
c. This individual came up with a rule named after him
d. Watson and Crick’s structure supports this person’s findings
31. Watson & Crick
a. Created the first 3D model of the DNA double-helix
b. Won the Nobel Prize in Science for their work
c. This pair of individuals used Rosalind Franklin’s X-ray crystallography image to support their
work
d. Came up with base pairing rules
32. Hershey & Chase
a. Determined that DNA was our genetic code
b. Worked with bacteriophage in their experiments
c. Used their understanding of NCHOPS for their research.
d. Discovered that DNA was what determined genes
33. Nucleotide
a. A monomer of nucleic acids
b. Made of a pentose sugar, phosphate group, and nitrogenous base
c. Guanine and Cytosine are examples of these
d. These join together to form either RNA or DNA
34. Hydrogen bonds
a. These are what give water its many properties
b. These hold the double helix strands together in DNA
c. These are formed between codons and anti-codons in ribosomes
d. These are weak bonds broken by Helicase
35. Purine
a. Adenine is an example of this category of nucleotides
b. Guanine is an example of this category of nucleotides
c. This type of nucleotide has a longer base
d. This is the opposite of a pyrimidine
36. Pyrimidine
a. Cytosine is an example of this category of nucleotides
b. This type of nucleotide has a shorter base
c. Thymine is an example of this category of nucleotides
d. This is the opposite of a purine
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