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AT THE STATE UNIVERSITY
OF NEW YORK AT ALBANY
BY THE ALBANY
X
*W
INDENT
PRESS
V O L U ME
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"
SUNY Art Gallery
Edward Mayer: works by the chairman of the Fine Arts Sculpture
program.
Adirondack Museum
Artists in residence through October 15.
Crailo State Historic Site(463-8738)
A Window of Our Past: The Dutch Heritage of the upper Hudson
Valley
Albany Institute of History and Art (463-4478)
Paintings and Sculptures from Albany Institutes permanent collection, Inner Light through November 3.
New York State Museum (474-5842)
Arts and Crafts Movement In New York State through October
20, The first hundred years of forever: A forest Centennial
through November 3, The Ideal Wheel through November 11,
Artwork from SUNY campuses.
Hamm/Brickman Gallery (463-8322)
Original works by area artists.
Film
Cine 1-8 (459-8300)
1. Remo Williams The Adventure Begins 1:25, 4, 6:40, 9:30, Fri,
Sal, 11:50
2. Agnes of God 2, 4:30, 7, 9:20, Fri, Sat, 11:30
3. Silver Bullet 2:15, 4:40, 7:20, 9:55, Fri, Sat, 11:55
4. Commando 2:30. 5, 7:40, 10, Fri, Sat, 12
5. Back To The Future 1:40, 4:05, 6:50, 9:10, Fr., Sat., 11:35
6. Sudden Death 2:20, 4:50 7:30,9:40,' Fri, Sat, 11:40
7. Sweet Dreams 1:30, 3:50, 6:30, 9, Fri, Sat, 11:20
8. Jagged Edge 1:40, 4:10, 7:10, 9:50 Fri, Sat, 12
UA Hellman (459-5322)
1. Pee Wee's Big Adventure 7:35, 9:30.
2. Year of the Dragon 7:15, 9:45
Crossgates (456-5678)
1. Teen Wolf 12:35, 3:05, 6:20, 8:55, 10:40
2. Sudden Death 2:30, 4:40, 7:15,9:50, 11:45
3. Plenty 1:15, 4, 6:55, 9:35, 12
4. Remo Williams The Adventure Begins I, 3:35, 6:45, 9:25, 12
5. Back To The Future 12:30, 3:20, 6:30, 9:10, 11:30
6. Sweet Dreams 1:10, 4:50, 7, 9:35, 11:50
7. Jagged Edge 1:35, 4:05, 7:10, 9:45, 11:55
8. Better Off Dead 12:40, 2:55, 7:05, 9:45, I 1:55,
Club
9. Silver Bullet 1:40, 4:15, 8:05, 10:10, 12:05
10. Commando 1:20, 3:40, 7:05, 9:15, I 1:35
11. Invasion U.S.A. 2, 4:20, 6:40, 9:05, 11:25
12. St. Elmo's Fire I, 3:15, 6:35, 8:50, 11:05
Third Street Theater (436-4428)
1. Crimes of Passion October 11-13, 7 and 9:15
2. What Have I Done To Deserve This? October 15-17, 7 and 9:15
Spectrum Theater (449-8995)
1. The Kiss of the Spiderwoman 7, 9:35, Sunday 4:00
2. The Shooting Party 7:10. 9:20, Sunday 4:00
Madison(4«9-543l)
Cacoon 7, 9:15
Pauley's Hotel
The Newports, October 11, Downtime, October 12, Rootie
Tootie, October 13
Duck Soup
Brian Brain, October 11, Dirty Face, October 11, Dumptruck, October 12, The Grindstones, October 12, Clive Pig, October 13,
Lifeboat, October 17, The Ushers, October 17
Town Crier Cafe(914-223-5555)
The Irish Tradition, October, 13
Silver Dollar
Bovine, October 13
Cafe Loco
David Mallet Band, October 13, Greg Brown, October 20, Livingston Taylor, October 20
Eigth Step Coffee House
Game Night, October 15, Cathy Winter, October 18
Skinflints
Half Moon Cafe
Michelle Tondreau, October 11, Kenny and Tzipora, October i2
Cafe Lena
Lou and Peter Berryman, October 11, Pierce Pettis, October 13
Siena College
Starting Here, Starting Now, October 12, 8 pm.
The Dream Keeper Speaks: The World of Langston Hughes, Oct
17, 8 pm.
Proctors (346-6204)
Faust, October 12, 8 pm. The Clancy
Brothers and Tommy Maken, Oct. 19, 8 pm.
SUNYA Performing Arts Center
End Of the World. October 16-26, Kenneth
Cooper, October 18, 8 pm, Page Hall.
Half Moon Cafe (463-0329)
ESIPA
The Raggedy Ann Musical Starting October 26.
Capital Repertory Company
"Playboy of the Western World" October 12 - November 10.
"Bo back by supperflme. Hump .
And, as always, you be careful.'
"Sldneyl I made a mlstakel... Deposit
the $50 check Into savings, and
put the $500 In cash into checking!"
Troy Savings Bank Musk Hall(273-0552)
Albany Symphony Orchestra, October 11,
Detroit Symphony Orchestra, October 17.
RPI
Skyline with Tony Trischka, October 17-19.
Palace Theatre(482-5224)
Albany Symphony Orchestra "Case of The
Stolen Song" October 20.
Skidmore
"Key Exchange," October 31.
The Unlimited Feast
Renaissance Lute and Classical Guitar,
October, 11 and 12.
Union College
Hanover Band, October 15.
"Well, I'm addicted.... Have you
tried Carol's sheep dip?"
L X
STUDENT PRESS
Tuesday
October 15, 1985
XII
NUMBER
Winning teams key to SA deficit
By Lisa Rlzzolo
. Although the recent five percent budget
cuts for Student Association funded
groups is due largely to athletic teams
overspending, the reason behind it is far
less grim than its results.
. According to Mark Rivers, chair of the
Intercollegiate Athletic Committee of Central Council one of the main reasons for
the. approximately $7743 overspending is
that more teams made it to the finals than
were expected to. Ten thousand dollars
was allocated to the post-season contingency fund, which is used when teams
qualify for the finals. So many teams
qualified for post-season play said Rivers,
that $15,313 was spent, leaving a $5,313
deficit in the post-season contingency
fund.
According to SA Controller Eric
Schwartzman, the. extra money was spent
"against the general SA banking
account."
Men's Varsity basketball coach, Dick
Sauers, said that the National Collegiate
Athletic Association (NCAA) has reimbursed the teams for post-season play in
the past, but now the women's division III
basketball team also has a post-season
tournament and the NCAA cannot afford
to reimburse the teams u r more. "The
team cannot be denied attending the
playoffs," said Sauers.
According to Schwartzman, another
cause for the deficit is inflation in food
prices.
"The teams are budgeted a certain
amount of money for each meal. At midyear there became a need to increase the
per diem. When the team's money
allowance was increased, the appropriated
fund was not i n c r e a s e d , " said
Schwartzman.
When asked why they took the risk of
creating a deficit, Schwartzman said, "It
CORPORATION
"We are going to
keep better tabs with
the teams this
year. . ."
— Mark Rivers
TANIA STEELE UPS
was something we felt was unavoidable."
The lack of gate ticket sales was another
cause for the deficit. According to the
schedule of receipts and expenditures from
the athletic, advisory board activities,
$6,000 was estimated for gate receipts and
only $5,290 was taken in, leaving a $710
deficit. "We over-anticipated what gate
receipts would be," explained Rivers.
According to varsity baseball coach Ed
Zaloom, the baseball team overspent their
budget because "when baseball is scheduled, you figure for a few rainouts. Two
years' ago twenty-eight games .were
scheduled and drily twenty-three were
played. Last year twentyrseveri games were
scheduled and twenty-six were played, so
more money was needed than anticipated.
We just got lucky as far as weather was
concerned. We had a nice Spring in
Albany last year."
The athletic over-spending created "a
deficit in the SA budget leat year, and, as a
result, SA was forced to cut funded
groups' budget spending lines by 5 percent
this year and income lines by 3 percent.
The athletic fund was not cut.
According to Schwartzman, the reason
is that athletic teams receive a separate
portion of money from the Student Activity fund. The athletic budget is controlled
by the SUNY Board of Trustees, while SA
controls the budgets of other campus
groups.
"If we cut one basketball game it
doesn't only affect SUNYA. SUNY all
conference doesn't want one game to messup t h e e n t i r e s c h e d u l e , " said
Schwartzman.
When asked how a deficit will be avoided this year, Rivers said, "We are going to
keep better tabs with the teams this year
and work closer with them so we know
when they are coming close to overspending their budget. Then we can help them
out."
D
30
SUNY audit
finds misused
sabbaticals
Albany, N. Y.
(AP) SUNY's sabbatical leave program
and the financial controls at one of its
colleges in Syracuse have been criticized
in audits issued by State Comptroller
Edward Regan.
Regan said last Thursday that some
SUNY academic and administrative
employees were taking sabbatical leaves
improperly by not meeting all conditions of the program.
The leave policy allows employees to
take off a year at half their normal
salary or a half year at full pay to travel,
study, do research or write. During the
two accademic years ending June 30,
1984, SUNY spent $18.5 million to pay
1,027 employees on leave, the audit
said.
The audit found that 14 employees
failed to return to SUNY for at least one
year after their leaves, in violation of
SUNY policy, but no attempt was made
to recover their sabbatical salaries of
$228,000.
In addition, the audit said that: five
employees were granted leaves even
though the required six years hadn't
elapsed since their last sabbatical leaves,
23 were granted leaves based on vague
proposals, 34 performed activities on
leave that differed significantly from
their approved activities, and 12 failed
to accomplish their leave objectives
because they became sick.
Other employees failed to provide
enough information about their leaves,
the audit found.
The audit also said SUNY failed to
follow recommendations in a 1980 audit
18*-
Quad walks shed light on dangerous areas
By Olivia Abel
To promote and improve campus safety,
Student Association is conducting
"lighting walks" around each quad to inspect the safest and most dangerous places
to be at night.
SA Media Director, Doug Tuttle, led
about 20 students around Indian Quad
Thursday night, pointing out areas that
should be avoided and noting things that
the University could do to improve campus
safety.
Major suggestions included fixing
broken lights and making existing lights
brighter, removing large bushes and trees
along the path to the parking lot and installing more emergency blue light phones
on Perimeter Road.
Although not much of Indian Quad is
brightly lit, the Indian Quad parking lot
and Perimeter Road area surrounding the
quad Is considered one of the most unsafe
places on campus, according to Tuttle.
There is only one blue light emergency
phone in the parking lot and it is located
close to the quail. Tuttle suggested that it
should be placed closer to Perimeter Road,
and most of the students on the walk
agreed.
The soccer field behind Indian Quad Is
also considered a potentially dangerous
area, said Tuttle. Students often walk
through the field at night returning from
popular hang-outs like Suiters and Across
the Street Pub. One student described it as
"walking through total darkness."
"We're trying to add a sense of urgency where to walk and where not to walk and
to improve lighting on campus. We want to make my job as an escort easier."
the university to reevaluate its priorities so Saborit is a member of the "Don't Walk
that projects that are now nine years down Alone" student escort service.
the Toad get consideration now. We want
D.J. Barish, who is also involved in the
the lighting more closely monitored and "Don't Walk Alone" program, said she
the lights reparied more quickly," aid participated in the walk because she
Tuttle.
wanted "to improve the safety of the
Students who participated on the walk campus."
agreed that it was helpful and informative.
Betty Ginzberg, SA Director of Student
Cretchen Saborit, a first year student liv- Programming, helped to organize the
ing on Indian Quad, said she participated walk, and stressed the fact that "especially
the walk because she "wanted to know women should never walk alone." Ginzberg, who is actively involved in the
Women's Safety Task Force said she feels
that "because of Karen Wilson people will
take this issue more seriously." Wilson, a
SUNYA student, disappeared over six
months ago.
While Cinzberg quoted an administrative official who said that there
had never been a rupe on Indian Quad, she
said she feels that improvement is needed
on the campus to insure that there never is.
Ginzberg said she wants to make
students aware of Women's Safety
Awareness Day on Nomvcmber 7. The
theme of the event will be "Living Safely
In an Unsafe World," and will include a
variety of workshops and. events.
It Is very important for first-year
students to attend the event because there
will be a special section devoted to relationships, said Oinzberg, and many frosh
Student* parttoloatlno In Indian Quad lighting walk
"may be dealing with sexual relationships
for the first time."
D
Women's safety died In effort to coordinate lighting.
According to Tuttle, "attacks occur
much less frequently when women are
together in lighted areas." Tuttle also said
that the more students who get involved,
the greater the chance the administration
will do something about he lighting issue.
There has already been a lighting-walk
on State Quad and all the remaining
quads, including Alumni will be toured in
the near future, said Tuttle. On Monday,
October 28, the Women's Safety Task
Force will lead a walk of the entire
2 ALBANY,STV0ENTPRESS
D
TUESDAY/OCTOBER ff, 19SS D ALBANY'STVBENtPlftE^ 3
TVESDAYi'OCTOBER-15,i98S
Students offer varied views on divestment
NEWS BRIEFS
Soviets threatened
Beirut, Lebanon
(AP) - Radio stations reported a purported
threat from Moslem extremists to kill three
kidnapped Russian diplomats and
demolish the Soviet Embassy unless it is
closed within 48 hours.
Christian-controlled Voice of Lebanon
and the Moslem-run Voice of the Nation
radios said the threat was made by an
anonymous telephone caller who claimed
to speak for the Islamic Liberation
Organization.
It was not immediately possible to
authenticate the claim.
The Islamic Liberation Organization
claimed responsibility for the abduction of
four Soviet diplomats in Moslem west
Beirut on September 30. The bullet-riddled
body of one, consular secretary Arkady
Katkov, was found two days later.
Poles boycott ballot
Tte SW^adjf^
in which a cripled New York City man was
shot to death. The four terrorists responsible surrendered to Egyptian authorities
and then were arrested late Thursday after
U.S. Navy jets intercepted their plane after
it left Cairo.
targets and orders the Whi e House to cut
federal spending if the president and Con-'
gress don't meet those goals.Even backers
of the plan concede they're not sure it will
halt the rising tide of red ink.
The plan would permit cuts in only,
about half the budget because it exempts
three large areas - social security, interest
Albany
on the federal debt, and prior government (AP) - State officials are considering the
Washington, D.C. contracts.
possibility of making it easier for drug ad(AP) - Treasury Secretary James A. Baker
dicts to get sterile hypodermic syringes as a
III says a plan to cut federal deficits to
means of combating AIDS, says a state
zero by 1991 can work, but warns that
researcher. !
reductions in Pentagon spending, may be
Rochester
"We feel the idea should be seriously exrequired to reach the goal.
(AP) - Eastman Kodak wilt appeal a plored," said Donald Des Jarlais, assistant
"I think, given the political will to make federal court order barring it from making deputy director for research in the State
the hard choices, you.can reach balance or selling instant cameras and film ruled Division of Substance Abuse Services.'
without having to raise taxes," Baker said infringing Polaroid Corp. patents, the $10 "We've got to do sometl- ,g to deal with
Sunday. "Yes, I believe it. Clearly, there billion photography giant said.
AIDS prevention."
would have to be reductions in defense."
"We do not anticipate that the injuncDes Jarlais said that of the almost 4,500
The deficit reduction plan won overtion will have any effect on Eastman AIDS cases that have developed in New
whelming approval in the Senate past week
Kodak's current marketing and manufac- York City since 1981, about 1,500 involve
and a House - Senate conference committuring activities." the company said in a drug abusers. He said about 300 of those
tee will try this week to agree on a com- statement released Saturday by Charles S. 1,500 were also homosexual males. The
promise over differing versions of the pro- Smith, Eastman Kodak's manager of news vast majority of AIDS cases in New York
posal. The proposal generally sets deficit
state are in New York City. More than half
services.
.
of all AIDS cases nationally have appeared
in New York.
State examines AIDS
Baker eyes savings
Kodak plans appeal
Majority wants prayer
Warsaw, Poland
(AP) - The government said more than 75
percent of Poland's voters rejected a call
from Solidarity to boycott parliamentary
elections, but the outlawed free trade
union claimed thousands stayed away
from the polls.
Sunday's elections for the Sejm,
Poland's legislature, were the first .since
Solidarity's creation in 1980.
Lech Walesa, Solidarity's former chairman, derided the balloting as "so-called
elections," and said his estimates indicated
more than 50 percent of the voters boycotted in his home town of Gdansk.
New York
(AP) - Prayer in the nation's classrooms
should not just be allowed, it should be encouraged, according to a majority of
Americans surveyed in a Media GeneralAssociated Press Poll.
And while there is strong support for the
consitutional separation of religion and
government, a surprising number of
Americans.- 25 precent - believe churchstate separation is a bad idea, the nationwide telephone poll found.
Eighty-seven percent of the respondents
favored a moment of silence in school in
which students, could pray if they wished.
If students were encouraged to pray during the moment of silence, 63 percent
would still support it.
Hfe totfe©^
Hijacker remains free
Washington, D.C.
(AP) - The Reagan administration is hoping Yugoslovia will arrest a Palestinian it
says was the key planner behind the
Achille Lauro hijacking, but U.S. officials
admit their request apparently will be
refused.
Mohammad Abu el Abas flew to
Belgrade, Yugoslavia, late Saturday after
he was released by Italian authorites
despite a U.S. arrest warrant sent to Rome
earlier in the day. White House spokesman
Larry Speakcs called the Italian decision
"incomprehensible."
U.S. officials worked Sunday to try to
convince Yugoslavia to hold Abbas, but
admitted their efforts were likely to fail.
Yugoslavia, a non-aligned nation, supports the Palestine Liberation
MARK MEOIAVILL* UPS
Organization.
Dutch Quad Board and InterGreek Council co-sponsored Olympic-style games
U.S. officials say Abbas masterminded Saturday behind Dutch Quad tc help raise money lor local charities.
the attack on the cruise ship Achille Lauro
Inmate escapes jail
Troy
(AP) - Authorities said a manhunt was
continuing Sunday night for an escaped
murder and robbery suspect who apparently used a hacksaw blade to saw
through thick iron window bars at the
Rensselaer County Jail.
Sheriff Warren McGrcevy said Ronald
Sampson, 39, of Brattleboro, Vermont,
apparently had been sawing through the
bars on a second-story window a little at a
time over a period of months, hiding the
work behind plywood which had been installed onseveral windows in place of highimpact plastic.
Sampson was described as white, with
blue eyes and reddish-blond hair, about
5-feet-6, 145 pounds, he was last seen
wearing a red plaid shirt and blue jeans.
PREVIEW OF EVENTStree listings
Albany Review and Nadir 7:00 p.m.
Literary Magazines will hold Study Abroad In China Inan open reading Wednesday, terest Meeting will be held
Oct. 16 at 7:00 p.m. In BIO 248. Wednesday, Oct. 16 at 4:00
Can We Talk Interest meeting The Submission Deadline for p.m. In HUM 354.
^
will be held Thursday, Oct. 17 the fall Issue of The Albany
Review will be November 1.
at 8:00 p.m. In HUM 128.
The Albany Chapter for
The Germanic-American Self Defense Class will be Special Olympics will hold Its
Association second Interest held Wednesday, Oct. 16 from first Qeneral Interest Meeting
meeting will be held Tuesday, 7:00-9:00 p.m. In Campus on Oct. 15 at 7:30 p.m. In LC 5,
Oct. 15 at 8:00 p.m. In HU 354. Center Assembly Hall.
Esther Chartowltz will speak
Class of '86 Council will hold a
on "Women and Judlasm" on
meeting Tuesday, Oct. 15 at Greenpeace Coffee House will Tuesday, Oct. 15 at 7:30 p.m.
9:00 p.m. In the Fireside be held Thursday, Oct. 17 at In CC 373.
Lounge.
9:00 In the Assembly Hall.
Career Day '85 will be held on
The Anthropology Club will Elaine Drooz Friedman will Wednesday, Oct. 16 9:30
speak
on
Soviet
Jewry
on
hold a meeting Wednesday,
a.m.-4:00 p.m. In Campus
Oct. 16 at 4:00 p.m. In SS 260. Thursday, Oct. 17 In CC 320 at Center Ballroom.
Bonnie B,. Spanler will speak
on "Feminism and Science
Recent Developments" on
Tuesday, Oct. 15 In HU 354.
Bob Marley's Wallers will play
In CC Ballroom on Friday, Oct.
18 at 8:00 p.m.
Casual Corner'* Fashion
Seminar will be held Tuesday,
Oct. 15 at 8:00 p.m. In CC
Assembly.
Bowling Club Interest Meeting
will be held on Tuesday, Oct.
15 at 8:00 p.m. In LC 20.
Students for Israel Interest
Meeting will be held Tuesday,
Oct. 18 at 9:00 p.m. In CC 320.
Prize Essay Contest sponsored by Benjamin and David
Scharp Is accepting applicants. Deadline for submissions in Dec. 12 in CUE.
Student Aid will be the topic
of a seminar given by
economist Michael McPherson on Oct. 17 at 2 p.m. In ED
335.
"Taking Charge of Your
Career" will be the topic of a
The English Undergraduate speech glvan by Susan
Club will meet on Tuesday at Kaplow Oot, 15 at 7:30 p.m. In
4;30 In HU 290.
HU354.
force the. South African government to
change its position, even if they are changing for the wrong reason."
By Pam Conway .
STAFF WRITER
Students had the chance to express their
support for divestment last week, but not
all chose to do so. ,
Student Action Committee chair Larry
Hartman coordinated a letter-writing campaign on quad cafeteria dinner lines.last
Monday and Tuesday, which allowed
students to write to Senate Majority
Leader Warren Anderson asking for state
divestment.
The majority of those who wrote leters
agreed with Colonial Quad resident Sam
Rosen, who said, "I don't know too many
of the details but I know the situation there
(in South Africa) is horrible., I wrote a letter basically to make a statement."
Deborah Reuben, a junior from Dutch
Quad, said apartheid is "unfair to the
black majority who are persecuted and
face oppression just because of their
.race."
"Our country Is supposed to represent
freedom and equality, therefore I feel it is
our duty to set an example for other countries through divestment," said Reuben.
The majority of the students in the
cafeteria, however seemed uninterested,
and when asked if they would like to write
Although in support of state divestment,
sophomore Jeanne Benecke "from State
Quad said that she doubted her letter
would be effective. "From what I hear, the
chances of the divestment bill passing in
the Senate are pretty slim,, but writing a
letter can't hurt,".said Benecke.
While all students seemed to be opposed
to apartheid, not all felt that state divestment was the answer. :
Larry Hartman
Senior Jeff Viezel from Dutch Quad
said that he was planning to write a letter
to the Senate against state divestment
because he felt the action would be "too
indirect. A company the size of IBM could
easily resell its stocks. Economic sanctions
would be a beter method because it has a
direct effect on the government."
a letter in favor of state divestment, many
answered, "Didn't we divest already?"
But those who did participate were concerned about how they could help in the
fight against apartheid.
Marc Musman, a freshman from Dutch
Quad said that "racial discrimination is
wrong and-1 feel that divestment could
Although Viezel opposes divestment, he
said that he supports as letter-writing campaign because, "it lets people say what
they feel and to show that they are informed, unlike a petition which people will sign
even if they don't know what they're signing for."
TASK STEELE UPS
Freshman Larry Glass from Dutch
Quad said that divestment is not the right
course of action in opposing apartheid,
saying "If we divest, it will only hurt those
we are trying to help. The South African
government will take it out on the blacks
and treat them worse economically."
Offering an alternative to divestment.
Glass said that students should "write to
Congress and their local officials asking
them to put governmental, not economic
pressure on South Africa."
But, senior Da id Bucci from Colonial
Quad disagreed. "New York is like a large
corporation and can put its money into
different places. New Jersey divested and
is now investing its money wisely," he
said.
Divestment would pressure the South
African government to change their
policies by "cutting off their cash flow,
and weakening their economic base,' said
Bucci.
Freshman Eileen Murphy from State
Quad said that although she was unsure of
her position on the issue, "students should
get involved. Writing letters is a good thing
but knowledge of an issue is involvement
in itself.''
•
SUNYA gets $860,000 for defense research
By Ken Dornbaum
EDITORIAL ASSISTANT
Among the over twenty million dollars
the University receives as research awards
from various sources, almost $860,000
originated as grants from the Department
of Defense, according to Frank DiSanto,
SUNYA's Director of the Office of
Research.
i "None of these research contracts from
the military is classified," said DiSanto,
adding "we don't do any classified
research."
"It's a SUNY-wide policy not to accept
classified research. It's that way with most
universities," said DiSanto. "Classified
research would be too difficult to do at a
university since it would bet too hard to
maintain secrecy because of the need of
faculty members to print," he said.
"We do the same type of research done
at schools like Siena (College) and RPI
(Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute). Most of
these monies come from Air Force and
Naval Research," said DiSanto, who added that the funds were dispersed to several
departments, mainly in the field of the
sciences.
The grants are unsolicited grants received by faculty members, said DiSanto.
"The monies from the grants are used to
support graduate and undergraduaste
salaries, supplies and other costs connected with the research," he said.
An official at RPI refused to divulge the
amount of monies received from the
military nor the ratio of such funds compared to the toal amount of grant funds
received. He did comment, however, that
RPI did receive more than SUNYA.
"The grants are established under the
name of the faculty member," said DiSanto. "This is the policy for each grant," he
added.
"Certain organizations, like Naval
Research, have interests similar to the Na-
tional Science Foundation," explained
DiSanto, adding that a faculty member
will send out his or her grant proposal to
various foundations, not just a single one.
Among the professors who receive
research funds from the military are
William Lanford and Walter Roth, both
of the Physics Department. Neither could
be reached for comment.
Some students, however, said they
believe the University should not accept
military grants.
Claudia Meyer, a senior who is on the
steering cbmmmittee of the Gay and Les-'
bian Alliance (GALA) said, "I think the
fact that they are on campus is unknown."
"I don't think it's a big issue," Meyer
added, "but it is wrong to take money
from places that don't ascribe to
humanitarian principles."
"As long as there is a policy against
discrimination on this campus based on
sexual preference, I think it would be il-
legal for the Unviersity to accept a contract
that is discriminatory against homosexual
people," said Meyer.
Stacey Young, a SUNYA graduate,
said, "I'm concerned about the increasing
ties between universities and the military
around the nation." The militaryindustrial complex, she said, "has pervaded all aspects of our society so thoroughly
that we become numb to the effect that it
has."
"We must keep in mind that the
military's business revolves arund war and
death," said Young, adding that "we need
to think critically about whether we want
to play a role in that, however innocuous
that role may appear to be.
Young is working on campus as the project coordinator of the New York Public
Interest Research Group. She stressed,
however, that NYPIRG does not have a
stand on the issue and her comments were
ony her own opi nions.
D
Career Day may open doors
Social Services, and the Library -if Congress
represented also, Carlos said.
SUNYA's business fraternity, Delta Sigma Pi,
"I like to think the fact that companies come,"
will act as matchmaker Wednesday by helping to to events like Career Day, "is the way we address
pair students with prospective employers at Career our opening letters," said Carlos.
Day to be held in the Campus Center Ballroom
Delta Sigma Pi stresses that Albany students are
Wednesday.
intelligent and would be a benefit to any company.
Companies to be represented include AT&T, the "We receive a quality education at SUNYA,"
Albany Medical Center, J.C. Penny, the Office of Carlos said.
State Comptroller, IBM, NBC, Sperry Univac and
"Getting more firms to recruit means we are
the N.Y. State Department of Social Services, ac- helping to get more students careers," Carlos said,
cording to Jane Carlos, a member of Delta Sigma adding, "we look at firms that would interest our
Pi and co-chair of the event.
students as well asfirmsthat would be interested in
Carlos said that one of Delta Sigma Pi's objec- our students."
tives is to get as many different companies as possiThe Career Development Center, suggested
ble in order to make the event more diverse. "We Carlos, can also help a student get in touch with a
are offering this as a service to the entire communi- particular company. The Center has manuals which
ty," she said.
contain hundreds of firms, their areas of interest,
"We are helping students to find out about life their locations and phone numbers. "Mailings are
the best way to meet them," she said.
after the Unviersity," Carlos added.
Carlos said that there are many jobs available
Career Development Center Assistant Director
within any one- company, but she is not sure what Owen Simmons said her office would not be setting
positions firms are scouting for. For example, she up a table for Career Day beause of a scheduling
said, Albany Medical Center may be looking for conflict.
anyone from hospital administrators to lab techni"However, some of the counselors will go over
cians to researchers. "They need someone for and greet the companies, but we won't be operating
everything," she remarked.
there on a formal basis," Simmons said.
NBC is a company which has a diverse number of
The University does not sponsor a career day of
job opportunities, as well, Carlos said. Other com- its own and Simmons said she feels that a second
panies like Arthur Anderson may be looking for ac- event is not needed. "They should try to build that
countants as well as people with management or one Instead of having theirs scatttered throughout
marketing backgrounds, she added.
the year," she added.
In addition to business companies, there will be
Carlos said that she was told that the Career
government groups like the Navy, Army, Federal Development Center would have a table set up, like
Bureau of Investigation, the State Department of they have had in the past, as a service to students. D
By Andrea Corson
STAFF WRITBR
... TUESDAY, OCTOBER 15r 1985 P ALBANY. STUDENT PRESS
•
" •
— ' " " ' • — ' • '
•
•.
"
Gawley and Alvaro answei
questions on grouper law
Student Association Executive Branch
POSITION AVAILABLE
By Roz Bickel
Educational Affairs
Commissioner
Responsible for:
-overseeing S.A. Test Bank
-SCATE
(Student Course and Teacher Evaluation)
-working on other educational issues
Applications open now until
Friday, October 18th at 500 pm
SA is an affirmative action/equal opportunity employer. Applications from women, minority and disabled students are
especially welcome.
'
Student Association President Steve
Gawley and the Albany City Director of
Code Enforcement Michael Alvaro
directed a discussion of the grouper law
Thursday night for about 30 Albany
residents.
Gawley and Alvaro, who is in charge of
enforcing the grouper laws, took turns
answering questions from concerned
residents and explaining their policies
toward student housing.
The grouper law forbids more than three
unrelated persons from living in the same
housing unit.
The meeting, held at St.- Vincent's Community Center, was sponsored by the Pine
Hills Neighborhood Association.
Mainly, people at the meeting wanted to
know what was being done in enforcing
the grouper law. One after another
residents who live in student housing
neighborhoods registered their complaints.
One woman complained of the noise, one
complained of the trash in the street,
another complained of parking problems.
As SA President, Gawley said he was
aware of the problems and that "the time
has come to do something about improving community relations with the school."
Gawley added that, "I'm not here
tonight to say things have totally improved
— we're trying to get these things going in
a positive direction."
Amidst frequent interruptions from
residents, Gawley explained what SA has
been trying to do to improve relations in
the community, and what has been done to
find a solution for the students who will
soon be affected by the grouper law.
"Something has to be done," Gawley said,
"and we're just asking that you give us a
little time for our programs to get going."
Because of the threat the grouper law
poses to many students, who could be
kicked out of their houses, Gawley said SA
has been pushing for the construction of
the new dormitory that will house up to
400 students and which should be up by
fall of 1987. The new dorm will be built on
Fuller Road.
SA is also in favor of the "Matchmaker
Project," in which students are matched
with neighborhood residents who have an
empty room to rent.
A "University As A Neighbor" committee has been set up to aid communication
between residents and the University and
to deal with student housing problems in
the community. "The University is making
an effort. We see, feel, and hear more than
a Grouper Law coming up and we're trying right now to correct things before that
happens," said Gawley.
The programs initiated, Gawley said,
need time before they can really be effective. "Students are violating the Grouper
Law right now, but it's not by choice. For
some there is no alternative but to violate
it," he said. "There is a problem with
housing, the dorms are at 103 percent
capacity, many students just have no
choice."
The solution, Gawley said, is to "allow
for us to get our alternative housing programs started before kicking students out
on the street." In addition, he said, SA has
been reminding the University of its promise not to increase enrollment next year.
"We know we haven't touched reality
yet," Gawley said, "but we are trying. The
time has come. You're tired, we're tired,
we want to get it worked out."
Gawley was addressing many residents
who feel the only alternative to getting
their problems with students solved is strict
enforcement of the Grouper Law. "The
main criminals are the landlords," said
one resident at.the meeting, "but that
Non-alcoholic programs to
be explored by task force
By Melissa Knoll
If you're wondering how you'll
entertain .yourself after the implementation of " 2 1 , " the Task
Force on Non-Alcoholic Programming, may be able to help
you.
The task force, which met for
the first time last Thursday, was
formed by Student Association
with the purpose of discussing
ideas for non-alcohol related
activities.
Nine out of the 15 members of
the Task Force discussed issues
concerning the increased drinking
age. "I've asked them alLto serve
on the committee so we can combine resources," said SA Director
of Student Programming, Betty
Glnzberg.
The committees involved include SA, the Office of Student
Affairs, the Intercollegiate
Athletic Committee (ICAC), Student Acitivities, University Auxiliary Services (UAS), Residential
Life, the Athletic Department,
Interquad Council, Minority
Group leaders, Alumni House,
and the Spirit Committee.
Not only was there a diversity
of groups invited to participate,
but the program, according to
Ginzberg, "is pretty much half
a d m i n i s t r a t i o n a n d half
students." Pleased with their
reactions, Ginzberg said,
"everybody was extremely
responsive. They took it very
seriously. This is a really good example of how we're combining
r e s o u r c e s because w e ' r e
concerned."
SA President Steve Gawley said
that the idea to begin a student-
initiated program started "when
we saw that the University wasn't
going to act on the need for nonalcohol programming ideas." He
added that "we're not going to
gamble with Student Activity fee
money. Down the road, creating
non-alcoholic programs is going
to cost more money."
Mark Rivers, chair of ICAC,
said that athletic events this year
will be free. "As far as I have a
say in it there will never be a
charge for a game," he said. In
the future, there will not be
budgeting or gate receipts for
athletic events, he added.
"The way athletes can bridge
the gap is by providing an alternative to those who can't drink
and those who can drink, also,"
said Rivers.
"On a Friday night, instead of
IS*-
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STUDENTS who want to
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6 ALBANY STUDENT PRESS •
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 15, 1985
NEWS
Anti-Apartheid Day
THE STERLING PHARMACOLOGY
STUDY UNIT IS SEEKING SUBJECTS
TO PARTICIPATE IN CLINICAL RESEARCH
Requirements:
• HEALTHY MALE
• BETWEEN AGES 18 & 50
• ABLE TO SPEND TIME AT OUR
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EARN EXTRA, INCOME!
F o r More I n f o r m a t i o n , P l e a s e Call:
STERLING PHARMACOLOGY STUDY UNIT
ALBANY MEDICAL CENTER
43 NEW SCOTLAND ATI.
ALBANY. NY 18808
618-446-8870
Due to publicity problems, the NYPIRO
Divestment Project's Anti-Apartheid Day,
held last Friday, attracted few people at its
events in the Rat, said co-chairs Rob Gullo
and Gary Sealey.
"The event was part of National AntiApartheid Day which was established by
the American Committee on Africa, a New
York City based group," they said. A
film, Generations of Resistance, which
highlights the history of apartheid, was
shown and was followed by student
speakers who discussed divestment and the
history of apartheid," they said.
"Future events include a pledge drive
against South Africa, and on November 1,
the National Student Conference on South
Africa and Namibia will be meeting at
Hunter College." The two added that they
plan on bringing as many people as
possible.
Volunteers needed
eWl ?1 Mrt.ROHOO "'J?'.
i'0'W, TVaClUTP, '''/.I'II
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 15, 1985 D ALBANY STUDENT PRESS J
the beginning of the semester until the
deadline Friday, October 11.
Student Action's next major goal is "to
get people to vote on election day," said
Hartman. He said that a "Meet the Candidates Night" will be held on Sunday,
November 3, at 7:30 p.m. in the Campus
Center Ballroom. "Publicity about where
to vote will be available on every quad,"
said Hartman. He added that election day
they will be going door-to-door to remind
- students to vote.
Information moves
The information office in the gym has
been moved to the center of the building
near the vending machines.
According to Andrew Schoenfeld, commissioner of intramurals the information
office was moved to it's new location
"because it is bigger." Schoenfeld explained that the information desk was formerly
the intramural office.
The intramural office is now located in
room B-109 near the women's locker
room. Schoenfeld said that the new office
is "a little bit inaccessible." He added that
the move may have hurt the intramural
program because people have trouble finding the office and it currently has no
phone.
The Teresian House Nursing Home is
looking for volunteers to provide a variety
of different services.
Volunteers are needed to work in their
country store, visit residents who have no
families, walk with residents, transport
residents to various therapies within the
home and provide other services to the
Although the deadline for applications
residents.
for the Minority Affairs Editor of the
The home is located as 200 Washington Albany Student Press was last Friday, the
Avenue Extension. For more information position is still open, said Heidi Gralla,
contact Sister M. Elias at 456-2000.
editor-in-chief of the ASP. ,
"We haven't chosen anyone yet," said
Gralla who added that several applications
According to Student Action Committee have been received. "We are still accepting
chair Larry Hartman the committee has applications for anyone who expressed inregistered 4100 students to vote. He terest prior to the deadline or who can proestimated that NYPIRG registered an ad- vide adequate justification for a late
ditional 200 to 300 votes.
application."
.,
"In a non-presidential election year this
The job requires 15 hours per week and
has to be termed a success," Hartman is stipended at $125 per semester. For fursaid. He explained that registration was ther information, contact the managing
Student Action's "utmost priority" from editor at 442-5662.
Editor still sought
SA registers 4,100
TAXI DIRECTORY
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November 7, 1985
PRICES ARE FOR 1 OR 2
PERSONS
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Deadline To Apply
October 16, 1985
Applications In CUE
(Prices based on uptown campus pick-ups)
(Prices subject to change)
CUP AND SAVE
Cosponsored by
Student Affairs, Academic Affairs, CUE
and Parents' Association.
UAS sub shops expanding
choices of late night bites
By Lauren Moore
The Future of MIS is Taking
Shape Today at NBC
STAFF WRITER,
Students who get hungry while
they're studying at night no
longer have to order out for food
and wait a half hour for it to
arrive. Instead, University Auxiliary Services now offers a more
varied menu at their cafeteria sub
shops on weeknights.
Starting this week, UAS will be
selling croissants, fresh fruit, and
bagels at sub shops, in addition to
the current fare of soda, pretzels,
potato chips, and submarine
sandwiches, said UAS General
Manager E. Norbert Zahm.
Jobs are provided for 15 to 20
students through the sub shops,
according to UAS Director of
Food Service Ronnie Clough.
Phil DiGiorgio, one of the
students who works for the Dutch
Quad sub shop, said the sub
shops provide an important service to the students. "I think it's a
good idea. It's convenient for
students and provides jobs for
students. It's run pretty well, and'
everything's organized, and the
food's fresh every day. I think it's
a good idea," he said.
Zahm said that UAS is "very
responsive to new products," and
that the new items, which have
been requested by students, will
not only bring more business, but
will also add a greater variety to
the sub shops.
"We think they' (sub shops)
have been very successful. It
started seven years ago as a pilot
project. The students were very
enthusiastic and we've had them
ever since," Zahm said.
Because hot many students
know about the sub shops, UAS
has also been trying to publicize
the service with table tents in the
dining halls and ads in the Albany
Student Press Zahm said.
The sub shops on the uptown
campus are located in the
cafeteria of each quad. On Alumni Quad, the sub shops are open
from 9pm to, midnight on Mondays through Thursdays, and
8pm to midnight on Sundays.
Business is generally very good
and consistent, said Clough, adding that the sub shops do better
in poor weather because students
stay on campus when the weather
is'bad.
The sub shop on Alumni Quad
does just as well as the uptwon
campus sub shops, added Zahm,
saying all of the sub shops pay for
themselves.
Clough stressed the convenience of the sub shops and said
that UAS tries "to be competitive
in price and product." He added
that the sub shops are "profitable
and provide a service to students
they otherwise wouldn't
have . . . 1 believe its a good service to the student."
UAS will be offering specials in
the sub shops, both this week and
in the future. Both Zahm and
Clough would not comment on
the specials in order not to "ruin
the surprise," but they did say
that the specials would be advertised and will be beneficial to
students.
The subs offered are:
vegetable, roast beef, mixed,
turkey, ham, tuna, cheese,
bologna, and salami. Prices range
from $1.60 to $3.10 and can Include various toppings as well.
Soda sells for 45 centi, and
chips are 25 cents. Fresh fruit and
granola will be 50 cents; The new
croissant sandwiches come in
almost as many varieties as the
Find out about the NBC
MIS Programmer Training Program.
Sub shop worker
More varied menu being offered
sub sandwiches and are priced
from $1.40 to $2.80, said Clough.
"I didn't even know about
them (sub shops)," said one student, "but I like the idea. It
sounds a lot easier than ordering
out all the time, so I'll try it." •
Stop by the NBC Booth at the
kSUNY ALBANY CAREER FAIR on,
Wednesday, October 16th
NBC
NBC is an equal opportunity
employer
HOW FAR WILL YOUR TALENT TAKE YOU?
Apply for the TIME College Achievement Awards and find $l,0Q0-$3,00fJ and profiled in a special promotional section
out. TIME Maguzinc is searching for 100 college juniors who in TIMK. Eightyfinalistswill receive ccnilkutcsof merit. Ail
have distinguished themselves by their excellence, in ucadem- 100 students will be givenfirstconsiderationforinternships
ics and, mora importantly, exceptional achievement outside with participating corporations, some of which ore listed,
the classroom. I' I The lop twenty winners will be uwurded below. U Details ut your dean's office or call I-8O0-523-5948.
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G^Mttoxtm&AWii.
Q ALBANY
STUDENT
PRESS
P TUESDAY,
OCTOBER
IS, 1985
TUESDAY,
Publishing ban inspires petitions
ALBANY MEDICAL COLLEGE
GRADUATE STUDIES PROGRAM
The Albany Medical College Graduate Studies Program is designed for
qualified students motivated toward teaching and investigative careers in
the basic sciences. The Program provides the student witti a solid background in all aspects of modem scientific study with advanced instruction in the student's area of specialization leading to a degree of Doctor
of Philosophy or Master of Science.
Requirements
Applicants must have a Bachelor's Degree from an accredited college or
university and should have taken courses in general and organic chemistry, genera] biology and physics. Students applying for admission in the
Graduate Studies Program are required to take the Graduate Record
Examination prepareaand administered by the Educational Testing
Service, Box 592, Princeton, New Jersey 08540.
Fields Of Study
Anatomy, Biochemistry, Microbiology and immunology. Pathology,
Pharmacology and Toxicology, Physiology.
Financial Aid
A limited number of full tuition scholarships and stipends based on
teaching assist an tships and research assist an tships are available. Other
financial assistance can be arranged through the department to which
the student applies and through the Medical College Office of Financial
Aid.
Located in Albany, New York, The Albany Medical College was founded
in 183°. In 1873. Albany Medical College united with Union College, the
Albany Law School, the Albany College of Pharmacy, ami the Dudley
Observatory, to form Union University. Since 1971, the Albany Medical
College has also been affiliated with the Hiutson-Mohtrwk Consortium of
College* anil Universities. For additional information contact: ,
Office of Gradual*? Studies and Research, Albany Medical College of
Union University, 47 New Scotland Avenue, Albany, New York 12208,
(518) 445-5253
COLLEGE PRESS SERVICE— Some
campuses may pull out of one of
the largest university research
bonanzas in American history if the
Reagan administration's recent
hints that it will stop professors
from publishing their research
results prove true, an official of a
national administrator's group
warns.
In October, the government will
begin pumping another $600
million into university research labs
that help it research new Star Wars
weaponry.
The controversial project — formally called the Strategic Defense
Initiative (SDI) - would put lasers
and other high-tech weapons into
space to shoot down Soviet missiles
in the event of an attack.
Petitions in which university
researchers promise not to solicit or
accept Star Wars research funds are
being circulated at more than three
dozen campuses this month.
The petitions protest the SDI on
political grounds, and because the
research contracts may restrict the
publication of research funded by
Star Wars grants.
Scientists seem most worried
about the publication Issue.
"The worst case scenario would
be that dozens of universities would
be forced to pass on Star Wars funding because the restrictions would
violate their policies against conducting classified or secret
research," said Jack Crowley, who
monitors federal research funding
for the American Association of
Universities.
Initially, SDI officials insisted all
university funding would be for
fundamental research. Professors
and graduate students thus would
be free to publish the results of their
work.
Then in August, SDI university
research director Jim Ionson issued
a memorandum reaffirming that
position, yet adding research on
operational capabilities and performance characteristics that is "unique and critical" to defense pro-
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grams would be classified.
University officials say they are
confused.
"3
"It's not an entirely clear
signal," Crowley said. "We may
have to play this out project-byprojecti"
"You can't say it's horrible only
because you're too confused to
know for sure what they're planning to do," said Massachusetts Institute of Technology research vice
president Kenneth Smith.
Other SDI officials have said
researchers couldn't talk about SDI
research on the phone or in person
unless, a government official was
present.
Schools also are worried about
recent statements by SDI director
Lt. Gen. James Abrahamson, who
said in July that all SDI research
will be subject to "sensitivity
checks."
If SDI decides certain research is
"just really amazingly important"
and that it was "absolutely critical
the Russians don't get it," it would
be classified, Abrahamson told The
Institute, the newsletter of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics
Engineers.
In other words, SDI could decide
to classify all the research even after
it promised to treat it as non-secret.
The restrictions "would give rise
to even more tension within any
campus over whether individual
professors should be doing SDI
research," Smith predicted.
Star Wars already has triggered
the most vociferous debate over
federal funding of university
research since the Vietnam War.
At the time, most large research
universities prohibited their faculty
from c o n d u c t i n g classified
rosea: , Smith says.
Secret research is best left to industry, university officials concluded, because academic freedom requires the results of scientific
research be available to all.
The petitions now protesting administration e f forts to force schools
to violate the anti-secret research
policies began at the University of
Illinois.
"It's absolutely unprecedented
for researchers to agree not to accept research funds like this," said
Illinois assistant physiology professor Eric Jakobsson, one of those
who started the petition drive.
Earlier this year, the federal National Science Foundation prohibited four universities with NSFfunded supercomputer centers from
allowing Russian and Eastern European scientists, t o use the
computers.
After Cornell and . Illinois officials refused to accept the restrictions, the NSF withdrew the ban in
July, pending a study of the issue.
"The whole thrust.; of this administration is to increase the level
of restrictions on ail sorts of
research," Jakobsson charged.
The biggest concern is Star Wars,
Jakobsson said, because It's so big.
It's worth $600 million for universities in the coming fiscal year
alone.
"To the extent universities are
for sale, the Pentagon can buy them
cheap," he said.
}•
D
call us at
442-5665
OCTOBER
IS, 1985 D ALBANY
STUDENT
PRESS
Q
'People and Food' strives to alleviate hunger
By David Kase
sTAfF moraa ; ) v
While this summer's Live-Aid celebrity
concert increased awareness about world
hunger, it hasn't solved the problem, said
one anti-hunger student group organizer at
SUiNYA.
"Live-Aid was good, but you can listen
to the music and the problem doesn't go
away. Through that, however, people have
become more and more aware that hunger
is an injustice which does not have to be. It
is our responsibility to end it," said Bob
Longobucco.
People and Food, a Student Association
(SA) funded group concerned about
hunger, is holding a World Food Day
teleconference October 16 to make
students aware of the problems, said
Longobucco,' People and Food President.
The United States Agency for International Development is sponsoring a National Town Meeting in Washington D.C.
which will be televised and ISO universities, including' SUNYA, will be participating via telephone, said Longobucco.
A panel discussion wilt be held from
12-1 p.m. and from 1:00-2:00 we will have
a local speaker and discussion, "From
2:00-3:00 We will ask at least one question
about hunger by telephone to the conference in W a s h i n g t o n , " said
Longobucco.
"All three hours are interesting but I
think the second hour will be most interesting because the discussion will give us
a chance to get out the frustration we feel
and! the hopes we have," Longobucco
said.
Other activites planned for this year in-
clude letter writing campaigns to members small. If all that bread could be saved and
of congress regarding hunger legislation,
donated, local hunger would be somewhat
preparing and sharing a meal with a local alleviated, she added.
shelter, holding a fast of 30 hours to raise
Referring to student eating habits on
money and awareness for hunger causes,
campus, Longobucco said, "In light of the
as well as providing new information to hunger in our world and our community, it
the campus, said Longobucco.
is wrong to leave half a tray of food un"Twenty percent of all food bought to- wanted when it could mean so much to so
day is wasted and there is tremendous food many."
"waste here at UAS (University Auxiliary
Services)"said Longobucco.
Citing current food stamps proposals in
"We'd hope that spare, uncooked food Washington, Longobucco said, "Food
could be. donated to food banks who - Stamps provide a diet that is below the
would be willing to pick-up unused food U.S. recommended daily levels of nutrifrom UAS and destribute them to local tion. As it is 20 million Americans go
e m e r g e n c y f o o d p a n t r i e s , " said hungry at least one day a month," adding
Longobucco.
that, "This is the program that the Senate
One student said that UAS workers only wants to cut. We have to ask ourselves, is
use the centers of bread loaves and throw it morally right to make them (the hungry)
D
out the end pieces because they are too pay."
THE MICHELOB FESTIVAL OF STARS
AT THE PALACE THEATRE
OGYRA
brten o l d e n
1MIGHEL0B
October 19 at 8:00 PM
TICKETS $12.50 u d $14.50
A NIGHT WITH QBK-FM 104
TICKETS ON SALE NOW AT:
.
PALACE BOX OFFICE 4M-4M3
TICKETRON
D R O M E S O U N D (Albany & Schenectady)
OUTLETS
RECORD, ETC.
U N C L E S A M (Tray)
LIVETN ALBANY
lOctober IS, 1985
10a Aspects on Tuesday
Chorus Line kicks at Proctors
saw A Chorus Line on Broadway
several years ago. I thought it was a
good show, not a singular sensation,
but a good show nonetheless. Last Thursday, the touring version played at Proctor's. That was a good show as well.
But. . .
I
A Chorus Line has been playing on
Broadway for eleven years now. The show
is a Manhattan staple, a legend in its own
time. But why? It's an enjoyable show,
granted, but better musicals have opened
and closed while the line at the Shubert
Theatre, and now Proctor's, continues
kicking up its heels.
Perhaps the s i m p l i c i t y w h i c h
underscores the entire production makes
the show tick. The story is simple enough:
A group of nearly twenty dancers dying
for a precious few spots in the chorus of a
Broadway show audition for a casting
director. For two hours they dance, sing,
and describe themselves.
In the end, who earns the jobs and who
doesn't proves not nearly as important as
the challenge. The casting director selects
the dancers based solely on talent and personality. The audience is left wondering
why those who weren't chosen failed the
test. The majority of the dancers were
superior. What gave those selected the
edge? We never find out.
A Chorus Line takes place in 1975, and
this time frame remains. Therefore, when a
dancer says she was born in 1945, the
assumption is she's forty years old. A forty
year old dancer? There are only so many
Ann Millers on this earth, so A Chorus
Line loses a degree of truth.
On the other hand, the play is timeless.
It's 1985, and still the only line a dancer can
count on in the theatre business is the
unemployment lirie. Thus, the problems
the various dancers mention still ring true
today. Also, in 1975, when the play
premiered, it was ahead of its time. The
Ian Spelling
conversations concerning homosexuality
are realistic, not melodramatic, and were
considered daring at the time.
The Proctors version was nearly identical to the Broadway production. Though
the Proctors' stage was smaller than the
Shubert's, this actually permitted more intimacy. The lighting was also effective,
particularly during solos, when a colored
light or spotlight set off an actor's face or
body. The large mirror at the back of the
stage reflected the dancers, as well as a
fascinating distortion of the Proctors'
crowd.
Acting is A Chorus Line's greatest attribute, and the show's broad scope its
greatest flaw. Too many actors fill the
stage. None is the star; all are supporting
actors, Thursday night, however, several
cast members stood out. Rita O'Connor
played the wise cracking, aging dancer to
perfection, while Lisa Leguillov's solid per-
Albany's own
Live Aid at J.B.'s
food. So, they came up with the idea of a
Live Aid-type of concert."
The show will be an all day event, with
matinee and evening performances by
volunteer professionals. "There will be two
different types of shows which will appeal to different groups of people," says
Herzlich.
The matinee runs from 1:00 to 5:00
p.m., and features Doc Scanlon, Lisa
Robelotto, Prodigy, Begonia, a Filcne's
fashion show, and other entertainers. From
7:00 p.m. to midnight, the Stomplistics,
Sarge Blotto
f a Live Aid concert can feed the starving people of Africa, then a Live
Aid concert can feed Albany
County's hungry. This is the concept
behind the Emergency Food Task Force's
Live Aid event scheduled for this Sunday
at J.B.'s Theatre.
I
Loren Ginsberg
As a part of the Capitol Fund Drive '85,
the proceeds from the event will be used to
supply food for the Emergency Food Task
Force's pantries, which are located
throughout Albany to provide food for
needy citizens. Karen Herzlich, a Task
Force volunteer promoting the event on
campus, explains, "Right now they have no
food left. They have to find a way to get
Ain't no mountain high enough
l eoTrg*, listen to me please. You can't make it up
therf, it's impossible. You'll die if you go. If we're
'going to die, be with us. Oh, please darling, don't do
this to me. Qoti't do this to the children. Think of them, for
Christ's sake. " •".• ''•''•
Ian Spelling
".,. This is not just a
campus thing; it's for all of
Albany..." '
-Karen Herzlich
Dance Planet, Chefs of the Future, Who
Likes What, Diversion Factor, The Distractions, and Filene's rock fashion show will
take the stage at J.B.'s Theatre, with Sarge
Blotto as a guest emcee.
Tickets are $5.00 and can be purchasd at
the door or in advance at J.B.'s Theatre,
Strawberries, Drome Sound, Filene's,
Records 'n Such, and Midland Records.
The Emergency Food Task Force expects
that this event provide a big boost for the
Capitol Fund Drive '85. With popular
bands and entertainers volunteering their
time and talent for the benefit of the poor,
all that remains is for the community to
participate by enjoying the show on Sunday. "This is not just a campus thing,"
stresses Herzlich. "It's for all of Albany." P
formance as Diana was enhanced by her
fancy footwork and enjoyable singing.
Perhaps the best performance of the
evening belonged to Willy Falk, whose
dancing skills complemented his acting.
The highlight of the show, in dramatic
terms, was Falk's soliloquy on his homosexuality. The audience sat enraputured while
Falk agonized on the empty stage.
Most of the other actors were fine,
though several weren't on key during
musical numbers. Donna McKechnse, as
Cassie, danced admirably, i however, her
voice lacked power. And if: one role in A
Chorus Line demands a sense of power, it
is that of Cassie.
All In all, A Chorus Line at Proctors was
as good as could be expected. And its
timelessness was proven once again when
Connie (Suzen Murakoshi) explained how
she acted as a child in The King and I. The
Proctors'audience fell silent for a moment
to reflect on Yul Brynner^s death a day
earlier. Then in the best show business
tradition, the show went on.
•
\Aspects on Tuesday 11a
O c t o b e r I S , 19851
"I am thinking of them, If we
don't eat we will all die.And if I die you must-send one of
the children Up for food."> '..':"But how will we know if you made it or not?"
"If I'm not back in four days, assume I am dead and send
one of the boys for food. It's in our blood. We must live until we are all dead. They can try and starve us if they will.
But I'll fight to my last breath. In the meantime, I'm hungry,
as are you, as is Mary and Tricia and Sue, and Adam and
Bob, and John. I don't want to die. I don't want anyone to
die. But we all will if someone doesn't do something. I am
doing something. I don't have a death wish, I have a life
wish. Life is precious. You only live once."
"So let us 1 ive and die together. Oh, George please, 1 beg
you, don't leave."
"Don't you see, Anne, if there was no hope;at all I would
stay and die as'one with my family. But there is food atop
the hill. It's within reach. 1 can get to it."
"Do you truly believe you'll make it?"
"I pray I will. But it's a long trek, and no one has ever
made it back. I will make it though, I am confident. I must
make it. Now bring the children to me, Anne."
Anne walked away, dejected. Her family was starving,
facing a slow, painful death. But Anne was a faithful wife.
She gathered her brood of six children and stood them
before their father. Her husband.
Though they tried, the children could not remain still
give up. Not now. Not ever. Do you understand me?"
The children weren't quite smiling, but they were proud
of their father. They knew, he loved them. He had always
been kind, loving, and affectionate;'sometimes overly affectionate. Every morning and every night George would hug
his children. Occasionally, in' the middle of the night,
George would check up on them and plant quiet kisses. The
children would pretend to be sleeping, or in some cases they
would not let George know he had awakended them with a
wet kiss. As soon as he would leave, they'd rub their faces
and wipe the saliva somewhere, anywhere — as long as the
stuff was off their faces.
But a quiet reality now set in. What if Dad never returned
to offer one of those sloppy smooches? Who would do the
hugging? Mom was the disciplinarian. Dad ran interference
when shewas on the warpath. Who'd do that? Who'd cry
when the children earned A's in school? Who'd be willing to
play a marathon game of hide and seek?
Tricia crawled to her father's side. "I love you Daddy,"
she squealed with delight, as she hugged him fiercely.
George smiled. The other children gathered around their
father, who continued smiling that smile, the one that says,
"Hey, they love me." And so they did. Though reveling in
pride, George stole a glance at Anne. She was sobbing
violently. Would they be expressing such devotion to her,
she wondered. George read this in the tears streaming down
her cheeks.
"Anne, join us," George demanded through a smile.
"Please Mommy," pleaded Tricia.
"Come on, Mom," urged Bob.
Simultaneously, Mike and Sue shouted, "We love you
too, Mom I"
So Anne joined the happy family. Happy in love. Happy
in the shadow of death because love conquers everything.
Asermely leads students
down Theatre Row
ark turns into Delaware. Go past the
Spectrum, take a left on Second
Avenue. Down this windy, narrow
road you'll find the Albany Civic Theatre.
Things are brewing inside.
L
Mike
Dermansky
A community troupe is, for the
first time, presenting an origianl work,
Theater Row, a comedy written by native
Albanian Ross Alexander. Albert Asermely, a theatre professor at SUNYA, is directing a cast which includes three SUNY
students: Marcelle Langan, Richard
Weidert.and Kolette K. Stim. Helene Ross,
a graduate student who teaches twp
theatre classes, is also in the cast.
When asked how he got involved with
the play, Asermely answered, "I had done
a stage reading in New York two years
ago. A play similar to it<opened'off Broad:
way (Nofees Off), which held up its production. That play has closed, so I see this
play moving on."
The fact that there are so many SUNYA
students in the cast is unrelated to
Asermely's involvement. 'The cast was
selected by a casting committee. The auditions were open call, with over 20 people
trying out for each part," he explained.
Assistant director, Ross Meyerson, a one
year graduate of SUNYA, spoke of the
play as a super vehicle to get outside the
university. "This Is what an actor's resume
is made up of. It is hard to get work, and
this is 'i step towards regional exposure."
Meyerson Is founder of a traveling company, The Alternate Theatre, which
recruites SUNYA students.
Helene Ross commented on how very
professional the SUNYA students trying
out appeared. "They said they have never
seen so many. I'd like to say I have lots of
talented kids In my beginning theatre
classes and would like to see them branch
out, get a feel for the acting world. There is
more and more theatre, especially for
SUNYA students and new playwrites."
Marcell Lagan said, "It Is an exciting new
From left to right! Ross Meyerson, Mnrcelle
Langon, Robert Weldert, and Albert
Asermely.
play, an exciting experience — especially
since the author is working With us."
Logan enjoys the fact that revisions are
made during regearsals. Since the play has
never been performed, the possibilities for
change at this point are limitless!
"There is something exciting about a
new play, versus something that has
already been done," Logan commented.
Richard Weidert also enjoys the
freedom of a hew production? "I can't be
compared to anyone. I'm creating a new
character," he Insisted.
The play is about a young Greek director, Nikos, who is given an ultimatum by
his father: "Make It'big in the theatre now,
or come home to the family business." It is
a play within a play, Kolette K, Stim plays
an assistant director In the play,' which is
"pretty bizarre" according to Stim: She ex,
l>lained,"l was the assistant director for Our
Town (ai SUNYA), It is like life as the
stage, and the stage as life."
The play opens October 16th and runs
two weeks, Wednesday ATM Saturday at 2
p.m, with Sunday matinees at 2:30.
Theatre Row may be a good opportunity
to get away from the sterile, the grade
point average, the cement. Explore a
vacuum dent in Albany — off Lark St., or
off off off (but seemingly not too far from)
Broadway.
D
They fidgeted; cried, and little Tricia,' the baby of the fami
|y, ran to her mother.Theykhew.
"Children," George stammered, though he tried to sound
forceful, "I must go away to find food for us. I have always
been honest with you. i .and I will be.. .1 love you
all.. Children, I may die attempting this, but we will all die
anyway if I don't at least try. I. . ."
"Daddy, what does death feel like?" queeried Bob.
"Well, you know that feeling in your stomach now, that
grumbling sound it makes. Well, that gets worse, really bad,
until it hurts so much it just stops hurting. And you're dead."
"But what's after that," cried- Mary, "do we suffer after
that?"
"No honey, we reach peace after that."
"Peace?," Adam wondered out loud. "How do you know
what it's like. Have you ever been dead, Dad? Huh,"
"Yeah, Dad, how can you talk about death?" murmmered
Sue.
George kept a calm face about him, but peered pleadingly toward Anne, whose look, translated, said, "You got
yourself into this mess, get yourself out of It."
"I have never been dead. You know that. I should not talk
as if I have met Him. I have no right to. But we — your
mother and I, you, your friends — everyone but those who
don't believe, have been taught for ages that life goes on. A
life far more peaceful than could be Imagined during your
lifetime of hardships awaits us all — even the non-believers,
"But, no," George admitted without reserve, "I have
never been dead. And I hope not to die soon. I want to
watch you all grow. 1 love your mother dearly and want to
spend the rest of my life with her. I adore my friends, my
family, my dear Aunt Valerie. Of course I want to live, but
my life won't he worth anything to me if I must watch you,
my own flesh and blood, die before my eyes. I must climb
that mountain and claim food for you.
"If I die in the process, I want you to know I did it for
you, out of love and nothing else. And If I don't make It,
don't feel sorry for me; to each man his own poison. I
choose death while striving for life rather than laying prone
and allowing death to consume me. No, If death wants me
so badly, It will have to beat me at Its own game. I won't
For George and Anne it conquered only as much as it had
tp; should George survive, life would be better than ever,
should he perish in his quest, the family will have known
love, and knowing the meaning of love stabs death in the
heart.
The next morning, George was ready for whatever fate
had in store. During the night he snuck his usual kisses, or at
least tried. All except Tricia opened their eyes upon hearing
the. smack of lips. The kids smiled and said "1 love you,
Dad." But Tricia slept right through. Later, when George
had fallen asleep, Tricia crawled into the space between
George arid Anne.$he pecked her father for hours, though
he failed to awaken. Finally, when the alarm clock within
sounded, George'awoke to a young face peering into his.
He gently reached for this face and brought it close to his.
"Kiss me again," cooed Tricia. And George did. Anne laughed and Wiped Tricia's face. She then joined in the kissing
contest and was soon teamed with the remainder of the
family. "Bliss," exclaimed George to no one in particular.
Soon enough, George kissed the children good-bye. He
walked over to Anne. "George," she said seriously, "do you
believe those things you told the children about Christ and
death?"
"All I know is I never questioned those things as a child. If
I die, you and the kids will have to face reality. I will have to
face our maker. Sure, I wish Christ would come to me today, In person. I'd say, "Christ, where have you been? Have
I got a shopping list for you. Look at what the world has
done to itself since you left. You've got a lot of work to do,
starting with getting food for me and my family."
"But, do I believe everything I told the kids? 1 don't know.
Somebody had to create all of this. We can't just live and
die. Just like that. There has to be more, there just has to.
But there are so many religions, and so many problems in
this world. And many of these problems are caused by
religion. In fact, since you put me on the spot, and since I
may never see you again, I'll tell you something else. Every
once In a while, and quite often lately, 1 think religion causes
more problems than It solves. Who is right? I can't say
because I don't know. Everyone thinks he is right."
"But what counts Is I love you and the kids. And I do
believe that if I die I will see you all again somewhere,
sometime. You and I are one, and the children are a part of
us both. Take good care of them if I don't return, and take
care of yourself. I love you and I always will. You can forget
religion,'but don't ever forget that."
With that, Anne and George kissed. George then hugged
and kissed each of the children. "I love you all," he said,
choking back tears, but they knew, that already.
It was daylight as George began his ascent. He took with
him no food, or water, or tools. All he needed was himself,
and his desires, and his desperation. That would be enough.
Home was but a faint blur on the horizon by the second
day. Arid George kept going. Onward, forward, upward, he
told himself. George thought of Anne and the children. He
was sort of their mother, not that she didn't love them as
much as he, but he was always the affectionate one, the one
who answered questions and cried when the children did.
Anne was tougher, or so she believed, he thought. But hope
filled his head. "I will make itl" George screamed. And if he
didn't, Anne would make the adjustment to playing both
mom and dad. She realized the children loved her in the
days before George left. They could count on her, and she
on them. George smiled at the thought.
The mountain proved fairly easy climbing.
Higher and higher he went.
Higher and higher.
Higher.
Finally, George reached the top. It was broad daylight.
And George celebrated his arrival in a triumphant silence.
He then sighted the bounty, tons and tons of food. Enough
to feed everyone in town. But, of more import, enough to
feed his family. His family. The tough part was complete.
Grab the stuff and run for it, George figured as he headed
for the nlass of food. Suddenly a cloud shadowed the area.
George panicked. He ran in circles. Around and around.
Serpentine, serpentine. He screamed within himself. Terror.
"I'm in hell," George cried. "I must be." The cloud then
lifted, and George let down his guard.
Then, without warning, the blackness, in all its horrible
glory, befell George. He was pinned under something —
something dreadfully heavy, something deadly. George, using the last of his strength, turned his head and saw the
master of his fate.
"God damn ants, Rose. I just smashed another one of the
little bastards. When is the exterminator coming?"
"Next Tuesday."
George heard this and frowned. "My family, my wife,
the kids. 1 love them. They love me. . ." With that
George's world truned dark.
At the foot of the kitchen table in Rose Price's home,
Anne felt a sensation. "Children," she sobbed, "I don't think
your father made it. . ."
"Can I try Mom, please," interrupted Adam.
"Yes, your father would want it that way."
Back at Rose Price's house life continued as usual. "He
promised he'd be here on Tuesday. Now stop complaining
and let's go upstairs. Wheel of Fortune is about to begin."
Upstairs, Pat Sajak was telling a contestant'that the letter
"A" had already been called. Rose Price and her husband
taunted the television. Downstaris, under the kitchen table,
Anne kissed her oldest son farewell. All the children wished
him well.
On the table, in the late afternoon of a typical Long Island
summer, atop an ant named Ceorge, sat a mug which read:
"Life Sucks — and Then You Die."
(
•
me FAR
By GARY LARSON
"I Just cant M l from her*.... mat could
either be our flock, another flock, or
Jutt a bunch of llfflo mV"
Making
compromises
Needless problem
Last week, Mike Alvaro, Albany's director of
Code Enforcement, (a.k.a. the grouper law hitman) informed us that he's got 125 houses he
could charge with grouper law violations —
tomorrow, if he wanted to.
At the moment, it doesn't appear that he's
going to. For now, University and Student
Association officials seem satisfied with this. But
that's not good enough for the students living in
violation, for whom temporary non-enforcement
is hardly the solution to the ever-present threat of
eviction.
To be fair, SA officials have not been
completely inactive in addressing students'
concerns over the grouper law. They've set up the
Matchmaker Program, which offers students
listings of homes that are looking for boarders,
and their Community Relations Program is
certainly praiseworthy. The problem is, SA has
been completely reactive. They're working within
a discriminatory law that needs to be changed, not
dealt with.
There are times when it's in the students' best
interests to work with the city to resolve
conflicting needs. This isn't one of those
situations.
Unfortunately, there's little room for
compromise here. As long as the grouper law
exists in any way, enforced or not, it's a constant
threat the city can hold over students' heads. Nonenforcement is an easy out right now, but what
about next month, or next year? SA relations with
the city don't stay this good forever.
Right now, SA is using non-enforcement as a
means of buying time. As SA President Steve
Gawlcy told a Neighborhood Association meeting
last Thursday, "We're just asking that you give us
a little time for our programs to get going." He
contends that students don't want to violate the
law, they just lack alternatives. Once SA's
programs (such as Matchmaker) are in full swing,
Gawley maintains that the number of students
living in violation will drop off significantly.
This seems a bit optimistic or maybe" just
intentionally naive. Students are violating the law
because it's arbitrary and impractical. A landlord
who owns a large four bedroom apartment can't
afford to rent only three of the bedrooms. And
three students living in a four bedroom apartment
can't afford to split the rent for the extra
bedroom. As a result, both landlords and students
have few options but to violate the law.
A law that determines the number of tenants a
house can have, based on the size of the house
would be a much more practical approach,
protecting both students and residents from
unreasonably overcrowded situations.
This is, no doubt, an alternative SA has
recommended to the city. But the city doesn't need
alternatives. What they've got right now is belter:
non-enforcement with the students as their pawns.
Still, SA's reactionary approach is preferable to
that of our University administration. They've
done nothing at all, except make a vague offer of
possibly providing housing to evicted students in
SUNYA's already overcrowed dorms.
They too, seem satisfied to accept the law,
despite the fact that the overcrowded housing
situation may deter students from attending the
University. In addition, their complacency fails to
address one of our University missions, which is
community service. If this University is creating a
housing problem within the community, then our
administrators should take an active role in
resolving it.
President O'Leary has demonstrated many
times in the past thai he docs hold the clout within
the city government to assist in creating a more
practical and equitable law.
Non-enforcement of the law is a temporary
solution. The only feasible long-term solution is a
revised law. It's time our university and our
student government started compromising on
something besides the student interest.
WARNING uwsas ON am\cpi
iwm...cxM2i EORE AGWHIS//
t o the Editor:
Saturday, October 5 at approximately 8:15 p.m., I was
dropping off a friend and her parents at the University
Gym to attend the Alan King performance.
A problem arose when I went to allow my friend, a
fellow student here at Albany, out of the van we were
traveling in. Because she is a disabled student in a
wheelchair, I wanted to let her out of the van in an
authorized location. When asking a member of UPD
where this could be done he told me to do so
further along. Perimeter Road. The spaces normally
reserved for making the gym more accessible to the
disabled were thoughtlessly blocked by several UPD cars.
Perhaps the officer was acting under orders, however,
his behavior was both discourteous and irresponsible. If
this is department policy the whole force should be
brought under scrutiny. Perimeter Road is no place to
discharge a disabled student in a wheelchair, especially
with its poor visability and the increased traffic due to
Parent's Weekend. ,
.
The van in which we were traveling has both University
and New York State authorization stickers. This incident
should never have occured and shows very little respect
for or compliance with the law.
This matter should be looked into with regard to the
origin of this directive and the officer's action. Furthermore, steps should be taken to insure that an unfortunate
incident such as this never occurs again.
— Paul W. Larrabce
ed' towards security. On my way I encountered two officers who did not hesitate to help me. Considering the
early hour, I was most grateful. They not only put gas in
my car (at no charge), but also followed me to Mobil on
Western to make sure I was ekay.
Once again, thanks, UPD, keep up the good work.
— William T. Salerno
UC responds
To the Editor:
This is in response to Mr. Michael Kohut's letter of
10/8, which was directed at the leadership of University
Cinemas.
Mr. Kohut, you made several statements in your letter
which we feel need clarification. You say that "they
refuse to sell tickets a reasonable time in advance." What
exactly do you mean by a "reasonable time?" Do you
suggest that we sell tickets a week or two in advance? Unfortunately, we are unable to do this because of the bookkeeping procedures within our group.
In addition, you made a reference to the length of the
ticket lines. They exist for several reasons. First, we are
bringing movies which appeal to a great deal of students.
Thus, it takes considerable time to sell 200-300 tickets.
Realizing this fact, our managers are instructed to begin
ticket sales 30 minutes before showtime. However, many
students wishing to see the movie arrive only five to ten
minutes before the show is supposed to begin. With only
a handful of people inside and several hundred outside, to
start on time would cause a riot.
You also say that if you are lucky you can catch the last
bus downtown. According to our bus schedule, the last
Draper bus leaves the circle at 12:35, while the last Wellington leaves at 12:30. This occurs on both Thursday and
Friday. On Saturday nights the last scheduled bus leaves
at 12:05. Allowing for a delay of "about 15 minutes in
To the Editor:
starting," you should be able to catch the last bus. In adIn my two and a half years as a student here at SUNYA dition, the Student Association should be starting to run
I cannot recall ever reading a positive letter regarding their late night buses soon. If there is no bus, that is a
UPD. If students would look more closely at UPD, they concern which should be expressed to the appropriate
persons, not University Cinemas. Also, if you are still
would realize that they are doing a good job:
I have had several experiences with UPD and every concerned about not being able to get downtown, come
time they have been both courteous and helpful, par- to the early show.
ticularly today (10/10). At 5:45 a.m.; on my way to my
Just one other minor point has to be brought out. You
internship at Channel Six in Schenectady, my car unex- state that the Student Association provides us with
pectedly ran out of petrol. Since I was passing the uptown $30,000. Apparently, you were quite misinformed as to
'bampu$; I figured I'd pull off of Washington Avenue on- j exactly how much money we receive. In fact, we are apto Perimeter Road. I left my car near Colonial and walk- propriated an amount which is considerably less than
what you stated.
It Is our opinion that you are uninformed as to the inner workings of University Cinemas. We invite you to
. come down early one night to find out what really goes
on.
— Ann Lamoy
Director University Cinemas
— Rick Kunen
Treasurer, University Cinemas
EatMillahed in 1916
Thank you, U P D
A Democratic appeal
This month, Democrats in the House of Representatives are embarking on an ambitious program to reach
out to America's college students. More than . 50
Democratic members plan to travel to campuses across
the country, holding "Forums for the Future" on 16
campuses this month, and hopefully many more in the
months to come.
•
Dick Durbin
We are reaching out to let America's students know
that our party embodies the spirit of America's future:
the spirit of opportunity, frredom, economic advancement and individual achievement. And we are reaching
out to hear the message America's students have for us:
their hopes, ideas and concerns for the future.
We've been told that the groundswell of support for
Ronald Reagan on campus in 1984 signaled a major
political realignment in our country. We've heard that
just as campus activism once made a generation of young
Americans safely Democratic, that Ronald Reagan's
popularity on campus is turning students safely
Republican.
But as Democrats, we're not ready to concede
America's college students to the Republican Party.
Students may have voted for Reagan because he seemed
to stand for new, bolder leadership after a decade of
frustrations that included Watergate, the energy crisis,
and the hostage drama in Iran. In fact, students' vote for
Reagan may have carried a bit of idealism of its own —
the promise of a stronger America and a growing
economy.
But young Americans ought to ask today whether the
Republicans plan to keep that promise. As Democrats, we
think students looking for real leadership for the future
ought to be listening to what our party has to say.
Let's first look at the reason many students voted for
the President: economic security. While students may
have felt more hopeful about our nation's future under a
Republican President, some lingering 'doubts remain
today.
Polling data indicate that an increasing percentage of
students have real doubts they'll eventually be better off
financially than their parents. Students quite properly
should ask which party will do the best on long-term
economic planning, which will make the real difference
for today's young Americans in tomorrow's world.
During the Reagan Administration, the federal deficit
has grown to more than four times what it was during
Jimmy Carter's presidency. No matter whom you blame
for it, that deficit will take years to pay off. It's a debt
students will keep paying long after their student loans
are taken care of, as they face higher interest rates buying
a house, starting a business, or thinking about college for
their own children.
The Democrats are concerned about that deficit, and
.
L'
n
. . ~~.
.
"
know that it cannot be remedied through rhetoric and
simplistic solutions. This year, the Democrats in the
House led the way in assuring passage of a budget that
cuts, the deficit $55 billion in the 1986 fiscal year. The
Republicans worked to make those cuts, too, but the
Democrats assured that the budget would be cut responsibly — so that crucial life-support systems such as'student loans and Social Security weren't compromised.
Young people also voted Republican, polls show,
because that party seemed to promise military strength
and resolve in a dangerous world. The Arab oil embargo,
the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan, and the wreckage of
U.S. helicopters in the Iranian desert made many young
people long for a government that would be firm and
tough.
The Democrats know that in a changing world, our
country has to be as strong as any on the globe. But we
also have to be smart. Our position in the world relies on
large part on gaining advantages now that will benefit us
in the future — in the world your generation will inherit.
Take the case of South Africa. It is only a matter of
time before that country's vast black majority assumes
power over their land and their destiny. The V.S. can
stand up firmly for justice, and win a friend in the future
government of South Africa, or we can continue the Administration's "constructive engagement" policy, which
ties us to a brutal, unjust white minority regime. The
Democrats have led the way in forcing the U.S. to impose
economic sanctions against South Africa, a first step
toward aligning our nation with that country's majority.
As students look to the future, they need to think about
the role they want government to play. Do they want national leadership that constantly declares government the
enemy — as the current Administration does — or do
they want leaders committed to'making government
work?
The role of government is indeed critical as we think
about solutions to the problems of the next decade: cleaning up toxic wastes, expanding and improving education
and job training, combatting Illiteracy, improving mass
transit. Should these problems be left in the hands of someone committed to dismantling government, or should
they be handled by people who are dedicated, to finding
efficient and realistic solutions?
We think most students genuinely seek a government
that works, a government that deals with the pressing
issues of tomorrow. That's why we're speaking out. But
we're not only asking students to listen to what we say,
but to tell us what they think. Our party needs young
voters: their energy, their Ideas, and their optimism. We
hope students will hear us out, because we both have
something pretty important at stake: our future.
•
Rep. Dick Durbin h a Democratic member of Congress
w W * t 7 ' ^ f ' M '**'•
I
(Aspects
Holdl J. GrslJa. Editor in Chief
Daan Chang, Managing Editor
NewsEdltora.,..
*
Associate News Editor..
ASPBCX* Editor
Associate 4 5 * t e U Editor-..Muslo Editor
Sports Editor
_
Editorial Pages Editor
AHciaClrnboia. JamoaO'Sulllvan
>
lleneWeinstein
lomn Ginsberg
Ian Spelling,
Michael Celt
v
'.Krlstine Sautr
Joseph Fusco
John Keensn, Senior Editor
Conlribuilng Editors Dean Bstx, Wayne Peereboorn. Preview Editor: Pam
Schustenrian, Editorial Asslilants: Rachel Braslow, Ken Dombaum, Ootte
Dxa nba, BUI Jacob, Brenda Scliaoffor, David Woithclm Stall writers: Karen
Beck, Dave Blette, Leslla Chalt, Ethan Chaxln, Ian Clements, Pam Conway,
Andrea Corson, Mike Dermaosky, Lisa Jackal, David Kase, Stacey Kern, Mark
Kobrinaky, John (.abate, Corey Levllan, Mike MacAdam, J. Michael Malec,
Caryn Mlske, Peter Sands, Keren Schlomy, Rick Swanson, Michael Skolnlck
Margie Rosenthal, Business Manager
Stephanie Sohensul, Associate Business Manager
Maura Keltott, Jocki Mldlarsky, Advertising Managers
Dan Flelahar, Salsa Manager
Billing Accountant.
Marsha Roth
Payroll Supervisor
Felicia Caaaetta
Classified Manager
rv
••• •
Frank Dlllberto
Advertising Salesi Karen Amstsr, Frank Cole, Drew Fung, Rich Utt, Michelle
Piiall Advertising Production: Greg Behrendt, Eileen Chen, Jill Gentile, James
Homer, Keith Kreughio. Alyss Margolin, Annette Muller, Sharon Reed, Eric
Roth Office Staff: Jennifer Chocsloi, Andy Cohen, Amy Sllber, Rob Msrlnelll
Patriots GUrmcla, Production Manager
Chief Typesetter
Jeannlne Dlanuuo
Typists: Laura Bslma, Joan Chrietlsno, Tracle Psui, Pam Strsuber, Posta-up:
Llss Bsrkeon, Nancy Cremen, Klralen Orlst, Steven Flaherty, Grace Flood, E.
Phillip Hoover, 0. Os'rrel Stat, M.D.Thompaon, Sonla Valentin Chauffeur: Jim
Lolly
Photography principally supplied by University Photo Service, e etudenl
group.
Chlal Photographer: Kenny Kirsch UPS Stsfl: Michael Ackermon. Shaft Albert,
Myrna Bravo, John Curry, Lynn Drelfue, Chuck Ginsberg, e»a Maurer, Mark
Medlavllla, Lisa Simmons. Unite* Sperling, Erioo Spiegel, Tanye Steele,
Howsrd Tygar, Mark Vscsreili
Entire contents copyright 1 M B Albany Student Press Corporation, ell rights
The Albany Student Press Is published Tuesdsys and Fridays between
August and June by the Albany Student Press Corporation, an independent
not-for-profit corporation.
Editorials are written by the Editor In Chlal with members of the Editorial
Board; policy Is eub|eot to review by the Editorial Board. Advertising policy
does not necessarily reflect editorial policy.
Mailing eddreas:
Albany Student Press, CO 329
1400 Washington Ave.
Albany, NV 12232
(510) 442-fMbVHflOJttU
New campus group
To the Editor:
If you come from a Reform or Conservative Jewish
background there is a new campus group that is just for
you. It's name is Chavurah, and its goal is to reach out to
those who are searching to find some spirituality within
college life.
If you lean toward the liberal side of Judaism and are
looking to maintain your Jewish spirituality the
Chavurah was made just for you. The only way that we
can help you is if you give us yqur input.
We have come up with a healthy mix of both Reform
and Conservative worship concepts. Our first Friday
evening service will be held on October 18 at 6:00 in CC
361 (to be followed by JSC Shabbat dinner - R.S.V.P. required). Remember that the only way we can function is
with your help.
— Ron Symons
Chavurah
Jewish Students' Coalition member
Appalled at Sorenson
To The Editor:
I am writing in response to the article I read in the ASP
covering the recent appearance of Burt Sorenson on campus. As a Baptist Campus Minister, I was shocked and
appalled at the comments Mr. Sorenson had to make.
First of all, let me say that I make no apologies for being a Christian and a minister of the gospel of Christ, but
what we as Christians don't need is someone like Mr. C
Sorenson making irresponsible, inane remarks like he
did.
Christians should be about the business of redemption
and reconciliation. No one has any business going around
publicly declaring the eternal destiny of other human beings. We are all God's children, and He loves us equally.
It's best, I think, that we let Him decide how He will handle matters such as this.
There are people around us in the world who hurt.
There are people who are hungry, homeless, and in
prison. Let us, as children of God, busy ourselves with
ministering to these. In a world of strife, let us bring
peace. May God's blessings be upon us all.
— Braxton LeCroy
Baptist Campus Minister
Chapel House, SUNYA
Grateful for support
To the Editor:
I would like to take this opportunity to thank the entire
University Community for the support they have shown
for what could be considered a major step in awareness
for the disabled students on our campus and maybe on
other campuses in the state. I am referring to efforts to
raise money to purchase a new van for the students. The
Disabled Van Task Force is only in effect now for one
month and already there has been a quick interest arising
from all members of the university.
Already we have verbal commitments from the Student
Association Media Office, Purple and Gold, the Ad- v"
ministration. University Auxilliary Services, and a few
other sources in the University community, as well as
manpower assistance.
I would also like to thank the Campus Crusade for
Christ for starting the whole effort off with an interesting
twist.— the Mega-Split.
This overall effort is one of the best ways to show how
many people pan come together for a needy and worthwhile cause.
Thank you all.
—Irwin Weinstein
Co-Chair of the Disabled Van Task Force
The ASP is accepting applications for
editorial pages editor
The job takes 15 hours per week, requires campus and
national political awareness, and is a paid position. Submit
application and writing sample (a term paper is fine) to
Managing Editor Dean Chang, in campus center 329. For
more information call us at 442-5665.
This is your last chance to apply for MINORITY
AFFAIRS EDITOR. Several students who expressed
interest in the postion have not yet turned in
applications. If you are still interested, it's not too late.
Ju§t call Dean or Heidi at the ASP right away. The
number to call is 442-5665.
The position requires 15 hours per week. You need
good writing skills and a knowledge of and concern for
minority issues.
TUESDAY, OCTOBER IS, 1985 D ALBANY STUDENT PRESS - | 5
1 4 ALBANY STUDENT PRESS D TUESDAY, OCTOBER IS, 1985
CLASSIFIED
PART-TIME
$600/Month
Need extra cash? 17 part-time
openings, 6:30 - 9:30 pm Sat 9:30
am • 3:30 pm local display work,
call lor Interview. 438-7824.
GETTING
PERSONAL
Deadlines:
Tuesday at 3PM for Friday
Friday at 3 PM. lor Tuesday
Rates:
$1.50 lor Ihe llrst 10 words
10 cents each additional word
Any bold word Is 10 cents extra
$2.00 extra for a box
minimum charge Is $1.50
Bitsy, Wanna buy a gun? A guy I
knew In Nam can hook us up on
Lark St.
Love Dave
Classified ads are being accepted in the SA Contact Ollice during
regular business hours. Classified advertising must be paid In cash at
the time ol Insertion. No checks will be accepted. Minimum charge lor
billing is $25.00 per issue.
No ads will be printed without a lull name, address or phone number
on the Advertising form. Credit may be extended, but NO refunds will
be given. Editorial policy will not permit ads lo be printed which contain blatant profanity or those that are in poor taste. We reserve the
right to reject any material deemed unsuitable lor publication.
All advertising seeking models or soliciting parts ol the human body
will not be accepted. Advertisers seeking an exception to this policy
must directly consult with as well as receive permission from the
Editor in Chief of the Albany Student Press.
II you have any questions or problems concerning Classified Advertising, please leel free to call or stop by the Business Ollice.
1978 Chevy Impala Good Condition, Runs Well, Call Nancv
271-1490.
1973 C H E V R O L E T CAMARO
RUNS WELL, SPORTY LOOKING,
GOOD STEREO SYSTEM. $800
489-4015.
GENUINE FUR PARKAS with
hoods. 2 medium size hlplength, 1
large size knee length. Moving
South $60, $75. 458-1250.
GOVERNMENT HOMES from $1
(U repair). Also delinquent tax
property. Call 805-687-6000 Ext.
GH-3106 lor information.
1974 Plymouth Valient. Good condition, $700. Please Call Louise at
442-5944. Early Morning.
VINYLUST — RECORD & VIDEO
FLEAMARKET — RARE ROCK,
JAZZ & COUNTRY — SUNDAY
OCT. 27, 1985 - NOON TO 6PM.
VFW POST 1019 481
WASHINGTON AVE. ALBANY
(BETWEEN QUAIL & LAKE) ADMSSION $2.00 — FREE VIDEOS
SHOWN ALL DAY - ALL YOUR
FAVE ROCK HEROES.
JOBS
Female/Male Nude Models (Experience Preferred) Needed lor
Art Department Classes, Contact
Art Dept. FA 216 or Call 442-4020.
STUDENT WANTED TO SELL HOT
NEW FOOTBALL BOARD GAME.
MUST BE A M B I T I O U S AND
OUTGOING, WITH A SPORTS
BACKGROUND. OWN HOURS.
GROUND LEVEL SALES POSITION WITH NEW DISTRIBUTOR.
CALL KEN'S DISTRIBUTING, (707)
763-6049, COLLECT.
$10-$360 Weekly/Up Mailing Circularsl No quotas! Sincerely Interested rush sell-addressed
envelope: Success, P.O. Box 470
CEG, Woodstock, IL 60098.
Needed: Sandwich Makers to work
nights and weekends. Experience
necessary. Apply at the Detl Works
alter 4 pm. Call 489-7953 and ask
lor MarvAnn.
FREELANCE ARTIST NEEOEO
I'm looking for an artist who can
provide designs and drawings
which will subsequently So
sllkscreened. Silkscreenlng experience Is not necessary.
TUTORING NEEDED for Accounting 211. If Interested, Call
Michelle at 442-6434.
PART-TIME POSTION
Varied duties In and around office
building Including shredding
paper, light cleaning, snow blowing, moving furniture, running errands. 20hrs per week. Send
resume and/or letter of Interest to:
I N F O S E A R C H , INC, H U M A N
RESOURCES DEPT., 800 CENTRAL AVE., ALBANY, NY 12206.
EOE,
GOVERNMENT JOBS $16,040 $59,230/yr. Now Hiring. Call
805-687-6000 Ext. R-3106 l o r current federal list.
Typist — Available lor ali typing
Jobs. Only $1 per page! Faat, neat,
reliable work. Call t r a d e —
442-6505.
jiii;
You are too cool!! I'm so lucky to
have you for my roomie.
Love Ya,
Trade
P.S. How does Scotland In our
Junior Sound?
:
PRECISION HAIRCUTTERS
Dec. 25-Jan. 5th
Price: $1269.00
Includes: Rd. trip air
-All tours 6 ent.
fees
-All breakfasts
-All hotels
-Gab H~w Year's
I" "ilLATIII
•dclightf J! "extras'
FOR SINGLES
ONLY
Tor R « M i v A ( l o n * a n d Info m i l l i o n
CM
Dl*rti
$9.00
Haircut
w/SUNYA ID
Latham Circle Mall
And
Colonle Canter Mall
(Next to Barnslder)
MArniit:
CHOSW f * <•< <• M A L L
S m i l e ,
will
yal
will ya?
Love,
•L-
Dear Indian Quad (especially Buddy and Kevin),
Sorry about Wednesday rilghtl
Love,
Maryann & Kellle
APARTMENT-MATE NEEDED.
Female. 2 bedroom apt. 185/mo.
Includes heat and utilities. For
Nov. 1. Uptown 482-9282.
Bill (SAYLES) Wanna Play a little
Touch? -I Promise Not to Tackle —
Well, Not too Hard.
„.
,
^
.r.
., -Mischief
.Classless GreatDame desperately
Seeking etiquette lessons from
DumbJock. Bring peanuts.
To the Lizards of the 83/84
Lounge, Even though we have
dissolved and all went our own
way, I still Feel this unique bond
between us. Thanks for all the
great times. I'll be at the Flying
Lizard's Party on Saturday, Make
an Appearance.
Goobs
June
Glad I got to know you You're a
special friend Keep Smiling, O.K.?
CAREER DAY — DISCUSS YOUR
CAREER W I T H R E P R E S E N TATIVES OF FIRMS FROM YOUR
FIELD OF INTEREST.
WED., 9:304PM
CAMPUS CENTER BALLROOM
FREE & Informal. Sponsored by
Delta Sigma PI & IMS.
CAREER DAY — DISCUSS YOURCAREER W I T H R E P R E S E N TATIVES OF FIRMS FROM YOUR
FIELD OF INTEREST.
WED., 9:30-4PM
CAMPUS CENTER BALLROOM
FREE & INFORMAL. SPONSORED
BY DELTA SIGMA PI & UAS.
You are a UAS Winner Keep your
Wrappers.
You are a UAS Winner Keep your
Wrappers.
Lost & Found
1 — Mars Coin Changer Cooper
Hall Location Reward Call Vending Services 442-5959.
Lost & Found 1 — Mars Coin
Changer Cooper Hall Location
Reward Call Vending Services
442-5959.
Dally & Sunday NY Times for Information Call Vending Service
442-5959.
Dally & Sunday NY Times for Informatlon Call Vending Service
442-5959.
Help Wanted
Mornings 7AM -11 AM Mon-Frl Call
Vending Service 442-5959.
Mornings 7AM -11AM Mon-Frl Call
Vending Service 442-5959.
0G
To: the Sexy Redhead in Clinton
303
nW.
Well they say the number 7 to be
lucky, and its been lust as lucky
for me. Thanks for Everything,
loveKen
Help Wanted
Wm®m
FREE ROOM & BOARD PLUS
ALLOWANCE IN EXCHANGE FOR
OCCASIONAL BABYSITTING &
LIGHT HELP W/HOUSEHOLD
CHORES 15mln FROM CAMPUS.
CALL 371-1206. CAR ESSENTIAL.
CAREER DAY — DISCUSS YOUR
CAREER W I T H R E P R E S E N TATIVES OF FIRMS FROM YOUR
FIELD OF INTEREST.
WED,, 0:304PM
CAMPUS CENTER BALLROOM
FREE & INFORMAL. SPONSORED
BY DELTA SIGMA PI & UAS.
Do you feel that you are to fat?
Do you leel guilty about the
amount of food you eat? A supiort group is now being formed
o help you deal with these and
other Issues surrounding concers
about Eating. For more Information call Middle Earth at 442-9777.
Middle Earth will sponsor a
Couples Support Group. If Interested •- call 442-5777 for more
Information.
f
Passport Photoe Taken Wednesday's 3:00-4:30 at Photo Service —
CC305.
Having a Party??? Hire the Best
SUNY Disc Jockey's. DJ Gordon,
DJ Jerry, DJ Marco. Low Low
Prices for the Best Sound
Systems, Light Shows and Music
Selection. Seperate Light Show
and Sound System Rentals
A v a i l a b l e . C a l l In Advance
459-0390.
Having a Party??? Hire the Best
SUNY DlscJockey's. DJ Gordan,
DJ Jerry, DJ Marco. Low Low
Prices for the Best Sound System,
Light Show and Music Selection.
Seperate Light Show and Sound
System Rentals Available. Call in
Advance 456-0390.
Dear Emma,
I miss you and I can't wait to see
y o u r s m I I e I
All my love,
Zodle
Pea:
What a pair! Me and the Anglos —
you and the NJB'sl Hopefully our
guests for "8-Guys" and TallSklnnies will end In fulfillment. Til
then, let's keep getting a Kick out
of each other!
Love ya — you're like my sister.
(I hate her) — Carret
GO BLOCK I
GO BLOCK I
DEAR BLOCK:
PLEASE FORGIVE ME
FOR ALL THE TIMES
I'VE YELLED FOR NO
GOOD REASON. REMEMBER,
YOU QUYS ARE THE BEST
AND I LOVE YOU ALL III
GO BLOCKI
GO BLOCK I
Fuzzy Face,
Saratoga's gettin' closer by the
minute! (with every word I type!)
Huny
FREE LINGERIE
Receive up to $50.00 FREE
lingerie. It's yours for lust
assembling 10 or more friends for
an exciting evening of fashion, fun
and profit. Great l o r prospective
brides, bridal showers, and
Chrlstmasl For complete details
call Trudy — 438-2354.
Community and Public Service
Program Sign-up lor Spring '88 —
Oct 28,29,30th Between LC 3 « 4,
10-4pm.
Happy 21st Lorenll
Maybe on your Birthday, you'll get
your wish to pitch a tent and go
camping.
love ya,
Dee
Need an Apartment Now by Nov 1.
Willing to pay up to $180. Prefer
apt downtown noar Alumni, with 2
females. Please call 455-6887.
Leave message.
TK
"^tWoWrimF—
The nations hottest collegiate
SINGLE
SENSATION
OVERSEAS JOBS
Summer, yr. round. Europe, S.
Amer, Australia: Asia. All fields.
$900-2000 mo. Sightseeing. Free
Into, write IJC, P.O. Box 52-NY1
Corona Del Mar, CA 92625.
_—.
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
POLICY
FOR SALE
Accompanist needed for Modem
Dance Classes at Emma Wlllard
School. Pianist and/or Percussionist desired. Call Rheba Hodge
274-4440 ext. 213.
459-3183
Passport Photo* Taken Wednesday^ 3:00-4:30 at Photo Service —
CC30B.
SBnhM ," nul| y °<"n»
to SUNYAI Send now for your free
details now I P.O. Box 3024
A l b a n y . NY
t ? ! i n '
FRANCO DlLIBETO FRANKO
DILIBERTOI
we canna no flnda he. .
Where canna dls bambino be?
Maybe hesa ona Indian. '
Cosa he no ona State.
We no understand dlaboy.
Hlsa Sultemates ara so great.
He comesa noma wldda da moon.'
Afta arlsln wldda da birds.
I gueasa he donna Ilka his
sultemates. •
Maybe he thlnkaa day alia nerds.
VOTE - Keith Miller for BIG STUD
ON INDIAN students — caat your
bananas, please.
CAREER DAY — DISCUSS YOUR
CAREER
WITH REPRESENTATIVES OF FIRMS FROM YOUR
FIELD OF INTEREST.
WED., 9:30-4PM
CAMPUS CENTER BALLROOM
FREE & INFORMAL. SPONSORED
BY DELTA SIGMA PI & UAS.
Loren,
FELIZ CUMPLEANOSI
You're not a sultemate, but a great
friend. I'm so glad you're back this
semester. I'd really be lonely
without you. Remember, always
do what makes you Happy! Be a
little selfish Sometlmee.
I Love yal
Patti
Are you or your roomate/family
members concerned with your
eating habits?... If Interested in
Joining a support group to learn
more about Eating Disorders call
Middle Earth: 442-5777.
What's In the future for your
Relationship? Middle Earth will
sponsor a Support Group for
Couples who want to work oh
these Issues. For Information
call: 44-5777.
CAREER DAY — DISCUSS YOUR
CAREER W I T H REPRESENTATIVES OF FIRMS FROM YOUR
FIELD OF INTEREST.
WEDNESDAY., 9:304PM
CAMPUS CENTER BALLROOM
FREE ft INFORMAL. SPONSORED
BY DELTA SIGMA PI ft UAS.
PROFESSIONAL TYPING SERV I C E . Xerox M e m o r y w r l t e r .
Automated letters. Resumes. Experienced. 482-2953.
Passport Photos Taken Wednesday's 3:00-4:30 at Photo Service —
CC306.
Attention:
Faculty and
Students
Save Save
Time ft Money
W* Do It
4U
Laundry Service
See the Laundry Doctor Rich
at 173 Quail Street Laundry
Centre. Call us at 449-5252. We
do mora.
.
"HEAD OVER HEELS"
WE'RE FINALLY HERE! 11 SEND
NOW FOR YOUR FREE INFORMATION ON THE NATIONS HOTTE8T
COLLEGIATE DATING SERVICE.
P.O. BOX 3924, ALBANY, NY
12203.
Would you like to learn more
ways tolmprove your communlcaHon skills with you
Girlfriend/Boyfriend? Join our
Support Group for Couples. For
Information call Middle Earth:
442-5777,
Delta Sigma PI Brother*
WHY???
- The Pledge Class
Thanx for the pizza.
Make
yourself
heard...
In an ASP
personal!!
Similarities in people measured
by more than sexual preference
By Claudia Meyer
Have you ever met a homosexual? Do homosexuals really exist, or is homosexuality just some absurd conception that is fun to joke about? Perhaps
you have heard about the social issue: human rights
for homosexuals, but do you personally know
anyone asking for them? Are homosexuals, in fact,
discriminated against? Would _
.
you mind a homosexual teaching P 6 0 D I 6
your children? Why do we hear i J K _
about discrimination without be- LI KB
ing able to identify its victims? I I Q
Did you ever ask yourself these
^*
questions?
, There are many more gay people around than
most people realize, and ceitainly more than most
people know. Oay people can hide, gay people can
pretend to conform. That which makes gay people
-"different" does not have to be obvious to
everybody. After all, it seems that most people
assume that others are heterosexual unless they feel
they have evidence to the contrary. Such evidence
can be taken from stereotypes, but how many gay
people do you know who conform to stereotypes?
However, the heterosexual assumption is unfair,
anyway. It carries the same implications as the word
"straight" when it stands for "heterosexual," that
heterosexuality is right and homosexuality is not.
What difference does it make who you love and
Homosexuality: being sexually-oriented toward make love to? Procreation is one good reason to
or having an affectional preference for people of have sex, but homosexuality has one thing going for
one's own sex; romantic involvement, i.e. love, bet- - it: it beats heterosexuality with respect to birthween members of the same sex. Maybe that is hard control.
to imagine if one could feel comfortable in or desire . However, the point here is not to advocate
intimate relationships with members of the opposite becoming gay, or to "convert" anyone, but rather
sex. But fundamentally does it matter what sex the to encourage people of whatever persuasion to feel
person that one loves is, especially if the two people"" comfortable with themselves with respect to their
are happy in their relationship?- What is the issue , sexual and affectional preferences as well as with
here? Are homosexual people fundamentally evil? the preferences of others.
Does the devil make them do it?
Prejudice, by definition, is unfair and both gay
Don't heterosexual and homosexual people have and non-gay people must work together to
a lot in common? All people are only people, eliminate the prejudice against gay people. To the
besides, aren *t there some things that either of these "oppressors," the stereotypes need questioning,
groups can do in bed? Are all these acts evil?
but to the "oppressed," we have to let the world
There seems to exist in this world an entity know we are people, too. Stereotypes cannot acknown as homophobia, a concept implying & curately represent any group of people; people can
discomfort on the part of those afflicted with the only represent themselves.
Idea of homosexuality of with homosexual people.
The only generalization that can be ascribed to
Perhaps the existence of this entity is due to a gay people refers to sexual preference, period.
misunderstanding of homosexual people and Perhaps if non-gay people were sensitized to gay
homosexuality by non-homosexual people.
people, it would not be such a big deal and there
However, such feelings are probably not the fault would be less misunderstanding. Sex and relationof the afflicted non-homosexuals. It would be ships are two pretty broad topics for anyone to have
understandable if the misunderstandings were due to censor from public expression.
to misinformation. What images come to mind
The Cay and Lesbian Alliance is the only
when- you try to picture a homosexual person? A S.A.-funded group devoted to the interests and
gay male? A lesbian? Perhaps your images are in- concerns of homosexual people as a minority group
fluenced by stereotypes. Have you ever met' a on this campus. We meet Tuesday nights at 8:30
homosexual person?
p.m. in Campus Center 375, and though we want to
People say things like, "I don't care what two emphasize that anyone is welcome to attend, we
people of any sex combination do in bed. I don't have speakers and hold discussions about questions
see the need to discuss discrimination against gay relevant to the gay community besides organizing
people." Okay; but how do you feel about seeing social activities. The GALA office is located in CC
two people of opposite sexes kissing or "making 333 and the phone number is 442-5672.
out" in public? And when two people are of the
If you are questioning your own sexual
same sex? Does the latter scene make you feel un- preference or just want to find out about gay concomfortable? Can your reaction be described as cerns, stop by the office or come to the meetings.
"homophobic?"
We don't discriminate against anyone, besides, we
D
Most people would agree that discriminating pre- need Everyone's Support.
judicially against different groups of people is Claudia Meyer is a member of CALA's Steering
wrong. A homophobic reaction to the above Committee..
scenario is unfair, too'. Sure,' there are some differences between gay and non-gay people — take ''Beyond the Majority" will begin appearing
their sexual preferences for instance — but all peo- regularly in the Albany Student Press this week.
ple have one thing in common: we're all people. Applications for the "Minority Affairs Editor" are
Across all groups, there are a lot mote similarities being accepted in CC 329. Please include a writing
than differences among us.
sample and resume..
Task force
he added, "I'm worried about
going to WT's or to the Lamp- not having adequate programmsuccessful
Post, as an aternative they might i n E a n d
go to a basketball game," ex- programming.".
plained Rivers. "Basketball
Ginzberg has already contacted
games can be dates. Basketball
games can be fraternity events. schools where the.drinking age
Basketball games can be dorm has already been raised, like the
University Of Massachusetts,
events," he said.
Tufts, Rutgers, University of
"We're not going to let Pennsylvania, and Penn State.
everybody throw their spring par- "Unfortunately," Ginzberg said,
ty in the fall," said dawley, but, "we cannot tell what kind of ef•46
Subversives
•*n
INS.
Randall, an American studies
professor, has written about 40
books. Leaders of PEN, an international writers' organization,
have petitioned the INS in Randall's support.
Norman Mailer, Gay Talese
and Kurt Vonnegut Jr., among
others, have signed the petition.
Randall said she's never Joined
a communist organization, but
acknowledges she's not a
republican.
"I do have socialist sympathies," she told the Daily
Lobo, the student newspaper at
UNM, earlier this month. "Those
are quite clear in my books. There
would be no point in denying
that."
And as for the people she
associated with during her 23
years as a photographer, editor
and writer in Latin America, Randall said: "Of course If one has
friends, one has associations."
State Department figures show
feet this program will have upon
the students until the law is
enacted."
Cheryl Savitz, co-chair of the
Spirit Committee agreed that the
effects on programming will be
unknown until students are forced to choose alternatives to
alcohol. Her goal, she said, is to
try and get students involved in
the spirit of the University by going to pep rallies, football games
and the homecoming dance. D
the most applications for permanent residency rejected for
political reasons are approved on
appeal within the INS or to
courts.
Randall submitted her application in May, 1984. Most applications are ruled on within two
months. Magglo expects a decision this fall.
The delay is "a kind of very
subtle but penetrating harassment
because you don't feel that you
can put down roots," Randall
said.
D
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CENTER1&2
C010MIE REAR OF MACV8 • 4W-H70
HELLMAN1&2
WASHINGTON AVENUE ALBANV • 489-M22
TOWNE1&2
1 MILE Ma TRAFFIC CIRCLE (RT.fl) LATHAM • 7M-1S15
PLAZA1&2
ROTTERDAM MALL. ALTAMONT AVE. • M » - t t 0 0
TUESDAY, OCTOBER IS, 198S P. ALBANY STUDENT PRESS \ J
• | 0 ALBANY STUDENT PRESS D TUESDAY, OCTOBER IS, 1985
Associating with 'subversives'
could force prof out of country
IF7 x
_ loducma
As s e e n in
MADEMOISELLE:
Jean Paul Coiffures, o n e of the best
in the country - D e c . '83
The beginning of a trend in facials - Oct. '84
COLLEGE PRESS SERVICE— University of
Rejecting applications for permanent
New Mexico assistant professor Margaret resident status — as opposed to turning
Randall is a native of the U.S. with a hus- down requests to visit the U.S. — on
MASSAGES
band, parents and a brother who are U.S. political grounds are more rare.
FACIALS
citizens. But now she thinks the govern"Both categories are equally politically
MANICURES
ment may force her off campus and but of obnoxious," said American Civil Liberties
PEDICURES
the country, primarily because she has Union attorney Steve Shapiro.
MAKEOVERS
associated with leftists.
"But in terms of consequences for
WAXING
Randall became a naturalized Mexican building a life, rejections of permanent
in 1966, and last summer, after she applied residency status are much more
TANNING
for permanent resident alien status in the devastating. The human dimension involvWIGS
U.S., an Immigration and Naturalization ed is greater."
FOIL FROSTING
Service (INS) officer grilled her about her
However, Joshua Koltun, a legislative
(our specialty)
friends, activities and writings during her aide to Rep. Barry Frartk (D-Mass),
AND ALL ASPECTS
23 years in Latin America.
argued Randall's case probably won't afOF HAIR CARE
, "It was a political inquiry," said Ran- fect many other people,
142 State St., Albany, N.T. 12207
dall's attorney, Michael Maggio, who, like
But Frank has sponsored a bill to narDiscount with student ID
(518) 463-6691 - Free Parking
Randall, now expects the INS to reject row the number of political exclusions
I Disi
Randall's application for permission to from the U.S.
For Ladies & Gentlemen
stay in the U.S. sometime this fall.
In the year ending September 30, 1984,
If that happens, Maggio said Randall 253 applications for permanent residency
will appeal.
'
status were rejected for political reasons,
And that battle, Maggio predicted, will according to figures compiled by the State
become " a focal point of national atten- Department's Bureau of Consular Affairs.
tion" because he says few people challenge
The State Department rejected about
those rulings.
600 potential visitors for political reasons
/
"Margaret Randall is being told that during the same period.
even though she lives in the land of her
Prominent academians like South
birth, has parents and a husband who are African poet Dennis Brutus and Latin
46S-726S
American and teaches at an American American literature professor Angel Rama the Duck Shuttle! Beginning Friday, October 11
university, she can't stay here because of are among those denied permanent
SUNVA Circle (In front of Administration Center)
residency for political reasons in the past.
what she thinks," Maggio said.
— 10 pm, 11:30 pm, 1 am, ?:J0 am
"The higher education community
Rama, who was teaching at the Univerand <• am (drop-off only).
ought to be concerned if the INS is going sity of Maryland, was killed in a plane
to be a brain police."
crash before the final outcome of his case
U.S. immigration laws allow the INS to was determined.
OCTOBER
reject visa applications from applicants
Brutus eventually received political
who have joined or affiliated with com- asylum, after which the government dropFRI 11 Brian Brain
munist, Marxist or "subversive" ped objections to his request for permaDirty Face
nent residency status. He is now an English
organizations.
SAT 12 Dumptruck
The INS also can reject applicants who professor at Swarthmore College' in
The Grindstones
have advocated communism, anarchism or Pennsylvania.
opposition to organized government, or
As in the Brutus case, Randall has atSUN 13 Clive Pig
applicants who may engage in activities tracted the support of prominent U.S.
that would be "prejudicial to the public writer's in her anticipated battle with the
19 or older
delays of fifteen minutes o r so ore possible!
interest.'^. I
15»-
F u l l Service B e a u t y Workshop:
bnl
dp
dEAN AWLOOfTURES
F
FEATURING: THE NEWPORTS & LIVE DJ
SATURDAY, OCT.19th 1:00-5:00
— $3 w/ tax sticker $4.50 w/o (19 & over double-id required)
- $ 1 w/tax sticker $1.50 w/o (under 19)
'.'-.BEER, SODA & MUNCHIES
NOBYOB
SA FUNDED
S P O N S O R E D BY: THE CLASS OF 1986, O C A & INTER Q U A D COUNCIL
t .
,
j
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iwfttiH^winMwmi^ii«^LiiHitria«'i^wiiiiiMiiM»iii«iiifwiw[ii<iiiiMiiwiiiii
'
i
IIIIMWBHHWMIII iimiiiii
,
II
i
mi
TAU KAPPA EPSILON
ON THEIR ONE YEAR ANNIVERSARY
AND THEIR NEW HOME IN HAMILTON HALL
OFFICERS
PRYTANIS: BARRY POLLACK
PYLORTES: KEVIN MANN
EPIPRYTANIS: PAUL WAGNER
HEGEMON: SCOTT BENDETT
CRYSOPHYLOS: A D A M HABER
HISTOR: LLOYD HAYMES
GRAMMATEUS: IRA G O L D M A N
HYPOPHETES: JOE ZANGRI
JOHN SALTER
MARK NELLO
MICKEY ANDERSON
DAVE HENDERSON
TIM HICKEY
JIM DOWNING
JEFF WYATT
CHRIS CARMODY
SETH LANDSBERG
MITCH NEWMAN
JOHNGULLOTTA
VINNY LOPRETO
JIM HALKA
KEVIN ALLEN
GEORGE KRAJCA
TOM THOMPSON
VINNY IANUCCI
SCOTT JANKES
KEVIN ATKINS
ERIC SIMONE
STEVE D'AG ATI
CHADDE LEVY
James Burns
Eric Blumin
Phil Schneider
UNIVERSITY CINEMAS
, EHRTI?
A crafty- young pick pocket.
A tyrant's dungeon...
An Adventure... A hero...
Lady Hawk®
"You never spend any
time with me J"
" 1 / you really loved
me, you'd ..."
SCOTT SEELEY
JOHN BOHRMAN
COREY BERLIN
COREY LEVITAN
DAVE GUNASTI
JOE LAPINSKI
T.K. SMALL
TY JIMINEZ
MARC RADIN
ROCCO MIGLIORI
JIMHAGAN
ALSO CONGRATULATIONS TO THE BETA PLEDGE CLASS:
Aaron Corman.
Jeff Friedman
Dave Friedman
Tom Huntington
RIDE
DUCK Sc9>!
—|
HIMHBMWW
CONGRATULATIONS TO THE BROTHERS OF
ERIC BLAHA
TOM TEMP1A
ANDY DARS
PETE FIRMIN
DAN RODIS
MIKE GOLDMAN
ROSS QUINN
SCOTT SINCLAIR
MATT GOETZ
KURT VELLEK
ROB NICHOLS
*
EE
Mike Nissenson
Corey Cutler
Roger Bohrman
Josh Sroge
Thurs.
Oct. 17
"You never listen
to me !"
"I wish I could just
tell you ..."
SOUND FAMILIAR ?
Not anymore...
Shows Begin at
7:30 $ 10:00
LC 18
COUPLES
WORKSHOP
INFO; 442-5777
or stop by t h e Middle- Earth pffi
SA Funded
ASAP!!!
r
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 15, 1985 O ALBANY STUDENT PRESS " | 9
-| 3
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS D TUESDAY, OCTOBER 15, 1985
Sabbaticals
(KB and WCDB's
Third World
Co-promote an evening of
Reggae with the original
(jdOtLBRS
fleas Om B®G> MoffDoyD
featuring Jimmy Riley
Friday, Oct. 18. 8:00 pm
in Campus Center Ballroom
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Tickets go on sale Tues., Oct.8, 11 arn
in Campus Center Lobby
and weekdays following.
SO (?(DliKfl9<a
-4Front Page
that would have reduced abuses of sabbatical leaves.
Another audit by Regan said that the
SUNY College of Environmental
Science and Forestry in Syracuse failed
to adequately control cash receipts of
almost $3 million per year.
The audit, covering a period ending in
June 1984, said that cashiers had too
much control of money, opening the
way for possible employee theft. It suggested that responsibility for dealing
with cash, handling accounting records
and bank deposits, and preparing
checks be split up among more
employees.
In a written response to the sabbatical
audit, SUNY officials said that "we
believe that, on the whole, the State
University and its faculty have made a
wide and appropriate use of sabbatical
leave privileges, and that the campus administrations have been vigilant in conforming to the Trustees' policies concerning the granting of these leaves."
The SUNY response said that "99.3
percent of the faculty who were granted
sabbatical leaves satisfied all of the
eligibility requirements, and 98.1 percent satisfied the obligations to return
for one full year at the conclusion of
their leave."
The response said that about 90 percent of the required reports by those
who took sabbatical leaves were completed before the audit period ended last
December and said that since then, 99
percent of the reports have been
completed.
SUNY officials said that "the University has seriously considered the comments provided in the audit report and
has established new administrative procedures which will provide the appropriate corrections."
In response to the audit on the SUNY
college in Syracuse, SUNY officials
issued a statement saying there is no
evidence that employees have taken or
improperly spent money.
SUNY officials said that under ideal
conditions they could separate the job
of dealing with money among more
employees but said that "with our current staffing level, and level of
workload, it is not possible to implement suggested changes and still maintain a timely operation."
The officials said they are developing
a computer-based student account
system designed to improve operations.
END OF THE WORLD
by ARTHUR KOPIT
Grouper law
he added.
doesn't help. We're tired of being woken
"Everything Steve says and you say
up at four in the morning. Something must makes us understand the problem," said
be done."
Alvaro, "but students can't come crying to
us when we enforce the law. Students
After arriving forty-five minutes late, know they're breaking it when they sign
Alvaro addressed the group saying that that lease. They have to learn they're
"my job is to enforce the Grouper Law to responsible for their own actions."
get safe, clean, quiet neighborhoods." He
said he is willing to "give Steve a chance,"
"The problem exists but is the answer
but he won't let the community "put up the Grouper Law? We have proposed
with what it's been putting up with for so alternative solutions that we feel will be
long." Student housing "is Albany's pro- very effective once they get a chance to get
blem, but the University's responsibility,' started," said Gawley.
'"" •
•44
^ur
OKI© @ PQK1S OMg^aSOK]
ua
aa
G University Theatre Production
CLASS OF '89
CLASS COUNCIL
ELECTIONS
WILL BE REHELD
ON THURSDAY OCT. 1 7
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FOR RESERVfiTIONS-CfiLL 442-3997
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•
TUESDAY, OCTOBER IS,
TUESBA K, "OCTOBER IS, 198S -O ALBANY STUDENTPRESS
ms
TTIH3 [email protected]@RS ® P 0 @ W i
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Brace Berns
Howard Bernstein
Mark Brisman
Ira Cohen
Larry Gelfand
Steven Gokib
Andrew Korus
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Robert Levin*
Blaine Messinger
Jeffrey Millman
Mike Mintz
Marc Masman
Steven Newman
Bill Paness
Neil Stadler
Mike Steinberg
David Sunshine
Jesse Tieman
David Vogel
Michael Weiss
Mark Weissman
Don Winter
8
THE PROGRAMING
OFFICE OF STUDENT
ASSOCIATION
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•
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H — — i — — • » » •
s
On first and goal from the
four, Dave Soldini got the call
three times, bringing the ball to
the one. On fourth and goal,
Soldini tried again and this time
surged into the endzone to close
the gap to 16-14. A personal foul
.was called on that play, and the
15 yards was tacked on to the ensuing kickoff.
That is when Ford reached into
his trick or treat bag that - he
always seems to bring to New
Haven. He called for an onside
kick. "We work on that play all
the time in practice," said Ford. I .
thought it was the perfect tim to
use it, especially after the
penalty."
Kicking from the Owls' 45, kicker
Tony Amarante caught Southern
Connecticut off guard as he
squibbed the ball to the 29-yard
line where Bo Murphy pounced
on the ball.
One play later, the Walt Whitman High School connection gave
the Danes a 20-16 lead as Milano
and John Donnelly hooked up for
a 29-yard touchdown pass.
"That was an audible." said
Donnelly. "The guy covering me
was looking for an interception
all day. So Mike pumped-faked
and we beat him. It felt great
because I wasn't having a great
day."
The Owls had six more possessions to regain the lead, but the
combination of poor field position and a well-disciplined Danes'
defense aimed at stopping the
run, nullified a comeback.
Amarant, the punter, gave his
best, performance as a Dane,
averaging 35 yards a kick, including a 32-yarder coming off a
fake field goal which pinned the
Owls back to the one-yard line.
"I said before the game that
field position is going to make the
difference," said Ford. " I
thought if we could give them
poor field position, we could hold
them."
The Owls give a little scare to
the Danes in the last two minutes..
Tacaks hit John Tito for 26 yards
and a tipped pass landed in Taccetta's chest for another 13, bringing the ball to the Albany 32.
But on the next play, Tacaks
was stripped off the ball by Dennis Murphy, who put in a solid
day of work, and Anderson fell
on the ball to insure the Danes'
fourth consecutive triumph.
Albany netmen capture record SUNYAC title
•424
all week," said Lewis, "and
Schmitz beating Buffalo's top
seed so early were definitely the
two turning points."
According to Lewis, Albany's
domination of the SUNYACS
results from good prparation. "A
thing that favors us is that we play
a lot of tournaments during the
season, so I think we're prepared
for the SUNYACS," concluded
Lewis.
For Eisenberg, the team captain, the record string is the
perfect ending to a long season.
" W e feel great, e l a t e d , "
Eisenberg said speaking for his
teammates. "I'm a senior, and it
feels great. The level of competition was the highest it's been in
years, so it was a great win for
us."
• Up-and-coming teams like Buffalo State and Oswego, who made
the level of competition higher
this year must wait until next
year, but Eisenberg passed along
the responsibility for Albany's
eighth chapionship to the
underclass teammates.
"I hope the youngsters on the
team will continue.to dominate,"
said Eisenberg. "I also hope they
don't rush me off the team right
away, because I'll be here next
semester."
•
LADIESAND
GENTLEMEN...
Wednesday is
EATING
DISORDERS
iADIES'
NIGHT
Support Group
will be held at [
Middle Earth
If interested call:
442-5777
or
stop b y
Schuyler Hall
102
Dutch Q u a d
SA Funded
And the Dane's will be anxious- PAW PRINTS: Halfback Ro
ly awaiting to see where they rate Mitchell carried only twice; he is
on the Division III Lambert Poll. suffering from a hip pointer inj u r y . . . T h e D a n e s were
"I could truly say that for once outgained in total yards
we deserve to be ranked." said 305-269 . . . Attendance at
Sarcone.
Bowen Field totaled 1,142.
D
Albany State rugby team
defeated by rival Union, 16-9
again, bringing the ball to
Union's 30-meter line when they
Celebrating was done in a non- lost possesion, and Union ran 70
traditional way by the Albany meters for a third try.
State rugby team following their
"That was really the turning
16-9 loss to arch-rival Union on point of the game," said Nasca.
Saturday.
"We pretty much gave up after
"Traditionally, we'll invite the that happened."
other team to go out with us,"
"We got discouraged and
said junior wing, Dean Nasca. winded at the end," said Cor
"But we and Union have a bad rigan. "Union wouldn't really let
rivalry. We clash like oil and us play our game, which is
water."
basically a speed game. They were
Albany's dislike for their oppo- bigger than us, they made us play
nent was by no means lessened by slower."
the loss, which will keep them out
"It's o.k. if they're little and
of the Upstate Rugby Union big, but they were big and big,
championship next weekend. "It with a lot longer legs," said
was a mental block," said Presi- junior Mike Maccache. "It was a
dent Pat Corrigan. "We should real heartbreaker, we were so
have beat them, we made a lot of close so many times."
stupid mental errors."
The Danes' final games will be
The Danes took a 3-0 lead in October 26 at Plattsburgh and
the first half when senior wing November 2, against Albany
Tony Ellis scored a penalty kick. Law.
Union then scored a try to lead
"This was probably our best
6-3 at the end of the half.
game all season," said Corrigan,
Both Union and Albany scored "Things that we've been talking
twice in the second half, Ellis about in practice came together
scoring again for the Danes, mak- today. Now, we know what we
ing the score 12-9. Later in the have to work on till the Spring."
half, Albany was close to scoring
•
By Cathy Errig
STAFF WRITER
Read ASP sports
ALL U CAN EAT
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E VE R Y MONDAY
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ounn
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z114.Western. Ave
Corner of'Qiioil
; • • • •
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All forms and applications
are available in CC 116
SA FUNDED
i
-*24 ,
foul penalty later, the Danes were
on the scoreboard as Milano
hooked up with Glen Carlin for a
six-yard touchdown pass on the
opening play of the second
quarter.
Southern Connecticut added a
26-yard field goal with 9:41 to
play to give the Owls a 16-7 lead
at intermission, but for the remainder of, the contest, the
Albany defense completely shut
down the Owls' ru. riented
offense.
"It's a great feeling." said
linebacker Frank Sarcone, who
played with a slight groin pull.
"After a while we knew we could
hold them."
The tide turned Albany's way
early in the second half as the
Danes scored two touchdowns a
minute apart, thanks to a cleverly
executed on-side kick.
The first touchdown drive
covered 68 yards on 12 plays as
the Danes mixed up the pass and
run. The key play came an first
down from the Owls' 27, when
Carlin took a reverse hand off
and tossed the ball 23 yards to
Scott Reagan, who had caught a
14 yard pass earlier on the drive.
'Do you feel guilty about Binge Eating?
-Are your friends or family members
concerned about your weight?
'Do you feel the need to hide the
amount of food you eat?
GETTNVOLVED
21
20-16 upset victory gives Albany football fourth straight win
VPtt
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SPOrtS
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ly.
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WEDNESDfiY, OCT. 2. 1985
739 Central Avenue
Albany
489-8294
72 Wolf Road
Colonie
459-3738
«*.-•
22 Sports
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 15, 198S U ALBANY STUDENT PRESS S f K H t S 2 3
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS d TUESDAY; ddTOBBR'lS, ISfcS
DeFeo leads as Albany wins Capital
University Auxiliary Service
In Your Quad Cafeteria Sub-Shop
By Rachel Braslow
EDITORIAL ASSISTANT .
The tradition continues. Saturday the Albany
State women's cross country team defended their title at the Capital District Meet making this their
fourth consecutive crown.
"The Capital District Meet was the highlight of
our season to this point." Head cross country
coach Ron White said, "Now" it's time to look onward towards the post-season competition."
" The pre-meet favorite, EUen Cavallo of Siena ran
away from the pack with an awesome 18:28:13
clocking over the 3.1 mile course.
Our new feature is
Buy 2 croissant sandwiches and get
one free
Valid only Monday October 14 thru
Thursday October 17
Also available- apples, oranges,
bananas, bagels with cream cheese
For late night snacks.
ATTENTION
CLASS OF 1986
If you are graduating in May,
1986, and one of your parents is a
Clergyperson (Rabbi or Minister)
please contact James Doellefeld,
Director of Campus Life at
442-5566 or in Campus Center 130.
This information is solicited
for the possible participation in
Commencement exercises.
Bill and Tim of Skippers
Tavern Challenge You!
Come Down To
Ontario & Second Streets
find Let (Js Fix You Death Wings
Our Loyal Wing Eaters fire Outraged.
you have not only condemned our
WINGS, you have also scoffed at the
WING EATERS find They Want
Retribution
so BE A MAN a&sa mauim
Fullback Franz Mltchall passes the ball oil In recent action.
Men hooters blanked, 2-0
By Cathy Errig
STAFF WRITER
Saturday's narrow 2-0 loss by the
Albany State men's soccer team to
Binghamton, a team ranked third in New
York, illustrates, that while the Danes
have proven they can play with the best,
they have yet to learn how to defeat them.
"We played a good defensive game,"
said co-captian Carl loos, "And we had
early chances to score but we didn't
capitalize on them."
The game was scoreless for the entire
first half, the most significant occurence
for the Danes being co-captain Tihan
Presbies' receivanqe of a yellow card for
tripping Binghamton's Kevin Martin, who
scored at 66:47 in the second half for the
Colonials. Binghamton's John Sherman
scored at 76:38 to give the Colonials a 2-0
lead.
The Danes' scoring chances were crushed when Presbie received a second yellow
card, and was ejected from the game with
three minutes remaining.
"Overall, we've had better games, it was
a disappointment," said loos. "We had a
lot of trouble with the midfield, and
whoever dominates the midfield usually
wins the game. They're a good team, but
they're not anywhere near Union or Cortland. We could defeat them in the University Center Championships."
The Danes' next opponent will be
Oneonta, a Division I team on Wednesday. Presbie, who received a one-game suspension due to Saturday's game, will
not play.
D
Troy Savings Bank
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An evening with
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Friday Oct 18
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fe^pB^iiagllrigg^^
. Once Cavallo had finished kicking in the final
straight-a-way, one could not help miss the sight of
purple and gold. Running second through fourth
overall and scoring first through third respectively
for Albany were, team members Karen DeFeo, Kim
Pettichord, and Lynn Jacobs. DeFeo (18:45:00),
• Pett'ichord (18:50:18) and Jacobs (19:00:20) were
only separated by 32 seconds.
One of White's goals for this season is to narrow
the gap between runners one through five, and this
the Danes are certainly doing.
Running a personal best and placing eighth
overall was junior Kitty Sullivan. Sullivan's
Karen DeFeo (right) led the Danes this weekend at the Capital 19:49:44 was a major breakthrough. It marked the
District meet. DeFeo finished first among Albany finishers and first, time Sullivan broke the twenty minute barrier.
second overall with a time of 18:45.00.
Following at Sullivan's footsteps was co-captain
MeNamara
By Mike Mac Adam
STAFF WRITER
The Albany State women's soccer team
finally have their heads above water again.
Consecutive wins over Williams and
Oneonta brought them back to .500 for the
first time since September 23.
The Danes looked in playoff form in the
3-1 decision over Williams last Thursday,
but had to come back against Oneonta on
Saturday to post the 3-2 victory that improved their recordto 6-6.
The Danes made Coach Amy Kidder's
job easy against Williams as they finished
plays well and declared open season on the
Williams net with 29 shots to a meager five
for the opposition.
"We were sharp, we played some super
ball," said Kidder, "they didn't have to be
coached too much out there."
Kidder did perform what she termed "a
major shift," however, when she put Mary
Dulkis, normally a forward, at right midfield and backer Cheryl Hensen at left
midfield;
"That made a difference in our offense," said Kidder, "they really got
things going."
The strategy paid off at 33:05 of the first
half when Hensen assisted forward Sue
Frost's goal to put the Danes up 1-0. High- >
scoring forward Joan MeNamara added
goals at 42:16 of the first half and 16:30 of
the second half, and it was more than
enough as Williams managed only a second half goal by Oigi Madore.
The SUNYACs being held at Brockport next
Saturday will fire up some post-season competition.
White will be limited to ten entries in this meet and
in all other meets thereafter seven people.
The 1984 traveling team which went on to place
eighth at the NCAA Division III Nationals was
clear cut. However, the 1985 squad possesses more
depth. It remains a mystery to White and everyone
else involved, who will make up the select seven. •
as women hooters win two
Lisa Aniano put Oneonta on top at 8:25
of the second half, but Albany's scqring
duo of MeNamara and forward Joanna
Lazarides brought them back from the
dead. Lazarides cancelled Aniano's goal
seven minutes later, and MeNamara got
the game-winner at 31:38 on an assist by
Mary Dulkis.
Lazarides played despite sore ankles that
kept her out of the Williams game. "She
had no business being out there," marvelled Kidder, and she put her feeling about
MeNamara in a nutshell by saying, "Joan
was just tough."
The Danes face Hartwick at home today
at 3:30 in a game that could put them over
.500 for the first time since their opener
against Skidmore, should they win.
"Hartwick will be tough," said Kidder,
HOWARD TYQABIIPS
"but we've come too far this week to lay Kim Kosaiek handles the ball for Albany in their loss to LeMoyne last week. The
down and die, and I know that's not going team bounced back to win two this week.
to happen.''
Q_
Netwomen lose despite victory by Valins
By Ethan Chazin
STAFF WRITER .
"They weren't a pushover, but it didn't
matter who we played," Kidder said of the
all-around team effort.,
Kidder also had high praise for
freshman sweeper Sandi Buitron. "Saudi
did a great job," said Kidder. "She came
up nicely and attacked," Co-captains
Sharon Yablonski and Laura McGrath,
and sophomore backer Kathy Parker also
had, according to Kidder, "games of their
season."
And the good habits established In the
Williams game were evident early on when
Albany faced Oneonta last Saturday, but
this time McNamara's first half goal was
equalled by Oneonta's Kim Disser at 38:22
of the first half. Suddenly, Albany's offensive gears were jammed as they tried to
make passes that weren't there.
"We played real well, and then
something happened," explained Kidder,
"they were shutting down our passing
lanes, but we still tried to force It."
Bette Dzamba. Dzamba, who missed several meets
this season due to a heel injury is on the move.
Despite missing some early season meets Dzamba
looks to be coming back strong.
Senior Chris Varley placing 11th overall ran a
respectable 20:04:19 over the home course.
Also running for Albany were freshman Jackie
Phipps, sophomores Roseanne Smith and Rachel
Braslow, and juniors Brenda Watson, Carol Bart
and Sue Gulla.
The Capital District Meet was the last meet in,
which the whole Albany team will run together. Unfortunately for the Albany team, they never reached 100 percent participation in any meets this year.
Senior running standout Donna Burnham along
-with junior Carla Docharty did not run any meets
due to injuries. Other injuries sidelined senior Sue
Spector, junior Maura Mahoii and Braslow for the
greater portion of the season.
Co-oiptaln Nina Choung
For the Albany State women's tennis
team this year, one fact cannot be
denied: for them to take the SUNYAC
Championships,, they will run up against
SUNY powerhouse Binghamton. And
when they dp,, the Danes will have to
play better against the Colonials than
they did on Friday, losing 6-2.
The Danes fell to the Colonials on
Friday, with all but one Albany singles
player losing.
The exception was at sixth singles, the •
spot occupied by Lisa Valins, who beat
Lynn Schwartz, 7-6, 4-6, 7-5,
Valins felt good about the way she
played. "I felt I played with a lot more
consistency than I have," said Valins.
The lone Dane singles winner also
believed that her experience was a contributing factor to her victory.
—•
Ceri Chiodo, at number one singles,
lost to the Colonials' top singles player,
Bonnie Lpcdel 6-2, 6-2. The Colonial's
second singles player, Stephanie Benado
defeated Caryn Levy 6-2, 6-3.
At third singles, Ellen Katz, lost 6-2,
6-1 to Binghamton's Jessica Vernon.
Playing fourth singles, Valerie Vullo
defeated Liz Feinberg 6-4. 6-3. Rounding out the top five, Natalie Goldberg
was blanked by Leslie Silverman 6-0,
6-0.
The only other Dane claim to fame
came at first doubles. Chiodo and Levy
fell in the first set.to the Locdel and
Benado duo, 7-6, but came on strong to
. win the next two and the match 6-4,.6-4.
At second doubles, the Colonial's
Vernon and Maia Weisburger needed
three sets to beat Goldberg and Katz
5-7, 6-3, 6-4.
The third doubles match was cancelled due to a lack of time. Co-captains
Nina Cheung and Nancy Forbes were
winning their match at the'time of the
cancellation,
Binghamton, the SUNYAC women's
champions for the last several years,
displayed their strength against the
Dane netwomen. It was a case of too
much strength and depth working for
Binghamton.
"Binghamton has been the SUNYAC
champs for the past several years," said
Albany Head Coach Linda Myers. "It
would have been a great upset to
Binghamton and a great victory for us
had we won."
The Albany State netwomen's next
face Amherst. It will be their last
scheduled match before the SUNYAC
Championships on October 18th,
A win for the Dunes,who stand at 6-3,
would be a real bt >:,t right now. Win or
lose against Amherst, the money's got
to be on them to be the team to upstage
Binghamton's bid at another SUNYAC
Championship.
D
^ ^
gtj
The netmen aren't the only
team from Albany to
repeat as champions.
See women harriers on
page 23
mump**
Sports Tu
PUBLISHED
AT THE STATE
UNIVERSITY
OF NEW YORK AT ALBANY
By Marc Berman
CONTRIUUTING EDITOR
New Haven—The significance
of a victory can sometimes be
measured by the fury of the
celebration afterwards. If that
scale of measurement is used for
the Danes' latest game, it can be
justly stated that the Albany State
football team posted a mighty big
triumph Saturday afternoon
against Southern Connecticut.
When the final second ticked
off the clock making the Danes's
20-16 victory over the Division II
Owls official, pandemonium ruled the Albany State sidelines as
the players pranced about Bowen
Field, leaping into teammates'
arms and giving out bearhugs to
all willing to accept.
For Albany State, it was their
fourth straight victory and second
straight win over a Division II
school, which should convince
Lambert Poll voters that the 4-1
Danes are worthy of a Top Ten
national ranking, and enhance its
chances for the NCAA playoffs.
It also marked the Danes sixth
straight win at Bowen Field.
"Since I've been here, there has
been no greater satisfying win
than today," said offensive line
coach Ed Zaloom in the winning
lockerroom. "It was such a
courageous victory. This team
showed that they had heart."
Few observers at the end of the
first quarter, including coach Bob
Ford, figured the Danes would
have reason to celebrate after the
. HOWARD TYCIAB UPS
Halfback Dana Melvln avoids a Springfield tackier In last week's 33-15 victory over the Division II
Chiefs. The Danes have won their last four games.
game. The Owls scored two the ball, and the Danes offense backfield coach. "He was hell on
touchdowns to take a 13-0 lead in moved into high gear as a revved- wheels today."
the opening seven minutes of the up Mike Milano orchestrated the
"Milano is a gutsy kid, a real
game. The Danes looked over- wishbone to perfection. Milano good football player," said
matched, as they were in last ran the ball on the option 20 times Southern Connecticut Coach
season's 39-0 drubbing. "The for 107 yards and though he com- Rick Cavanaugh. "He's a real
way they were moving the ball on pleted just 5 of 17 passes, two of winner."
us," said Ford, "I thought we them went for touchdowns.
The Danes' offense started the
were going to get beat 70-0."
"Milano did an outstanding day tentatively. Milano didn't
But the Owls stopped moving job," said Chuck Priore, the touch the ball until Albany State
was down 7-0. Albany won the
toss but elected to kick, a move
that backfired as the Owls marched down the field 63 yards in nine
plays. The ninth play' was an
8-yard touchdown pass from Jim
Tacaks to Joe Taccet ta. The extra
point was blocked by Wayne
Anderson.
The Danes' first possession
was over before it. started as
Albany was stopped cold on three
straight plays. On their next
possession, disaster struck.
Milano made an errant pitch to
Caesar Revano, which brought
the ball back to the four-yard
line. After an incomplete pass,
Caesar Revano fumbled a pitch
and Bob Wilson caught the loose
ball in mid-air. On the first play
from the 3-yard line, Tacaks
found John Miller in the endzone
to give the Owls a 13-0 bulge.
The Danes looked in trouble.
They failed to get a'first down on
the next possession, but after a
strong defensive stand, the Danes
got the ball back one minute later.
After getting their initial first
down of the game with 3:41 left in
the first quarter, Milano ran the
option 43 yards to the Owl 27
yard line before being stopped
from behind by Stan Morrison. It
was a crucial play for Albany
mainly in terms of confidence. "I
think we were nervous as a team
at the beginning," Milano said.
"But after that drive, we settled
down."
Four plays and one personal
21 to
Albany netmen take 7th SUNYAC
By Mike MacAdam
STAFF WRITER
The dynasty lives on.
The Albany State men's tennis
team put their names in the record
book Saturday when they rose
above a strong field to capture an
unprecedented seventh straight
SUNYAC championship.
The Danes totaled 29 points to
overcome University of Buffalo,
who came in second place with
25, and third place Binghamton,
who had 22 S4.
While Albany only outscored
Buffalo and Binghamton by one
point in doubles play, good team
balance in singles gave Albany a
decisive edge, as they scored 20
points in singles to Buffalo's, 16
and Binghamton's, 14.
For Dane Coach Bob Lewis,
winning the seventh time is just as
good ns winning the first time. "It
was very satisfying, especially
because we knew we were facing a
very tough field," said Lewis.
"The overall' competition was
reat this
year.''
The spotlight match in first
singles was the final between Buffalo's top seed Ken White and second seed David Grossman of
Albany. Grossman took White,
this fall's ECAC champion, to
three sets, but lost, 6-1, 2-6, 6-3.
"He (Grossman) felt that he
played poorly, but I thought he
HOWADD TYQAR UPS
played well," Lewis explained.
Albany's first singles player Dave Grossman lost In the finals of "It's certainly no disgrace losing
iho SUNYACs, Of, 28, 0-3 to top-seeded Ken White.
in three sett to Ken White."
One of the turning points of the
tournament came in second
singles when Albany's Tom
Schmitz surprised first seed Dan
Scheulfand of Buffalo, 7-6, 6-2,
in the quarterfinals.
"Tom Schmitz had a tough
match," said Lewis, "but it was a
big turning point for us because
he knocked off the number one
seed immediately, which was actually a 7 point swing in our
favor."
Lewis was referring to the four
points Schmitz earned when he
won the final over second-seeded
Mark Birnbaum of Binghamton,
1-6, 7-5,6-1. That left Buffalo
with only one point in a bracket
they were favored to win.
Another important turning
point came when Albany's fifth
singles player, Mike Dermansky,
shook off Injuries that kept him
out of practice all week to storm
past Binghamton's Hall Groat in
straight sets, 6-1,6-1.
"I was a little skeptical about
our chances becuuse Mike was
hurt and he hardly practiced all
week," said Lewis," but he was
the key for us."
At third singles, Albany's Juy
Eisenberg fell in the finals to Buffalo's Ed Wagner in a close match
that required two tiebreakers, 7-6,
7-5. Albany failed to produce u
singles finalist in only the fourth
singles flight as David Zobler lost
in the quarterfinals to the eventual champion, Joe Alfano of
Binghamton, 6-0, 4-6, 6-1, in the
quarterfinals.
At sixth singles, Albany got a
tremendous boost when Bob
Siracuse came back in the finals
after falling behind by a set to top
seed Brian Myerhofer of Buffalo,
7-5. Siracuse took the next two
sets, 6-3, 6-2.
First doubles competition matched top-seeded White and
Scheulfand of Buffalo against
Grossman and Schmitz of
Albany. The Buffalo duo prevailed, 6-2, 3-6. 6-3.
Albany did pick up some important points in second doubles
as Eisenberg and Dermansky
whipped Oneonta's Jim Wilk and
Scott Aitchinson, 6-4, 6-2. This
was the Albany duos second
straight SUNYAC doubles championship and gave Dermansky
two championships again this
year.
Third doubles found Albany
being defeated in the semifinals,
6-4, 1-6, 6-0, to Binghamton
when Siracuse teamed with Mitchell Oerber, who made an appearance after spending most of
the season injured.
Lewis attributed Albany's
record-setting championship to
good ti;aiit balance and the
heroics of Schmitz and
Dermansky.
"The whole team played well,
but Dermansky coming through
for us after not practicing much
21 to
STUDENT
PRESS
CORPORATION
Friday
ALBANY
STUDENT
PRESS
OCTOBER IS, 1985
Danes stun Southern Connecticut
BY THE ALBANY
VOLUME
October 18,1985
L X X II
NUMBER
31
SUNYA sets AIDS contingency plans Dorm rate increases
By Ken Dornbaum
EDITORIAL ASSISTANT
First of two parts
Rooms that have previously been used to isolate
students with chicken pox, hepatitis and other infectious
diseases in the infirmary may be used in the future for
AIDS patients who attend SUNYA, said Neil Brown,
Associate Vice-President for Health arid Counseling
Services.
"There have been no confirmed cases at SUNYA,"
said Brown who added that several months ago Health
Services began to gather information on AIDS (Aquired
Immune Deficiency Syndrome) educate its staff, and
prepare itself if such a situation arose.
'
SUNYA Infirmary
"All of the staff feel the same way," he said. "Any student or visitor to campus would receive treatment or
emergency care upon initial diagnosis of AIDS just like
any other health issue," Brown said, adding that depending upon the severity the patient might be referred to an
off campus health facility.
The infirmary lacks such facilities as a radiology unit,
and x-ray machines which diagnose pnuemonia, an ailment sometimes afflicting the AIDS patient. Such procedures could have to be done at a hospital, Brown
stated.
"Our health educators do need education about
AIDS." continued Brown. "We have sent our nurses and
physicians to conferences, and they've all been made
aware of the AIDS Council in Albany as a resource," he
said.
"I went to a two-day conference held at the Police
Academy," said Michele Lennon, the nurse in charge of
the out patient department at the infirmary. "The consensus of opinion at the conference was that among all
the health care workers who have dealt with AIDS, there
have been no cases of AIDS," she said.
feared as SUNY votes
on self-sufficient plan
By Karen E. Beck
STAFF WRITER
Students may have to pay more for on-campus housing next year if the SUNY Board of Trustees and state
legislature approve the concept of "dormitory selfsufficiency."
Self-sufficiency means all facility operations and
maintenance costs are funded primarily through dormitory fees while state subsidies are eliminated.
While the idea could be applied in many different
ways to include many combinations of costs, SUNY
Central is working with a form of self-sufficiency
which would include all direct and indirect costs of running a dorm.
The self-sufficiency plan goes before the SUNY Central Board of Trustees on Wednesday, October 23 and
before the New York State legislature in January.
Self-sufficiency is a system in which the income of
the dormitories pays for the dorms themselves," said
University President Vincent O'Leary.
Capital District AIDS outbreak tied to IV drug
The Board of Trustees announced its first steps
use . . .
toward self-sufficiency in 1980 with a {150 dorm room
Seepage 7
rent increase. Increases have followed, but a full selfsufficiency plan requires legislature approval.
"Although 1 feel comfortable about dealing with
"What self-sufficiency boils down to is that SUNY
AIDS, I need more information," Lennon said, adding
wants more control over campuses and wants the New
that there has been no panic among the infirmary staff."
York State Department of Budget to have less control
"We do treat hepatitis and infectious mono," said
over it. In this way, self-sufficiency could be a good
Lennon, 'and we will treat an AIDS patient the same as
thing." said Steve Saroki, Executive Vice President for
the Student Association of the State University
any other infectious patient."
Five Quad, SUNYA's volunteer ambulance service, has <SAS.U),„„...,
r.lso made plans in case they have to deal with a person
"This is something that's been developing for about
five years. Over that time a member of the Board of
with AIDS.
Trustees said the dorms should go self-sufficient," said
"We would never refuse to take a person with AIDS,"
said Cecilia Carroll, Vice President of Five Quad. "We O' Leary.
"In order to decide what will be encompassed by
mayriot-evenknow.that they have AIDS," she said.
self-sufficiency," said O' Leary "we've had to reach in
"We'd treat "them the same as any other infectious
a decide what (cost) is uniquely the dormitories and
disease, such as meningitis or Infectious mono," Carroll
continued. "We'd keep anything that could be con- what is uniquely the institution's."
According to the self-sufficiency plan, dormitory
7to
fees could include such services as grounds department
or campus security.
"I think the issue of self-sufficiency demands our attention most importantly because we should see that
dorm rates don't increase prohibitively," said Student
Association Vice President Ross Abelow.
The Department of Transportation.publishes an "OcSUNY's application of self-sufficiency could cause
cupational Awareness Minibrief," she added, explaining,
"It's a looseleaf notebook periodical — all it does is list dorm rates to vary throughout the SUNY system.
''it's a dangerous proposal for students," said SA
careers and occupations, how much schooling is needed,
President Steve Gawley. "It will seriously effect access
how you can advance, and what kind of occupational
on the part of the students applying to state schools. A
future this thing has. It also talks about working condifurther danger is that room rates will vary statewide
tions — fringe benfits, advantages and disadvantages,
from SUNY campus to SUNY campus. A student's
and related choices."
choice for school might have to, for example, be made
Similarly, Kaplow said, the Department of Transportabased on utility costs in a specific part of the slate, or
tion publishes an "Occupational Outlook Handbook" something as bizarre as that.''
which reviews "the nature of work, the working condi"Variable room rates on campuses across the state is
12» one on the biggest problems with self-sufficiency,"
said Saroki. "The way SUNY is defining selfsufficiency right now, it doesn't help to improve student life at all. It could, in fact, lead to discrimination
against students on the basis of how much money they
have.
"The campuses which will undergo the greatest
room rate increases are the dorms which are most
underutilized," said Saroki, noting that Brockport and
New Paltz are such campuses. "Students will have to
pay more money in order to make up for the costs of
the rooms not being used," he said.
"Costs for schools will no longer vary according to
the quality of education available at each school, but
will be determined by other less relevant factors," said
Gawley. "Public education's mission is to provide
11M
Pros to advise women interns
By Laureen Moore
A new Women's Studies Internship which will provide
students the chance to gain experience in the traditional
"man's world" was announced Tuesday as part of a lecture titled "Taking Charge of Your Career."
Dr. Susan Kaplow, who will direct the internship,
discussed the benefits of networking among women when
seeking, a job and also the best method of determining
what job is the right one.
"I want to introduce you to a different philosophy and
different method of thinking about career and career
planning," Kaplow said. "I think the way we usually
think about career is we get some information . . . and
then we figure out which box of the different boxes of
society we might fit ourselves into."
,
She continued, saying, "I'm going to suggest turning
this process around and not start with what are the existing boxes . . . professions and career tracks that we
can fit ourselves into, but start instead with ourselves.
"To me, that's the essence of the difference between
having a job and having a career," she emphasized.
"A career is something that expresses you. The place to
start building something like that is yourself," Kaplow
added, beforo handing out an "office politics selfassessment questionnaire" which Kaplow said will help
students "hone in on what kind of person you are and
points you in the beginning directions of your career
planning."
The questionnaire had students pick adjectivos they
would use to describe themselves and ended with one of
the six categories being pointed to. Categories included
groups like "artistic" or "enterprising."
"After you have some sense of how you can begin to
sort jobs through, what do you do next? You do some
research," Kaplow told the audience. "There are many,
many books In the library which are really nothing but
fancy lilts ot the different things people can do In this
World, she added.
On the S>ack page:
Administrative mix-up might
deprive], SUNYA trains of postOr. Susan Kaplow
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