Sports Tuesday The streak is halted, Danes upset by Cortland

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PUBLISHED
Sports Tuesday
V O L U M E L XX
Red Dragons hand
Albany 21-16 loss
Albany playoff
hopes dimmed
CONTRIBUTING EDITOR
EDITORIAL ASSISTANT
Cortland, N.Y.
The dead silence in the Albany State
lockerroom told the story.
If the 4-2 Great Danes are to receive
their first NCAA playoff berth since 1977,
they will have to sweep their remaining
four games. And even that might not be
good enough.
Saturday, the Danes saw their playoff
hopes slip away in the mud and muck
covering Chugger Davis Field, as the Cortland Red Dragons halted Albany Stare's
four-game winning streak with a 21-16
victory.
"We were brought back to earth today." whispered a somber Bo Murphy.
Afterwards, Coach Bob Ford stood in
the middle of the lockerroom, his voice
breaking the silence. "We're at a
crossroads right now," he softly told his
players. "We could do one of two things;
we could feel sorry for ourselves, and give
up right nc v. Or we could come back on
Monday and itart preparing for Norwich.
"This one hurts me deeply, and I'm sure
it hurts you the same," he continued. "But
don't think that next Saturday, Norwich is
going to be feeling sorry for you."
What hurt the Danes the most in Saturday's game was the wet weather, which induced Mike Milano to fumble seven times
(three of them resulting in turnovers) and
hindering the effectiveness of the wishbone
attack.
"With our kind of offense, because
we're small and rely on quickness, we
always are praying for a dry track," Ford
said. "Last night when we got into Cortland it was raining, so I went with some
coaches to check out the field and it was
like a sponge. At our field the drainage is
so good it wouldn't have mattered."
Despite the slippery surface, the Danes
maintained a 16-14 lead heading into the
fourth quarter thanks-nainly to the expert
kicking of Scott Reagan. The Hudson
Palls native booted field goals of 40, 47
Cortland, N.Y.
When the Albany State Great Danes ran
onto muddy Carl 'Chugger' Davis Field in
Cortland on Saturday, it looked like the
only thing that could keep them out of
post-season play was bureaucratic red tape
surrounding a late compliance form sent to
NCAA headquarters.
When they trudged off the field
however, the late form was the last thing
on their minds, after a shocking 21-16
defeat to the Red Dragons left Albany with
two losses and shaky footing in the playoff
picture.
The Danes, handicapped by a sloppy
field that slowed them down and a
multitude of penalties, appeared to have
added the fumble as an integral part of
their playbook. There was speculation that
Albany would experience let-down and
overconfidence going into the game, but
Head Coach Bob Ford didn't see complacency as the problem.
"We had a super week of practice," said
Ford, "and we played our buns off in that
game."
The bottom line for Albany is that they
have to win their remaining games against
Norwich, Hofstra. SUNY Buffalo and
Wagner, but that won't be enough if they
don't get some help from other schools.
The unexpected loss to Cortland takes control- of Albany's playoff chances out of
their grasp.
"Before this loss, our destiny rested in
our hands," Ford explained, "but now, as
much as I hate to have to admit it, we need
a lot of help from other people."
The Danes received no help in the national rankings over the weekend, as only
three of the nation's Top 20 Division III.
schools lost, but Ford is more concerned
about the regional outlook than how the
rest of the nation fared. Because only four
Division III schools from New York, New
Jersey, and New England are selected for
T2:JLWk
K/JIHI
TYOAR UPS
Receiver John Donelly looks downlleld on a reverse option play against Brockport.
The Danes lost to Cortland on Saturday dropping their record to 4-2
failed to attain a first down.
The Danes got the ball back, but Milano
hit Viscardi between the numbers again
with 7:49 to play, setting up the Dragons at
the Albany 35, trailing by a pair.
On a second-and-19 play, the Danes'
secondary was caught in the wrong defensive alignment, enabling wide receiver Paul
Bearup to spurt free near the goal line.
Quarterback Paul Dargie lofted a high
pass, which sailed into Bearup's arms for
what turned into the game winner.
Down by five, the Danes had one more
opportunity to regain the lead. Milano
connected with Chris Haynor for 13 yards
and Donnelly for another 13 on a crucial
fourtli-and-eight. The reception put the
ball at the 20-yard line with two minutes to
play.
Milano kept the ball for a yard on first
21»-
21 *•
Chiodo leads netwomen to third in SUNYACs
By Ethan Chazin
Second singles player Natalie Goldberg.
This weekend's women's tennis SUNY AC championships reaffirmed that Binghamton, Cortland
and Albany are the three best SUNY women's tennis teams, in that order.
The Danes were unable to finish better than
third, as Binghamton once again captured first
place scoring 21 points and Cortland ended up second with 18 points. The Dane netwomen came up
short finishing with a total of 16 points.
The tournament's number one ranked player
from Cortland was knocked off in the semi-finals
by Albany's Geri Chiodo. Chiodo, ranked third in
the tournament, reached the semi-finals by destroying an Oswego player in the quarter-finals, 6-3,6-2.
Chiodo played the semi-final match flawlessly.
She hammered away from the baseline, varying her
shots throughout the match, hitting effective slice
and top spin shots.
In the finals, Chiodo was beaten 6-0, 6-3 by the
number two tournament seed, Bonnie Loedel of
Binghamton.
Chiodo and Karen Levy went to the doubles
finals, after beating Potsdam 6-1,6-3 in the semifinals. In the finals, the Dane duo lost to the
number two ranked doubles team of Loedel and
Stephanie Benado of Binghamton, 6-1, 2-6, 6-2.
BY THE ALBANY
ALBANY
STUDENT
PRESS
II
STUDENT
PRESS
CORPORATION
October 25, 1985
NUMBER
Anti-S. Africa labor drive underway
New York Public Interest Research
Group (NYPIRG) chapters across the state
are participating in a pledge drive asking
students to promise "not to take a job with
companies that are directly or indirectly
associated with the apartheid system in
South Africa," according to Rob Gullo,
NYPIRG Disarmament Project Leader.
In a press conference Tuesday, Gullo
said that there are 18 schools that are involved in this that have NYPIRG
organizations on them. These include
SUNY schools and private schools, including Syracuse University." There is
over $14 billion invested in South Africa
from the United States and over $7 billion
comes from investments in corporations
that are doing work in South Africa, he
added.
The drive to get students to sign the
pledge began last week, said Gullo, and
names will be used to show how many support the pledge.
Major companies invested in South
Africa include Mobil Corp., Xerox, Texaco, Coca-Cola, Johnson & Johnson, Exxon, GE, and Dow Chemical Co.
Half of these investments in South
Africa from the United States are of New
York headquartered companies. "New
York students will make up many of the
future employees of these companies and
that's why the pledge starts here in New
York state," Gullo said.
According to Gullo, NYPIRG hopes to
accomplish two goals with the pledge: to
make the public aware of students' feelings
about apartheid and companies investing
in South Africa, and to make the companies aware of these feelings.
"Refusing to take a job with these companies is the single most important
measure that a student can take to stop the
apartheid system, and it's not going to
stop here," Gullo said. NYPIRG hopes to
see more colleges in New York state take
The Binghamton tandom dominated the first set,
making all of their shots, while the Dane team made
a lot of uncharacteristic mistakes. The result was a
quick openning set.
But in the second set, Chiodo and Levy turned
things around, playing much more steadily. Loedel
and Benado began making mistakes that Chiodo
and Levy had made in the first set.
In a tense final set, Chiodo and Levy reverted to
their first set ways, forcing too many low percentage shots. They dropped the third set quickly.
The doubles team of Chiodo and Levy has been
an asset to the Danes this year. And on Friday and
Saturday, this team continued to play well. "Karen
has been just fantastic in our last few doubles matches," said Chiodo. "She's been making some
great shots for Albany."
Albany's fourth singles player, Liz Feinberg, won
the finals of her flight, making her the only Dane
besides Chiodo to get past the quarter finals.
The SUNYACs are won by overall point accumulation, making it a team oriented tournament.
And it was evident late Saturday, as the last matches of the day were finished, that the Denes don't
have the kind of depth that they need to beat
Binghamton or even Cortland.
But the Dane's performance this season has been
ai»»
33
Trustees vote
6 percent hike
in dorm rates
By Karen E. Beck
EDITORIAL ASSISTANT
HARK HE0IAVH.Uk UPS
Bob Quite addresses the press conference Tuesday.
"Most important measure a student can take to stop apartheid.
part, he added. "We're going to be sen- cooperate to help NYPIRG's continued
ding information to colleges that don't success, said Duarte.
have NYPIRG organizations on them,
"We cannot allow students to be told
we're, sending1 information to. schools out- that we are ineffective, and that we played
side New York state, and by the end of the no role in^SUNY's divestment," said
yearwe KOpe to have more schools involv- Duarte. It is evident that students did play
ed," he said.
a major role in SUNY's divestment deci"Here at SUNY many students and the sions, he said, adding that students may
NYPIRG chapter had taken . . . a pledge not have been the only factor which afof racial equality of South Africa. fected the SUNY Board's decision, "but
Students on this campus will be asked to the truth of the matter is that we did play a
solemnly promise to refrain from seeking major role."
or accepting employment upon graduation
Duarte said that "at the time of the
from any U.S. corporation that is doing SUNY divestment, strong criticism fell on
business in South Africa," said Paco students and upon those who pledged to
Duarte, Minority Affairs Coordinator for end the economic ties our nation has with
Student Association (SA).
the immoral minority government of
4»SA supports NYPIRG and will
The SUNY Central Board of Trustees
voted Wednesday to increase dorm rates
on all of its campuses by six percent and
took the first step on the road to selfsufficient residence halls.
The increase in dorm rates will result
in an estimated $93 increase for each
student living in a SUNY dormitory.
While at present students are facing
room rate increases, SUNY expects the
cost to level off and eventually decrease.
"In 1993 we will begin to see a lowering of dorm rates and we'll continue to
see a lowering of costs after that as long
as there is no substantial increase in inflation rates," said William Anslow,
Vice Chancellor for Finance and
Business.
In approving self-sufficient dorms,
SUNY will also lose its $6.6 million state
subsidiary for residential halls.
SUNY presently has a state subsidy of
$5.4 million in the 1985/1986 Budget,"
for the- operation of Residential Halls,
said Anslow.
"This is the first time the residence
hall budget has been submitted under
the concept of self-sufficiency although
the concept of self-sufficiency itself has
periodically come before the Board
since 1980," said Executive Vice
Chancellor Jerome B. Komisar in a
memo to the Board members.
Not everyone believes self-sufficiency
is the way to go, however.
"People are abandoning public support for public education. I don't see
how SUNY can do the same," said Student Association of the State University
(SASU) President Jane McAlevey.
"Allowing dorms to be tested on the
market is wrong." she said. "It defeats
the purpose of subsidized education."
Under the concept of self-sufficiency,
it is possible that dorm rates would vary
from campus to campus. This could
force students to choose a university
based upon dormitory costs rather than
the quality or type of education
available, she said.
"Under the plan that we presented to
the Board on Wednesday, the cost on
some campuses won't increase at all but
will continue to be $1,550, although
there were inflationary costs on that
campus," said Anslow.
"Self-sufficiency means all facility
operations and maintenance costs are
funded primarily through dormitory
fees," said University President Vincent
O'Leary last week.
"Several definitions of the concept do
exist," he added, "based on the expenses to be included and the extent to
which the subsidy will be reduced."
Also at Wednesday's budget meeting
was Steve Gawley, Student Association
president, who protested the lack of student input involved in the decision to go
self-sufficient. "We went to the meeting
in order to convince the trustees to
postpone consideration of selfsufficiency until such time as the
students and other groups could get involved," said Gawley. Other groups
might include United University Professors (UUP) and the State Faculty
Senate.
"We would like to convince SUNY
Central to adopt a "walls-in"!
SA sues for grouper law injunction
By Altera Clmbora
NEWS EDITOR
STAFF WRITER
ALBANY
By Laureen Moore
By Mike MacAdam
By Marc Berman
and 31 yards; the last one coming with 31
seconds left in the third quarter, giving
Albany a 16-14 lead. The Danes scored
their only touchdown in the second quarter
on a 13-yard pass to John Donnelly.
Except for two running plays in the first
half, the Danes' defense dominated the
Dragons' run-oriented offense. The
Dragons were unable to sustain a lengthy
drive, but still managed a 14-10 halftime
edge on the strength of Todd Hobin's
75-yard touchdown run in the opening
period and Howard Horton's 81-yard encore performance in the second quarter.
Besides those two defensive
breakdowns, the Albany defense would
not budge. But in the fourth quarter, the
Dragons' offense finally capitalized on the
Danes' mistake-prone offense.
Milano was intercepted by Bob Viscardi
with 10 minutes to play, but the Dragons
OF NEW YORK AT
Friday
The streak is halted, Danes upset by Cortland
ALBANY „
UNIVERSITY
Kim Pettichord made her
Hall of Fame run in the
SUNYACs
See page 23
OCTOBER 22, 1985
^.
AT THE STATE
Charging that Albany's Grouper Law is
unconstitutional, Student Association
President Steve Gawley, along with the 16
students and one landlord, will file for a
temporary restraining order against the city Friday.
If the restraining order is granted, said
Gawley, the law, which states that no more
than three unrelated people may live on the
same rental unit, becomes "null and void"
pending a hearing for a preliminary injunction, which would extend the suspen-
Mark Mishler
Equal protection under the law.
sion of the law until resolution of the suit.
The law is being challenged, said SA attorney Mark Mishlcr, on several
arguments based on the principle of equal
protection under the law. This means that
different groups in the same situation
should be treated the same and any
destinctions made must be legal.
One distinction made in the Grouper
Law, according to Mishler, is in regard to
age, since the law says that no more than
three unrelated, people over the age of 18
may live together.
A second distinction is based on relation. "There is no rational basis why
unrelated people may not live together,'
said Mishler.
The third distinction is the violation of
the due process rights of landlords, in that
the law restricts how landlords may use
their property, said Mishler.- •
An important factor in the case, both
Mishler and Gawley agreed, is whether the
city has the power to enact such a law.
We feel it's a basic constitutional question of whether a city ordinance can define
the word "family", said Gawley. "The
definition of a family is not something a city is allowed to do,"said Mishler. "Cities
are the creations of the state and can only
do what the state allows them to do," he
said, adding "this kind of enactment is
beyond the powers a city can have."
In order to get a temporary restraining
order, according to Mishler, four things
must be shown: that the case is likely to be
successful, that irrepairable injury will be
inflicted if it is not granted, that there is a
balance of equity on both sides, and that a
restraining order is the proper thing to do
while the case is pending.
"Ws feel it's a good suit," said Gawley.
"There's no guarantee we'll get an injunction, but I think we have a good chance,"
he said.
As an example of irrepairable injury,
Gawley cited an affadavit given by a
former Director of Off-Campus Housing
Karleen Karlson which stated that students
could be harmed irrepairably in terms
ofgrades if forced to move out of their
apartments.
"The ordinance is being used as a tool to
keep students in line," said Gawley. "It's
unrealistic in what it's trying to achieve.
It's not going to transform students into
good neighbors," he asserted.
Gawley said the suit would be filed even
if a temporary restraining order is not
granted. "The suit is an anti-ordinance action — not an anti-city or antl-Whalen action," he said, adding that students will
still be encouraged to be good neighbors.
"We have a reasonable shot but there's
no guarantee," said Gawley. "Restraining
order and preliminary injunction aside, the
case on its own merit could very well
won."
13!J
wm&m*
. .
. . . . , ,
• • *.&.*««;.*•*
FRIDAY,
2
ALBANY
STUDENT
PRESS
D FRIDAY, OCTOBER
25, 1985
NEWS BRIEFS
fftoWmM
Brutality charged
Johannesburg
(AP) An opposition group in Parliament
on Wednesday accused police of shooting
indiscriminately in their attempt to quell
riots that have gripped the Cape Town
area for weeks.
Officers manning a new rapid-fire gun
that fires rubber bullets were seen behaving as if they were "trying out their new
toy," said a member of the Progressive
Federal Party's "Unrest Monitoring
Committee."
A spokesman at police headquarters in
Pretoria, speaking on condition of
anonymity, had no comment on the report
except to say its contents should be filed
"at the nearest police station" for
investigation.
Gen. Constand Viljoen, chief of the
South African Defense Force, said
"malicious elements" were trying to
discredit security forces through rumors of
brutality by the police and soldiers.
tion centers is reduced from 1,771 to a
court-ordered 1,373.
Attorney General Mike Cody asked the
judge to delay the ban requested by
lawyers for inmates until after a special
legislative session on prisons, but Higgins
said the state "has been indulged time and
time again."
Cranston blasts China
Washington, D.C.
(AP) Newly uncovered information that
China has recently offered sensitive
nuclear technology to Iran and other nations threatens to derail the U.S.-China
nuclear cooperation agreement signed in
July, congressional experts and other
analysts said Wednesday.
They voiced concern that China will
help other nations, including Iran, acquire
a nuclear weapons capability in violation
of the spirit of the U.S.-China nuclear
agreement, which provides the framework
for sales of U.S. commercial nuclear
technology to China.
Sen. Alan Cranston, D-Calif., went
public with charges Monday that China
has aided, or offered aid, to Brazil, Argentina, Pakistan, South Africa and Iran.
"My information is that China has
either engaged in serious nuclear trade
negotiations with or actually has continued
a series of nuclear exports to each and
every one of these five "nuclear outlaw"
nations subsequent to Chinese discussions
with the Reagan administration officilas
on the importance of curbing such
troublesome exports," he said in a statement on the Senate floor.
Reagan to meet at UN
New York
(AP) President Reagan embarked Wednesday on three days of intensive talks with
friendly world leaders to help prepare him
for his summit meeting next month with
Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev.
Arriving at the United Nations for a
round of ceremonies marking the world
JOHN CURRV UPS
The latest Capital District attraction Is romantic carriage rldas leaving the Albany
Hilton on State Street lor scenic tours ol historic downtown Albany.
NEWS EDITOR
As many as SO students on two
separate nights were left stranded
last weekend on the uptown campus when a bus driver left work
early one day and then did not
show up for work the next.
According to Assistant Vice
President for Plant Facilities Dennis Stevens, one of two drivers
scheduled for the past Saturday
and Sunday nights was fired after
the truancy was discovered.
In addition, University Police
Department (UPD) cars will be
used to verify that late night runs
are in fact being made, Stevens
said.
Many of the students were apparently trying to return home
after using study facilities uptown
during the weekend to prepare for
their mid-term exams. On Saturday night, a bus labeled "garage"
refused to take the students
downtown, said one student, but
the driver was told he had to by a
UPD officer when the situation
reoccurred Sunday.
Tid> §[email protected]@
UN makes traffic jam
Store hostages let go
Jaii doors closed
By James O'Sullivan
body's 40th anniversary, Regan's first
order of business was to meet with his
special envoy, John C. Whitehead, just
back from a fence-mending mission to Italy, Egypt and Tunisia.
The deputy secretary of state was dispatched by Reagan to soothe strains arising
from the U.S. interception of an Egyptian
airliner carrying Palestinian hijackers to a
safe haven following the murder of
American tourist Leon Kilnghoffer aboard
an Italian cruise ship.
In a sutement issued after the 20-minute
meeting in Reagan's hotel suite, White
House spokesman Larry Speakes said
Whitehead reported he had been wellreceived in all three capitals and was confident his mission had been successful.
New York
(AP) Fenders gleamed, diplomats preened
and motorists steamed Wednesday as more
than 1,000 state limousines delivered the
leaders of the world into the no-man's land
of midtown Manhattan traffic.
"It's terrible. It's gridlock all over,"
said William Fugazy, owner of the city's
biggest limo service. "Trying to pick someone up at the Waldorf is just desperation. And with the president in town,
forget it."
The occassion for the occlusion was the
40th anniversary of the United Nations,
being celebrated this week by more than 80
government cheiftans and their entourages. They moved by motorcade,
dipensing misery as they passed.
"They ought to have these nice beautiful
diplomatic meetings outside of the,ci,t,y,"
suggested Gary Scrittorale, clenching his
teeth and his steering wheel as he sat in a
line of halted cars outside the WaldorfAstoria Hotel.
Brasilia, Brazil
(AP) Brazil's Congress on Wednesday approved a bill to set up a national assembly
to rewrite the Constitution, vastly altered
by the military regime that ran the country
for more than two decades.
The bill, introduced last June by President Jose Sarney, passed by a vote of 399
to 61. The tally came after a debate that
began Tuesday morning.
The measure calls for a constitutionwriting assembly to be made up of new
senators and House of Representative
members to be elected Nov. 15, 1986. The
assembly will convene Feb. 1, 1987.
Brazil's last constitution, written in
1946, was changed by the right-wing
military government that took over in 1964
to give wide-ranging powers to the five
successive army generals who served as
president until this year.
New York
(AP) Two sobbing clerks and a jubilant
department store manager were freed early
Thursday after being held hostage for
more than three hours by three armed men
who apparently bungled a holdup, police
said.
Two of the gunmen surrendered five
minutes after releasing the hostages. The
third gave up about three hours later after
one of the suspects, speaking over the
store's public address system, urged him to
surrender.
No one was injured in the hostagetaking incident, which began at 9:30 p.m.
Wednesday and ended early Thursday in a
Times Square Store in the Springfield
Gardens section of Queens.
According to Inspector Robert Burke, a
police spokesman, the three gunmen apparently entered the store with the Intention of robbing it.
Students boarding a bus
"We had a bus driver . . . Notice the past tense.'
Student Zionist Council ol the
United States will be held Oct.
25-27 at Howack Hotel. For
more Info call 434-0866.
Halloween Party will be held
Saturday, Oct. 26 In CC
Ballroom 8:30 p.m.-1:00 a.m.
Ticket sales Oct. 22-26 In CC
lobby.
Trip to Boston's Qulncy
Market will take place Sunday,
Nov. 3. T i c k e t s available
Tuesday-Thursday from 2:30
p.m.-5:30 p.m. In Campus
Center.
Jay Leno will speak Monday,
Oct. 28 In the Campus Center
Ballroom. Tickets on sale In
CC lobby.
Special Olympics will be
holding a General Interest
Meeting on Tuesday, Oct. 29
at 7:30 p.m. in LC 11.
Who's Who Among Students
n o m i n a t i o n s and sellnomlnatlons are due In the
Student Affairs office AD 129
on Friday, Nov. 1 at 5:00 p.m.
The Capital District Law
School Fair will be held on
Wednesday, Oct. 30 9:00
a.m.-11:45 a.m. and 1:30
p.m.-3:30 p.m. In Campus
STUDENT
PRESS
3
Center Ballroom.
University Community Symphony Orchestra Unlverstlty
C h o r a l e and q u e s t bass
barlton Thomas Beverldge will
play on Tuesday, Oct. 29 at
8:00 p.m. In Performing Arts
Center.
The Race Is on soda can drive
for telethon has begun. All
dorms have until Nov. 24 to
win. For more Info contact
Diane at 442-6725.
Apache Heiay will be held Sunday, Oct. 27 between 3 p.m.
and 4:30 p.m. at small founThe Vale Russian Chorus will tains. For more Info call Steve
sing on Sunday, Nov. 3 at 3 at 463-5430.
p.m. at the Troy Savings Bank Woman Internship Program is
Music Hall.
now available for s p r i n g
Vlnyluat
record and video semester. For more Info call
flea market will be held Sun- Susan Kaplow at 442-4220.
day, O c t . 27 from 12:00 Halloween Party at the Hilton
p . m . - 6 : 0 0 p . m . a t 4 8 1 will be held Thursday, Oot. 31
Washington Ave.
at 9 p.m.-4 a.m. sponsored by
Marathon Concert and Open PI Lambda Phi.
By Craig W o r t m a n
anyway. What are they going to restrict next, where
Calling it an "issue of freedom," the SUNYA do you draw the line?" he asked.
Young Republicans are embarking on a petition
The issue is in direct relation to free trade,
drive to protest the University's new vending Weinfeld said. "People shouldn't he forced to pay
policy.
money to groups they don't like. Less people are
The new policy limits the right to sell goods on able to be involved so the market is controlled."
the podium exclusively to student groups. In addiThis sentiment was echoed by vendors on the
tion, all profits must go to the group and only podium, all of whom were reluctant to have the
group members are permitted to sell.
organization they were selling for identified because
The Young Republicans are fighting the new they said it might jeopardize future relations with
policy on the basis of "philosophical principles." . the administration regarding solicitations permits.
President Bruce Weinfeld said, "As Young
"I can't figure out why they're doing it," said
Republicans we believe in individual rights in a one student selling records. "I've heard a lot of
strong sense. We want to protect these rights and reasons, but I haven't heard any good ones. I think
limit restrictions."
it goes against the way our country is being run."
Weinfeld said he intends to circulate a petition
Another vendor selling beer signs said, "I don't
around campus to try to gain support for the issue.
agree with it because it restricts free enterprise for
He said he anticipates a great deal of backing, judg- students."
ing by the results of a previous informal poll he conThe record vendor was working to raise money
ducted. "Students have overwhelmingly supported for the tennis teams, according to solicitations perthe right to sell, only one or two out of about 200 mits on file on the Office of Campus Life.
people have been opposed," said Weinfeld.
Ross Abelow, Student Association Vice President, had a different opinion. "I do see it as an ad"We believe in the people," Weinfeld continued,
"people should be allowed to decide. An vantage for students for there to be as many sellers
authoritative figure shouldn't say 'this is right and as possible," he said, "but this is university property, it isn't a shopping mall. We need to regulate a
this is wrong'."
Weinfeld asserted, "this may seem like a small glut" of sellers.
Abelow, however, said he saw no reason why
thing, but what liberty will they take away next?
With the drinking age, there's less to do on campus
6»»
'•
TANIA STEELE UPS
Young Republicans President Bruce Weinfeld
"We believe in the people.'
IBM mainframe considered for SUNYwide link-up
By Bill Jacob
EDITORIAL ASSISTANT
H o u s e w i l l be h e l d on
Wednesday, Oot. 30 from
12:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m. In the Red
Carpet Lounge of the Performing Arts Center.
Halloween treats are being
sold on Quad dinnerllnes, Oct.
24, 25, and 27 for $1.00.
Community and Public Service Program Sign Up Is being
held Monday,
Oot.
28-Wednesday, Oct. 30 between LC 3 and 4 between
10:00 a.m. and 4:00 p.m.
Let's Make a Deal show will be
held Friday, Oct. 28 at 7:30
p.m. In the Dutch Quad
cafeteria.
"I was unaware that the other
driver had some problem . . . I
think given the circumstances he
should have" made one last run
downtown, said Stevens.
UPD spokesman Nancy Loux
said she had not seen any incident
reports saying UPD officers had
interacted Sunday night. Stevens
added he too was not aware that
an officer was involved.
"We did have a problem —
that problem was one bus," said
Stevens, noting that normally two
buses run until about 12:30 a.m.
on Weekend nights.
"I apologize for the inconvenience and I have taken the action
necessary," said Stevens, adding,
"we had a bus driver . . . notice
the past tense."
According to Stevens' assistant, Megan Beidl, the transportation supervisor will now be expected to call Public Safety and
verify that officers have noted
that the buses are running.
"We can verify on radio and
we will do that," added Stevens.
Young Republicans fight for campus vendors
PREVIEW OF EVENTS
free listings
ALBANY
Bus driver fired after stranding many students
Brazil to reform
Nashville
(AP) A federal judge has slammed shut the
doors of the Tennessee prison system
because of overcrowding, a move the head
of the system said would help but "is not a
solution to the problem."
The order Wednesday by U.S. District
Judge Thomas A. Higgins burs the state
from admitting prisoners to the system except for dangerous convicts who must be
kept "for reasons of security."
He ordered the ban to continue until the
number of inmates housed at three recep-
OCTOBER 25, 1985 •
lillICA SPIEGEL UPS
The University's current malnlrame
A $2 million IBM computer is coming.
A network of computers hooking up SUNY
Central with the four University Centers could be
in place within two years as SUNY purchases a
set of IBM mainframes to link the campuses
across New York.
SUNY has received bids from major computer
manufacturers to install a mainframe computer
in each of the four University Centers and
SUNY's Central Administration building
downtown, said John Philippo, coordinator of
Computer Systems Development for SUNY.
IBM has turned in the lowest bid which fulfills
state requirements, and will most likely supply
the'universities with their 3080 series of computers, said Lelf Hartmark, Acting Director of
SUNYA's Computing Center.
Although major companies such as Sperry,
Digital Equipment Corporation (DEC), and
NAS also submitted bids, IBM's bid was
substantially lower, Hartmark said. In addition,
an IBM would give students access to a computer
which plays a large role in the usiness field, he
said.
The IBM at SUNYA will initially cost approximately $2 million for hardware (the actual computer), with $1 million to be added after they
upgrade one year later, Hartmark said. The annual maintenance and software expense will be
about $1.3 million, he added.
Installation of the new system is expected to
begin early next semester and requires the expansion of the "machine room" in the computing
center, Hartmark said.
According to Hartmark, the State Division of
Budget was concerned about the rising cost of
computing in the SUNY system and recommended that identical computers be purchased for four
University Centers to reduce purchase and
maintenence costs, as well as costs associated
with writing software (programs) for each campus' administration needs.
Although the new computers will only b purchased for the university centers and SUNY Central, plans are being made to purchase smaller
computers for all of SUNY's four-year colleges,
Philippo said.
Although these computers will probably differ
from those at the university centers, they will all
be linked together by SUNY Net, which is currently, being devefoped, he said.
By linking the computers of SUNY's universities and colleges, students and faculty will both
benefit by being able to exchange information
6*
4
ALBANY
STUDENT
PRESS
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OCTOBER
25, 1985
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FRIDAY,
Safety Day to get publicity fund
By Angelina Wang
STAFF WRITER
At their Wednesday night
meeting. Central Council voted
after much debate to take $305
out of its Emergency Spending
line (ESL)'to pay for publicity for
November 7th's Women's Safety
Awreness Day.
"Every year, SA has helped the
P r e s i d e n t ' s Task Force on
Women's Safety to sponsor their
W o m e n ' s Safety A y a r e n e s s
Day," said Lisa Donohue, Chair
of the President's Task Force on
Women's Safetey. This year,
however, the money was never
budgeted by SA.
Donohue told the council that
the only result of not passing the
bill was "you'd be killing another
(awareness) day."
Gawley, however, said " I or
Eric never made^a committment
— I think it was a misunderstanding. I'll leave the decision of this
up to the Council. I don't believe
the Task Force is trying to pull
something fast."
" I was working under the
assumption that there was already
a budget line and that we
wouldn'thaveto dip into the ESL.
There was a definite lack of communicarion. We may came short
on other programs if we allot this
money,"said Francisco Duarte,
Steve Landis, an off-campus
Minority Affairs Coordinator for council member, made a point
SA.
that "the Emergency Spending
Council Member Nathaniel line is not just for groups that
Charny asked why SA, which has weren't budgeted for, it is an
its own women's safety line, sup- emergency function. If a group
ports the President's Task Force. doesn't have ways os paying for it
"University President O'Leary — they shouldn't spend it. '
is saying that Women's Safety is
Tuttle responded by saying that
not that important to him, and "work, and printing being done
that SA should p a y , " he said.
now will not have to be spent by
Steve Gawley, SA President, SA if the bill does not pass. This
agreed, saying the "President is an event which will come off
would have given $3000 for Cor- whatever we vote for this or not.
etta Scott King to come and It is not a crime of this Task Force
speak." He added, "they should
be able to handle $300, and not
take it from a tight SA budget."
" W e are given a small budget
for the Task Force of $1500,"
said Donohue, adding that if the
bill didn't pass, "we would have
to use the money put aside for
another Awareness Day in the
Spring." According to Donohue,
Eric Schwartzwall, SA controller,didn't see a problem with
2 Commerce Ave.,
Albany 434-1955
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Steve Russo, Internal Affairs
Committee Chair, called the
situation " a n internal SA screwup. Put your money where yourmouth is. If you want awareness,
you should pay for awareness."
Stephanie Kay, council member
for Dutch Quad agreed, "it was
our mistake — We allocated forthem in the past. If we don't give
it to them now, we'll have to go
through the same thing again,"
she'said.
The bill passed by a vote of
20-7-1. Afterwards Council Chair
Bill McCann lectured to Council
and said, " t h e point here tonight
wasn't over funding money, or
women's issues. The point is that
people come to Central Council
after they've spent money, and
assume we'll give it to them and
then the bill passes."
D
Shiyveiam Plaza
Albany
440-0077
. . , « • « . « .. .
KAPLAN
I
The worlds leading
test preporilanlzallon
By Dan Happ
The nuclear freeze movement on campus is inching closer to its goal of rounding
up 5,000 signatures as part of a nationwide petition drive to present ot President
Reagan a n d Soviet leader Mikhail
Gorbachev.
The movement is hoping to get the
signatures of one million freeze supporters
in time for the scheduled summit talks in
Geveva on November 19 and 20.
After just three days of petitioning in
the Caampus Center and one sweep of
State Quad, organizers have collected
almost 600 signatures, according to Peace
Project Coordinator Laura Letendre.
The petition, which is being sponsored
by the Upper Hudson Nuclear Weapons
Freeze Campaign, the local branch of the
national Freeze movement, is an urgent
appeal to Reagan and Gorbachev. It calls
for a ban on the testing and stockpiling ofnuclear arms while the talks proceed, and
subsequent measures towards a permanent
Test Ban Treaty and a comprehensive
Freeze Agreement.
Although she said she is "really please d " by the enthusiastic response to the
petition so far, Lentendre admitted having
doubts as to the impact the petition Would
have on the Summit meeting, even if the
goal of one million signatures is achieved.
"It's a big propaganda game on both
sides," she said, referring to the hostile atmosphere generated by the exchange of
petty insults and accusations between
Russia and the United States. Reagan has
already indicated that he will shift the
focus of next month's summit meeting
form arms control negotiations to Russia's
human rights violations and expansionist
policies.
Despite the somewhat pessimistic
outlook for the summit meeting, members
of Peace Project stressed the need for
positive action rather than passive
acceptance.
Tom Gaveglia, who has been with Peace
Project for a year and a half, said he feels
that the "ludicrous and crazy" nature of
the arms race is enough to work against it.
"These problems can be solved," he
said, "it's not going to happen overnight
and each of us has to do our part."
Gaveglia added that right now, "the
world is in big trouble -r- The nuclear arms
race threatens my life and the lives of
everybody I k n o w . "
It is the almost universal fear of nuclear
war and the large public support of a
mutual and verifiable freeze that Peace
Project, and the Freeze Campaign in
general, is trying to draw upon in its petition drive, he said.
A referendum last year at SUNYA
showed that 85 percent of the voters supported a freeze and it is estimated that
three out of every four Americans would
like to see an end put to the arms race.
Translating this support into constructive
action, freeze organizers say, is the difficult part.
"It's h a r d , " Gaveglia said, referring to
Peace Project's effort to educate people
about the arms race and gain their support
of an arms freeze, "but somebody has to
do it. People ill the movement care about
life. Humans are generally good, it's just
LIVE IN ALB A N Y
THE M I C H E L O B
F E S T I V A L O F STARS
that world leaders are serving their own
needs and people are blindly following.
Social change can't happen if people aren't
educated," he said.
Peace Project is a campus group which
was founded 15 years ago by History Professor Don Birn, who was a student during
the years of the Vietnam War, and who re-
Smyvosant Plaza
Albany
480-0077
STUDENT
PRESS
*j
PROPEACE hopes to gather 5,000
for nine month anti-nuke march
Los Angeles
COLLEGE PRESS SERVICE — Hoping to
revive the fires of campus anti-nuclear
activism, disarmament proponents are
combing colleges this month tosign up
students for an "unprecedented" ninemonth march across the country.
Leaders of PROPEACE (People
Reaching Out for Peace) hope to attract
5,000 people — over 2,000 of them college students — to march from Los
Angeles to Washington D.C. next year,
a 3,235 mile journey beginning in March
and climaxed by a candlelight vigil by
one million protestors in November.
"Members of Congress have made it
very clear that nothing will happen to
dramatically affect the arms race until
there is, literally, a citizen uprising,"explaines PROPEACE founder David
Mixner, a veteran of Vietnam war protests and a longtimeorganizer of state
ballot referenda.
To pull off the uprising, Mixner
hopes to raise $18 to $20 million, which
would make it the most expensive, prolonged protest in memory.
PROPEACE will also have to find
some way to awaken the dormant campus anti-nuclear movement.
"Organized anti-nuclear forces on
campus are not there now, but there is a
great deal of receptivity ot the issue,"
reported Marshall Mayer, who is
organizing PROPEACE's current fourweek national 125-campus recruiting
drive.
Because few students can devote nine
months to walking across the country,
Mayer has organized a panel of professors to aid students in getting course
credit for t h e a d v e n t u r e . Marchorganizers expect students will make
up between 33 and 40 percent of the
participants.
Mayer thinks the sheer magnitude of
the sacrifice PROPEACE is seeking will
revive interest in the arms race.
COME TO GRANDMA'S
The Palace
True F l a v o r
Homemade Pies
b a k e d right
on the p r e m i s e s
South Africa." He added that
students were "accused of ignoring the oppressed and the starving
of our own nation, but the truth
is that the injustices in South
Africa are injustices of this
nation."
Student activists "worry more
about the welfare of this nation
than those who fail to see how the
American corporations in South
Africa take away from the
employment opportunities that
should be available to the people
of this nation," said Duarte.
Bojana Jordan, President of
the South
African-American
Peoples' Friendship Association
and a South African exile, added
that " I just want to say how much
we salute this step taken by
NYPIRO."
According to Jordan, as of last
July, the U.S. invested $14.6
billion in South Africa, "thus indirectly enabling it to finance
apartheid, and apartheid lives on
the blood, sweat and tears of 26
million oppressed Africans who
are relegated to a status of subhuman being by representatives
of the Wi million whites."
"We make no apologies. These
companies are In South Africa to
do nothing but help genocide of
Africans by the racist South
African government. Signing this
pledge is a logical follow-up to the
most glorious divestment action
already taken by SUNY," said
j'ordan.
ALBANY
mains active in the nuclear freeze movement. Although it is small, at presenr
there are only 15 members. Peace Project's
members are dedicatred and, as Birn suggested, more committed than in his day
because there isn'tthe individual, personal
motive that there was then, and because
they're pursuing a concern most people on
campus today don't have."
Special Separate
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a v a i l a b l e for
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OF VOUK I «Vt SOi TO I 0 l
ROCK IIIIIOESIIIII
Jeff Rosen, Council member
for Dutch Quad, said in defense
of the Finance Committee, " I was
under the impression that this
money was needed, and would
ber otherwise supported. We
shouldn't worry about who's running the show,as long as the show
goes on.
25, 1985 •
Disarmament petition to reach Geneva summit
Pledge
LIBERTY
(Pick-up at EACH TOWER LOBBY)
LlvE LP*-lM%RrS
CoMNtRY-SoUl-^Z2
that the posters were to be made
before the bill passes. Thid decision was not an example of the
Executive Branch running rampant with the budget. They had
no choice, they had to spend the
money."
Kenny,
We would like to offer our
condolences to you during
this difficult time.
The ASP
Free Transportation
from
SUNY to JADE FOUNTAIN
and return.
the bill passing since SA is a part
of the Task Force, and has traditionallyhelped with funds.
One-third of the money will be
spent on posters, which had
already been sent to the printers
before Council voted on the bill.
"Members on the Task Force
assumed money for advertising
would be taken care of from
S A , " said Doug Tuttle, SA
Media Director. "Posters and
adds will go through regardless of
how the bill goes," he said.
OCTOBER
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ALBANY
STUDENT
PRESS
D FRIDAY,
OCTOBER
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 25, 1985 D ALBANY
25, 1985
IBM mainframe
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with members of other schools, Philippo said.
All of the colleges will belong to BIDNET, a
network of schools which is designed to exchange
information and allow students to work together
with other private and public colleges or to access
the wide variety of computers available at other
schools, Philippo said.
There is also the potential for inter-faculty
research through networks. "One of the side effects we hope that will come out of the change is
joint projects between faculty members," said
Philippo.
Several SUNY campuses expressed a desire to
upgrade their computer facilities about three
years ago, Hartmark said.
By purchasing more than one computer at a
time, SUNY will be able to make better use of the
money which is allocated by the state legislature,
Philippo said.
The Computing Center will maintain the
recently upgraded Sperry 1100/91 until January
1989. At that time, all of the administrative needs
of the university will have already been
transfered from the Sperry to the IBM, Hartmark said.
The Sperry will be in use for another three
years in order to allow the IBM to become integrated in the university, especially with respect
to administrative services, Hartmark said.
According to Hartmark, the Computing
Center plans to make other changes in the near
future. "The DEC has proven to be a popular
machine and we encourage its use," Hartmark
said, "but we are trying to get together a package
on campus to purchase a VAX [also produced by
DEC] to eventually replace the DEC-20."
The DEC-20 is the Computing Center's second
largest computer and was purchased about two
years ago.
Hartmark noted that the DEC-20 was purchased at a fifty percent discount and was "a good
financial deal." However, he added, Digital
Equipment Corp. will only actively support the
machine for an additional three years.
The new IBM will initially suuport about 200
simultaneous users, as the Sperry does, but will
be upgraded in about one year to accept as many
as 300 simultaneous users, Hartmark said. The
DEC can currently handle 90 users, he added.
•students- •
SfiVE 20 °lo
' on any of our
services
(with valid student ID)
\ EXPIRES 12110)85
!Mot valid'with any other special
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The IBM will probably not be available to
students and faculty until January 1987, Hartmark said. The reason, he explained, is to allow
Computing Center staff to become fully familiar
with the computer and to ensure that the transfer
of administrative records is done efficiently and
accurately.
Although many decisions have yet to be made
concerning the purchase of software and other
options for the IBM, Hartmark said that "we
will have more software than we currently have."
He added that a laser printer would also probably
be purchased, allowing users to have various
graphics capabilities.
Although students may be somewhat inconvenienced by the changes going on in the Computer
Center, Scott Kashen, President of ACM, the
University's Computer club, said that students
will benefit in the long run. "We'll have a much
more powerful machine and one with a better
name [IBM]. One that will hopefully reduce the
inefficiency of the Sperry," he said.
But the benefits most students will receive are
expected after graduation, Kashen said. "It [the
IBM] will give Computer Science majors more
background in computers when they go looking
for a job."
•
Vendors
-«3
groups couldn't work with individual sellers. "A
student should be able to go through a group and
give to the group a percentage [of the profits], then
both benefit," he suggested. "Many groups with
small budgets may have trouble raising money.
Why can't the chess club make some money this
way?"
He continued, "Everyone doesn't have good
connections to get records for $2. There's no reason
why a group can't gain this benefit" from a private
vendor.
Under the current policy, that isn't allowed, but
it happens anyway, according to Weinfeld. He said,
"Someone can go to a frat president and ask to use
the name and then take the profit. I know people
who've joined clubs so they can sell stuff. If you
don't have friends in high places, you can't do
that," he added.
•
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Dirty Face
Sat 26 Roger Wilco & The Radio Waves
Thur 31 The Jailhouse Rockers
with Gary Windo
19 or older
dolavs uf fifteen mlnutrra or so are possible
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O
'.(.'t.t ' r r H H •*•»»*•*•*••"•'
Q
DesFosses
Heavy Metal
Heaven and Stone Henge
Romantics & special guest Four Walls
Admission only $7
By Colleen Deslaurier
n
Running a campaign is hard work admitted Helen DesFosses, who hopes to use
her experience as chair of SUNYA's Public
Affairs and Policy Department wisely as a
member of the Albany County School
Board.
The School B.oard elections will be held
November 5 and are citywide, said DesFosses,
adding tri.'you never
realize how i ig the city is
until you go door-todoor." DesFosses said
she realized from campaigning that "a
small number of people can swing an election. This makes each individual vote
crucial."
Friday
Profile
"There is an enormous challenge to
reach as many people as possible,"
DesFosses said. "I have realized the importance of the organizing of volunteers,"
she added.
From campaigning in every quad, handing out literature and shaking hundreds
of hands, DesFosses has met many
students who, contrary to statements that
have appeared in the press, she said are
concerned about what happens in the
School Board race.
"The students want to be good
neighbors. Also, a large number of SUNY
graduates end up living here and are concerned about the reputation of the school
system," said DesFosses.
"Being a political scientist, I have long
studied and taught how the American
government works. However, up until now
I never had the chance to participate in it
first-hand," said DesFosses.
"Many people have' expressed lots of
concerns and goals for the city of Albany.
I want to be able to put these goals into action," said DesFosses, adding "I care
about this city and want to make it my
home."
As an active participant in community
affairs since she first moved here in 1978,
DesFosses said she believes that she has
both talent and experience to add to the
Albany School system.
DesFosses has displayed her leadership
abilities by chairing the Advisory Committee for the Women's Building Project, ser-
"I have positive energy — I am a realist,
but an optimist. I can keep groups moving
toward one goal and keep them enthusiastic along the way," asserted
DesFosses. "I also feel I have the skills in
communication to help pull everything
together," she added.
"I am also experienced in taking an idea
from conception and following it through
to completion. This steady consistent approach will be helpful to the school
board," she explained.
DesFosses said there are several issues
she hopes to deal with if she is elected including increasing the number of high
school graduates to attend college and raising more revenues without raising taxes.
"I would also like to develop partnerships between the University and corporations on one hand and the Albany School
system on the other," said DesFosses, adding that there is already some "collaboration" between the SUNYA and Albany
High School departments in languages and
the arts.
But DesFosses said she feels the relationship between the university and Albany
High School "could be greatly expanded."
High school students could be encourages
to attend SUNYA's football games and
college students should be encouraged to
do more tutoring at the high school, she
explained.
There should also be some sort of mentor system between both, the athletes as
well as the minorities to increase the enrollment at SUNYA, said DesFosses.
"I also feel many corporations in the
Capital District can bring staff assistance,
computer equipment, and management
training in the school system. There are
some cities where companies have
'adopted' a school — I would like to see
this sort of thing occur," DesFosses said.
?AY<
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COREY HART
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Saturday, Oct 26
Monday, Oct 28
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Public Affairs chair DesFosses
seeks work at different 'school'
ving as a member of the Board of Directors at the Albany YWCA, Mercy House
and Albany County Youth Bureau.
DesFosses is also the former chair of the
Peace and Justice Committee of the
Roman Catholic Diocese in Albany as well
as a member of the Legal Redress Committee of the Albany National Association for
the Advancement of Colored People
(NAACP).
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EDITORIAL
Making policy
Vending
To The Editor:
We feel that the recent University action prohibiting individual vendors from selling on
the SUNY Albany
campus is wrong. These students had been able to offer
students bargains on a variety of items. This policy
prevents student vendors, who have enough courage and
creativity to start their own business, from doing so. In
addition, the policy was put into effect without seeking
student opinion. Many students purchased items before
returning to school and are now not permitted to sell
these goods. Is this fair? Students in need o f money just
to continue their education can no longer supplement
their income by vending on campus. As in the case of the
new 21 year old alcohol purchase age, students are being
given less opportunity to make their own decisions in the
market place. Over-regulating supply and demand puts
contraints on the freedom we enjoy as Americans.
- Bruce Weinfeld
Young Republicans
The Central Council subcommittee on investigations oversight and analysis set out to
help create a stronger and more coherent base
for SA elections, and to refocus the elections
process on platforms and ideas, rather than
policy infractions committed by the
candidates.
Their final report offers some innovative
ideas to that end, and clearly reflects a lot of
carefully compiled research, but it seems that
for many of the problems it solves, it merely
creates new ones.
The most glaring of these is a new idea for
student association funding for SA presidential and vice-presidential campaigns. Student
association would provide up to $150 in matching funds for any presidential or vicepresidential candidate drawing more than 20
percent of the vote.
This does provide lower income students
with the opportunity to run an all-out campaign, except they'll have to lay out a lot of
money in hopes of garnering 20 percent of the
vote. Not even some of SA's most determined
contenders have in the past, drawn this much
support. SA would probably find that the only students who could count on being eligible
for matching funds would be SA 'insiders'.
'Outsiders' like Paco Duarte, who got 11
percent of the votes last year, or Bill McCann,
who got about eight percent of the votes two
years ago, would not have been eligible,
despite running very impreessive campaigns.
Matching funds might be a good thing to try,
but the voter requirements should be around
ten percent, so that the funds are accessible to
most serious candidates.
The subcommittee also recommmends
eliminating the polling place in Brubacher
Hall on Alumni Quad, since the "densest
population" is in Alden/Waterbury. This
might save SA a little money and a few
hassles, but it's at the expense of accessible
elections. All other on-campus students vote
on their dinner lines, Why should Brubacher
be the exception?
Another change the subcommittee recommended was to lift the 1500 limit on campaign
flyers (hand-outs). They reasoned that these
flyers promote more personalized campaigning, and that candidates need to offset the influence of the campus media. In the past,
campaign materials have been limited to ensure that no candidate can buy an election
while another is priced out of an otherwise fair
race. Ensuring equal access should be SA's
first priority on this matter, but the removal
of any campaign spending limit could exclude
some students from the election process.
One vital addition to the policy that was not
addresssed at all in the subcommittee report is
a procedure for informing the public of the
results of an election. The ASP has, in the
past, had difficulty reaching the elections
commissioner. Results posted outside the SA
office have been tampered with. Part of SA's
duty to its constiuents is to keep them informed on who their representatives are. It should
be written into the elections policy that the
commissioner is responsible for notifying the
campus media of the result as soon as they are
available.
The subcommittee's report did contain a lot
of good ideas, such as an SA-run candidates
forum, and a lottery to fairly divide sheet sign
space in the campus center.
All this still has to be written into formal
policy by Central Council's internal affairs
committeec, and thn approved by council.
The overhaul of SA elections policy is long
overdue. It's essential however, that SA officials remain conscious that the policy should
serve their constituents, not their political
future.
freedom
Defends ASP Sports
Advice from an Old Warrior
Second of two parts
The modern multiversity has itself become one of the
massive bureaucratized systems of the society it prepares
you for, reflecting the dominant forces directly, inculcating the dominating culture. Sociologists still talk of
studenthood as a moratorium time, a delay of social
adulthood; but in a deep sense, that's nonsense. This is it,
kid; you're in the thick of it already. Your school is a fair
replica of institutional society; and your schooling is
already the experience it prepares you for.
For throughout its operations, your school has a
shadow program, a meta-curriculum active in each particular course, each transaction with the Registrar. Its
normal processes teach you to divide yourself from others
through specialization and sub-specialization; to accept
hierarchical systems of status and decision-making; to expect and depend on authoritative direction of what you
should do and how to do it; to work and learn in
mechanized periods having no natural relation to your
own needs and energies, in groups formed and dissolved
by institutional processes rather than their own dynamics;
and so on. Through all this it teaches also a deeper lesson,
of passive and unconscious adaptation to the institutional
order itself as the state of nature.
The relations and experiences you school yourself in
now, prepare you for what lies ahead. Waiting till after
you graduate to assume some non-passive relation to the
institutions that serve and govern you, is like waiting till
you get rich and powerful enough to "really be able to do
something about social injustice." I don't mean that you
can't; but it's a lot harder to get around to doing it, unless
you've been practicing.
So you work for divestment, or whatever, and bless the
university even as you curse its administration's
resistance, for giving you the chance to practice. For your
school's doing its proper job after all, in an ironic but
precious sense, by providing you a rich ground on which
to learn the vital lessons that no courses cover, that
prepare you indeed for life in modern society.
Here you can learn how to And and share resources in
the institutional wilderness. Here you can learn how to
deal with bureaucratic systems for your needs and rights,
and to preserve your sense of self in the dealing. Here you
can learn how to make your personal imprint on the impersonal; how to deal off with authorities to get your own
patch of turf on which to exercise self-direction; how to
work alone and with others to affect the processes and
decisions that affect you; and how to change the whole
for better, or at least to try.
This is some of the learning your school offers, once
you step beyond the stance of passive passage through its
system. Or rather, this is your counter-schooling, the
thrust of a different response to the same circumstance,
providing you with technical skills and more, restoring
what is withered by the institutional process: directness
and connection, integrity and autonomy.
Your Job Making You
So you work for divestment, or for whatever else matters, because the work joins you with others isolated in
the machinery's compartments, cuts across the divisions
of discipline, class, color, status, connects you in a community engaged together in coming to grips with what
matters to all. You do it to help call this community itself
into being; you do it to help call yourself Into being, to
learn who you can be and what you can do in this
By Michael Rossman
connection.
You get involved not only to help make this institution
respond, but to make yourself a person who responds, a
person who can help make social machinery responsive.
For you yourself are the most precious product of your
action, as important as the community it engenders and
the end it achieves. Your own learning, your own growth,
are your action's gift to the future — to your future, and
to ours, for you need to know your potency as a citizen,
and we need you to know too.
To say that you get involved to prepare yourself as an
agent of democracy, makes campus activism sound like a
boot-camp for professional do-gooders — and worse,
makes the impulse and training seem so dreadfully exterior. There's just no adequate language to speak of your
citizenship as if it were an intimate personal quality, as
complex and tangible as your musculature, your emotions, your mind. Yet it is indeed another sort of body
that you wear in the world from within, that develops
through your exercise, that your exercise for the same
reasons you exercise your muscles, your feelings, your
mind — from sheer existential pleasure, just because you
can; and to make yourself whole, healthy, capable, to
make yourself who you can be for the long run. And also,
of course, because you must: for your citizenship obeys
the same stern law as your strength, your compassion,
your analytic power: Use it or lose it.
All this is reason enough to work for divestment or
whatever. But beyond this, as a student, as a learner, you
have special reason to "become a social activist." You do
it to learn in practice a different set of lessons about learning itself, than your school teaches you; and to become a
different sort of learner. For this study is your own
choice, unassigned. It offers you the chance to choose not
only the subject but how to approach it, what resources to
use, what information to seek; to choose who you learn
with and who you learn from; and to follow the learning
wherever it may lead. It invites you to learn how to form
your own view among conflicting evidences; and requires
that you be your own judge of the learning and consequence, though not alone and with history's aid.
In such ways and more, your activism can be a specific
antidote, or at least a healing balance, to the lessons of institutional studenthood. For these are the habits and
capacities of a self-directed learner, that prepare you as a
free and potent citizen of a community of learning, and
of a democratic society — and prepare you, quite
mudanely, for most of the learning you'll be faced with
for the rest of your life, at least outside your job.
Of course it's easy enough to fail this curriculum even
while working for the good, by recreating in your activism the same habits of authority-centered learning that
the institution teaches, depending on authoritative figures
to define what's important and how to approach it, to
assign your roles and judge your performance, and so on.
There's no charm against this, but only your clarity and
will to persist in becoming your own person, with the help
of your friends.
So you work for divestment or whatever, and try to
make the work itself reflect your goals. You try to make
the group, the action, the movement embody equity and
mutual care; you work to have your rightful say within It
as well as through it, and to make It responsive to all, So
simple to pose, this curriculum of democracy; you could
spend a lifetime learning how, might as well keep on gelling started now.
0»-
To the Editor:
This is in response to Keith Marder's "letter" that appeared in the October 22 issue.
Mr. Marder contended that Dennis Murphy, an Albany
State defensive lineman, has not received the recognition
he deserves. To this statement I agree, Murphy has had an
excellent season so far.
However, I disagree with Mr. Marder's tactics of
criticizing ASP football reporters.
In Tuesday's game story, (which had to have been written before Tuesday) it was impossible to mention that Mr.
Aspects
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Murphy was selected to the All-East Team because it
hadn't been announced yet. The reporter, however, did
mention that Mr. Murphy had a solid game. After inspection of the local newspapers, no such recognition was
reported.
Mr. Marder either didn't read Friday's football story,
or he read it carelessly. The writer reported that Mr. Murphy was chosen to the All-East team.
Mr. Marder could have used the space better if he
wrote of Mr. Murphy's value to the Danes, instead of
putting down ASP reporters, where criticism was uncalled for.
— Mark Chcsnut
Late buses to run
To the Editor:
A late night bus service has been contracted with
CDTA to provide students with bus runs Friday and
Saturday nights. Concurrently, CDTA regulations will be
in effect for all CDTA buses involved. It is a CDTA
policy that no open containers are to be allowed on the
bus. Anyone found violating this regulation will not be
allowed to ride. The bus will stop only on designated bus
stops previously determined on standard SUNY bus
schedules.
To explain the delay in contracting a bus service for the
late night weekend run, consider the difficulty involved...The main problem deals with the fact that no
reputable bus company wishes to subject their drivers or
their equipment to excessive abuse, which has been a
definite problem in the past whenever SUNY students
were involved.
CDTA has agreed to provide this service on a conditional basis only. If the drivers and or bus is abused in any
way, either verbally or physically, this service will be immediately terminated at the.discretion of CDTA.
This service is paid for through the Student Association
as a service for the student body. The behavior of the
students using this service is the sole determinant of
whether or not this contract will be withdrawn. Once
withdrawn, the students will have to find their own
transportation (cabs) and have only themselves to blame.
This service is provided for SUNY students only. Proper I.D. will be required. No bus tickets will be necessary
for these particular runs.
Friday leave circle at 1:30 a.m., 2:30 a.m.
leave Wellington at 2:00 a.rn., 3:00 a.m. '
Saturday leave circle at 12:30 a.m., 1:30 a.m., 2:30 a.m.
leave Wellington at 1:00 a.m., 2:00 a.m., 3:00 a.m.
— T. J. Star
SA Transportation Director
Refutes letter
To the Editor:
As I read the letter of Akbar Anwari, I was overcome
with horror and shame — horror that such primitive ignorance can still exist in an institution of higher learning,
and shame thatthat such glaring nescience should find
one square-inch of space in the ASP. In time, however,
the horror subsided and was replaced by the realization
that Mr. Anwari's letter provides us with a rare opportunity to explore the tenuity of the arguments employed
against millions of people because of their affectional
orientation. So, forthwith, let us examine Mr. Anwari's
letter — one lie at a time.
The brief letter begins with the observation that
Claudia Myer, in her article, "did neglect one
point,....exclusive homosexuality is not biologically normal." Of course it does not occur to Mr. Anwari that
such a "point" was not neglected at all; it was rejected as
untrue. The word "normal" is defined in the New
American Webster Dictionary as 1) conforming to a cer-
Advice
-«8
Good Luck
All this may seem a bit much to hang on the slender,
hesitant thread of your early participation. Following the
news, listening at the noon rallies, a few talks with
friends, a book looked into, joining a march across campus — it doesn't amount to much yet, hardly enough to
trouble your studies. Yet these are the issues, the stakes,
that even your most tentative participation involves; these
are the social and personal potentials that resonate in
your simplest actions, inviting your to explore and realize
them further.
Or so it seems to me now, a quarter-century down the
line. Of course there are other ways to understand involvement, and I hope you'll learn from many, to balance
whatever weight you give to Uncle Mike's quaint views.
But as you commit yourself further, you may find some
such set of ideas helpful, or even necessary, to make sense
of what you are doing as a whole person, rather than as a
schizophrenic torn between the world and the academy,
tain type of standard, and 2) free from mental defect. As
Mr. Anwari was too preoccupied conjuring up valuejudgements for later paragraphs and thus failed to identify the term "normal", we can assume that he was referring to the latter.
Homosexual love is not defective. Exhaustive
psychological studies on sexual response, brain patterns,
and emotional response show shockingly little difference
between heterosexuals and homosexuals. Of course, Dr.
Anwari is far more knowledgeable in this area than such
charlatans as Kinsey, Masters, and Johnson. After all,
Mr. Anwari tells us, "if it wasn't for heterosexuals,
homosexuality would not exist." While one can ignore,
perhaps, the sophmoric content of such a statement, and
the atrocious grammar use to express it; the manifest irrelevance of this charge to the question of "normality" is
impossible to overlook.
Moving on to paragraph two, we are instructed that
"there are two theories for the basis of homosexuality."
This will come as a great surprise to those who know of
dozens of advanced theories n the origins of this
phenomenon. Just where Mr. Anwari discovered that
there are but two, we are not told. Nor, in fact, are we
given the source for these "theories". But let us give Mr.
Anwari the benefit of the doubt and hear his disquisition
on the first." One is that it is a choice. . . you should be
willing to accept that others do not accept your conformity. . . Is there a Punk and Hardcore Alliance?"
And theory number 2? . . . People are born
homosexual. That still doesn't make it normal. People
are born with cerebral palsy. . . one would certainly
hesitate to call this a normal condition. -Think of it as a
birth defect." •
Since the gist of Mr. Anwari's argument is stated in
these three paragraphs, we shall not proceed further into
his coarse dialectic. Further, since any student of scientific method would snicker at the thought of calling the
preceeding rhetoric theories, we shall examine it as the rot
that it is.
Mr. Anwari, I do not think that you are a bigot. I do
not question the sincerity with which you speak. Then
how is it, Mr. Anwari, that you can say to 20 million
Americans that they must be "willing" to accept the
unacceptable. Should they accept that 300,000 gays were
burned in the ovens of Nazi Germany? Should they accept that their very existence is illegal in some states?
Should they accept that someone on this campus circulated flyers announcing "Kill the Gays Week"? Should
former Olympic skating star Dick Button accept permanent loss of hearing because some youths chose to
demonstrate their lack of acceptance of him by beating
him with a hammer? No, Mr. Anwari, this should not be
accepted, and more importantly, it will not be accepted.
The second "theory" fails to impress. It does not concern Mr. Anwari that the vast majority of Western
psychiatrists no longer classify homosexuality as a
"defect". The word "normal" again appears, undefined
as we might expect. The most that one can glean from the
comparison of homsexuality to cerebral palsy is another
insidious attempt to convey the perception that homosexuals are something "less" than "normal" people. After
all, they are defected. If, in spite of all the evidence to the
contrary, this is the case, then may we forever be blessed
with such "defected" people — "defected" subhumans
such as Alexander the Great, Socrates, Oscar Wilde, and
of course, Rock Hudson. From every town and city in
this nation, these "defects" contribute their skills,
wisdom, and ideas to society. Mr. Anwari, they are no
less than you or I.
It is easy to fall into the trap of cheap vituperations and
bombastic aspersions when dealing with a subject held in
taboo for solong. It is a temptation that must be overcome. For when vindictiveness and intolerane
predominate, when slurs and stereotypes go unchallenged; the ugly head of bigotry rises, and the death knell
sounds a little louder — for us all.
— Alan Schorr
activism and studenthood, selfless good and selfish need,
and such other disabling contradictions.
Little of what I've said here is specific to divestment activism. The same issues and stakes are involved each time
you move with a few others to meet some modest need in
your department of dorm, each time you step beyond
routine alone. In many ways you can learn more from
local small-scale involvement. But a mass movement does
offer fruitful learning, if you follow the basic rules: Find
or make a small group to work in; attempt something
feasible; take care to evaluate what happens. The antiapartheid movement is hot this year, and will surely tempt
you —- though if you want to invest yourself in an international cause, I'd suggest Nicaragua instead, where the
tragedy is entirely a U.S. production and is happening
faster, with the historical stakes much greater and so few
of us opposed.
Whichever you choose, I hope you'll come also to bring
the impulse, the vision, the lessons of the democratic curriculum, home to the may aspects of your life as a student
within this institution, for its sake and your own.
D
Copyright 1985 by Michael Rossman. All rights reserved.
'-*
10 ALBANY
STUDENT PRESS • FRIDAY, OCTOBER 25,
CLASSIFIED
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
POLICY
Deadlines:
Tuesday at 3PM lor Friday
Friday at 3 PM. lor Tuesday
Rates:
$1.50 lor the first 10 words
10 cents each additional word
Any bold word is 10 cents extra
$2.00 extra for a box
minimum charge is $1.50
Classified ads are being accepted in the SA Contact Office during
regular business hours. Classified advertising must be paid In cash at
the time of Insertion. No checks will be accepted. Minimum charge for
billing Is $25.00 per issue.
No ads will be printed without a full name, address or phone number
on the Advertising form. Credit may be extended, but NO refunds will
be given. Editorial policy will not permit ads 10 be printed which contain blatant profanity or those that are in poor taste. We reserve the
right to reject any material deemed unsuitable for publication.
All advertising seeking models or soliciting parts of the human body
will not be accepted. Advertisers seeking an exception to this policy
must directly consult with as well as receive permission from the
Editor in Chief of the Albany Student Press.
If you have any questions or problems concerning Classified Advertising, please feel free to call or stop by the Business Office.
Want to help manage the Wrestli n g T e a m ? M a n a g e r s do
everything from admlnstrative
tasks to score-keeping, and the
benefits are many. Apply at the
Wrestling Room (3rd floor, gym) or
call 442-3047. 3:30-5:45, daily
Publicity Postlon Available
for someone hardworking and
creative, to work with the SUNYA
Wrestling Team. Job includes promotion of team through radio, T.V.
and press. Stipend Available. Apply at Wrestling Room (3rd floor,
gym) or Call 442-3047. 3:30-5:45,
dally.
Part-time
Sales & Stock
Opportunities
Are you looking for employment
that provides 1 wk training, 30 percent discount, bonus money and
10-15 hrs of medlng the public? If
so you would be Interested in applying in person at Fashion
Footwear, Norlhway Mall.
REWARD — Free trip to Daytona
plus Commission Money.
WANTED: Organized group or Individual to promote the no. 1 Spring Break trip to Daytona. II Interested, call 1-800-453-9074
immediately!
Sbarros — the Italian Eatery ut
Crossgates Mall is looking for full
or part-time employment. Days or
nights. Flexible hours. Apply In
person.
GOVERNMENT JOBS $16,040 —
$59,230/yr. Now Hiring. Call
805-687-6000 Ext. R-3106 lor current lederal list.
'ART-TIME
S600/Month
Need extra cash? 17 part-lime
openings, 6:30 • 9:30 pm Sat 9:30
am • 3:30 pm local display work
caNJor Inlerview. 438-7H24
I
Needed: Sandwich Makers to work
nights and weekends. Experience
necessary. Apply at the Deli Works
alter 4 pm. Call 489-7953 and ask
tor MaryAnn.
$10$36O Weekly/Up Mailing Circulars! No quotas! Sincerely interested rush sell-addressed
onvolope: Succoss, P.O. Box 470
CEG, Woodstock, IL 60098.
Part-time sales position of evening
and weekend hours in decorating
dopl. ol the Shorwln-Wllliams Co.,
130 Woll Rd. Albany. Apply lo Clllf
McCumber.
OVERSEAS JOBS
Summor, yr. round. Europe, S.
Amer, Australia, Asia. All Molds.
$900-2000 mo. Sightseeing. Froo
Info, wrlle UC, P.O. Box 52-NY1
Corona Del Mar, CA 92625.
Female/Male Nude Model* (Exparlance Preferred) Needed lor
Art Department Classes, Contact
Art Depl. FA 216 or Call 442-4020,
FREE LINGERIE
Receive up to $50.00 FREE
lingerie. It's yours for Just
assembling 10 or more friends for
an exciting evening of fashion, fun
and profit. Great for prospective
brides, bridal showers and
Christmas! For complete details
call Trudy — 438-2354.
Must Sell)
ESCORT Radar Detector. Best
Made! $250 New, asking $150.
Trek 580 Racing Bicycle. With accessories, $250. SALOMAN SX-90
Ski Boots, Size 345 (9-10). Used 6
times, $125. Also: FISCHER XCountry skis $40. Hiking Boots
size 9 $30. Everthlng In excellent
condition, all prices negotiable.
Call Marty4360588 after 6pm.
78 VW Beatle Excellent condition
— $800 will dicker Call 274-7216.
'
JOBS
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 25, 1985 D ALBANY STUDENT PRESS -\ ]
1985
Part-time sales position of evening
and weeken hours In decorating
dept. of The Sherwin-Williams Co.,
130 Wolf Rd Albany. Apply to Cliff
McCumber
Part-time sales position of evening
and weekend hours In decorating
dept. of The Sherwin-Williams Co.,
1330 Wolf Rd. Albany. Apply to
Cliff McCumber.
Part-time sales position of evening
and weekend hours in decorating
dept. of the Sherwin-Williams CoISO Wolf Rd. Albany. Apply to Cliff
McCumber.
SERVICES
PROFESSIONAL TYPING SERV I C E . Xerox M e m o r y w r i t e r .
Automated letters. Resumes. Experienced. 482-2953.
I m young, I'm wild I'm free I've got
the magic power of Music In me
I! m D.J. McDE call 462-9225 room
IT'S FINALLY HEREIII
YES IT'S FINALLY HERE!!!
What Is it? It a MASSAGE SERVICE WITH YOUR OWN PERSONAL MASSEURE. THIS IS FOR
REAL. I CHARGE $15.00/15mln.
Oils are Optional at $5:00 per tube.
I don't have my therapy table so
we'll have to use your floor or bed
and I supply towels so nothing
gets messy. For a serious Appointment Call 8157 ask about the
Massage Service Leave your Name
and Number and I will get back to
you as soon as possible.
TYPING: Fast, Accurate, Reliable
Service. 465-1779.
HAVING A PARTY??? Hire the
Best SUNY Disc Jockeys. DJ Gordon, DJ Jerry Stuchl, DJ Marco.
Low Low Prices for the Best
Sound Systems, Light Shows and
Music Selection. Seperate Light
Show and Sound System Rentals
a v a i l a b l e . Call in Advance
456-0390.
FOR SALE
1978 Chevy Impala Good Condition, Runs Well, Call Nancy
271-1490.
1973 CHEVROLET CAMARO
RUNS WELL, SPORTY LOOKING,
GOOD STEREO SYSTEM. $800
489-4015.
GENUINE FUR PARKAS with
hoods. 2 medium size hlptength, 1
large size knee length. Moving
South $60, $75. 458-1250.
1984 KAWASAKI KX-12S
Excellent condition Hardly used
Many Extras, must See! Asking
$875. Glenn 462-6540.
VINYLUST - RECORD & VIDEO
FLEAMARKET — RARE ROCK,
JAZZ & COUNTRY — SUNDAY,
OCT. 27, 1985 — NOON TO 6PM.
VFW POST 1019 — 481
WASHINGTON AVE. ALBANY
(BETWEEN QUAIL & LAKE) ADMSSION $2.00 — FREE VIDEOS
SHOWN ALL DAY — ALL YOUR
FAVE ROCK HEROES.
1974 Plymouth Valient. Good condition, $700. Please Call Louise at
442-5944. Early Morning.
You Need a Car I need The Cash —
Silver Monarch $850. 442-6685.
GOVERNMENT HOMES from $1
(U repair). Also delinquent tax
property. Call 805-687-8000 Ext.
GH-3106 lor Information.
Dependable Silver Monarch A/u,
P/S, P/B $850. 442-6685 Mike.
74 V.W. Beatle runs exc. $300. Call
272-0173.
1977 DATSUN F10. Motor and
body In good shape, New Shocks,
recent brake Job, tuned twice a
year. Asking $900. Days 445-5414.
Computer/Terminal for Sale ATARI
800, modem and tons of software
Best offer Dave 463-3907 Leave
Message.
For Sale
Large White Dresser Made ol
Wood — In excellent condition.
Lots ol deep drawers, and Bargain
hunters — It'a only $301 ana I'll
even deliver Call Ken at 438-2548.
r<4fi?
'MM >
GETTINGSiH
^PERSONA?*
Hey Guys —
If you can talk dirty call Angle at
442-6080 and help her celebrate
her Birthday this Sunday!
______
Lets meet at Denny's and have a
cup ol collea or 2 or £ or 411
Previously forgetfully you , Little
Bro.
Dear Fellow Procrastinators —
Still burning the midnight oil. How
about you? Smldge P.S. anybody
got food?
Happy birthday
Pam Conway!
Here's some advice: Go to Work
drunk, do your story sober and
sleep late Monday.
Love, Jim
Two days ago It was 56 degrees
and sunny in Paris. Eat your
heart out Albanians!
STEVE FADDIS
The ASP could use your skills.
-
Dearest 503
""
Thanks for dinner and the Powerful Margaritas. Love Lll Bro
Dear Maria 501, Sorry I couldn't
make ralters. I'll see you this week
don't worry I won't blow you oil.
Your Little Bro
Sam I am still waiting lor the
eggs!!! Your little Valerie
Dear Laura
Our friendship means so much to
me,
I miss you not living
downstairs a lot. Love ya Always
Scott.
bear Mlka,
Keep smiling! Your
like a sister to me Thanks for
everything, love Dawn.
Dear Wee — Wee, Wanna order
some Pizza. Yours & Our lovehut
To Elon
The best Big Bro In Delta Sigma PI
1 couldn't have come this far
without you, but I've still got a lot
more to learn. Your Hyper Little
Bro
Dear Delta Sigma PI Brothers.
We are on our way to winning the
Pennant!
Love, the Pledges
Dear Chris You are the Best BlgBro Love Maria.
Dear Margie, thanx for all your
time, You're great Love Jay.
2 Females need an apartment for
next semester. Prefer downtown
near Alumni Please call 442-6691.
Leave Message.
Ange,
Halloween will be truly "Hallow"
without you. I love you & Miss you
t e
r r I b
I y
I
Forever yours,
Babe
CRISPER Iggly Blggly squirrel surprise.
Snaggly sniggly, Frank's Demise
upsy downsy Hop the bus, Topsy
Turvy turtle truss — Happy Anniversary, baby —
But Warn,
Bananas simply don't stretch!!!
Love,
Trlxle
Rob —
I couldn't have asked for anything
better Happy 1st yearl I love you!
Kiwi
Jane — Babe
Albany Is different without you. I
hope (know) You're fun In Londonl
Missing you,
Betsy
Dear Joe,
Happy Blrthdaylll
love,
Everyone
Jeff,
Happy Birthdayl
Bestestll
You're
the
L, Bon
VERNE E. BAKER HAPPY 24th BIRTHDAY!!
love,
ken, Audrey and Mike
P.S. JUNIOR FIDDLESTICKS AND
BABALU AND EDNA (?) also say H
B-day.
KARATE KID YOU'R ONE IN A MILLION!!
HAPPIEST OF BIRTHDAYS!
KARATE KID II
Happy 1st to no. 1
I love you BAD forever
Jackie,
We wouldn't want lo miss Halley's
Comet would we?
Joe
Jeanlne,
Have a wonderful 21st birthdayl
Love ya!
And! & Christina
Agent 6(MB) —
"Smiling Ron" live; you have failed miserably. Perhaps you need a
vacation. How does a win ter resort
In Siberia sound? Ah, but I will
give you a second chance. Your
next assignment Is to termlnater"
Carlo Rossi — Quarter Pounder".
Be Cautious. He is neither" friendly" nor a "ghost".
Mike G.
Vietnam Veterans Awareness Day
Dear NY Plates^
Yes I will rotate your brakes If You
oil my engine. Missed you at
Franks. Can't get my parking spoil
Blue Sweater a Jeans this Friday
after 10:30?
love,
Albany Mens Bootors: Kick Ass at
Buffalo
T. Pail —
Sorry I haven't been around much
this week. I promise things will get
bettor.
T. Paul
Public Affairs Advisoathon
Wednesday, 10/30
7:30PM
Contact Office
Refreshments Servedl
Attend and get the real story from
the Veterans themselves. Film,
Slides, Info. Rap with a Vet 11/6/85
CC Ballroom 9AM-9PM.
Miss Emma
Happy Birthday
Does 20 feel good?
Love ya,
Miss D
Klera Thanks for a great year. Who
could ask for Belter.
Love,
Rob
REXYTlrVatch Your Llmirpolnts
and Your S t e r e o G raphlc
Projections.
BEWARE OF RABBITS CARRY^
ING BALLONS - THE THIRD OF
THE BIRTHDAY CLUB.
BeThA
I hope you're feeling belter. I
miss your smile.
AB Always,
Karen,
Happy I s f i o no. 1 I love youTiAD
forever.
> *
NEWS UPDATES
Telephone Systems. Off-campus students
can pick up copies at the Campus Center
A revised FIN 300 midterm was given Information Desk, he added..
Monday after the original was thought to
The directories come out in late October
have been stolen, but the results of the new because of many changes in student
exam are being monitored by the Depart- residences during September and the two
ment of Finance following rumors that weeks required to have them printed,
cheating occurred during the exam' itself, Henighan said.
Hany' Shawk-y, Chair of the Finance
This year's listings were published in
Department said.
separate student and faculty volumes,
Henighan
said, but future directories will
"I will oversee the grading of the exam
and will decide if rumors of- cheating are be combined and published at about the
accurate," Shawky said in an interview same time the student directories were this
Thursday. The exam will be graded this year.
weekend and the results will be studied earWhen asked why many student numbers
ly next week. At that time, a decision will, Were not listed, Henighan said that many
be made to determine if. the exam was students- were probably requesting supvalid, Shawky said.
pression of their phone numbers.
The original exam was believed to have;
been stolen after the Finance Department
Copies of SUNYA's yearbook, Torch
received a letter which stated that the
'85, are on sale in the University Photo
author saw someone with the exam.
Service room, CC 305, for $10.
Torch '85 will be sold in the Campus
A petition asking the chair of the Center lobby, probably starting next week,
Mathematics Department to "take im- said Lisa Simmons, editor of this year'';
mediate action" against Professor Torch '86.
On the cover of Torch '84 is a color
Boguslaw Tomaszewski was signed by 19
out of 25 students in his MAT 361 class, drawing of the campus with a large face
said Dan Verkman, a student enrolled in emerging from the academic podium, said
Simmons.
the class.
According to Verkman, the petition
stated that Tomaszewski can not speak
A 15-member committee has been
English, is often unprepared for lectures,
organized to search for a vice president for
and is unable to teach.
The' petition was submitted to Joe research and dean of graduate studies here
Jenkins, chair of the Mathematics Depart- at SUNYA.
ment, and a copy was sent to Mike Miller,
Warren Ilchman, provost of the Nelson
chair of Student Association's Academic
Affairs committee, Verkman said. As of A. Rockefeller College of Public Affairs
yet, students in the class have not received and Policy and director of the SUNY-wide
Rockefeller Institute, has been named
any response, Verkman said.
chair of the committee, which hopes to
complete its nationwide search by July 1.
The position has been held on an acting
The Student Directories have been
printed and will be distributed to the suites basis by John Shumaker, who was recently,
on the quads soon, according to John appointed vice president for academic
Henighan, Assistant Director of planning and: development.
Half Price - First Visit
Exam monitored
Torch '85 on sale
'Student's Special'
by A
8
'Hair Goes9
Pp.
n
men
5
student ID Required
t
The Professional
Electrolysis and
Waxing Studio
1789 Western Ave.
Math Chair petitioned
CHRIS HAYES
The ASP could use your many
talents.
Ellen S
You are the Best in the world
thanks lor helping out on the ASP
esp with the linger. I owe you.
"Bye Bye Albany! Hello Paris.
Jim, "
I look back and think ol all the
special times we've shared —
There've been so many and Its only been a year. We've only Just
begun.
I love you!
Always,
Jane
Dear Scoby & Chief Muck,
Happy Anniversary! I You made It
through one year together. Amazing, unbelievable. I wish you guys
the best and a great future
together.
Love yas,
Lisa & Jack!
Everybody,
14 more days, you Schmuchs!
Joe
Looking to move oil In January?
Nice apartment in great location
available for $118 a month plus
utilities. Housemates are fun and
not slobsl Call Jim at 436-7218 or
442-5660.
Congratulations to Angle Wang
who celebrates her 19tn Birthday
this Sunday. Enjoy your 35 days ol
legality!
Love,
Jim
Committee formed
Directories available
PSI GAMMA SORORITY
proudly announces its
fall pledge class:
Kristen Carter
Cynthia Cleary
Debbie Craig
Jenny DeVaul
Jackie Kail
Audra Kay
Doreen Kleinman
Mika Otomo
Anne Rosenberg
Judith Trescott
Congratulations
Good Luck.
S_0_ $ (51L(3§§ ®p °QV
@1_0_S_ 5>[email protected]__.
0 NIGHT
OF COMEDY!
Slndl, VCR, LORI, MO
When Is the next Session?
My name Is Andrew Richard. I'm
Looking for my father. Please call
my mother, Sandy She's looking
for you too.
Leslie,
Keep hlml He cooksl
Trudy,
How many days and countlng?ir
Katia;
Got any corn leftl I neeeeeed
pepperl
Chris,
Turn down those sneakersll Have
fun with F&G this weekend.
Kathy
Where's your vodka? It disappears
mighty fast, huh?
LET'S GO RODSIIIIII
Your cheer???leadors
Trudy
Cheer upl Things are not as bad as
Ihey seem. Remember — Bruce
loves you I
Chris
Your fluff Man will finally be here
tonight! Thank Godlll Have fun
this weekendllll
Grace,
You're a Wusslell And a W.B.
Slimy has now moved out of town
but you can call me anyway.
Clndf,
"The roof Is on Fire." I will really
miss you next semealor.Somaone
won't got any bananas II you're
n o l h e r e . H o w ' s t h a t lor
Incentive?!
To Rob:
Thanx for listening to Bill's order.
L n h W . h 8 , rea , n y, appreciates having his order followed. And thanx
. _ , . » '°r 'ha' *erm °'
Signed,
'EdllorPest'
SUNY ALBANY'S OWI
TOMWHITELEY
qnd
&fc
JEFFZEBROWSKI
and
JOHN MCILROONEY
TUESDAY • OCT. 28th RT 9pm
IN THE PATROON ROOM
TICKETS ONLY $3 W/TAX STICKER ON SfiLE NOW fiT THE
CONTACT OFFICE BUY EfiRLY • LIMITED SEATS AVAILABLE
FOOD AND DRINK SPECIALS
M
FCJMDE
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 25, 1985 • ALBANY STUDENT PRESS - J 3
\ £ ALBANY STUDENT PRESS D FRIDAY, OCTOBER 25, 19&5
Definition said to be first round of porn, debate
By Jim Avery
STAFF WRITER
With the lecturn set out of the way in the
comer, Susan Russell addressed a crowd
made up almost entirely of women in the
Humanities Lounge Wednesday, speaking
on the legal history of pornography in
America.
Russell, an Albany attorney, recently
graduated from Albany Law and is President of the Albany chapter of the National
Organization of Women (NOW), and currently teaches a course in pornography at
SUNYA. Her lecture was part of the
Women's Studies Department Colloquium
Series.
Russell repeatedly stressed the most important factor in the debate over pornography is defining pornography. "If we
don't find a way through it (obscure
definitions), history will repeat itself," she
said. "The pendulum will swing back and
people who are not our friends will come
up with a solution" which may not reflect
either a concern for women or women's
safety.
"As an interest arises there will be
strong actions taken by religious
fanatics," said Russell, adding, "We will
not let it be taken out of our hands again."
Dorm rate hike
•fl Front Page
philosophy as a definition of selfsufficiency," said Oawley, meaning only those necessities that would exist with
or without the existence of a dormitory
system would be charged to the
dormitories.
"Services that would exist regardless
of the existence of dormitories are campus police and grounds crew," he
explained.
Although the Board of Trustees has
approved the concept of selfsufficiency, the New York State
The lecture traced legal action taken by
the government; from colonial
Massachusetts to the present regarding
pornography. Early legislation, according
1
to Russell, was concerned with "the manly
virtue of young men" who looked at- pornographic pictures.'Citing current-laws
concerning whose hands pornographicmaterial may fall into she said, "We have
stayed viewer-oriented," as opposed to
focusing on women who are victimized by
pornography merchants.
Throughout the discussion of historic
legislation, Russell continuously returned
to"the problem of definition. "What has.
emerged so far?" she asked. "The definition is key. You can talk about pornography all day and the person next to
you may have another definition."
Russell proposed a possible explanation
for the relative ovscurity of meaning in the
legal definitions. She said the wording is
such to deter people from creating pornography because "you will not stray into
the sphere of sexually'explicit material if
you are hot clear on what is obscene."
"I think there is a harm done when there
is a portrayal of a woman being subjugated," Russell said. She added, "There
seems to be a growing consensus in this
Legislature, still has (to vote on its implementation. "We're going, to lobby
the state legislature against the proposal. We plan to get directly involved
in redefining and retailoring the definition to assure that this campus has exhausted every possible avenue for increasing revenue and decreasing costs,"
said Gawley.
"The relationship between students
and educational institutions is traditionally different from the relationship
between tenant and landlord." said
McAlevey. "An educational institution
i
.i
•
!
are you making that person an object?"
"It is impossible to visualize what ,a
world without the subjugation of women
would be like," said Russell, adding, "The
law is interested in the status quo, you set
up a norm, you try to enforce it, if subjugation is so pervasive you cannot see it,,
you cannot use the law. I think the law has §
to deal with what it can see."
Russell said that too often the courts are
bogged down in whether something has
any redeeming social value, adding that
there is not enough research into the con- .
nection between pornography and violence.
"What does enjoy mean?"
country about violent images." Russell
said she fears, however, that only tfie
violeht aspects of pornography may be
targeted.
Russell brought the issue back to definition again in terms of subjugation. She
asked, "What does enjoy mean? Does she
have a smile? Does she object? What is an
object? If you take a picture of a person,
Studies had been done which, according
to Russell, show that people are desensitized by pornography, but other studies show
people could be re-sensitized into I
understanding that the women involved
are people.
The two polarities in the issue, she said,
are the "free-love people" who see the
women as participants and believe the
solution is "the more sex the better," and ,
the "Puritans" who view women as always
being victimized and that the answer is no
sex whatsoever, she said.
•
must promote an environment consistent with the educational process."
In 1977, the Department of budget
(DOB) stated that all future dormitory
construction projects required the submission of plans for operational selfsufficiency before construction plans
would be approved. All dormitories
built since 1977 have been selfsufficient. At present, 1,800 beds are
now operating under self-sufficiency.
McAlevey urged the trustees to "Let
the Legislature advocate increases, not
the educational institutions."
The State Legislature provided SUNY
with a $6.6 million subsidy last year
which made it possible to balance the
residence hall budget without a dorm
rate increase for the 1985-1986 school
year.
How costs will be divided and
whether or not to delegate full respon'-"
sibility for self-sufficiency to each campus will be voted on at a later date.
"There are trustees who believe that if
we save money in dorm costs it will
necessarily benefit academics," said
McAlevey.
LYNN DREIFUSUPS
Susan Russell
I
UNIVERSITY CINEMAS
"ONE OF THE YEAR'S 10
Notional Board Ol Review
People Maacume
"At The Movies"
- Rogef Ebon ft Gone Sskei
US Mogatlne Stephen Scnaefef
Fri. and Sat
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Anderson
••Back Page
Springfield's DeLong can attest
to that. In last year's game,
Anderson had three interceptions, including one for a
touchdown. This year he was
more lenient defensively, but
burned the Chiefs with a 93-yard
kickoff return touchdown.
"Wayne has scarred me permanently," said DeLong. "On
that kickoff, we thought we had
him. We had a boy hit him to
slow him down. Wayne changed
directions and we didn't have
anyone fast enough to catch him.
"As a free safety," said Coach
DeLong, "he's an important part
of their defense play after play.
He's a kid who can make a key interception and not get beat deep.
That's where his talents lie."
Anderson doesn't mind the
fewer interceptions, as long as the
team is doing well.
This year the interceptions
aren't coming in such high
"If we were 8-2 and I had one
numbers; Anderson got his first interception," said Anderson,
against Cortland last week. "or if we were 5-5 (last year's
Flanders blames that on hisrecord) and I had nine intercepreputation.
tions, I'll take the one interception every time."
"They're not going to attack
Given this year's team talent,
Wayne's area," said Flanders. Anderson might Have the best of
"He was more of an untested both worlds this season.
p
Dane football
10°/o
off all chemical work.
Includes perm color and cellophane.
-oBack Page
you know where he is. If you run
away from him, he's so quick,
you don't want him chasing down
the play," said Ford.
GdUU ^(?9ai'.i i ) < M I ©liuOy MdUIii
Mynter, on the other hand,
displayed a certain military indifference toward Murphy's exceptional talents by saying, "We
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don't single players out. We require our defense to play assignment football, so that means that
it's the fullback's and guard's
responsibility to handle the defensive end."
last week, with field goals of 40,
47 and 31 yards along with an extra point.
Because another loss will all but
eliminate Albany from postseason play, they go into Saturday's game with the ultimate inAlbany will also have the ser- centive for winning.
vices of split end/kicker Scott
When asked if he had told his
Reagan, who was stellar in defeat players that they can play the
spoiler role for Albany's playoff
chances, Mynter laughed, "No,
definitely not. We've got our own
[Pepsi
problems to worry about."
PAW PRINTS: Split end John
Sun - Thurs
Donnelly has 21 receptions so far
4pm - Midnight
this season . . . At halftime of
Fri - Sat
the Norwich game, Wendy
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DELIVERY
^El Sports 15
Men boaters fall to RPI, 3-2
By Cathy Errlg
STAFF WRITER
There was both good news and
bad news for the Albany State
mens soccer team following Tuesday's game against RPI.
,
The good news was that the
Dane bootersscored two goals,
and of their 13 seasonal games
played thus far, only two of their
opponents have scored more than
that amount against the Danes.
The bad news was that this was
one of those two times.
The hooter's defense, usually
the team's strongest asset, was
not quite up to par, as they allowed the Engineers to score three
times, resulting in a 3-2 Dane loss,
dropping them to 4-7-2.
"RPI was not as good as some
of our opponents have been,"
said co-captain Carl loos. "We
were weak in. the mid-field, we
dominated them for 80 yards and
then gave them the last 20."
RPI's John Biscette opened
the game's scoring with a goal
29:34 into the first half. Less than
two minutes later, at 31:01,
Albany freshman Ed Rogan passed the ball to forward John,
Willard, who scored to tie the
game at 1-1.
Willard gave the Danes a 2-1
lead in the game's second half,
scoring on a penalty kick at 61:40.
The lead was short-lived,
however, as Biscette tied the game
less than 10 minutes later with a
HOWARD TYQAR UPS
Warren Manners controlling the ball for the Danes.
goal at 70:07. RPI took the lead
with less than six minutes remaining, scoring the game's final goal
at 84:40.
"The game was characterized
by a lack of finish," said assistant
coach A.frim N e z a j . " W e
deflnately had our chances to
score. And if we score two goals,
we deflnately should win, because
no team should score more than
two goals on us. We play good
defense."
"This was our only real disappointment up to this point," said
loos. "It's our first real setback. I
guess you could blame it on
everyone blaming everyone else
for looking past this game to next
week and not being psyched
enough for it."
The Danes could understandably have been saving their
energy for this weekend's University Center Championships,
which will take place in Buffalo
and include Albany, Buffalo,
Stony Brook and Binghamton.
Binghamton, the tournament's
top seeded team, defeated the
fourth seeded Danes earlier in the
season, 2-0. The Danes have not
played Stony.Brook or Buffalo,
r a n k e d second a n d third
respectively.
"We should play Stony Brook
in the opening round," said loos,
"and we're deflnately looking
forward to playing Binghamton."
D
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MANHATTAN TRANSFER
Women booters drop to 7-8
By Mike Mac Adam
EDITORIAL ASSISTANT
) «r r y i
SflbS & StClff
STUDENT
The Albany State women's soccer team knocked themselves out
of contention for a chance'at the
SUNYAC title by losing to Hartwick and Plattsburgh last week.
After the two losses a victory
over Castleton Vermont Monday
revived their hopes of at least vying for the State Championship as
they improved their record to 7-8.
Fourteen teams in the state
receive bids for the championship
on the basis of an index,
calculated from points awarded
for victories. More points are
awarded for wins over opponents
higher in the standings.
Albany could have picked up
some important points against
Hartwick last Tuesday, but late
second half pressure by Hartwick
produced the only goal of the
game at 37:25, and settled a
scoreless deadlock that appeared
to be heading for overtime. But,
according to Albany Coach Amy
Kidder, her exhausted troops
would not have faired much better had the game reached
overtime.
"Exams really caught up with
us; we just ran out of gas," said
Kidder. "In the second half, I was
thinking, 'If we don't score, I
don't think we can make
overtime'."
Both teams played evenly for
most of the game, but most of
Hartwick's 25 shots on goal came
during the late .shooting, binge, SUNYAC championship,, but, a
and even a sparkling 13-save per- 3-1 victory kept their hopes alive
formance by Dane keeper Karen for a bid in the state tournament.
Campbell couldn't hold out
"We aren't going to the
forever.
(SUNYAC) playoffs," said KidAlbany's frustrations carried der, "but we have an outside
over into the Plattsburgh game chance at the states because there
and erupted into a foul-filled bat- are a lot of teams around .500."
tle that kept the officials busy;
Freshman forward Joan
Plattsburgh was tagged for 11 McNamara's goal 6:43 into the
fouls in the second half alone. second half settled the offense
When the smoke cleared, that had seen a first half goal miss
however, Albany was on the short the buzzer by one second.
end of a 3-1 defeat and in jeopar"It's hard playing against a
dy of missing any kind of post- team like that because they play
season play.
goal-line to goal-line, so we had
"It was an absolute war out to change the point of attack by
there, an absolute war," said Kid- kicking deep passes over them inder. "We have emotional players, stead of keeping the ball on the
and they just got caught up in ground," explained Kidder.
that kind of game. It was just real "When Joan scored, we finally
started to relax."
destructive."
Although the shots on goal
Amy Lowell assisted on
were even, 12-11 in favor of Plattburgh, Albany's attempts to keep McNamara's goal, and Kim
Plattsburgh scoring threat Darlin Kosalek and Cheryl Hensen did
Levielle were futile, as she drove the same for forward Sue Frost at
home the game-winner at 23:37 of 25:06 of the second half, as she
the first half after teammate Beth converted an indirect kick to put
Campbell had put the Cardinals Albany up, 2-0,
up 1-0 six minutes earlier.
Castleton got a goal back at
'We knew they were having 35:30, but designated corner kick
trouble on re-starts, and that's specialist Mary Dulkis served up a
when we scored, on an indirect header to McNamara three
kick," said Kidder. "We weren't minutes later that put the game in
finishing our plays, though, and the bag.
At 7-8, the Danes now await
that's been our nemesis all year."
When the Danes travelled to this weekend's compilation of vicCastleton with their 6-8 record in tory points to determine whether
tow, they knew they would be they will be among the .14 state
CI
playing the spectator's role in the championship hopefuls.
1985 Sportsman and Sportswoman of
the Year
Wrestler Andy Seras
Softball pitcher Wendy Williams
October 26 at 8:00 PM
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Ml
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The women's soccer team
was booted out of
contention from the
upcoming SUNYACS.
See page 15
Sports Friday
OCTOBER 25, 1985
Great Danes try to stay alive against Norwich
By Mike MacAdam
EUITOK1AL ASSISTANT
All week the Albany State football team
has been ralizing that their playoff chances
are riding on a lot of 'it's,' 'maybes,' and
question marks concerning other teams'
schedules.
But the Great Danes will finally be able
to get their hands on something tangible in
the form of the Norwich Cadets when the
Cadets arrive at University Field Saturday.
Although last week's upset to Cortland
takes Albany's destiny out of their hands,
the 4-2 Danes can do their own part to ensure post-season play by beating a team
that Albany State Head Coach Bob Ford
considers as probably one of the greatest
rivals Albany has had.
"Because they arc a military academy,
Ihey are very disciplined; they are always
the same," Ford said. "They play just as
hard on the last play of the game as they
do on the first play of the game, whether
they're winning 30-0, or losing 30-0."
The game also has special meaning to
the Walt Whitman High School connection. Quarterback Mike Milano and wide
receiver John Donnelly, both Huntington
natives, are on the brink of smashing
Albany State records. Donnelly is currently tied with '83 graduate Bob Brien with 67
career receptions and Milano enters the
game with eight touchdown passes to tie
the single-season touchdown pass record.
Both records demonstrate the tremendous
impact Milano and Donnelly have made
on Albany's passing attack.
3-4 Norwich returns quarterback Mike
Gallagher, whose favorite target is 6-4 split
end Gordon Leonard. They are joined by
senior tailback Bruce Johnson, who terrorized Albany's defense in a 27-17 victory
last year. Last year's team finished at 9-1
before bowing to Ithaca in the ECACs.
Gallagher, who is protected by what
Ford calls a "large, economy-size offensive line," rewrote the Norwich record
books this season when he broke the
school's all-time passing yardage record, a
mark that has stood since 19S4.
Gallagher, who threw seven interceptions all of last year, has more than doubled that total already this year. Norwich
Head Coach Barry Mynter feels they must
limit turnovers in order to beat Albany.
"We have to stop beating ourselves. We
only had 11 turnovers all of last year, but
we've really been putting our defense in
the hole this year," said Mynter. "We've
put ourselves in poor field position with
too many turnovers, and field position is
what it's all about."
Ford feels that the Danes must stop Norwich's Johnson at all costs, and Mynter is
quick to agree.
"Because we run from the I-formation,
of course Bruce is the important man, he's
the mainstay of our running attack," explained Mynter. "He's so dangerous
because he has the potential to break a
long one at any time, but he can also be a
punishing runner inside who can wear
defenses down."
The Danes left last week's loss to Cortland with plenty of injured pride, but no
extraordinary physical problems, which
means that Mike Milano and the Albany
wishbone will be in full force and back on
familiar turf. Because Norwich has recently converted from the wishbone to the 1,
Ford doesn't think Norwich will try
anything special against Albany's
wishbone.
"They are a wishbone team," said Ford.
"Their staff knows the wishbone, so 1
don't see them doing anything other than
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HOWARD TYQAR UPS
Split end Chris Haynor finds running room In the Springfield secondary. The Danes
host Norwich at University Field Saturday.
their normal 4-4 defense."
Mynter agreed, but added an interesting
fact about this year's attack.
"We know the wishbone, sure, but we
haven't seen Milano yet because he was injured last year. We don't really know what
makes him click yet," said Mynter.
Milano was handicapped by poor field
conditions last week resulting in seven
fumbles, but Ford is confident that he will
be ready for Norwich.
"Everybody knows how the saying goes,
when a team wins, the quarterback
receives too much of the credit, and when
they lose, he gets too much of the blame,"
said.Ford. "Well, he's our trigger, and
he's a mature young man, so I know he'll
bounce back."
Norwich will also have to combat AllEast Honor Roll regular Denis Murphy at
defensive end. Ford feels that, given the
choice between running at Murphy and
running away from him, he would opt for
the former.
"I would run at him, because at least
14*
Anderson poses double-threat to Albany foes
By Dean Chang
MANAGING EDITOH
He was a walk-on, a guy Head Coach Bob Ford had
never seen play. But as soon as Ford saw Wayne Anderson in person, he knew he had something special.
"Wayne impressed me from Day One," said Ford.
"He had incredible quickness, blazing speed, agility, and
a confident manner about him. We basically fell into
him."
That was two years ago. Now as a junior, Anderson is
recognized as one of the top defensive backs in the country in Division III, as well as being an explosive kickoff
and punt returner. This is not your average walk-on
HOWARD TVO.AR UPa
Wayne Anderson after his TD return.
player.
As a freshman, Anderson transferred from the University of New Haven after one week at the Connecticut
school. Even though he had the talent to play at the Division II school, Anderson didn't like the Division II
mentality.
"Everyone's attitude.was geared to playing profootball," said Anderson. "Their priorities were in the
wrong order, and I didn't want to be surrounded by those
kind of people."
Anderson decided to transfer to Albany. His sister
went to the school, a quality education was a factor, and
of course, the football team was pretty decent. He called
Ford to express his interest in playing, but didn't receive a
warm welcome at first,
"He was like, 'who the hell are you,' " said Anderson.
"That's funny, because I've never had that happen to me
before."
Considering his achievements at White Plains High
School, Anderson's reaction is understandable. He was
recruited by the University of Massachusetts, the University of Connecticut, New Haven and Springfield College
to name a few. Although Ford had never recruited him,
Springfield Head Coach Mike DeLong did.
"We saw him on film and he's a heck of a player," said
DeLong. "He was a big-play type of kid on both sides of
the ball. He had exceptional speed, reflexes, and the ability to really break on a ball. He was a good enough of an
athlete to play flanker, or even running back."
In Anderson's first game as a Dane, he didn't impress
many people. In the season-opener against Ithaca, he
fumbled the opening kickoff and the first punt thereafter,
said Ford.
Things naturally got better as the season progressed,
but the team wasn't seeing the real Wayne Anderson yet.
That would come a year later, when Anderson forced
himself to concentrate on football, rather than dwell on
an unfortunate past.
His mother was suffering from cancer that first year,
and Anderson admits he was in his own world.
"I didn't sit down with Coach Ford until the end of the
year," said Anderson. "He was frustrated with the year I
had and I owed him an explanation, It's something I
should've told the coaching staff, but didn't."
Anderson's mother died after his freshman year, and it
took some time for him to get over her death.
"For a while it bothered me," said Anderson. "I lived
as if she were still alive and pretended things were still the
same. For some reason, I just woke up. Things just have
to go on."
"I still look back," continued Anderson. "But that's
all it is — just looking back. That's all I can do."
Anderson put the personal tragedy behind him and
went on to have a year that earned him Alt-ECAC
Upstate New York honors. Nine interceptions and an
interception-return yardage total that topped the nation.
Definitely not your average walk on.
"Wayne is a step above Division III players," said
Ford. "He could probably play at every Division II
school and at most Division I-AA schools not obsessed by
height or size."
At 5'9" and 175 pounds, Anderson knows that his size
is the only thing that's keeping him from bigger things.
"My size was one of the biggest factors leaving high
school," said Anderson. "They felt I wasn't big enough.
I always ran a 4.5 40 (yard dash) and benched 300
pounds. I wasn't 6'1" and 195 pounds."
Not every pro football player is that big, and Anderson
knows it. He's visited the New York Giants' camp for the
past two years to observe a little and dream a lot. For
now, Anderson's content to be the best he can at this
level.
Defensive back coach Rick Flanders who played at
Maine, a Division I-AA school, said Anderson could probably play at that level.
"He would have to work hard, but he could step In and
play," said Flanders. "Anytime he touches the football,
he's as dangerous as any guy on offense we have."
14»-
Inside:
Knights in the Cathedral
Roches in the Hall
King in disguise
Aid in J.B/s Theatre
and more. • •
2a Aspectit
• October 25, 1985
October 25, 1985 I
CICB
Presents
fin Evening With
Featuring filRTO
MOREIRfi
In Th« Palace Theatre,fllbany
Wed., Nov 6, 8p.m.
Tickets available Theirs, Oct 24 at CC,
Strawberries & The Palace Theatre
tickets are $7 with student tax card
$10 without
FALL 1985
BUS SERVICE INFORMATION
RATES:
$10 SEMESTER STICKER (GOOD FROM
SEPTEMBER 1, 1985 THROUGH JANUARY 1. 1986)
$5 HALF-SEMESTER STICKER (GOOD FROM
NOVEMBER 1985 THROUGH JANUARY 1.
$1 BOOK OF TEN COUPONS ( $ 10 PER RIDE)
INDENTIFICATION: UNIVERSITY I.D. WILL STILL BE
REQUIRED OF FACULTY, STAFF. AND STUDENTS TO
RIDE THE UNIVERSITY BUSES. IN ADDITION ?Q
onCKER OR BUS COUPON.
SALES LOCATIONS:
(1) VEHICLE OPERATIONS CENTER IN THE PLANT
BUILDING
( Guest Passes, Coupons. Stickers)
(2) PARKING LOT ATTENDANT AT CIRCLE
( Guest Passes, Coupons. Stickers^
(3) PUBLIC SAFETY TRAFFICK DIVISION
( Coupons. Stickers)
(4) PUBLIC SAFETY BUILDING
( Vending Machine- Coupons only)
(5) CAMPUS CENTER INFORMATION DESK
( Vending Machine- Coupons only)
(6) CAMPUS CENTER BOOK STORE
(Coupons only)
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(8) COLONIAL, STATE, INDIAN. DUTCH. WATERBURY
DINING HALLS
( Coupons onlvl
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( Coupons only)
(lO)DOWNTOWN CAMPUS, KUMQUAT
LOUNGE
( Vending Machine- Coupons only)
(^speculation
don't eat red meat. I eat poultry, seafood, vegetables, and Drake's Funny
Bones. I didn't become a pseudo-vegetarian for religious, moral, or healthrelated reasons; I became a vegetarian by parental subterfuge.
My parents had a good set-up going when I was young. Every summer they'd
send my brother, my sister and me to Florida to stay with our grandparents. For us,
it was a long, fattening vacation. For my parents, it was salvation. They could go to
the beach without bringing pails and shovels, without having to help us jump the
waves, without lavishing With praise every dead and reeking sea creature that we
laid at their feet. They could go out to dinner without reminding each other about
"restaurant manners." They could go to the duck pond without stale bread and
wash-ups. The possibilities were endless for two months of parental relief.
One summer, about ten years ago, they decided to give up red meat for two
childless months. By the end of the summer, they felt more healthy, relaxed, and
happy. Instead of attributing this positive state of being to temporary freedom,
they vowed to give up red meat for good.
We came home that summer expecting the normal readjustment to a lifestyle
that had once been comfortable, familiar, and predictable. We had the traditional
first-day-home dinner celebration. It wasn't steak; it was green spaghetti and soybean loaf. My parents, in a kind attempt to ease us into pseudo-vegetarianism, had
tried to fake us out with imitation meatloaf. We all agreed that it was better to give
up the idea of red meat altogether than to try to deceive ourselves into believing
that soybeans walk on four legs and moo.
My sister, the youngest, was traumatized. She made me swear that as soon as I
could drive I would take her to McDonald's as often as possible. She said she could
wait the six years, as long as there was hope on the horizon. We wouldn't let her
near the dog for a few months, because she couldn't pet him without a hungry
gleam in her eyes. She grew thin and weak. She solicited dinner invitations from
friends.
My brother, on the contrary, became a health food fanatic. He thought Mom
and Dad'really had something going, and he took it even further. He abandoned
Twinkies cold. He gave up Milky Way sandwiches. As a matter of fact, he would
not eat anything with white flour, sugar, artificial ingredients, or any semblance of
flavor. He became very conscious of saturated fats, and was distrustful of
hydrogenation. He ate no meat at all, and, never a lover of vegetables, he subsisted
on pure thought for several years. He also grew very thin, but stayed close to
home, firmly believing in "starvation before contamination."
I took it well. I ate whatever was around, within reason. I didn't miss meat too
much, and I tried to make the transition smoother for my brother and sister. I baked muffins for my brother, denying any trace of non-nutritive ingredients. I
donated my mini-hot dog hors d'oeuvres to my sister at every occassion. The experience made us close.
Pseudo-vegetarianism became a way of life for us. We grew up, eventually,
though not too tall and not too strong. Now all the kids are off at college, and my
parents are free once again.
A few weeks ago 1 went home for a surprise visit. I arrived just before dinner
time and found my parents in the kitchen, up to their elbows in raw hamburger
meat. They were making real meatloaf this time, and, as they cooked, were nibbling on pepperoni. There was a box of Suzy-Q's on the table, white bread on the
counter, and Smurfberry Crunch cereal on top of the fridge. They were embarrassed at first. They sat me down and tried to explain.
"Once you kids moved out," said my mother, with tears in her eyes, "we decided to take more risks, to make life more exciting..." She paused. "We had a steak.
And then pork chops . . . and ham . . . and, well, we felt good. We felt healthy."
"So, that's great, Ma," I assured her.
"But you see," my mother stammered, "it's the same way we felt that summer,
when we thought it was the diet. . . "
She took my hand, put a slice of pepperoni in it, and said, "I think we made a
mistake."
I
dfo*-<&m(rtoas
Betrayal
My china heart
Placed in your hand,
Thought safe, secure
In your command.
Let slip - Smashed!
Upon the floor,
With open fist
You beg for more.
•Victoria Crosse
^Aspects 3a
Real knights do eat quiche
I
t was a chilly, rainy day in October as
I walked up to the Cathedral bf All
Saints. Little suspecting what was inside, I strolled boldly through the doors —
and entered a world more than five hundred years old. Where to begin? Sights and
sounds surrounded me. Perhaps, 1 considered, I'd be able to think more clearly
after I'd eaten something. Let's see, a
tankard of ale (the meal looked good) and
some . . . quiche7
Keren
Schlomy
The Cathedral of All Saints has been
hosting a Medieval Faire for nine years
now. I don't know if quiche was on the dinner table of Henry the VIII, but it's been a
custom at the church for quite a few years
now and no one seemed to mind.
The cathedral, which is a beautiful
• building in and of itself, was gaily
redecorated for the two-day affair. The
40-foot high ceilings were hung with banners and coats of arms. The usual church
benches were nowhere to be seen, and the
center aisle was filled with booths of all
sorts. The clergy themselves were happily
dressed with medieval robes over their
own. Despite all the changes, the Cathedral
was somehow a very appropriate place for
the faire to be held.
There may have been no Madonna in
1485, but that didn't stop people from singing about her and her son. In any event,
Madonna 198S doesn't have anything on
SUNYA's Chamber Singers. They performed for half an hour, rendering a host
of varied styles. They sang in German,
French, Latin and English — sacred and
secular songs. As a group, they had the
best costumes there.
Members the Society for Creative
Anachronism, who gave a slide show on
medieval attire, were costumed comparatively poorly. In addition to mediocre
costumes, their medieval dances were
clearly not ready for public viewing. Those
who did actually know the steps couldn't
seem to get them in time with the rest of
the troup. On the whole, they looked like
they'd be better off staging battles than
dancing.
Tim Downy juggled on a unicycle, to
the delight of all who watched. On the
other hand, Jim Snack, the magician, lacked the absorbing qualities that an illusionist
needs to hold attentions, though he successfully entertained the young children.
The grandest spectacle of all was clearly
the Professional Enthronement of the Boy
Bishop, a custom which has survived for
hundreds of years. Originating with the
feast of Saint Nicholas, the children's
patron saint, a boy from the Cathedral
School is enthroned as bishop. Heralded in
by organs, the procession of children bearing candles, cross and incense traveled
through the Cathedral. The audience was
encouraged to sing along, and even the
sheep joined in, punctuating the pauses.
Other forms of entertainment included a
lutist, a storyteller, a puppeteer and a musician. That music man played the meanest
hammered dulcimer I ever heard. .The
hammered dulcimer is the forerunner to
the piano, but the strings are struck
directly.
Roches invade Troy
T
he Roches returned to the Troy Savings Bank Music Hall Friday night
for an enthusiastic, sell-out crowd.
They delivered a fine hour and a half long
performance without intermission. The terrific acoustics of the Music Hall heightened
their rich harmonies. They performed here
over a year ago to a very pleased audience,
too.
Roni Ginsberg
Maggie and Terre Roche sang together
and had recorded Seductive Reasoning
before they added sister Suzzy and became
the Roches. Originally from New Jersey,
they started out playing clubs in the
Village and got a major recording contract
in 1978. Since then, the trio have produced
four albums, the newest of which is
Another World. The group is known for
their original music, harmonies and often
zany and bizarre lyrics. In concert, they
space their songs out with equallly bizarre,
dry comments the audience can relate to.
After the concert ended, and the audience
gave a standing ovation, Suzzy announced,
"This is supposed to be the encore, but it
seems pretty stupid to go off (stage) and
then just come back on."
Sibling comraderie is evident with the
sisters playing off each other. Suzzy introduced a new song which focused on being talked to by compulsive bores. Terre
implied that maybe Suzzy talks too much,
too, to which she replied, "You've gat to
learn what people are thinking, not what
they're saying." In "Waterfall," on the new
album, they address this Issue with the
lines:
"Turn off the faucet, you waterfall
I'm no bucket, damn It all.
I asked how you were feeling
Even though I didn't really care ..."
They opened with "Slice of Life" and
"You're Being Weeded," both new songs.
Being found "Face Down in Folk City,"
one of the clubs they started in, is the topic
of another. "Missing" and "Older Girls" are
also two of their new upbeat tracks. They
mixed in some older songs of theirs, as well
as their own rendition of "Come Softly To
Me." Older Roche stuff included "Pretty
and High", "Hammond Song", "We", and
"The Hallelujah Chorus." "Mr. Sellack"
and "The Train," about some odd
characters they've encountered, brought
chuckles from the audience.
The three sisters have very different
voices and personalities when they sing.
Suzzy does most of the lead vocals. Terre
had a beautiful solo, with piano accompaniment by Maggie on "West Virginia."
Maggie's deep contralto can be heard in
the harmonies and alternating with her
sisters' voices. A new addition to the tour is
keyboards/synthesizer player Libby McClellan. She does her job well, as the do the
Roches, with Terre and Suzzy on electric
guitar and Maggie on piano and
keyboards. McClellan is their token "band
member" and somewTBt" apart from them.
When she wasn't playing, she retreated to
a seat at the back of the stage. She was
there for her ability, not as a "presence"
like the Roches.
Concerts at the Music Hall are extra enjoyable for me, since smoking is not allowed and the noise level is pleasant, letting
one hear how the building's design
enhances the sounds. It's nice to leave a
concert and not have ringing ears and smell
like an ashtray.
The Roches pick up energy from their
audiences. There is a true rapport between
the group and the audience.
D j
Immediately to the left of the entrance
of the cathedral was a small cadre of
animals, most available for petting by the
anxious hands of children and not a few
adults. There were four doves, two rabbits
(one, an angora), two ducks, one pig a
goat, and yes, two sheep. The 4-H Sheep
Club was set up there selling sheepskins
and wools.
One man had a blacksmith's stand and
sold his own forged shields and swords (to
hang over your fireplace). With his black
tights, leather vest and apron, black meshed tank top and spiked bracelet, I wasn't
sure if he looked more punk or medieval.
He sold handmade crowns, wands,
helmets, and pendants, and would happily
discourse on applied mathematics if given a
chance. He was just one of the interesting
characters who helped set the atmosphere
for this usual event.
Other booths were as varied in their
wares as one could imagine. There were
brass works, stained glassers, driftwood
sculptures, face painters, paper makers, and
pottery people. There was a woman spinning wool by hand, selling the woolen
clothing that she'd made. One man made,
played, and sold his flutes, and another
made hats of the sort that haven't been in
fashion for a long time. Robinhood and
jester caps, conical princess caps, floppy
berets and more adorned the heads of
many that day. One of the more unusual
sellers was a woman who sold bee products: candles made from beeswax or
honeycombs, wax ornaments, honey butter, a honey recipe book, and a variety of
(you guessed it) honey.
Many happy hours later 1 walked out of
the Cathedra) and back into the real world.
It was still cold and rainy, and cars were
honking their horns with impatience. The
phone bill was due, I had two more
midterms, and could look forward to a
crowded Green Machine (SUNY bus)
Monday morning. Welcome back to 1985.
•
October 25, 1985 I
4a Aspects i
OB Aspects
3a
| Vegetarianism
and animal rights
by Ken
emember those McDonald's commercials on TV a few years ago in which
Ronald is touring the hamburger patches with Mayor McCheese, and the
hamburgers are sort of like flowers (they are growing on plants) and are
singing and humming quite merrily? I'm not exactly sure of the intent of the
advertising firm that did this ad, but its message seems to be that hamburgers or
any type of meat is grown without pain, and that murder has not been
committed to produce the burgers, and also that they are happy that they will be
harvested to be eaten.
R
Realistically, if there were truth in advertising,
Ronald McDonald would be walking through a
slaughterhouse watching overcrowded steers
screaming in pain, as there is no room for them to
move or even lay down. Then he would watch as
they are killed and, depending upon the particular
slaughterhouse, the animal would either be shot in
the head or killed with an injection (unless it were
killed in the kosher fashion, in which a very slurp
knife is used to cut the throat). The corpse of the
animal then would be hung upside down and sent to
another room to be skinned and bled. Finally, the
animal would be cut up and shipped to an animal
processing plant where the McDonald's hamburgers
are made. And, I doubt that Ronald would be so
jovial in this commercial. Witnessing animal
slaughter would probably make him nauseous (it has
been said that it takes years for workers at animal
factories to get used to these sights), and the smell
would certainly make him lose his appetite.
Ironically, the actor who originally played Ronald
McDonald has become a vegetarian and no longer
does the commercials.
In the song "Meat is Murder" by the Smiths, Morrissey, the lead singer sings:
Heifer whines could be human cries
closer comes the screaming knife
this beautiful creature must die . . .
a death for no reason is MURDER
and the flesh you so fancily fry
is not succulent tasty or nice
. . . and the calf you carve with a smile is
MURDER
and the turkey you festively slice is MURDER
do you know how animals die
kitchen aromas aren't very homely
it's not comforting, cheery or kind
it's sizzling blood and the unholy stench of
MURDER
it's not natural normal or kind
the flesh you so fancifully fry
the meat in your mouth
as you savor the flavour of MURDER
. . . who hears when animals cry?
Obviously, this song is advocating abstention
from eating meat, but various critics such as Wayne
Robins of Newsday have labelled it as an "Antihamburger" song; it has also been called a song that
advocates animals rights by other critics.
Why is there a reluctancy within the general
public to consider the horror of the fact that an
animal must be killed to create the meat, poultry
and fish that we buy in the supermarkets? How can
people not consider that a hamburger is, in actuality,
ground up animal flesh7 The answer probably approaches this: that people don't want to think about
it. As one person has said to me, "It's not a priority."
Even among some vegetarians this is not an issue.
Vegetarians choose to abstain from eating meat for a
variety of reasons. Among them are health reasons,
ecological reasons, religious reasons, moral reasons,
and also because they don't like the taste of meat.
Usually, several of these reasons overlap.
Among the health related reasons to adopt
vegetarianism into one's diet is that meat is high in
fat, and studies have shown that consumption of
meat, chicken and fish can lead to heart disease. People may be surprised by the inclusion of chicken and
fish as a contributing factor to heart disease, since it
is advocated as an alternative to eating red meat and
pork, but it is only a lesser evil, so to speak. Since
animals are on the top of the food chain, flesh is
much more contaminated with various environmental poisons than are plants. Doctors also assert that
diets high in fiber and low in fat reduce the risk of
cancer threefold. That diet can be found in a
vegetarian lifestyle.
Eating meat can be a direct cause of death,
though. In 1983, 18 people were hospitalized after
eating hamburgers from cattle raised on antibiotics;
one person died. Antibiotics are added to animal
feed to prevent the animals from getting ill, since
they easily lose their immunity when taken from the
pastures and placed in the animal factories or
warehouses that overcrowd them.
An interesting and very little known fact is that
over 1,300 tons of antibiotics, nearly half of the U.S.
production, and a market worth over $250 million,
go to feed meat animals each year. According to Dr.
Scott Holmberg of the Center for Disease control,
"antibiotic resistant bacterium can actually make its
way from the barnyard to the dinner table."
According to the book Animal Factories, by Jim
Mason and Peter Singer, "Nearly 90 percent of U.S.
cattle are reared on Synovex, Ralgro and other
growth hormones whose cancer-causing effects are
not yet known." In Puerto Rico, Singer and Mason
point out, very young children have developed
"freakishly mature sexual organs which their doctors
believe to be caused by residues of hormones used
to stimulate growth in cattle and poultry."
Dornbaum
Ecologically, the amount of grain used to sustain
The average meat eatei consumes 15 cattle, 880
an animal destined for slaughter is incredible. 91 chickens, 12 sheep. 771 pounds of fish, etc.
percent of the corn grown in the U.S. is destined to Moreover, an addition I wo tons of animal bybecome animal feed. If these grains were fed to products (such as soaps w) ich contain animal fat, or
humans directly, then much less land would be baked goods made with l|rd) is consumed by each
wasted, and more food would be produced. Also, it person.
takes 20 grams of plant protein to make one gram of
cattle protein, therefore one can consider that when
one eats a steak, one eats for twenty.
Moreover, because the animals are given antibiotics and hormones, the waste products of these
animals are very toxic. Anyone living near or working at a factory that kills chickens can attest to the
smell that permeates for miles around. Also, disposal
of this waste has become a major public health problem. For example, on eastern Long Island a few
years ago, wells were being contaminated by toxic
wastes from duck farms, and the water supply was
threatened with total contamination in eastern Suffolk County. Only after strict guidelines were
drawn up regarding disposal of this waste did the
situation ease somewhat.
Many groups adhere to vegetarianism for
religious reasons. Seventh Day Adventists, Hindus,
Buddhists, and various Orthodox Jewish sects ad"... the bulk oi>n animal
vocate vegetarianism as a commandment of God.
consists of
experimentatioi
Hindus advocate a "karma-free" diet.
Professor A vraham Amir, the Director of General
\, costly, and
duplicative, pal iful,
Studies at Ben Gurion University of the Negev, and
of
unnecessary
forns
a recognized Talmudic scholar and authority on
research... '
Jewish law has cited a legal ruling by Rabbi Akiba in
the Talmud. Rabbi Akiba stated that a vicious ox
that gorged a man could not be executed prior fo being judged by 23 judges, the same amount needed to
judge a human being for capital offenses. Professor
The anti-vivisectionists roint out that products
Amir noted that no judges heard the case against a
such as shampoo, make u| and medicines increase
calf slaughtered for human consumption. He also
the toll of animals consurn d by each person. Also,
noted Psalm 145 that states, "He opens His hand and
between 60 and 100 mill: in animals are sacrificed
provides for all living things." This Psalm, according
each year in the laboraton and the bulk of animal
to Professor Amir, is recited three times daily in
experimentation consists .>f duplicative, painful,
order that humans be cognizant of their relationship
costly, and unnecessary foms of research. Among
with the entire universe, and indicates the need for
these studies are a $1,000,100 study on the mother
humans to spiritually rise by the cessation of animal
love of monkeys and apes. n a series of experiments
slaughter.
at the University of Wi5 ronsin, dozens of baby
The moral reason to pursue vegetarianism inchimpanzees were taken avay from their mothers at
cludes all of the aforementioned, but also includes
birth and kept isolated
bare, wire cages for
stopping all cruelty to animals. The antiperiods of five to eightt ye; is. While in solitary convivisectionist movement, which is very strong in
finement, their behavior
observed through oneEngland and growing here, advocates not only
way glass. The conclusion vas that animals so convegetarianism, but also the liberation of animals
fined developed stereotypical, compulsive
from human domination and slavery.
behaviors, such as clasping heir heads in their hands
-•',-s.--*
and rocking or chewing themselves raw.
A group called the United Action for Animals has
documented thousands of experim»nts such as one
at Kansas State University where beagles and mixed
breed dogs were force fed ethylene glycol to
demonstrate the effects of anti-freeze poisoning.
Predictably, the dogs suffered loss of coordination,
vomiting, depression of the nervous system,
weakness, paralysis and convulsions before dying
within 8-40 hours.
Also, for a master's thesis, two University of
Texas researchers and a PhD watched the effects of
oil and kerosene admnistered to 31 calves and one
steer by stomach tube. According to this group, the
animals suffered painful deaths preceeded by severe
vomiting, pneumonia, bloated stomachs, chest inflamation, muscle spasms, depression and
respiratory distress.
Experiments such as these are very common and
are big business. In fact, the animal experimentation
(or as they call it "animal research") business has its
own magazine called Lab Animal. Among the
advertisements of products in the magazine is one
for a rodent guillotine. It reads, "Instantly
decapitates rats and mice. Long lasting stainless steel
blades. Bench mountable. Completely washable
. . . " There is also an ad for beagles to be sold to
laboratories that says, "We're different because . . .
we're puppy petters. (Our company)... employs a
dedicated team of 12 puppy petters who train our
dogs to be docile during IV"s. EKG's, and other procedures, making these procedures easier to
perform."
It is argued that these animals are being sacrificed
to make human life better, to find cures for such
diseases as cancer, etc. However, a majority of these
experiments are used to create new anti-biotics for
feed animals. Moreover, many of these experiments
are cruel and can be avoided, such as the Draize tests
for cosmetics which blinded rabbits. After a massive
public outcry a new method of testing cosmetics
was developed (without using animals!), and the
Draize test was abolished.
Another example of useless tests is the L.D. 50
Test (Lethal Dose 50 percent test). The L.D. 50,
which killed five million dogs, cats, monkeys, and
other animals last year, is the amount of a toxic
substance that will, in a single dose, kill half a group
oi test animals. This test is not required by the FDA,
and non-animal experiments, such as cell and tissue
culture experiments, and computer modeling can be
used instead
The L.D. 50 is crude and imprecise, according to
the animal rights organization PETA (People for the
Ethical Treatment "of Aimals). The test substance,
which may be a weedkiller, oven cleaner, cosmetic,
or food additive, is forced into the animals stomach
by tube, sometimes through a whole cut in the
throat. On occasion, this causes death by rupture of
the sheer bulk of the chemical dosage. Sometimes,
the substance being tested is injected or applied to
the eyes, rectum or vagina, or inhaled through a gas
mask. To avoid interference with results, lab personnel do not administer painkillers.
In England, a group known as the Animal Liberation Front has been raiding laboatories and setting
animals free. They have also used violent tactics to
prevent the slaughter of animals, such as bombing
butcher shops, and even bombing the corporate
headquarters of the largest animal research
laboratory in England. There have been some raids
on animal laboratories in United States, but as of yet
there have been no bombings. It is of note that the
ALF in England has only destroyed buildings and
property, but has not caused injury to anyone. Most
animal rights groups in the U.S. promote public
education as a tactic to stop vivisection.
Many people will argue that animal experimentation is necessary, and also that humans are natural
meat eaters. Neither is particularly true. The fight
against cancer has taken over 30 years, for example,
and still there is no cure. PETA has estimated that
since 1955 almost one billion animals have been killed in cancer research. Of course, there have been advancements towards prevention of cancer, but they
are based more on common sense than anything
else. Diet, smoking, and environment are large contributing causes of cancer, and only now has it been
advised to modify the above conditions to prevent
cancer.
Moreover, humans are not natural carnivores.
Cats, which are natural carnivores, have sharp teeth
and claws to help tear up the meat, and very short
digestive tracts to help the cat avoid digesting toxic
substances. Humans, on the other hand, have very
long digestive tracts, and it is estimated that five
pounds of rotting animal flesh will be situated in the
average meat eater by the age of 50.
Common questions asked of vegetarians are:
What do you eat? Where do you get your protein?
According to a pamphlet put out by the National
Meat Council, vegetarian food is quite bland and
non-nutritious, and vegetarians are always in ill
health. Recently, in Cosmopolitan, a famous nutri- j
tionlst said that he ILK; never seen a healthy
vegetarian. Obviously, he has never met many
vegetarians.
' Vegetarians eat a great variety of food, and since
there are so many styles of vegetarianism, there Is a
great variety in what a vegetarian does and does not
eat. The range Is from pesco-vegetarians who eat
fish, to fruitarian!! who eat only fruits and anything
that does not kill a plant.
Contrary to popular belief, protein deficiency
among vegetarians is not much of a problem since
most vegetarians are pretty up to date about nutrition and also more aware of diet. Moreover, plant
protein is excellent protein and very easy to intake.
Even if a person does not use dairy products, attaining such vitamins as B12 is relatively simple. Sea
vegetables such as nori, hiziki, and Wakabe which
are staples of Japanese diet are extremely high in
B12. Also, there are vegetarian vitamins.
Among the dishes one would see at a vegetarian
restaurant are vegetarian chile, nori maki
(Vegetarian sushi), tofu burgers, and all sorts of
stews, soups, breads, etc. The possibilities are
endless. Vegetarianism can be inconvenient if someone lets it. There are not fast food veggie
restaurants, and eating at the Rathskellar is not an
easy task.
Becoming a vegetarian is also not as difficult as
people imagine. Most vegetarians do not miss such
"delicacies" as Whoppers and Chicken Wings. Some
methods of discarding meat from one's diet include
doing it in stages, or just plain cold turkey.
There are over ten million vegetarians in the
United States and hundreds of vegetarian
restaurants. Among the more famous vegetarians include Patti Reagan Davis, William Shatner, Todd
Rundgren, Joe Strummer of the Clash, Annie Lennox, Michael Jackson, Paul McCartney, Darryl Hannah, Dick Gregory, Cloris Leachman, and many
others.
Of course, no one is perfect; some vegetarians still
wear leather shoes or jackets, or occassionally eat
something with animal lard, such as Oreo's, for example. However, in this culture it is not easy to
avoid animal products totally. Any attempt, though,
does save ani mals.
•
Aspects 7a
October 25, 1985 '
6a Aspects^
I October 25, 1985
Stephen King finally stands up
CUE
&
Tray Savings Bank
(MtiuticCMll
and
QBK FM 104
The SUNYA Pre-Law Association
prosents
The
S UIM Y-AL B AIMY
CAPITAL
DISTRICT
LAW SCHOOL FAIR
Present
An evening with
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Saturday Nov. 2
at 8:30 pm
Tickets
8 & 11 dollars
Featuring Admissions
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Over 3 0 !
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^i
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For Ticket Information Call
(518) 273 - 0038
or Write: 33 Second Street,
Troy, N.Y. 12180
'Troy Savinga Bank
MUSIC HALL
4UZ0^=^r nnni4n7?i*h^Nf
The Bachman Books
by Stephen King
Plume Books
9-11:45 & 1:30-3:
SUNYA Cunpus Genter BaUroom
FwhrthMlnlaRn.tia.Mlk C U E ?
4 ways to pick up a date
while entering the
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1. Go to the Bookstore this
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S. Sample Sugar Free Suisse
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3. Borrow their lucky pen to fill
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form below.
4. Pick up your free poster...and
ask their advice on where to hang ltl
442-38(0
692 pages, $9.99
I
f Stephen King really wants people to
take him seriously, he should stop
writing introductions to his novels as
simpering as the one which preceeds "The
Bachman Books: Four Early Novels by
Stephen King."
John
Keenan
The revelation early this summer that
Stephen King had been writing a series of
books under the pseudonym Richard
Bachman gave King's readers some cause
to wonder why King had been using a false
name. In an introduction section entitled
"Why I Became Bachman," King explains
his reasons for the pseudonym, and quickly goes through what he considers to be
the merits and faults of the four books
presented in the collection. This introductory section has now become easily
recognizable as the "King Gets Chummy
With His Faithful Readers" section, a
technique he employs in about every third
book. It's long, pointless, and kind of annoying. But you do get to hear his story on
how, and why, he became "Richard
Bachman."
honest one. And if King is tryingtoexplain
that the Richard Bachman pseudonym was
just a way of breaking out, of having a little fun and stretching a bit without having
to fulfill the obligations of being "Stephen
King," then let him say so, (which he does
later on). For a man with as many fans as
he has, he certainly isn't showing much
confidence.
And the most ironic thing about his
whining is that in three out of four cases,
they are good novels. No, he'sriotgoing to
win the Pulitzer with any of these entries,
but he isn't going to win the Pulitzer for
anything else he's written, either.
The strength of each of these works is
King's imaginative scenarios. The leadoff
novel, Rage, is about an insane student
who holds his social studies class hostage
But the flaw of the introduction, and
maybe the reason for the pseudonym
itself, is that King evinces no confidence in
the four novels he's presenting to us. "Are
they good novels?" he asks. "I don't know.
Are they honest novels? I think so."
So, what the hell is an "honest novel?"
The reader buys a book with the expectation that it's a good book, not that it's an
for a day. Rage is the kind of horror novel
that somebody might like, but would feel
vaguely ashamed of liking. When I finished it, my first reaction was "God, that was
fun." My second was, "God, am I sick."
Rage is one of the better novels here, but it
is somewhat flawed, and a weak ending
doesn't help mucfi, Nonetheless, it stands
up well against King's "real" books.
Not so Road Work, the second book in
the collection. Honest it may be, but it certainly isn't very good. Reading it was a
chore, and even playing REM loudly as I
tried to work my way through it didn't
make it anymore enjoyable. It is in Road
Work that King's inexperience (none of
these books were written later than 1980)
really shines through.
In sharp contrast, The Long Walk is
definitely the best book in the collection. It
stands up exceptionally well to almost
anything King has written, and, with a little more work, might have been one of his
best books. Again, the book isn't fleshed
out completely, but it's as near a miss as the
collection offers.
The story centers around a futuristic
sporting event called the Long Walk, in
which 100 adolescent boys have to walk
until only one boy is left walking (the ones
who stop walking are shot). The novel
weaves interesting characterizations
around each other, and, as the walk continues, and more and more people stop
walking and die, the novel achieves an intensity that King should be proud of. (But
is it honest, Steve?)
The final novel, The Running Man, is
more interesting for the world it takes
place in than for anything that actually
happens. Set in the not-so-distant future,
the only way the lower class can make
money is to audition to appear on game
shows. An example of the kind of futuristic
game show King cooks up is Treadmill For
Bucks, which takes people with heart and
•
-.
• :
••
•
•
..
... .
THE UUlUHIfc SPORTS
ABB
5ua
£K8,«5g ,Mn
lung conditions and makes them run on a
treadmill while answering trivia questions.
When they answer right, (hey get money.
When they answer wrong, they lose
money — and the treadmill speeds up.
"The Bachman Books" are good books,
all in all. If Richard Bachman really existed,
he might be considered a challenger to
Stephen King's domination of the horror
market. But the real sad. thing about the
"death" of Bachman is that Bachman probably would have stood up for his books,
not whined about them, the way King is
doing. Even under an assumed name.
King's the best.
Now if he would only learn when to i
shut up.
•
Not enough aid from Live Aid
T
his past Sunday the Albany County
Emergency Task Force, in collaboration with J.B.'s Theatre, presented
Capital Fun(d) Drive '85, Albany's "Live
Aid." All proceeds went to the Task Force
to help stock their pantries which feed
Albany's hungry through the winter. The
event lasted from 1 p.m. to midnight and
was divided into variety-style matinee and
evening shows.
Steve Raspa
The afternoon show featured performances by Doc Scanlon, Lisa Robilotto ,
Prodigy, and Begonia. Street dancers,
mimes, magicians, jugglers, and other local
performers also entertained the matineegoers.
The evening show boasted entertainment by some of Albany's best club bands
and, despite an often too restricting half
hour time limit, each band was able to give
listeners a good idea of what they were
musically about.
The Distractions, Diversion Factor, and
The Stompllstlcs
Dance Planet played the first half of the
show, experiencing equipment difficulties
that particularly disrupted Dance Planet's
performance. These first three bands were
followed by a seemingly unending Filene's
rock fashion show complete with motorcycles, dancing Domlnatrix-wigged
models, and clouds of fog. Chefs of the
Future, the Stomplistics, and Who Likes
What rounded up the evening with the
night's best performed numbers.
at Barnes & Noble Bookstore
<z>
Doo Soanlon'i Rhythm Boy»
All three of these last bands were instrumentally together. Hearing them was
definitely worth paying the admission and
sacrificing a night of study. Hearing Chefs
of the Future's "Red Soldier" and newer
material alone was worth it. The
Stomplistics' overall funky, reggae, kind of
soulful, bluesie, rock 'n' rolled up sound
was equally entertaining, although the
vocalist's voice was weak from the strain of
the band's previous weekend's concerts.
Who Likes What's opening cover, "I Am
The Walrus," was not a particularly good
clue of the band's capabilities (the vocalists
are best with originals), but "Leave Me
Alone" and "Green Onions" revealed the
band's talent at full strength.
The event itself provided (!0°d entertainment, but, unfortunately only raised
$775, a far cry from Hie $10,000 that was
hoped for. A publicity error was blamed
for Ihe poor turn out. Whatever the
reason, it's really a shame that so many
people missed out on a good time.
Anyone Interested in helping the
Emergency Food Task Force should drop
by J40 First Street, Albany, N.Y. 12206, or
callj!62-3459.
D
PUBLISHED
Madison (489-5431)
St. Elmo's Fire 7, 9:15
Cine 1-8 (459-8300)
1. Jagged Edge 1:40, 4:10, 7:10, 9:50, Fri, Sat, 12
2. Agnes of God 2, 4:30, 7, 9:20, Fri, Sat, 11:30
3. Back To The Future 1:40, 4:05, 6:50, 9:10, Fri, Sat, 11:35
4. Remo Williams 1:40, 4, 6:40, 9:30, Fri, Sat, 11:50
5. American Ninja 2:20, 4:50, 7:30, 9:40, Fr., Sat., 11:40
6. Commando 2:30, 5, 7:40, 10, Fri, Sat, 12
7. Silver Bullet 2:15, 4:40, 7:20, 9:55, Fri, Sat, 11:55
8. Sweat Dreams 1:30, 3:50, 6:30, 9, Fri, Sat, 11:20
UA Hellman (459-5322)
1. Pee Wee's Big Adventure 7:35, 9:30.
2. After Hours 7:25, 9:20
Club
Crossgates (456-5678)
1. American Ninja 12:35, 3:05, 6:40, 9:55, Fri and Sat 12
2. Sweet Dreams 12:50, 3:50, 6:20, 8:55, Fri and Sat 11:25
3. Back To The Future 12:25, 3, 6:30, 9, Fri and Sat 11:25
4. Remo Williams 12:55, 3:40, 6:50, 9:30, Fri and Sat 12
5. Key Exchange 1:10, 3:40, 7:35, 9:55, Fri and Sat 11:55
6. Commando 2:15, 4:40, 6:40, 9:10, Fri and Sat 11:30
7. Jagged Edge 1:45, 4:20, 7:10, 9:50, Fri and Sat 12:05
8. The Stuff 1:50, 3:55, 7, 9:35, Fri and Sat 11:35
9. Silver Bullet 1:40, 4:15, 7:20, 10, Fri and Sat 11:55
10. Better Off Dead 12:40, 2:55, 7:05, 9:40, Fri and Sat 11:50
11. Plenty 12:30, 3:05, 6:35, 9:15, Fri and Sat 11:45
12. Marie 1:05, 3:20, 6:25, 8:50, Fri and Sat 11:15
Third Street Theater (436-4428)
Silver City, October 25-27, 7. 9:15
The Lavender Hill Mob, October 28, 7,9
Dear Inspector, October 29-31, 7, 9:15
Spectrum Theater (449-8995)
1. The Kiss of the Spiderwoman 7, 9:35, Sunday 4:00
2. The Shooting Party 7:10, 9:20, Sunday 4:00
Proctors (346-6204)
Royal Winnipeg Ballet, October 29, 8 p.m.
A Salute to Gershwin, October 26, 8 p.m.
Allen Mills Halloween Organ Concert, October 27, 8 p.m.
Vienna Symphony Orchestra, October 31.
SUNYA Performing Arts Center
End Of the World, October 23-26.
University Choral concert, October 29
Page HaU
Gala Tricentennial Concert of Music by J.S. Bach, Handel, and D.
Scanlatti
Skidmore
Key Exchange, October 31.
TOE FAR SIDE
By GARY LARSON
"Oh, yeaaaooh? ... Vour mother
lives in on Army pooll"
Pauley's Hotel
The Sun Mountain Fiddler, October 25
Out of Control Rhythm and Blues Band, October 26,
The Newports, October 31,
Duck Soup
Mircale Legion' October 25
Dirty Face, October 25
Roger Wilco and the Radio Wares, October 26
The Jailhouse Rockers October 31
Gary Windo, October 31.
Half Moon Cafe
Paul Strausman, October 26, 11 a.m.
General Electric, October 26, 8 p.m.
Eighth Step Coffee House
Contra Dance, October 25
Skip West, October 26.
Skinflints
Lisa Robilotto Band, October 25
Johnny Rabb and the Jailhouse Rockers, October 25 and 26
Quintessence
Doc Scanlon's Rhythm Bovs, October 27.
Elbo Room
Bovine, October 25 and 26, 10 p.m.
288 Lark
Paisley Jungle, Dance Planet, October 31
Cafe Lena(584-9789)
Joe Heukerott and Adams Davis, October 25
Albany Institute of History and Art (463-4478)
Paintings and Sculptures from Albany Institutes permanent collection, Inner Light through November 3, David Miller: an exhibition drawn from 1985 Mohawk-Hudson Regional exhibiton, October 23-November 1.
Hamrh/Brickman Gallery (463-8322)
Original works in varied media by area artists.
Hannanus Bleeker Center (465-2044)
Sculptures, Paintings, a Faculty Exhibition.
Crailo State Historic Site(463-8738)
A Window of Our Past: The Dutch Heritage of the upper Hudson
Valley.
Schenectady Museum
Visual Poems, Horizons under the sea, Planetarium shows.
RCCA
Ceramic collections and Photoghraphing art.
ESIPA
The Raggedy Ann Musical Starting October 26.
Capital Repertory Company
"Playboy of the Western World" October 12 - November 10.
Union College(382-7890)
Mostly Mozart Festival Orchestra, October 29.
Russell Sage College(270-2395)
The Importance of Being Earnest, October 25, 26
Music Poplare, October 27.
RPI
Priscilla Herdman, October 25, 26, 8:30 p.m.
The Psaltery, October 31, 8:30 p.m.
AT THE STATE
VOLUME
UNIVERSITY
OF NEW YORK AT
ALBANY
BY THE ALBANY
ALBANY
STUDENT
PRESS
L X X II
STUDENT
CORPORATION
Tuesday
October 29,1985
NUMBER
34
SA granted stay
in Grouper Law
suit against city
Measures taken
to deter stolen
exams, cheating
By Jim Thompson
By llene Welnstein
STAFF WRITER
The suspicion of stolen exams and
cheating plagued the Finance 300 midterm
last week and forced department Chair
Hany Shawky to take measures to prevent
such incidents.
In the past, students have been involved
in the the duplicating process of exams,
Shawky said, which may have invited the
stealing and welling of tests. "We are coming up with some drastic changes," he said
explaining, "The changed formate for copying tests will inlcude only the Council
(of) Chairs and no students will be involved in the process."
The exam, which was planned for
Wednesday October 16, was postponed
until Monday the 21 when there were
rumors that some students had seen the
test beforehand.
In an effort to prevent cheating, the
Finance 300 class which usually meets in
lecture centger 2 was divided into two
groups, said Shawky.
One half of the class was moved twice to
different rooms because of room scheduling problems. During the second move,
Shawky said, students were allowed to
carry their papers with therri, and during
this time the alleged exchange of answers
"took place.
Shawky said he will cxamin the tests personally to determine whether there is any
evidence of cheating. The exam contained
20 true and false and five multiple choice
questions with no; work needed to be
shown.
'
"I will look at the exams and alone will
determine whether there was cheating,"
saidf Shawkey, adding that after the
change in copying procedures all rumors
of stolen tests will be considered fake. Up
to now, Shawky said, "we have had to
take all rumors as being truthful because
we knew it was possible.'*
SUNYA possesses one of the beast
busincsse schools among state colleges' in
New' York, and therefore a high
cumulative average is required for acceptance, said SKawky, adding, "At another
school without that pressure there might
be less cheating, the Competition Here is sc
fierce that some students will do anything
to get good grades."
"When I have made my decision as to
what to do with the tests, I wil personally
go to the class and tell the students
myself," said Shawky.
Some students in the class were upset at
the way the whole issue was handled, One
student, Ivan Prafder, said, "1 have noticed cheating ever since I came to Albany."
He added, "There is so mueh cheating it is
unbelievable."
The problem is important not only
because people who cheat get better grades
but they destroy any curve for students
who studied, said Prafder. In reality people are being punished for taking the test
legally, he said.
"I have studied two weeks for this exam
and my other grades have suffered for it,"
Prafder said. "I honestly doubt I'll get a
fair grade," he added.Another student,
Greg Behrendt, said, "It is typical of the
way things are run at Albany."
Not everyone is upset however, "There
was no cheating going on as far as I
knew," said student Howie Llndenbaum.
When asked If the competition drives
business students to cheat, Llndenbaum14*
PRESS
ASSOCIATE NEWS EDITOR
WT's before Ita recent renovation. The popular bar la the only ansa pub now
considering a wristband policy..
While Student Association lawyers won
their first victory against Albasny's
Grouper Law Monday city officials are
continuing their proceedings against the
landlord most recently found to be
violating the law.
According to SA attorney Lew Oliver,
New York State SUpreme Court Judge Edward S. Conway has grantd a stary which
prevents city officials form evicting those
students who are named as plaintiffs in the
SA case against the city.
SA is currently suing the city of Albany
charging that the Grouper law is unconstitutional. Sixteen students from four
separate households are named as plaintiffs in the suit, as well as one landlord.
Monday's eviction proceedings against
two students in two of the houselhods
named as plaintiffs in SA's case were
halted by the city's prosecutors after Conwa granted the stay, said SA President
Steve Gawley. Conway wantd a temporary
restraint in order to prevent "those
students from being kicked out," said
Gawley.
'What we really wanted was a blanket
injunction "to protect all students
violating the Grouper Law from eviction
until SA's case is decided by the Supreme
Court,'said Gawley. But, he added, "it's
difficult to get anything from a judge."
Conway also indicated that he would
consider protecting other student violators
not named in SA's suit on a case-to-case
basis, said Oliver. Conway said he would
"entertain similar applicsatins sympathetically," added Oliver.
SA will seeka preliminary injunction on
November 14 which will prevent city officials from evicting any student violators,
said Olovers. New York Supreme Court
Judge Joseph P. Torraca will decide on
theinjunction. The decision on the
Grouper law's constitutionality has not
been scheduled yet, said Oliver.
Conway feels that the Grouper LAW "is
unconstitutional, he didn't want to see
some students thrown out on the street."
The stay has put "the brakes on enforcing
the law," tie said, adding that there is a
good chance the whole Grouper Law
statute "will be thrown out."
Meanwhile, city officials are planning to
charge landlord Randall Fasnacht of 92
Willett St., with violation of the law.
Fasnacl owns an 11-bedroom one-family
dwelling at 410 Hudson Avenue that he
rents to ten tenants.
According to Michael Alvaro, director
14»-
New wristband system not viewed
as an alternative by most area bars
David Spalding
and Evan Welsoman
: .' Thousands of students who will be
closed out of bars after December 1 may
be able to get inside with, a new wristband system, but the management of
several popular area bars say. the: idea
can't work.
According to Student Action Committee Chair Larry Hartman, W.T.'s
(Washington Tavern) will definitely implement a policy to allow patrons under
21 in, but no other bars have made such
a committment.
"Anyone would be allowed to enter
the bar,1 but only people'with
wrislbands(agcd 21 or older) would be
allowed to be served alcoholic
beverage's,"said Hartman.
In Order to attain the status of 'social
bar,' bars would have to add to their
present repetolre, said Hartman. Theme
nights, Increasing the menu, and increasing "virgin," (non-alcohol) drinks
are some changes that would help
"socialize bars," he said.
Enforcement of a "wristband"
system would be the responsibility of the
bar, Hartman said, suggesting two ways
to control who drinks would be to enforce a two drink maximum and by
"keeping a strict watch on the number
of glasses given out with each pitcher
sold."
"The main problem Is accountability," said Hartman, "bars don't want to
be held responsible for drinks getting into the hands of minors." New York
State Penal Code 260.20 for the
unlawful treatment of minors sets the
penalty for a bar caught serving minors
as a ten day suspension of their liquor
license and a $1,000fine.In addition, an
adult that buys a drink for a minor arid
is arrested and convicted will face a fine
and possibly an jail term, also.
According to Hartman, however, bar
owners will eventually hive to comply
with the system or lose business; "Many
(bar owners) think that the age change
will not affect them," said Hartman,
"they won't feel the change until a couple of weeks after the '21' law goes into
effect."
'' Ron Howard, the manager of the
Long Branch expressed the feelings of
many bar owners when he said he would
take a "wait and see attitude," adding,
"Perhaps after the '21' law goes into effect if we see a tremendous drop in
business we might consider it."
Howard said he believes the main problem with a wristband system Is that on
busy nights it would prove
unenforcable.
Once a drink leaves the bar it is impossible to check who is really drinking
it, he said."If the police come in and
spot check I.D.s, which they sometimes
do, and they find an underage person
with a beer, we are in big trouble,"
W.T.s owner Mlcheal Byron said he
believes that wristbands can work and,
he added, he will institute a wristband
system "to accomodate our regular
customers for food, soft drinks and
non-alcoholic drinks." He went on to
14f
Stave Ouwloy
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