Passover or Track Parkfest? and Field

advertisement
CELEBRATING 100 YEARS
1916—2016
Passover or
Parkfest?
PAGE 4
Track
and Field
celebrates
seniors
PAGE 10
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
TUESDAY, APRIL 26, 2016
ISSUE 23
ALBANYSTUDENTPRESS.NET
ON CAMPUS
LIMITED PARKFEST TIX PROMPTS CHANGES
By ILENE ROTHMAN
After a struggle to obtain tickets to this
year’s Parkfest, some students are demanding a change to the system.
The first 500 tickets to the spring concert
were distributed to students during the
Cultural Carnival on April 17 and the following days of ticket distribution resulted in
students skipping class and work to line up
ALUMNI
as early as 6:30 a.m.
On Monday, April 18, the first day of
ticket distribution, the overwhelmed Student
Association shut down further sales after being mobbed by the student body. To release
their anger and frustration with the distribution, students took to social media.
In a post on Facebook, sophomore
environmental science major Madison
Corbeil said, “I am a dedicated student
and also hold a part time job. I should be
rewarded for working hard, NOT penalized
for going to class. Instead, I am excluded
from the main spring social event because
I can’t afford to skip all of my classes and
spend hours waiting in line.”
Donavan Swanson, director of Programming for SA and a senior public administration major, immediately reached out to
students and provided his email address to
those who wanted to voice their concerns.
One of the foremost complaints among
students is that Parkfest ticket sales are not
online. The University at Buffalo had its
SpringFest tickets available for purchase
through Ticketmaster.
Swanson has addressed this issue and
said online ticket sales will be available next
Please see PARKFEST page 3
PODIATING
PARKING
Discrimination
in the sharing
economy
Better
technology,
fewer
tickets
By RYAN MAESTRE
The growing popularity of the online lodging
service Airbnb has changed
the way people list, find and
rent overnight residency,
but according to a study
conducted by University at
Albany alumnus Michael
Luca, the increase in online
anonymity may leave more
room for discrimination.
Luca returned to campus
on Thursday, April 22 to
speak about the research
that he and his coworkers,
Dan Svirsky and Benjamin
Edelman, have conducted
about discrimination
through Airbnb. Luca and
his team created 6,400
accounts looking to rent
homes in Washington, D.C.,
Los Angeles, Baltimore,
Dallas and St. Louis, with
each account named under
stereotypical white and
black names.
The experiment aimed to
see how the rental experience of an individual with
a stereotypical black name
would compare with the
renting success of someone with a stereotypically
white name, and the results
showed that there were high
levels of discrimination
against black guests from
both white and black hosts.
Under the study, the
created accounts with
black-sounding names, such
as Jermaine and Tyrone,
were accepted 15 percent
less often than those with
white-sounding names, like
Allison and Brad.
UAlbany students that
are users of Airbnb said the
results of Luca’s study are
revealing.
“This is eye-opening,”
said Whitney Martuscello,
a junior studying social
welfare. “That’s not fair at
all. I’d be pretty upset too if
I were discriminated against
just because of my name.”
Both Martuscello and her
friends use Airbnb.
Graduating with a bachelor’s degree in economics
and mathematics in 2002,
Luca’s choice to focus on
race in Airbnb was based on
its “fantastic example of an
online marketplace.” Luca
said that since the website
lets users see the race of
hosts that were anonymously participating in the
study, the results are more
accurate than a website that
does not allow the host or
Please see ALUM page 8
By JHOANNA HARO
Brandon Maxwell / Albany Student Press
Great Danes welcome return of fountain
While there’s no longer a Fountain Day, Great Danes are still taking advantage of the spring sunshine and cool
water before finals approach.
Aleks Siemenn, a freshman environmental science
major, and Alan Dee, a sophomore accounting major,
lounge under the sun in front of the business school.
Alejandro Alvarez, Morgan Lorenz and Val Paulino sit
at the central fountain’s edge soaking their feet in the
water. “Suns out, guns out,” Paulino said.
New technology in the
University at Albany’s
Parking and Mass Transit
Office is intended to help
students avoid parking tickets and improve customer
service, according to the
parking director.
“At least two pictures of
the citation will be downloaded into the computer
through a ticketing machine
which can help for the appeal process giving visual
evidence,” said Jason Jones,
parking director at UAlbany.
Various payment
methods like meters, online
visitor passes as well as
physical passes that are sold
at the parking office, and
pay and display machines in
SEFCU are also available.
“We are moving toward
mobile pay technology to
replace meters. LPR systems are plate recognition
that speeds up seven times
the job for the enforcers,”
Jones said.
One of the many ways
Mass Transit is trying to
help students from receiving tickets is upgrading the
signs in the Colonial Quad
parking lot, where many
tickets are given out.
According to Jones,
they plan on changing the
stripes to white and yellow
Please see PMT page 8
HEALTH
Campus asbestos removal may take decades
By JANIE FRANK
The abatement of asbestos in the
Campus Center at the University at
Albany is complete.
However, asbestos removal
across the entire campus will not
be complete for at least another 10
years, according to Kerry Csontos,
who is in charge of coordinating
campus-wide asbestos removal.
The asbestos removal on campus
began more than 10 years ago,
according to John Giarrusso,
associate vice president of Finance
& Administration for Facilities
Management.
The Campus Center abatement
did not begin until the summer of
2014.
“We on campus, like everyone
in the country, are regulated
for asbestos removal when it is
disturbed,” Giarrusso said. “When
the oversight and attention started,
I’m not sure… We’ve been
dealing with it on every project for
decades.”
Abatement became a concern
in the 1970s when organizations
such as the U.S. Environmental
Protection Agency, and the New
York State Departments of Health
and Labor began to regulate it.
Stephen Pearse, executive
director of University Auxiliary
Services, said this is normal for
most buildings built between the
1950s and ‘70s.
“Most of this campus was
built in the late ‘60s,” Pearse
said. “Asbestos was a miracle
substance back in the ‘60s and it
appeared in so many of the building
components: floor tile, wall siding,
mastics and caulk.”
In the Campus Center at
UAlbany, much of the Asbestos
Containing Materials (ACM) were
in the glue used to hold down floor
tiles, according to Csontos. There
was also asbestos present in thermal
duct insulations and exhausts ducts.
Other SUNY schools have
similar asbestos removal projects.
The University at Buffalo has been
dealing with abatement products
since at least 2005, according to
The Spectrum, UBuffalo’s student
newspaper. SUNY Oswego has had
projects involving asbestos removal
since at least 2007, according to
WTOP News 10. SUNY Canton,
Binghamton University, and SUNY
Geneseo also reference abatement
on their websites.
“Asbestos removal is a highly
regulated and rather routine part
of virtually any significant work
we do to alter or upgrade original
PRINTED BY THE TIMES UNION, ALBANY, NEW YORK — A HEARST CORPORATION NEWSPAPER
Please see CC page 3
2
NEWS
EDITOR: KASSIE PARISI
[email protected]
TUESDAY, APRIL 26, 2016
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
FIGHT FOR FIFTEEN
Citizen Action’s campaign for minimum wage increase
Kimari Hazward / Albany Student Press
People gather on South Pearl Street to rally for a $15 minimum wage. Some hold signs saying #faithfor15.
By JULIAN ALBAN
Workers in the Capital
Region rallied together on
April 15 with Citizen Action of
New York at two McDonald’s
restaurants to protest for a $15
statewide minimum wage.
The first rally began at 8
a.m. at the Hoosick Street
McDonald’s in Troy. Another
followed at the McDonald’s on
South Pearl Street in Albany at
5 p.m.
These rallies came just two
weeks after the release of the
2016-2017 New York State
Budget announced a minimum
wage raise to $15 an hour by
2018 for parts of the state.
Mark Emanation, the
community organizer for
Citizen Action, has spent the
last five years actively pushing
for a minimum wage increase.
“We’ve been working
for several years now to get
the Legislature to raise the
minimum wage…and this year
we were successful in getting
some of it done,” Emanation
said. “New York City got $15
by 2018, Westchester County
and Long Island by 2019.”
Upstate exclusion
Despite these victories,
however, it seems as though
the rest of the state might have
been left out.
Upstate New York will raise
its hourly minimum wage to
$12.50 by 2020.
Emanation is not alone in
his dissatisfaction with the
significantly slower increase of
minimum wage upstate.
“It shouldn’t take graduation
into it, it should take effect
now,” said Jacque Jordan,
a McDonald’s employee of
seven years. “There’s no
reason they [McDonald’s
CEOs] can’t do it, they have
the money.”
Jordan is frustrated with her
current living situation, which
is all she can afford with her
wages.
“I live in a hotel, I pay $250
a week and my paychecks are
$189 to $199 a week so I have
to beg and borrow every week
to make ends meet, which is no
way to live,” she said.
Raising children on fast-food
wages
The rally also had several
strollers scattered around
the location. According to a
2015 Fiscal Policy Institute
testimony, 26 percent of fastfood employees have one or
more children.
A similar study conducted
in 2013 by the UC-Berkley
Center for Labor Research
and Education, along
with University of Illinois
at Urbana-Champaign
Department of Urban &
Regional Planning, found
that 20 percent of fast-food
employees have family
incomes below the federal
poverty line with 23 percent in
a “near poverty” status. This
is defined as having an overall
income between 100 to 200
percent of the federal poverty
line.
“I have kids to worry about
and I need the union and I
need benefits,” said Elizabeth
Ritchie, an employee at Moe’s
Southwest Grill.
“When you give people
who are living in poverty
more money, they spend more
money immediately. That is
actually an economic driver
and that increases demand
locally and helps build new
business and new jobs,” he
said.
William “Bill” Ritchie,
president of the Albany
Federation of Labor, had a
similar view to Paparonne.
He believes that an increase
in minimum wage among
fast-food employees would
increase demand and allow
employees to “spend their
money immediately at places
like McDonald’s.”
“As far as I’m concerned,
if the price of a Big Mac
has to be increased by 10 or
20 cents so that people can
have reasonable existences
as workers, then I am for it,”
Ritchie said.
Concerns for raising the
minimum wage
The Next Steps
Critics of raising the
minimum wage have predicted
an increase in product prices,
layoffs to compensate for
high labor costs, and the risk
of businesses closing, but
proponent Joseph Paparonne of
FOCUS Churches of Albany
disagreed.
“The arguments against
raising the minimum wage
have been the same since the
minimum wage was instituted
and they’ve always been
wrong,” he said.
FOCUS Churches of Albany
hosts a number of food pantries
and soup kitchens throughout
Albany, and Paparonne often
sees low wage workers at their
doors.
While the future of the
Fight for 15 in upstate remains
unclear, protestors at Friday’s
rally remained optimistic.
According to Emanation,
Citizen Action, with the help
of local unions and churches,
was able to find Jordan an
apartment that she’ll move into
at the end of the month.
“We’re gonna go back and
continue to fight over there.
Build rallies, get new people
elected, if they don’t want to
vote for it get rid of them and,
and that’s what I think about,
it’s important to keep this out
here,” said Emanation.
CRIME BLOTTER
CRIMINAL
POSSESSION
CONTROLLED
SUBSTANCE
4/15/2016
University Drive East
Report of a female
student with marijuana
brownies. An arrest was
made.
OPERATING MOTOR
VEHCILE IMPAIRED BY
DRUGS
4/16/2016
University East Drive
Report of a male subject
driving with a suspended
out of state license,
driving while intoxicated
and in the possession of
marijuana. An arrest was
made.
TAKE INCAPACITATED
PERSON FOR
EMERGENCY
TREATMENT
4/16/2016
Empire Commons- B
Cluster
Report of an
intoxicated male
student, unconscious.
Transported to hospital
by 5 Quad. A referral
was made.
POSSESSION FORGED
INSTRUMENT
4/16/2016
State Quad- Cooper Hall
Report of two female
students in possession
of marihuana, marihuana
paraphernalia and forged
licenses. A referral was
made for the same.
FALSE REPORT
FIRE EXPLOSION
OR HAZARDOUS
SUBSTANCE OF
PROTECTION
4/17/2016
Indian Quad- Cayuga Hall
An unknown subject
pulled the fire alarm for
no apparent reason.
ANIMAL REPORT
4/18/2016
Empire Commons- G
Cluster
Report of a cat stuck in
a tree.
CRIMINAL MISCHIEF
4/19/2016
Dutch Quad lot
Report of car being
keyed.
MEDICAL INCIDENT
4/19/2016
PE Building
Report of a male
student with laceration
above eye. Transported
to hospital by 5 Quad.
AGGRAVATED
UNLICENSED
OPERATION OF A
MOTOR VEHICLE
4/19/2016
State Quad Lot
Report of a male student
found to be operating
a motor vehicle with a
suspended license and
speeding.
CRIMINAL NUISANCE
4/20/2016
Colonial QuadLivingston Tower
Report of three
female students with
marijuana and marijuana
paraphernalia. A referral
was made.
GRAND LARCENY
4/20/2016
PE Complex- SEFCU
Arena
Report of a stolen golf
cart.
MEDICAL INCIDENT
4/20/2016
PE Building
Report of a male
student with an injured
knee. Refused medical
treatment.
DRUG COMPLAINT
4/20/2016
Empire Commons- C
Cluster
Report of subject to be
smoking marijuana in
public.
PERSONS ANNOYING
4/21/2016
Other-Parking
Management
Report of four male
students being rowdy.
Referred for same.
DOMESTIC INCIDENT
4/21/2016
State Quad- Fulton Hall
Assisted subjects in a
domestic dispute.
MEDICAL INCIDENT
4/21/2016
Indian Quad- Cayua Hall
Report of a female
student having asthma
attack.
MEDICAL INCIDENT
4/21/2016
Indian Quad- Cayua Hall
Report of a female
student having asthma
attack.
CHECK A SUBJECT
4/21/2016
Roadways-Thurlow Lot
Check a subject.
CHECK A SUBJECT
4/21/2016
Roadways-CQ Lot
Check a subject.
ADVICE
Time managment, the reduction of anxiety
By MIDDLE EARTH
College life places rigorous scheduling demands on students. Students juggle
various assignments and deadlines across
multiple classes; they have extra-curricular
schedules such as sports teams and clubs,
and many students manage work and internship schedules as well. For many students,
college is their first experience with such
demanding and varied schedules. Add to
these demands the challenges associated
with being away from home, trying to
establish new friendships, and discovering
who they will be in the world, and it is easy
to understand why the experience of feeling
anxious is so common among the college population. While some of the social
aspects of college life (e.g., friendships and
self-discovery) unfold rather organically
and require some patience, the ability to
manage one’s time effectively can offer
some relief from anxiety.
Some students manage their schedules
without the use of any tools such as day
planners or smart phone calendars; they
keep track of it all in their heads. Many
of these students report doing quite well
managing their time in this manner, but
managing anxiety is another matter. When
people describe the emotional experience of
anxiety, they often mention racing thoughts,
problems concentrating, feelings of dread,
and difficulty getting rid of worries that
rationally they recognize as disproportionate. This is where time management
tools can help. Writing down one’s tasks,
deadlines, appointments, etc. and checking
them off as they are completed essentially
removes them from one’s head and reduces
the clutter that those racing thoughts and
overwhelming dread may cause. Written
down or stored in an electronic scheduling
device, these items are less apt to fuel the
experience of dread and looming angst.
The distinction between tasks can become
blurred in one’s mind during moments of
feeling anxious; multiple manageable tasks
can morph into what seems like one enormous and unmanageable chore. Checklists
and calendar tools provide users a way
to break things down. For example, that
20-page paper due at the end of the month
might look something like this:
Day 1: Brainstorm topics, preliminary lit
review (2 hours)
Day 2: Finalize topic, deeper lit review
(4 hours)
Day 3: Create outline of paper, reference
prof’s guidelines from syllabus (2 hours)
Day 4: R&R (Gym in the morning,
lunch with a friend)
Day 5: Write draft for two sections
of the outline (2 to 4 hours)
Day 6: Write draft for two more sections (2 to 4 hours)
Day 7: Revisit and complete first
two sections
Be mindful that none of this
information is intended to suggest
that anxiety is not a real and difficult
struggle for many students. If you find
that you are having difficulties with
time management or anxiety, there are
options for you. If you are a University at Albany student, you can make
an appointment at Counseling and
Psychological Services with a mental
health professional to discuss this subject further. To make an appointment
with any of their clinicians, call 518442-5800. For additional information
you can access their website at www.
albany.edu/counseling_center.
Also, if you would like to talk to a
peer about additional ways to effectively
manage your time, you can call the Middle
Earth Peer Assistance hotline at 518-4425777. The Middle Earth Peer Assistance
hotline is open when classes at UAlbany
Source: Middle Earth
are in session during the academic year
(September through May). The hotline
hours are from 1 p.m. to midnight Monday
through Thursday, and 24 hours on the
weekends beginning on Friday at 1 p.m.
NEWS
TUESDAY, April 26, 2016
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
DANES SAY WHAT?
This week, we asked students:
Did you vote in the primary? Why or why not?
EDITOR: LINDSEY RIBACK
[email protected]
3
Name: Mike Almas
u
Year: Senior
Major: Business Accounting
Didn’t vote, didn’t know the
location of the polls.
Name: Alexis Fiddemon
Year: Sophomore
Major: Mathematics
I voted, this is my first time, I
want to take a stance on what I
see that’s happening.
q
t Name: Alexander Martin
Year: Senior
Major: Communications
Didn’t vote, I messed up my
absentee ballot.
p Name: Forhad Rahman
Year: Junior
Major: English
Least like to see president:
I voted, I heavily support
Sanders and his policies, and
I want to help him win this
primary.
Compiled by Milo Votava
PARKFEST
Continued from Page 1
year.
“Student Association was not
guaranteed that service as of this year,
resulting in physical tickets and lines,”
Swanson said.
The fact that ParkFest is an exclusive
event made the demand for tickets that
much greater. As of Thursday, event
attendance for a school with almost
13,000 undergraduate students was
capped at 5,000 people, and 1,000 of
those tickets were available to students
who do not attend the university.
Sophomore Nicole Lvov, an
environmental science major, spent two
hours on April 20 waiting in line and
did not received tickets.
“We pay for this with the student fee
and I think it’s absolutely ridiculous
that we have to wait in a line and not
every student gets to go,” she said of the
mandatory $100 fee that all UAlbany
undergraduates have to pay.
While the SA is a nonprofit entity
separate from the university, it is the
university that determines the capacity
since the event is held on its property,
according to Swanson.
“In the future if there is such a desire
to attend Parkfest such as this year,
Student Association would be forced to
hold the concert off campus and begin
to charge students in order to pay for the
venue,” said Swanson.
After April 18, ticket distribution
was capped at 1,000 per day and the
University Police Department helped
manage the line.
On Thursday it was decided that
there would not be a physical ticket
distribution after the university decided
to increase the maximum capacity.
Instead, SA would raffle off the
remaining 1,000 tickets.
Despite students’ dissatisfaction
with the distribution of tickets, Colin
Manchester, next year’s vice president
of SA, hopes students will look on the
positive side of the event.
“As far as ParkFest goes, I think
the lineup we have really reaches out
through many genres and appeals
to a broad amount of students,” said
Manchester, a junior who is double
majoring in financial market regulation
and financial analyst.
ParkFest was held on Sunday, April
24 for a crowd of 5,000 students on the
State Quad Field and was hosted by
Terrence J and DJ Young Chow with
performances by Pusha T, Timeflies,
Hippie Sabotage, Jeremih, and headliner
Future.
CC
Continued from Page 1
construction here on
campus,” Giarrusso said.
Removal can get pricy.
The budget for the abatement
within the Campus Center
was included in its extension
project budget. The cost
of abatement in only
the Campus Center was
$575,000, according to
Csontos.
It is unclear how much it
will cost to abate the entire
campus, as every project has
its own budget.
“There is no way to get an
estimate of cost,” Giarrusso
said.
He also said the removal
will be drastic because
asbestos is assumed to be in
the majority of the buildings
on campus.
“All of the older buildings
on this campus, on every
campus and in every
neighborhood in this country
likely has [asbestos] in floor
tiles, plaster, construction
glues and adhesives, pipe
insulation, fire rated doors,
roofing felt and glazing,” he
said.
The entire removal
process will take “probably
decades.”
“We have over 5,000,000
square feet, so getting to
every building will take
time,” Giarrusso said.
Sessions begin
May 23, 2016
and run
throughout
the summer
THUR. MAY 5th ACADEMIC PODIUM
8:30p - 10:30p [S M A L L FOU N TA I N ]
Flexible 4 and
6-week sessions
Online course
options available
5/8: Late Night Coffee House* | 8:30p - 10:30p
Registration
begins
March 21, 2016
and is
ongoing
CAMPUS
CENTER EAST ADDITION
REAK
COFF
2016
EE B
*FREE FOOD GIVEAWAYS
SNAC
5/9: Late Night Snacks | 8:30p
- 10:30p
K ATT
A
DUTCH & STATE QUAD
CK
5/10: Late Night Desserts | 8:30p - 10:30pTREATS
DUTCH & STATE QUADSWE ET
albany.edu/summer
HAVE A NEWS TIP? EMAIL US AT [email protected]
4
OPINIONS
EDITOR: KEVIN MERCADO
[email protected]
TUESDAY, APRIL 26, 2016
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
RELIGION ON CAMPUS
PARKFEST OR PASSOVER
By AMANDA ZIEGLER-IANNOTTI
I
’m sure many are familiar with the Jewish
holiday of Passover. Many may have seen the
“Rugrats” episode with Grandpa Boris talking
about the Jewish exodus from slavery in Egypt.
There is a chance most people have a Jewish
friend who celebrates the holiday and has spoken
about their Seder with them.
Passover this year was
celebrated from April 22 to April
30, beginning Friday night at
sundown and ending Sunday night
at sundown. It is customary for
this holiday in particular to be
spent with family. Many Jewish
kids want to go home, and many
Jewish families expect them home.
For many Jewish students at the
University at Albany, it is not an
option to stay on campus in order
to attend a concert instead of
celebrating Passover.
“Jewish people are not supposed
to drive or travel by public transit
within the first two days of
Passover, also the two more widely
celebrated days,” said Irit Block,
wife of Rabbi Jeremy Block of
Aish NY.
Jewish students would have
likely gone home on Thursday or
Friday and come back up to school
some time late Sunday or Monday.
Parkfest was Sunday, April 24, with
doors opening at 1 p.m.
In my case, I don’t particularly
care for Future, the headlining
artist. I also am not so serious about
my religion that if Parkfest were to
feature an artist I did want to see, I
would travel during the hours many
others wouldn’t. However, I am not
the only Jewish student on campus,
and I personally know plenty of
Jewish people who both celebrate
Passover and would have liked to
see Future.
One such student is Bryan
Nichols, who said he originally
planned on going home for
Passover, but decided to stay on
campus this year so that he could
attend Parkfest. He had been unable
to attend previous years because of
finals and end-of-semester papers.
He’ll be celebrating Passover at
Rabbi Block’s home Friday night,
and Rabbi Gavriel Horan’s home
on Saturday night.
Nothing is wrong with Nichols
wanting to attend Parkfest, but
some people are more observant
of the holiday than him. Senior
Jennifer Perlman went home
for the holiday, even though
she loves Future and had been
looking forward to Parkfest since
September. She said she didn’t feel
like it was really a choice, because
for her it was like choosing between
God and a concert. Perlman feels
it’s disrespectful to have the
concert scheduled this weekend,
Source: Wikipedia.org
The Jewish holiday, Passover, consists of a ceremonial dinner
known as a Seder.
when it could have been held any
other weekend that didn’t fall on a
religious holiday.
So then why, with Passover
being a well-known Jewish holiday
and UAlbany having a large
Jewish population, would Parkfest
be held during a weekend when
many Jewish students could not
be in Albany? Was the university
unaware of the holiday, or did they
not care that Jewish students would
have to miss the yearly concert?
Whatever the case, plenty
of Jewish students are feeling
overlooked.
StiLL
ACCeptiNg
AppLiCAtiONS
FOr Our
SepteMber
CLASS
Academic
Excellence.
Dedicated to:
• AcademicExcellence
• QualityPatientCare
• ProfessionalLeadership
Degree Programs include:
Professional
Success.
• DoctorofChiropractic
• MasterofScienceinAcupuncture
• MasterofScienceinAcupuncture
andOrientalMedicine
• MasterofScienceinApplied
ClinicalNutrition(onlinedelivery)
• MasterofScienceinHuman
Anatomy&PhysiologyInstruction
(onlinedelivery)
For more information call
NYCC at 1-800-234-6922
or visit www.nycc.edu.
Finger Lakes School of
Acupuncture & Oriental Medicine
of New York Chiropractic College
School of Applied Clinical Nutrition
2360Route89•SenecaFalls,NY13148
CELEBRATING 100 YEARS
1916—2016
Janie Frank
Lifestyle Editor
[email protected]
Kassie Parisi
Editor-in-Chief
[email protected]
518-225-5759
Madeline St. Amour
Managing Editor
[email protected]
518-369-5505
Lindsey Riback
News Editor
[email protected]
ALBANY
STUDENT PRESS
Celia Balf
Sports Editor
[email protected]
Thomas Kika
Social Media Editor
[email protected]
Julia Day
A&E Editor
[email protected]
Eli Enis
Assistant A&E Editor
Kevin Mercado
Opinions Editor
[email protected]
Daniel Pinzon
Assistant Opinions Editor
Brittany Gregory
Photo Editor
[email protected]
Jonathan Peters
Assistant Photo Editor
Jose Reynoso
Business Manager
[email protected]
Advertise in the ASP:
Mark Fanneron
Business Manager
[email protected]
FOLLOW US ON TWITTER: @ALBSTUDENTPRESS
The Albany Student Press
is published Tuesdays from
September through May by
the Albany Student Press
Corporation, an independent,
not-for-profit organization.
Advertisements, as well as letter
and column content, do not
necessarily reflect the opinion of
ASP staff. All unsigned editorials
are written with the approval
of the editorial board. The
ASP is a registered trademark
of the Albany Student Press
Corporation which has exclusive
rights to any materials herein.
Contact the ASP
for information and
publication schedules:
Newsroom:
Campus Center 326
Email:
[email protected];
[email protected]
www.albanystudentpress.net
OPINIONS
TUESDAY, APRIL 26, 2016
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
ASSISTANT EDITOR: DANIEL PINZON
[email protected]
5
CENSORSHIP
Kevin Mercado /
Albany Student Press
The Albany Student
Press experienced
its first-ever form
of censorship that
can be traced. Tour
guides during the
Accepted Students
Open House were
told to remove all
ASP issues that
featured the headline
“Assault reports up
200 percent,” as it
looked bad on the
university as a whole,
despite the story
speaking favorably
for the university.
Students are more
open to report sexual
assault.
SILENCING THE VOICES OF STUDENTS
By KEVIN MERCADO
T
he First Amendment says: “Congress shall
make no law respecting an establishment of
religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof;
or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the
press…”
Therefore, censorship is a clear violation of our First
Amendment rights.
A Google search of the word “censorship” defines it as,
“the practice of officially examining books, movies, etc.,
and suppressing unacceptable parts.”
Recently, the Albany Student Press received the
unfortunate news that tour guides at the University at
Albany campus were disposing copies of the paper
because the word “assault” was written across the top. It’s
believed that admissions didn’t want potential students to
get the wrong idea about the university.
Editor-in-Chief Kassie Parisi covered the incident for
the ASP. The ASP obtained a tour guide group message
which read, “Hi team! If anyone is in the LCs today and
sees the ASP that says something about assault. Please
remove them. Grab a stack and recycle them. I felt
horrible doing it but it’s just not something we want to
welcome our families with this weekend.”
The censored article in question “focused on the fact
that the reports are increasing because there are now
more ways for students on campus to report and get help
regarding sexual assault, such as the University Advocacy
Center,” Parisi wrote.
This is just one example of how censorship doesn’t
work. Had the article been carefully looked at, this
entire mess could have been prevented. The article was
in the interest of the university and could have been
incorporated in the tours to say that the University is
advocating for the awareness of sexual violence on
college campuses and is actually doing something about
it. The article’s message was lost under the discretion of
the tour guide; it was a bad judgment call.
As reported in Parisi’s article, UAlbany Provost James
Stellar responded to the incident, saying, “The decision
was an inappropriate judgment call, and inconsistent with
our values as a University. The free and open exchange
of data and ideas is a principle on which we, and all
universities, stand. I would like to take this opportunity to
apologize to the ASP.”
UAlbany administration were fortunately able to
recover the papers and get them back on stands fairly
quickly, which is good news for the ASP.
But, the ASP is certainly not the first school paper
plagued with censorship.
According to David R. Wheeler in an article for The
Atlantic, Lori McKown was an adviser for the school
paper at Butler University in Indianapolis. This past
September, she was relieved from her position.
According to the article, “Her most recent employee
evaluation, signed on April 13, 2015, had listed a rating
of ‘above expectations,’ asserting that she ‘consistently
performs at a level that meets, and often exceeds, the
institution’s expectations.’”
It was later revealed that McKown had sent a private
email which spurred her release from the adviser position.
Get your ASP writing
for our last issue of the
semester.
Email [email protected]il.com
for more info.
This summer catch up with
your friends and your future...
at Columbia-Greene.
TWO SUMMER SESSIONS
Summer Session I:
Open Registration on
May 12 • Starts May 16
Summer Session II:
Open Registration on
May 12 • Starts July 11
Also, non-matriculated students can register weekdays.
Route 23 | Hudson, NY | 518-828-4181 | MyCommunityCollege.com
/ColumbiaGreeneCC |
@ColGreeneCC |
/ColumbiaGreeneCC
TOMORROW, TODAY.
cgcc_4year16_ualbany_4.9x6.5.indd 1
What tops it off - she was replaced with someone from
the university’s public relations team.
“It’s a clear conflict of interest for a university public
relations professional to advise a college newspaper,” said
College Media Association President Rachele Kanigel.
Wheeler asks in his article, “In an era of tight budgets,
and heightened brand consciousness, are administrators
more afraid than ever to leave students in charge of the
student newspaper?”
Maybe I can understand that a university wants to
display its campus with the utmost esteem, but to hide the
voice of its students is a violation of our rights.
If the right to free speech is clearly defined in the
Constitution, at the very beginning no less, then that right
should be respected despite the “negative” repercussions
it may have.
According to an article in The Atlantic, Susan Zake, a
journalism professor at Kent State University, wrote, “I
still find it hard to believe that a bunch of smart people
at a university can’t understand what a free student press
should look like.”
Zake puts into words exactly what most of us are
thinking. How can someone think that violating the
Constitution can make the school look better?
And realistically, I don’t think a lot of those students
would have stopped to look at the paper, especially during
a walking tour. Even if they did, I’m sure they would
have had the common decency to actually read at least the
first paragraph or so.
The ASP is another student paper that was silenced.
FINANCES
Money vs. college
By DANIEL PINZON
C
ollege is the official practice run
for life. And one of life’s many
tasks includes being in charge of
your own money.
As the youth enter into young adulthood,
we have been taught that money is
important, it’s essential for a decent
living. With this in mind, we either take
that message seriously or as a joke. As a
college student we are either overwhelmed
in paranoia of being low on money or we
spend without a care. Money is important,
but it shouldn’t guide our lives.
As we were constantly reminded by
our high school administration, the cost
of college shouldn’t impact our decision.
Yet how can we not let it? Simply being
in college, a student is most likely in
debt, setting the foundation for financial
struggles. We don’t want to add on to this
established debt.
I have experienced the life of the extreme
sides of prioritizing money. I didn’t spend
a single penny in the fall semester, however
when the spring semester came around, I
spent everything I had. It’s clear the ideal
money spending habit is somewhere in the
middle.
I have gotten to the point that I would
think if I didn’t buy a pack of potato chips,
I would save a dollar. I would save so much
money if I didn’t buy anything, obviously.
That is most definitely not the case. As
much as a person would think that this
dollar will stack up into millions, spending
a dollar will not drown you in debt. By not
spending money, you are restricting your
potential of living. It’s good to save money,
but what does one gain if all they do is
save?
They may be able to afford one
expensive object or experience, however
the little experiences and expenses matter.
Depriving oneself from buying snacks or
buying new clothes is not experiencing all
of life. It’s significant to point out that a
student is able to buy a cup of coffee every
now and then, and that won’t kill them
financially.
3/30/16 12:55 PM
FOLLOW US ON TWITTER: @ALBSTUDENTPRESS
Nonetheless, no one should dedicate
their life to paying off debts. Debts will be
paid eventually, in theory. No one should
dedicate all their money to debt, as it’s a
part of life, not the entire span of it.
With that said, caution should still be
used when considering going into debt. You
can spend money, but not too much. You
can buy some things, but not everything.
If there is anything the majority of the
University at Albany students spend fast
or carelessly, it’s Munch Money. Many
students treat Munch Money as if it’s not
real money and swipe away, spending their
$200 or $400 in the first month. And I
think, when people waste it all, that is their
first rude wake up call.
Students continue the rest of the semester
with no Munch Money, realizing that the
next semester, they should be more cautious
with their spending. Or they could be the
person that adds on more Munch Money
and indulge in their spending.
“It’s so easy to keep buying things with
Munch Money, but when you can’t buy
anymore because you spent it all, that’s
when I realized I need to calm down
with the spending,” said Michael Chen, a
UAlbany freshman. “I didn’t keep in mind
my balance and I didn’t [waste] Munch
Money for the second half of the semester.”
Mastering the art of spending is hard,
especially for a college student, who
is potentially putting all they have into
education. Hopefully, this education
will pay off in the end, and it should in
theory. Nevertheless, going to college is
already a risky move. Going to college is
the equivalent of accepting debt. Unless
someone is part of the lucky few who don’t
have to worry about expenses, most are
forced to accept debt. Congratulations to
them, but I’m still going to worry about my
money situation.
I think it’s important to remind students
that money isn’t everything. Don’t hinder
yourself by not having money. But also,
don’t hinder yourself by saving too much
money. Ultimately, this is your money, this
is your hard earned money. Spend it wisely
and as you please.
6
ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT
EDITOR: JULIA DAY
[email protected]
TUESDAY, APRIL 26, 2016
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
BAND INTERVIEW
AMERICAN AUTHORS TO
ROCK DOWNTOWN ALBANY
Source: American Authors Facebook
The band American Authors, known for their hit song “Best Day of My Life,” will perform in Albany this week.
By NICOLE WALLACK
scene or genre, just kind of having fun.
Rock band American Authors made a huge debut with
their chart-topping single “Best Day of My Life” from
their first album, “Oh, What A Life,” catapulting them
into fame. Now, their follow-up album “What We Live
For” seems poised to firmly plant the band in superstar
status when it is released on May 13.
I spoke with American Authors lead singer and
guitarist Zac Barnett about the band’s upcoming album
and their current club show tour, which will be passing
through Albany at The Hollow Bar + Kitchen on Apr.
27.
ASP: Did you feel any kind of pressure with that followup album?
ZB: For sure…we just tried to really work as hard as we
could and write the best songs that we could. And also it
was important to us to not stop writing and not just feel
like “Okay, we have some songs that are pretty good and
stop.” …We’re still writing because you never know
where something great is going to come from.
Albany Student Press: What motivated the small more
intimate club shows for your tour?
Zac Barnett: We just wanted to start playing this new
album. We’ve been working on it for so long that we
wanted to do a tour leading up to everything else and
really just make it a small intimate show where our fans
can really come out, hear the new songs, and we can
really start gauging a real reaction from people who
know our music.
ASP: Were you expecting the amazing success of those
singles from your first album that prompted those big
shows and all of that exposure?
ZB: Not really. We were just writing to write and we
were just trying to write good, fun, exciting music for us,
and we were trying to not hold back. And that was the
first time we had ever done that where we weren’t trying
to label ourselves or brand ourselves into any certain
ASP: What is your writing process like?
ZB: It’s all super collaborative. You might get an initial
idea, that’ll come from a certain person, but then we all
bring it into a room and we all work on it together and
make it into what the final product ends up being.
ASP: You were the Blue Pages, before you were
American Authors, what prompted that name change?
ZB: We had just been a band for so long that we had
been performing for so long under one name and our
music had changed so much since the first day playing
together. We were in a new city, we had moved from
Boston to Brooklyn, and it was a new time and it seemed
like the right move for a new chapter in our lives are
musicians.
ASP: Do you feel that your experience going to Berklee
College of Music helped you to develop your skills?
ZB: Berklee was great. Because for one, it allowed us
to meet each other. Without Berklee, we wouldn’t know
each other and we wouldn’t be in this band, at least not
what it is today. So that’s huge right there. Also it’s nice
because it does facilitate you with a bunch of tools that
you may not use every day, but it’s always nice to have
them in your back pocket ... I think that it just overall
gives you a better understanding of music.
ASP: Do you have any advice for aspiring musicians?
ZB: Practice and having an open attitude about things.
I know so many people who just stay in their own
bubble and they’re not open to trying new things and
are not open to doing things maybe a little differently.
Music is changing so much nowadays, that you really
need to have a good attitude and be open to always
experimenting and always being willing to write with
new people or experiment with new genres or try
something that might be a little scary and a little different
because without that you’re really just limiting yourself.
ASP: Who is your biggest musical influence?
ZB: I started out listening to classic rock, which is a
huge part [like] The Beatles and Crosby, Stills, Nash &
Young. That was always so huge. And then nowadays
I’m always looking for new stuff. Our most collective
influence is probably Coldplay. They’re just so great …
We’re taking so many influences from so many different
places … while also staying true to who American
Authors are.
You can follow American Authors on Facebook, Twitter,
and on weareamericanauthors.com for additional
information on “What We Live For” and their current
tour. “What We Live For” hits shelves on May 13.
LITERATURE
UAlbany professor hosts
‘An Evening of Poetry’
By JON MILLER
April is National Poetry Month,
a time for bookworms and aspiring
writers to celebrate the work of some
of the greatest poets the genre has to
offer.
In correlation with National Poetry
Month, the University at Albany’s
own Leonard A. Slade, Jr. held “An
Evening of Poetry” on Tuesday,
April 19 to read and discuss his
works.
Slade is a professor in Africana
Studies and English and the director
of the Doctor of Arts in Humanistic
Studies Program and Master of Arts
in Liberal Studies Program. An
expert in black literature and poetry,
he is also a renowned writer with
several published books of poetry.
Slade read some of his best work
to the crowd from his books “Sweet
Solitude,” “God Put a Rainbow in
the Sky” and his most recent book,
“Nobody Knows.” In between each
poem, Slade referenced quotes from a
diverse group of poets.
Some of the quotes from the
mentioned poems included “Poetry
is the spontaneous overflow of
powerful feelings: it takes its
origin from emotion recollected in
tranquility” by William Wordsworth,
and Slade’s personal favorite,
“Poetry is the human soul, entire,
squeezed like a lemon or lime, drop
by drop into atomic words” by famed
African-American poet Langston
Hughes.
Beginning the night with a reading
of “Acquittances,” much of Slade’s
work tied back to his experiences as
well as the people that he considers
valuable to his life and work.
Acknowledging those who inspired
his work, he noted that many of
his poems are dedicated to them.
His wife, Roberta Hall Slade, to
whom he dedicated his book “Sweet
Solitude,” was also the inspiration for
one of Slade’s poems in “God Put a
Rainbow in the Sky.”
George Hendrick, who donated to
the Africana Studies scholarships that
Slade is very much associated with,
also influenced Slade’s poem, “My
Professor.” The poem is a tribute
to someone that Slade considered a
mentor and true inspiration when he
was a studying student.
One of the most significant
poems of the night was titled “Black
Madonna” from “Sweet Solitude”
which he owes his inspiration to his
mother, Elizabeth Langford Slade,
who he considers to have been his
best friend.
Much of Slade’s poetry covers
social and racial issues of past and
present. Significant in his work,
it requires no arduous effort to
see his true passion of AfricanAmerican history and the ways he
incorporates it in his literature truly
echoed throughout his three books.
“Nobody Knows” featured references
to the controversy in Ferguson,
Missouri and the social injustices that
accompanied it.
By far, the fiercest of Slade’s
work, “The Country Preacher’s Folk
Prayer” was equipped in an almost
gospel song and southern accent. As
Slade sang and shouted the words,
the crowd was able to feel and
understand the compelling meaning
behind each stanza. “The Country
Preacher’s Folk Prayer” resonated
with much of the listeners before
Slade closed the evening again with
Langston Hughes’ iconic quote.
Source: albany.edu
Leonard A. Slade, Jr. was awarded Editor’s Choice
Award for six of his poems published in “Today’s Best
Poets Anthology.”
MISS THE SHOW? READ ABOUT IT ONLINE AT ALBANYSTUDENTPRESS.NET
ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT
TUESDAY, APRIL 26, 2016
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
SPEAKER SERIES
EDITOR: ELI ENIS
[email protected]
7
FILM REVIEW
Dark twist for Disney
By AMANDA CASE
“The Jungle Book” is resurrected
in the new action-packed
blockbuster, which includes famous
voices like Bill Murray, Scarlett
Johansson, Christopher Walken and
Lupita Nyong’o.
Jon Favreau of “Iron Man” fame
uses stunning computer-generated
imagery to revive this classic tale
by Rudyard Kipling, recreating the
jungle animals we all knew so well.
For those of us who need a
recap of the 1967 original movie:
Mowgli, played by newcomer
Neel Sethi, is a child who has been
raised by wolves but finds out he
is no longer welcome in the jungle
by the menacing tiger Shere Khan.
Having been harmed by man,
Shere Khan promises to eliminate
anyone he sees as a threat to the
jungle. After abandoning the only
home he’s ever known, Mowgli
embarks on a journey to find
humans, accompanied by Bagheera,
a panther who has become his stern
mentor.
On his captivating voyage of selfdiscovery and adventure, Mowgli
encounters many jungle creatures
including the free-spirited bear
Baloo (Murray), seductive python
Kaa (Johansson) and the persuasive
orangutan King Louis (Walken).
Some of these animals don’t have
Mowgli’s best interests at heart and
he finds this out through epic animal
battles and suspenseful encounters.
This live-action adaptation
is much more dramatic than the
original. There are moments of edgy
violence and startling scares. Even
the timeless tune “I Wanna Be Like
You” comes at a tense time in the
film, almost leaving the audience
somewhat haunted.
But even with all the action, the
movie stays true to its Disney roots
and maintains a light-hearted spirit
with humor sprinkled in throughout.
Source: Laura van den Berg
Writers Institute presents
award winning author
By LEE McPETERS
Laura van den Berg visited the Writers
Institute at the University at Albany to give a
seminar for students last Thursday, April 21. As
an excellent writer, van den Berg was bound to
give the audience a treat, and that she did.
Held in the Standish Room in the Science
Library, the seminar started off with a
spokesperson from the Writers Institute, who
gave a short biography and started the discussion
with few questions.
The real treat came when the floor was
opened up to the audience. Many students asked
questions about everything from her writing
process to more personal questions, such as how
to work with struggles in writing, and how to get
ideas as. Throughout, Van den Berg answered
all questions in depth and with kindness. She
was never aloof and never put down a question
as stupid or irrelevant.
“You can ask me anything…it is virtually
impossible to embarrass me with anything,” van
den Berg said.
Van den Berg was raised in Florida and now
lives in Boston with her husband who is also a
writer. She is also a teacher - she expressed that
she experiences much joy from both professions.
She has written two short story collections:
“What the World Will Look Like When All
the Water Leaves Us” (2009) and “The Isle of
Youth” (2013).
“Find Me” is her first novel, released in
2015, and she revealed that she has a new
novel in the works as well as some new short
stories.
As a child, she did not enjoy school and
eventually completed high school by finishing
a GED. While attending night school, the
idea of writing fiction never crossed her mind
until she realized she didn’t enjoy her first
major, philosophy, and decided to try a fiction
workshop.
Van den Berg also talked about her writing
process. To her, she said, struggles and
insecurities were things to embrace about
the writing process, not a sign of weakness
or insufficient talent or worth. While short
stories are the format in which she enjoys to
write most, she said that she enjoyed writing
novels as well.
For Van den Berg, a novel is a story that
has too much to offer and a short story would
not do it justice.
VISITING STUDENTS
WELCOME AT
Some of the characters also offer
a comfort that we’re used to from
many Disney characters.
The visuals are pretty mindblowing to say the least. The
animals look very tangible, down
to every last strand of fur. Their
facial expressions are captured in
a way that’s extremely realistic for
animation. The entire movie was
shot using motion capture and then
the scenes were cut together. Using
that footage, the effects team then
built the film’s sets virtually.
“Everything was mapped against
the virtual sets,” Favreau told Wired
Magazine. “We designed the sets
like you would for a video game.”
The filming took place in a
warehouse in Los Angeles while
Sethi acted out the scenes on small
sets created by the production
designers. Other actors stood in
for the animals and props and blue
screens were also used during
filming. Meticulous lighting was
programmed to create particular
shadows of the different animals as
well. The creators definitely pushed
filmmaking technology further than
it’s ever gone before.
Despite being created this way,
similar to the methods used in
“Avatar” (2009) and “Gravity”
(2013), “The Jungle Book”
appeared as if it was actually shot
out in the jungle with real animals.
It never seemed to be fake, only
stunning.
Since opening on April 15, the
movie so far, has grossed over $300
million worldwide and has become
the highest grossing Hollywood
release ever in India, with about
$24.6 million since opening. The
movie, which cost roughly $175
million to make, continues to climb
the Hollywood charts and is sure
to pave the way for future Disney
remakes.
Two Good Reasons to Join Us
at East Addition on Saturday Night!
LEHMAN COLLEGE
Over 800 Graduate And
Undergraduate Course Sections
1-Step Application/Registration Process
Low In-State Tuition
Convenient Bronx Location Easily Accessible
Late Night
Entertainment | 10p - 12a
May 7th · Trivia Night
From Manhattan, Yonkers, And Lower
Westchester By Car, Train, Or Bus
2 16
SUMMER
T
HT
GH
NIIG
EN
TE
AT
LA
L
U
REGISTRATION
IS OPEN
SESSION 1 6/1 – 7/6
SESSION 2 6/1 – 7/14
SESSION 3 7/11 – 8/10
SESSION 4 7/18 – 8/18
ONLINE SESSION 7/18 – 8/5
FULL SEMESTER 5/31 – 8/18
www.lehman.edu/summer
(718) 960-8036
[email protected]
NU
EN
ME
EM
UE
LU
AL
VA
V
10P - 2A
2A ONLY
ONLY
10P
1
$
• Cupcake
• Cookie Duo
• 16 oz. Coffee
• 32 oz. Fountain Beverage
2
$
• Soft Pretzel
• Cheese Quesadilla
• Nachos with Cheese
• Grilled PB & J with Bananas
3
$
• Loaded Beef Nachos • Beef Taco Trio
• Pulled Pork Slider Trio • Southern Chicken Biscuit
MISS THE SHOW? READ ABOUT IT ONLINE AT ALBANYSTUDENTPRESS.NET
8
FROM THE COVER
EDITOR: MADELINE ST. AMOUR
[email protected]
ALUM
Continued from Page 1
renter to share a profile. With its
“outstanding” reputation – roughly
two million active listings – and a
well-designed interface, Luca said that
Airbnb is paving the way for room
renting, generating over $25 billion
since its creation in 2008.
Amanda Flood, a senior majoring
in psychology, used Airbnb during her
trip to Canada in March 2016. She said
that her experience with the service
was successful, but feels that with the
results of Luca’s study, the potential
discrimination between hosts and
renters is a problem for the service’s
customers.
“If I got denied, I’d be upset because
Airbnb is so affordable,” Flood said.
TUESDAY, APRIL 26, 2016
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
PMT
“We’re in college, and we like Airbnb’s
lower prices.”
Online marketplaces are changing the
way in which customers buy services.
One of Luca’s suggestions to reduce
potential discrimination on Airbnb is
to label discrimination illegal in the
service’s terms and conditions.
“My hope is that this paper will shed
light on the implications of the choices
market designers make,” Luca said.
“My goal is to help online businesses to
create a better - and fairer - society.”
Luca is currently an assistant
professor of business administration
at the Harvard Business School.
According to the Harvard Business
Schools’ website, he works closely with
companies and cities, including Yelp,
Facebook and the U.K., to help them
become more data-driven.
Continued from Page 1
in the parking lot to show
differentiation between the two areas.
Parking tickets at UAlbany are a
big deal for college students who are
often frustrated when a small piece of
paper is left on their windshield with an
amount they have to pay.
To help student avoid tickets, Mass
Transit offers a variety of source tables
throughout campus with information
as well as information on Uptown and
Downtown campus parking through
social media and its website.
Jones said it is the student’s
responsibility to understand the
rules and regulations, although he
understands that the information is
not broadcasted properly and the
department hopes to adjust signs.
Appeal citations are
available for students online through
MyUAlbany. Most students who
appeal their tickets at the beginning
of the semester have a high chance
of succeeding, according to Jones.
Appeals for tickets from Colonial Quad
also have high success rates, since the
signs are unclear.
According to Jones, 90 percent
of their customers enjoy the parking
services, while the other 10 percent are
dissatisfied due to tickets.
It is common for vehicles to be
parked closest to Washington Avenue
because that is where the majority of
traffic flows.
“The goal is to issue less citations,
but if we didn’t do our job the way we
do now, campus would be a mess,”
Jones said.
$4
FO 95
RA
LL
PE
ON
LIN
RC
EC
RE
OU
RS
DI
ES
T
Earn Summer Credits
at a World-Class College
This summer, take advantage of a
great opportunity to catch up on—or
accelerate—your studies. With expert
faculty, a wide range of course
offerings, and small, personalized
classes held in mornings, afternoons,
and evenings—or online—St. Joseph’s
will give you everything you need to get
ahead this summer.
Explore our classes and registration
details at:
2016 SUMMER SESSIONS
Summer Session 1:
Monday–Thursday, May 23—June 20
Summer Session 2:
Monday–Thursday, June 21—July 19
Summer Session 3:
Mondays and Wednesdays,
May 23—July 20
Tuesdays and Thursdays,
May 24—July 14
Weekend College Summer Session:
Alternating Saturdays through Sundays,
May 21—August 28
1-Credit Courses: Visit sjcny.edu/summer
sjcny.edu/summer
TRADITION. INNOVATION. EXCELLENCE.
CELEBRATING 100 YEARS |
ADVANCE
YOUR EDUCATION + YOUR CAREER
> Graduate degrees and certificates in these fields:
Education
Health Sciences
Management
Psychology
> Accredited programs, flexible and hybrid online/on-site courses
> NOW ALSO satellite locations in Saratoga (M.B.A.)
and New York City (Ed.D.)
INFO
SESSIONS
OF MANAGEMENT
JUNE 8 SCHOOL
SCHOOL OF PROFESSIONAL & CONTINUING EDUCATION
SCHOOL OF EDUCATION
JUNE 9 ESTEVES
SCHOOL OF HEALTH SCIENCES
LEARN MORE:
sage.edu/infosession
[email protected]
(518) 292-8615
HAVE A NEWS TIP? EMAIL US AT TH[email protected]
SPORTS
TUESDAY, APRIL 26, 2016
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
Douglass
DANES DEFEAT YALE
at dawn
By BENNETT DRAKE
This past week the
men’s lacrosse team was
lucky enough to play on
Bob Ford Field at Tom
and Mary Casey Stadium
during the school’s annual
“Spring Stomp.” The team
always looks forward to
these opportunities because
of the atmosphere that
comes with it, especially
the 7 p.m. face-off under
the lights. It seemed like
Binghamton caught some
of that big game energy
as well and came out
and matched us punch
for punch all night long.
On paper we knew we
were the better team, but
Binghamton made us prove
it by not backing down at
all.
U.S. History 2
(HIS 204)
IN
ONL
E • O N S I T E • O N Y O U R WA
Y
Convenience without compromise.
PGraduate on time!
PTransferable SUNY credits
PAffordable tuition
PGCC offers 150 summer courses
• more than 50 online!
ONLINE & AT 7 CAMPUS LOCATIONS | WWW.GENESEE.EDU | 866-CALL-GCC
Want to become a teacher? or
Already teaching and want to
diversify your skills and credentials?
The Division of Special Education
at the University at Albany can help!
We offer the ONLY graduate degree programs in the Capital Region that can lead to multiple
certifications in elementary school, reading, and/or special education teaching.
Learn from experienced faculty who have expertise in the latest evidence-based teaching
methods and who conduct and publish cutting-edge research.
For more information, contact: Bruce Saddler, Director, Division of Special Education Email: [email protected] Website: albany.edu/special_education as a “slugfest” with both
teams going on mini
scoring runs throughout the
game. I thought it really
showed how well we can
play under pressure by not
panicking during their runs
and being able to answer
right back with goals of our
own. They carried all of the
momentum into overtime
because of their late goal,
however the mood on the
sideline never changed.
I never felt like we were
going to lose that game,
and I believe the other 46
guys felt the same way. We
got two huge stops from
Blaze in over time and one
crazy outside shot from
Seth, and that is all we
needed to get the victory.
Tuesday we are back
in Casey Stadium to face
our cross-town rival Siena.
This game is always a fun
one to play in because
of how close both of the
teams are together. Even
though the Saints aren’t
having their best season
you cannot overlook them.
Both teams know that this
is a special game on the
schedule. I am looking
forward to getting back
into the big stadium and
playing in front of our fans
for the last regular season
home game of the year.
I think this was good for
us because we had been
playing just okay lacrosse
up to this week and we
needed a team to wake us
up heading into Yale week.
As much fun as the
atmosphere in Casey
Stadium was last week,
nothing can compare to
the on-field energy at
Reese Stadium during our
top 10 matchup with the
Yale Bulldogs this past
Saturday in New Haven.
We could have played this
game out in a farmer’s
field and I think it would
have had the same energy
and excitement that was
brought by both teams. It
was a game we have had
circled on our schedule for
a few weeks now because
of the NCAA tournament
implications that it holds
for both teams. The win
gave us what is called a
“significant win” to add
to our resume. This is the
type of win that we were
desperately in need of
all year. The energy was
present right from the
pre-game as both teams
were being vocal to each
other in a classic SUNY
versus Ivy way. There
always seems to be an edge
between us two for some
strange reason. The game
itself was best described
WE NEED A
SPORTS EDITOR!
Email [email protected]
to apply.
WELCOME
TO THE
LARGEST PUBLIC
COLLEGE OF
TECHNOLOGY
IN THE
NORTHEAST
SUMMER SESSIONS @ CITY TECH
10 WEEKS. 3 SESSIONS. 1 CAMPUS.
COMPLETE UP TO ONE YEAR
OF STUDY IN THREE MONTHS
APPLY NOW: WWW.CITYTECH.CUNY.EDU/SUMMER
NEW YORK CITY COLLEGE OF TECHNOLOGY
CITY TECH
WHERE CAN TECHNOLOGY TAKE YOU?
9
LACROSSE
FREDERICK
SPORTS EDITOR: CELIA BALF
[email protected]L.COM
300 Jay Street • Brooklyn, NY 11201
Follow
US:
718.260.5500
SPORTS
TUESDAY, APRIL 26, 2016
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
EDITOR: CELIA BALF
[email protected]
@SPORTS_ASP
10
PHOTOGRAPHY
SENIOR SEND OFF:
TRACK AND FIELD
Jonathan Peters, Brittany Gregory / Albany Student Press
(Left) Junior Matthew Campbell placed sixth in the long jump and second in the high
jump. (Top) Freshman Calvin Butlak won the men’s 3,000--steeplechase. (Bottom)
Senior thrower Lauren Lopano placed second placed second in hammer throws.
SOCCER
Amazing Abby teams up with
Great Danes to battle Saints
By KIANA RUGER
Last Friday, the University at
Albany women’s soccer team had
a game under the lights in Tom
and Mary Casey Stadium against
in-city rivals Siena College.
Normally we would tackle this
game as any other game against
the Saints -- eager to play,
anticipating a fight and expecting
a win. Except, today, something
was different. There was this new
feeling -- a new drive in all of us
that we never had before.
As we waited for the first
whistle to blow, we heard a
5-year-old girl cheering her heart
out among our fans. It was at that
very moment that playing this
game meant so much more.
Her name is Abby. We like to
call her Amazing Abby, since it’s
more fitting. Last year UAlbany
women’s soccer proudly became
a part of the program Friends
of Jaclyn. The program allows
sports team across the nation to
“adopt” a child who is suffering
from a chronic disease. This
adoption allows the child to
experience what it’s like to
be a part of a sport and more
importantly, part of a team.
Last year we got the privilege
of meeting Jaclyn, the inspiration
for the foundation. This past
week at our banquet we got to
adopt Abby.
As soon as we met her there
was an instant connection. Abby
is battling leukemia. You’d think
all the therapy, hospital visits and
battles she’s faced would bring
her down, but Abby is quite the
opposite. You would never be
able to guess what this girl is
going through. She has a bright,
loving, carefree personality
and is a stunning person on the
outside as well. In fact, she’s way
more of a people person than
most of us, so we’re learning
from her each day.
Abby surprised us at our game
and when we found out she
was there, we all ran to her and
gave her a big hug. She told us
that she practiced how she was
going to run up to us and we all
complimented her on her Albany
sweatshirt and number 10 jersey
that the team gave her a week
before. After our visit with Abby,
it was time to focus on the game.
As our coach gave her usual
pregame talk, she said something
that stuck with me.
Sure we had fitness testing all
week and were going into this
game in a new formation, but
Abby was there supporting us
with a smile on her face as she’s
battling leukemia. If she can do
that, playing a 90 minute soccer
game should be pretty easy.
Unfortunately we didn’t get
the result we were hoping for.
We settled with a 1-1 tie with
our lone goal coming from Cait
Paltsios in the first five minutes
and Siena’s goal coming in the
last 10 minutes. On top of how
awful it felt to not come out with
a win, I was also concerned with
how Abby would feel after the
game.
Sure enough her sparkling face
came running to me and gave me
a hug. She then made me race
her. I could hardly get my legs to
go after a long game, however I
couldn’t turn down a race against
Abby. Abby beat me in several
full field races.
The team couldn’t have asked
for a more special person to
adopt as a Great Dane.
FOLLOW US ON TWITTER @SPORTS_ASP!
Source: Meghan Merritt
Kiana Ruger and Abby walk on Bob Ford Field.
Download
Related flashcards

Philosophy books

23 cards

Medieval literature

42 cards

Series of books

21 cards

Cinematography

19 cards

Create Flashcards