Welcome to APEH!!! Prior to this school year students will... Advanced Placement European History (APEH) Summer Assignment 2015

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Advanced Placement European History (APEH)
Summer Assignment 2015
Instructor: Maude Stearns-Droker – [email protected]
Welcome to APEH!!! Prior to this school year students will need to prepare themselves for work comparable to collegelevel rigor in terms of reading, writing, and learning! To assist you with preparing for APEH, students will be required to
do the following assignments. These assignments will be due on the first class day and included in the homework grade
for the first semester.
Directions/Assignments:
1. Purchase a three-ring binder (1.5” recommended minimum), tab dividers, and a spiral or composition notebook.
2. Read chapter 11 from A History of Western Society. Handwrite detailed outline notes for the first chapter of our
textbook using the Chapter Preview Questions that are provided on page 323. You may use “Cornell” note taking
or “Outline” note taking strategies. These notes will be graded for completeness and will count as a homework
grade. Be thorough! Write legibly! Your notes must be handwritten and there must be one set for each chapter.
Make sure you answer the questions after the Primary Sources and Map Questions that accompany the chapters.
(See attached samples).
3. Purchase a copy of The Prince, by Machiavelli. It is readily available at Barnes and Noble and Amazon. There
are also online versions if you chose not to purchase it. However, having your own copy will allow you to
highlight and write notes as you read. Answer the attached questions using the correct format.
4. Complete the attached maps. (2)
5. You will be tested on this information during the first week(s) of school. The test will include multiple choice
and short answer questions and map identification.
If you have any questions over the summer about these assignments, please do not hesitate to get in touch with one of us
via email: [email protected]
Have a great summer and see you in September.
Maude Stearns-Droker
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Sample “Outline” Note-Taking
Topic: Chapter 11: The Latter Middle Ages
I.
Student Name
Date
APEH Per.
Prelude to disaster – climate change shapes the late Middle Ages
A. Climate change and famine
1.
“little ice age”, 1300-1450, follows a period of warmer than usual weather (1000-1300)
2.
storms ruin wheat, oat and hay crops which are needed for people and animals
a.
Great Famine – 1315-1322
b.
non-famine years see high prices due to diseases that hit cattle and sheep
c.
fewer calories leads to increased susceptibility to disease and less energy which
reflected on productivity. (↓productivity =↓output =↑prices)
B. Social consequences
1.
Abandonment of homesteads
a.
Scottish-English borderlands – vagabonds
b.
Flanders and eastern England – mortgage, sublease or sell holdings to richer farmers
2.
Population decline
a.
death from famine and disease
b.
young people move to cities and delay marriage
3.
Violence towards rich, Jews, and lepers
4.
Impact on trading partners – disease in English sheep affects wool weaving in Flanders and
trade with Italy
5.
Government response is ineffective
a.
France – speculators condemned and sale of grain abroad prohibited
b.
England – speculators condemned and attempt to purchase foreign grain (looted
and sold on black market)
2
Sample “Cornell” Note-Taking
Topic: Chapter 11: The Latter Middle Ages
Important Points:
Key Concept 11.1 –
Explain how climate
change shaped the late
Middle Ages
Student Name
Date
APEH Per.
Notes and Questions:













“little ice age” (1300-1450), follows a period of warmer than usual weather
(1000-1300)
storms ruin wheat, oat and hay crops which are needed for people and
animals
Great Famine – 1315-1322
non-famine years see high prices due to diseases that hit cattle and sheep
fewer calories leads to increased susceptibility to disease and less energy
which reflected on productivity. (↓productivity =↓output =↑prices)
Abandonment of homesteads
Scottish-English borderlands – vagabonds
Flanders and eastern England – mortgage, sublease or sell holdings to richer
farmers
death from famine and disease decreases population
young people move to cities and delay marriage decreases population
Violence towards rich, Jews, and lepers
Trade with foreign countries is disrupted - disease in English sheep affects
wool weaving in Flanders and trade with Italy
Government response is ineffective
Key Concept 11.2 –
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Important Points:
Notes and Questions:
Vocabulary:
Summary of Topic:
Great Famine
Black Death
Hundred Years’ War
representative
assemblies
Babylonian Captivity
Great Schism
conciliarists
confraternities
Jacquerie
English Peasants’
Revolt
Statue of Kilkenny
Summary of chapter is written here
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Student Name
Date
APEH Per.
The Prince
Directions: Read The Prince, by Machiavelli and answer the following questions. Your paper must be typed. Use
standard margins and font.
The Prince
Niccolo Machiavelli
Study Questions – Answer in complete sentences.
Chapters 1-11
1. Why is a hereditary princedom easier to maintain that a new princedom?
2. What qualities of a republic make it difficult to hold?
3. For what reasons is rebellion common in mixed princedoms? What steps can a new prince take to maintain order?
4. In what sense is an ecclesiastical princedom the easiest to maintain but the most difficult to obtain?
5. How does fortune contribute to a prince’s greatness?
Chapters 12-14
6. What is the difference between an auxiliary army, mercenaries and national arms?
7. Why is a mixed army better than one comprised of mercenaries, but not as good as a national army?
8. List the qualities a prince must develop within himself to become a “master of the art of war.”
9. What do you think Machiavelli is trying to persuade Lorenzo de Medici to do as ruler of Italy?
Chapters 15-23
10. For what reasons must a prince learn to “use or not use his goodness as necessity requires?”
11. Why does Machiavelli believe that a prince who is miserly is better loved by his people than one who is liberal?
12. When is it acceptable for a prince to take the property of others? How can he avoid being hated but still be feared
by his people?
13. What is a prince’s best defense against assassination by his subjects?
14. When is a fortress useful for a prince? What is his greatest fortress against the aggression of a foreign power?
15. Why is it important for a prince to be decisive and take sides in a conflict? What advice does Machiavelli offer
him when selected his allies?
16. Define a “good minister” according to Machiavelli.
17. Why is it ironic that Machiavelli advises a new prince to avoid surrounding himself by men who flatter him?
Chapters 24-26
18. How can a prince use his “free will” to protect himself against bad fortune?
19. Why do you think Machiavelli is encouraging a prince to be bold and decisive?
20. Do you think Machiavelli is more interested, at the end of The Prince, in helping himself, helping Italy or helping
Lorenzo de Medici?
Quotes – Find and copy 5 quotes that you find particularly inspiring. Write a brief analysis explaining the meaning and
why you chose the quote.
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Maps
Directions: Maps should be neatly labeled and colored. Some physical features may need to be drawn in. There are
many maps in our textbook, or you may use online resources, such as d-maps.com. (There will be a map test within the
first 2 weeks of school.)
1. Modern Europe
Countries
Albania
Algeria
Austria
Belgium
Belarus
Bosnia& Herzegovina
Bulgaria
Croatia
Czech Republic
Denmark
Estonia
Germany
Finland
France
Great Britain (England, Northern Ireland, Scotland& Wales)
Greece
Hungary
Iceland
Ireland
Italy
Latvia
Lithuania
Luxemburg
Macedonia
Moldova
Morocco
Netherlands
Norway
Poland
Portugal
Romania
Russia
Serbia& Montenegro
Slovakia
Slovenia
Spain
Sweden
Switzerland
Tunisia
Turkey
Ukraine
BODIES OF WATER
Adriatic Sea
Aegean Sea
Atlantic Ocean
Baltic Sea
Barents Sea
Black Sea
Caspian Sea
Dardanelles (straits)
Straits of Gibraltar
Mediterranean Sea
North Sea
White Sea
ISLANDS
Corsica
Crete
Elba
Gibraltar
Malta
Sardinia
Sicily
RIVERS
Danube
Elbe
Loire
Marne
Rhine
Rhône
Seine
Thames
MOUNTAINS
Alps
Apennines
Caucasus
Pyrenees
Urals
CITIES
Algiers
Amsterdam
Avignon
Belfast
Belgrade
Berlin
Brussels
Budapest
Dublin
Florence
Frankfurt
Geneva
Genoa
The Hague
Helsinki
Istanbul
Lisbon
Liverpool
London
Madrid
Manchester
Paris
Prague
Rome
Sarajevo
St. Petersburg
Trieste
Tunis
Venice
Vienna
Warsaw
Zagreb
2. Renaissance Italy About 1494 – Use your book, p. 361, to identify and label the city-states and bordering areas.
Color the map to reflect the political borders.
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