EMPLOYMENT SUPPORT Provide workplace orientation and training and ongoing employment support

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20037
28-Jun-16
1 of 12
EMPLOYMENT SUPPORT
Provide workplace orientation and
training and ongoing employment
support
level:
6
credit:
15
planned review date:
June 2005
sub-field:
Social Services
purpose:
People credited with this unit standard are able to: explain
strategies for establishing and maintaining effective
employment support for service users on the job; develop
and implement individualised employment support plans with
service users; and evaluate the effectiveness of the
individualised employment support plans for service users.
entry information:
Open.
accreditation option:
Evaluation of documentation and visit by NZQA, industry and
teaching professional in the same field from another
provider.
moderation option:
A centrally established and directed national moderation
system has been set up by Community Support Services ITO
Limited (Careerforce).
special notes:
1
People awarded credit in this unit standard are able to
implement Te Tiriti o Waitangi in the social services
according to the authority and resources available to
them, and are able to demonstrate application of this
competence to the context of assessment for this unit
standard (for further clarification, please refer to Unit
7928, Implement Te Tiriti o Waitangi in the social
services).
 New Zealand Qualifications Authority 2016
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EMPLOYMENT SUPPORT
Provide workplace orientation and
training and ongoing employment
support
2
Characteristics and needs of service users may be
physical, emotional, psychological, spiritual, social,
economic, or political. Characteristics and needs may
include but are not limited to: age and stage of
development, culture, disability, gender, health status,
language, sexual orientation, and needs for physical
comfort, safety, and privacy.
3
The following apply to the performance of all elements
of this unit standard:
a
All activities must comply with service provider
guidelines, protocols, staff manuals, strategic
plans, kawa, or tikanga.
b
All activities must comply with relevant cultural,
legislative, and regulatory requirements, which
include but are not limited to: Code of Health and
Disability Services Consumers’ Rights 1996; NZS
8134:2001, Health and Disability Sector
Standards; Health and Disability Services (Safety)
Act 2001; Health and Safety in Employment Act
1992; Human Rights Act 1993; Official Information
Act 1982; Privacy Act 1993.
4
All communications are treated confidentially. The
scope and limits of confidentiality are defined through
negotiation and informed consent, and criteria
established by legislation, ethical practice, and service
provider guidelines. In the context of this unit standard,
sources of criteria established by legislation, ethical
practice, and service provider guidelines include but are
not limited to: Official Information Act 1982, Privacy Act
1993, service provider codes of conduct, codes of
practice issued by the Privacy Commissioner, social
service codes of ethics, and service provider guidelines,
protocols, staff manuals, strategic plans, kawa, or
tikanga.
 New Zealand Qualifications Authority 2016
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EMPLOYMENT SUPPORT
Provide workplace orientation and
training and ongoing employment
support
5
Social policy and legislative and regulatory
requirements may include but are not limited to:
Minister for Disability Issues. April 2001. The New
Zealand disability strategy: Making a world of
difference: Whakanui oranga. Wellington: Ministry of
Health;
Department of Labour. September 2001. Pathways to
inclusion: Ngā ara whakauru ki te iwi whānui: Improving
vocational services for people with disabilities.
Wellington: Department of Labour;
Department of Social Welfare. 1990. Vocational
Opportunities Support Programme: Issues, policy, plan.
Wellington: Department of Social Welfare;
accident compensation legislation, including the
Accident Compensation Act 1982 and the Injury
Prevention, Rehabilitation, and Compensation Act
2001;
Code of Health and Disability Services Consumers’
Rights 1996;
Disabled Persons Community Welfare Act 1975;
Disabled Persons Employment Promotion Act 1960;
Education Act 1989;
Employment Relations Act 2000;
Health and Disability Services Act 1993;
Health and Disability Services (Safety) Act 2001;
Health and Safety in Employment Act 1992;
Human Rights Act 1993, Industrial Relations Act 1973;
Minimum Wages Act 1983;
Privacy Act 1993;
Public Health and Disability Act 2000;
State Sector Act 1988 (and associated Equal
Employment Opportunity EEO strategies);
New Zealand Standard (NZS) 8134:2001 Health and
Disability Sector Standards: Te Awarua o te Hauora,
available from Standards NZ - Paerewa Aotearoa:
Wellington.
 New Zealand Qualifications Authority 2016
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EMPLOYMENT SUPPORT
Provide workplace orientation and
training and ongoing employment
support
6
This unit standard cannot be assessed in a simulated
environment. It is required that people seeking credit
for this unit standard will demonstrate competence and
be assessed in the workplace. This can be through
paid or unpaid employment, or in placements in a
service provider workplace negotiated by an education
provider. An ability to integrate theory with practice in
the workplace must be demonstrated. This will call for
a variety of modes of assessment and forms of
evidence. Evidence is required to show consistency of
performance across a range of situations and to
demonstrate knowledge, understanding, and skill in the
principles and practices directly relating to the
competent performance of the elements to the standard
defined in the performance criteria.
7
The candidate is required to take all necessary steps to
ensure the safety and self determination of the disabled
people to whom they are offering employment support.
These measures are in accordance with criteria
established by legislation, ethical practice, and service
provider guidelines.
8
People seeking award of credit for this unit standard
must show that their actions are guided and supported
by valid theory for practice in employment support.
Evidence is required of theory that is derived from
authoritative sources, which may include but are not
limited to: the body of knowledge related to employment
support work; social service work; cultural theory; or
practice research.
 New Zealand Qualifications Authority 2016
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EMPLOYMENT SUPPORT
Provide workplace orientation and
training and ongoing employment
support
9
Resources related to workplace orientation and training,
and ongoing employment support may include but are
not limited to:
a
The Association for Supported Employment in
New Zealand (ASENZ). 1999. Second edition. A
framework for quality: Quality assurance for
supported employment services in New Zealand.
Palmerston North: ASENZ.
b
Callahan, J.; Bradley Garner, J. 1997. Keys to
the workplace: Skills and supports for people with
disabilities. Baltimore, Md.: Paul H. Brookes Pub.
c
DiLeo, D.; Langton, D. 1996. Facing the future:
Best practices in supported employment.
St
Augustine, Florida: Training Resource Network
Inc.
d
Smith, B. 1991. Managing disability at work:
Improving practice in organisations.
London:
Jessica Kinsley Publications.
e
Wehman, P.; Sherron, P. 1995. Off to work: A
vocational curriculum for people with disabilities.
New York: Programme Development Associates.
10
Resources related to individualised support plans may
include but are not limited to:
a
Ford, Laurie Howton.
1995.
Providing
employment support for people with long-term
mental illness: Choices, resources, and practical
strategies. Baltimore, Md.: Paul H. Brookes Pub.
p. 193-198.
b
Moon, M. Sherril and others. 1990. Helping
persons with severe mental retardation get and
keep employment.
Baltimore, Md.: Paul H.
Brookes Pub. p. 103-128.
 New Zealand Qualifications Authority 2016
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EMPLOYMENT SUPPORT
Provide workplace orientation and
training and ongoing employment
support
11
Resources related to instructional strategies may
include but are not limited to:
a
DiLeo, Dale. 2001. Developing instructional plans
to help supported employees learn their jobs. St
Augustine, Florida: Training Resource Network
Inc.
b
Ford, Laurie Howton.
1995.
Providing
employment support for people with long-term
mental illness: Choices, resources, and practical
strategies. Baltimore, Md.: Paul H. Brookes Pub.
p. 199-225.
c
Moon, M. Sherril and others. 1990. Helping
persons with severe mental retardation get and
keep employment.
Baltimore, Md.: Paul H.
Brookes Pub. p. 129-158.
d
Test, David W.; Wood, Wendy M. 1997. Rocket
Science 101: What supported employment
specialists need to know about systematic
instruction.
In
Journal
of
Vocational
Rehabilitation, v9: p. 109-120.
12
Resources related to support strategies may include but
are not limited to:
a
Hagner, David; DiLeo, Dale. 1993. Working
together:
Workplace
culture,
supported
employment and persons with disabilities.
Cambridge, USA: Brookline Books. p. 19-45, 148175.
b
Inge, Katherine J.; Tilson, George P. 1997.
Ensuring support systems that work: Getting
beyond the natural supports versus job coach
controversy.
In Journal of Vocational
Rehabilitation, v9: p. 133-142.
c
Moon, M. Sherril and others. 1990. Helping
persons with severe mental retardation get and
keep employment.
Baltimore, Md.: Paul H.
Brookes Pub. p. 105, 108-110.
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EMPLOYMENT SUPPORT
Provide workplace orientation and
training and ongoing employment
support
13
Resources related to effective support strategies may
include but are not limited to:
a
Ford, Laurie Howton.
1995.
Providing
employment support for people with long-term
mental illness: Choices, resources, and practical
strategies. Baltimore, Md.: Paul H. Brookes Pub.
p. 253-265.
b
Hagner, David; DiLeo, Dale. 1993. Working
together:
Workplace
culture,
supported
employment and persons with disabilities.
Cambridge, USA: Brookline Books. p. 207-235.
c
Hagner, David C. 1996. Natural supports on trial:
Day 2799? In Journal of the Association for
Persons with Severe Handicaps, v21(4): p. 181184.
d
Rusch, Frank R.; Hughes, Carolyn. 1996. Natural
supports: Who benefits - 'we' or 'they'?. In Journal
of the Association for Persons with Severe
Handicap, v21(4): p. 185-188.
e
Steere, Daniel E.; Cavanagh, Diane P. 1997.
Assessing the impact of systematic instruction:
dimensions of success. In Journal of Vocational
Rehabilitation, v9: p. 121-131.
f
Test, David W.; Wood, Wendy M. 1996. Natural
supports in the workplace: The jury is still out. In
Journal of the Association for Persons with Severe
Handicap, v21(4): p. 155-173.
g
Test, David W; Wood, Wendy M. 1996. Some
additional thoughts about supported employment
using natural supports.
In Journal of the
Association for Persons with Severe Handicaps,
v21(4): p. 189-193.
 New Zealand Qualifications Authority 2016
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EMPLOYMENT SUPPORT
Provide workplace orientation and
training and ongoing employment
support
Elements and Performance Criteria
element 1
Explain strategies for establishing and maintaining effective employment support for
service users on the job.
performance criteria
1.1
Strategies for workplace orientation and training and ongoing employment
support are explained.
Range:
1.2
The principles of systematic instructional strategies are identified and explained
in how they assist people with learning difficulties.
Range:
1.3
evidence is required of five strategies.
principles of systematic instructional strategies include but are not
limited to - chaining, errorless learning, fading, prompts,
reinforcement, shaping, task analysis, self management.
Methods for engaging and including co-workers in support strategies are
explained.
Range:
evidence is required of two methods for engaging and including
co-workers, and five co-worker support strategies.
1.4
The primary roles, functions, and relationships that need to be managed for
ongoing support are explained.
1.5
The origin and rationale for the concept of natural supports is explained, and
examples of natural supports are provided.
Range:
evidence is required of three natural supports and their rationale.
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EMPLOYMENT SUPPORT
Provide workplace orientation and
training and ongoing employment
support
1.6
The role and function of service co-ordination is explained and examples are
provided of inter-agency liaison for two service users.
1.7
The role and function of ongoing partnerships with employers is explained and
examples are provided of two partnerships between employers and
employment support service providers.
element 2
Develop and implement individualised employment support plans with service users.
Range:
evidence is required of individualised employment support plans for two
contrasting service users, linked to established career development plans and
job development processes.
performance criteria
2.1
The methods and skills used to develop the individualised employment support
plans are matched to the characteristics and needs of the service users.
2.2
The plans are developed in collaboration with the service users and are
consistent with their goals and employment aspirations.
2.3
The plans are developed in collaboration with people who are significant to the
service users and the workplace.
Range:
people who are significant to the service users and the workplace
may include but are not limited to - family or whānau; employer;
co-workers; others who will be engaged in providing employment
support; support people.
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EMPLOYMENT SUPPORT
Provide workplace orientation and
training and ongoing employment
support
2.4
The plans are developed in accordance with significant factors in the situation.
Range:
significant factors in the situation include but are not limited to characteristics and needs of the service users; skills of the service
users; resource issues related to the goals and aspirations of the
service users; family or whānau and wider social system of the
service users; safety of the service user; the requirements of the
employment opportunities and workplace circumstances.
2.5
The plans incorporate strategies for workplace orientation and training and
ongoing support.
2.6
The plans are implemented in collaboration with the service users and people of
significance to the service users and workplace.
Range:
people who are significant to the service users and the workplace
may include but are not limited to - family or whānau; employer;
co-workers; others who will be engaged in providing employment
support; support people.
2.7
Arrangements for ongoing support, natural supports, service co-ordination, and
employer partnerships are implemented in accordance with the plans.
2.8
The plans are implemented in accordance with social policy and legislative and
regulatory requirements.
Range:
evidence is required of compliance with three of - social policy and
legislative and regulatory requirements applicable in the workplace
that is the context of assessment of the candidate.
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EMPLOYMENT SUPPORT
Provide workplace orientation and
training and ongoing employment
support
element 3
Evaluate the effectiveness of the individualised employment support plans for service
users.
Range:
evidence is required of evaluation of individualised employment support plans
for two contrasting service users.
performance criteria
3.1
Information is gathered for the evaluation process from all people involved in
developing and implementing the plans.
Range:
all people involved in developing and implementing the plans service users; family or whānau; employers; co-workers; others
who were engaged in providing employment support; support
people.
3.2
Information gathered is in accordance with the perspectives, goals, and
aspirations of the service users.
3.3
The evaluation process is matched to the characteristics and needs of the
service user and others involved in developing and implementing the plans.
3.4
The evaluation measures the outcomes of the individualised employment
support plans against the goals that were set for the plans.
Comments on this unit standard
Please contact the Community Support Services ITO Limited (Careerforce)
[email protected] if you wish to suggest changes to the content of this unit
standard.
Please Note
Providers must be accredited by the Qualifications Authority or a delegated interinstitutional body before they can register credits from assessment against unit standards
or deliver courses of study leading to that assessment.
Industry Training Organisations must be accredited by the Qualifications Authority before
they can register credits from assessment against unit standards.
 New Zealand Qualifications Authority 2016
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EMPLOYMENT SUPPORT
Provide workplace orientation and
training and ongoing employment
support
Accredited providers and Industry Training Organisations assessing against unit standards
must engage with the moderation system that applies to those standards.
Accreditation requirements and an outline of the moderation system that applies to this
standard are outlined in the Accreditation and Moderation Action Plan (AMAP). The
AMAP also includes useful information about special requirements for providers wishing to
develop education and training programmes, such as minimum qualifications for tutors and
assessors, and special resource requirements.
This unit standard is covered by AMAP 0222
http://www.nzqa.govt.nz/framework/search/index.do.
which can
be
accessed at
 New Zealand Qualifications Authority 2016
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