Danes come up short; beaten by Engineers, 62-61

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PUBLISHED A T THE STATE UNIVERSITY OF NEW YORK AT ALBANY BY. THE ALBANY STUDENT PRESS CORPORATION
Tuesday
January 31, 1984
Danes come up short; beaten by Engineers, 62-61
By Keith Marder
ASSOCIATE SPORTS EDITOR
Albany State took 33 more shots than RPI;
they accumulated 10 more assists than their
opponents, and outrebounded the Engineers
25-22.
Take a guess who won. If you said Albany,
you were wrong. The RPI Engineers defeated
the Albany State Oreat Danes 62-61 Wednesday night at University Gym.
The game served as a fine homecoming for
former Dane basketball captain and assistant
ED MARUSStCH
UPS
Dane captain Wilson Thomas goes up (or two ol his 24 points in Albany's 62-61 loss
to the RPI Engineers at University Gym Wednesday night.
coach John Quattrocchi, who is currently in
his first full season as head coach of the
Engineers.
He guided his team to a victory in the same
gymnasium he has so many fond memories
of, beaiing a coach he has nothing but
respect and admiration for.
"I told the players in the lockerroom. we
had the second best coach and the best
players," said Quattrocchi.
The Engineers won the game by using the
style of play that was Quattrocchi's
trademark as a player. They played smart
and shot extremely well (61 % from the field),
especially foul shots in pressure situations
down the stretch.
"When he (Quattrocchi) played here,"
recalled Albany State trainer Jack Koelmel,
"he wasn't our quickest guard but he was our
smartest player. Just like (Dane point guard
Dan) Crouticr he would want to handle the
ball at the end of close games. When he got
fouled he would always hit the foul shots."
With 20 seconds remaining and Albany
trailing 58-57 RPI forward John Mahony was
fouled around the mid-court stripe. Mahony
missed the front end of the one and one. The
Danes were unable to capitalize on this
mistake as Engineer Toward Robert Fassett
came up with the loose ball. He was promptly
fouled and calmly sank both of his shots.
That made it four straight in the final 1:06
and six out of seven in the final 5:41 of the
game for Fassett, not too shabby considering
Fassett is a 44% foul shooter on the season.
"1 was making them in the beginning and
that built up my confidence," said Fassett.
Albany guard Dave Adam then hit a
baseline jumper to bring the Danes to within
a point again, 60-59.
Adam then fouled Mike Giannaccini on
the ensuing inbounds play. That put Giannaccini on the foul line with seven seconds
still left on the clock. The RPI guard canned
both of his chances to give the Engineers a
three pointlead that iced the game.
"Give RPI credit,"said Albany Head
Coach Dick Sauers. "They did what they had
to do to win."
In the first half, attempting to stop the
Engineers' high scoring guard Eric
Weinberger, Albany utilized a box-and-onc
defense.
While this defense effectively
stymied Weinberger it neglected to slop
Fasset, who scored seven points in the first
three minutes as RPI jumped out to a quick
9-4 lead.
' The hot hands of Wilson Thomas and
John Mracek enabled Albany to take their
first lead of the game, 31-30 with 3:05 left in
the first half.
While Thomas scored most of his 14 first
half points off of sharp passes from Croutier
(10 assists on the game), Mracek was making
his own opportunities. Mracek had two steals
and five points in a span of 1:42.
Both teams traded baskets to finish out the
half as Albany went into the lockerroom
ahead 35-34.
The Danes came out strong at the outset of
the second half. They opened up a six point
lead, 43-37 for their biggest lead of Ihc game.
But RPI never gave up. As the Danes'
shots slopped falling the Engineers scratched
and clawed their way back. With 5:41 remaining RPI captured the lead for good,
50-49.
On three occasions in the final two minutes
the Danes were able to cut the deficit to one,
but they failed to make the big play.
"When Mahony missed thai foul shot it
was our chance to win the game," said
Sauers on the Danes' bcsl opportunity lo
have the ball with a chance lo lake Ihc lead
laic in the game.
Perhaps game high scorer Thomas (24)
summed it up best: "They played better offensively than us. Doc (Sauers) said before
the game it was going to be one of the
toughest defenses we would play against. He
was right."
HOOP-LA: The Danes are about lo enter the
heart of their conference schedule as their
next seven games are against SUNYAC
rivals...The first uf these conference games is
In P o t s d a m t o m o r r o w night at
8:00...Potsdam Is on a tear of late as Ihcy
have recently crushed Cortland 112-74 . D
Grapplers' holiday win streak snapped, 38-7
By Marc Berman
ASSOCIA TE SPORTS EDITOR
Unfortunately for the Albany State wrestling team, their holiday break had to end.
After sweeping their three meets during the
four week winter recess, the Danes, in their
first match of the new semester, were dealt
out a severe licking by Division II Springfield
College, 38-7, Wednesday afternoon at the
University Gym. .
The Danes, whose record dropped to 8-3,
were beaten in 10 out of 12 matches, including the last seven.
Dane head coach Joe DeMeo had nothing
but praise for the victors, whose record
climbed to 13-4: "They're a quality learn,"
he said following the mccl. "They beat Army
earlier this season and they (Army) are one of
the finest Division I clubs in the East. I was a
little disappointed because I thought it
would've been closer."
The Danes came inlo ihe mccl riding ihe
crest of a successful semester break in which
Ihey upended Williams, Potsdam, and
Oneonta.
And at the start of Wednesday's afternoon
meet it appeared their momentum from the
break would carry over. The Danes, whose
best three wrestlers occupy the first three
weight classes, took two of the first three
matches.
118 pound Freshman Shawn Sheldon
opened up the meet by losing to Springfield's
Daryl Arroyo in a 12-5 decision.
"Sheldon shows great potential," said
Springfield coach Doug Parker. "1 was im-
pressed with him, but he was going up against
a very experienced senior."
Junior All-American Dave Averill lied the
meet at 3-3 when he outpointed Division II
All-American Craig Kosinski in easily the
most exciting match of the afternoon. II led
up to its advanced billing as the two AllAmericans were deadlocked at 4-4 until
Averill scored a spectacular three-point
takedown with only 15 seconds remaining in
the match.
The triumph was even sweeter for Averill
considering he was beaten by Kosinski earlier
in the season at a West Poinl Tournament.
In order for Averill lo increase his personal
dual meet record lo 10-1 — his only loss coming against Oneonta — he had to overcome a
4-1 deficit at the end of two periods.
"At that point I guess I was just trying to
keep it close," said the All-American following the meet. "He had beaten me before but
this lime I felt in better shape because we
started our double workouts."
134 pound John Balog boosted the Danes
lo a 7-3 lead with a 13-5 decision over Tom
Ber-er. Balog came from behind as he trailed
4-0 midway through the first period. From
there, Balog dominated by outscoring him
13-1.
But after the Balog match, it was all
downhill for the Purple Gang. Springfield
swept the next seven matches, which included
two pins and a forfeit at the heavyweight slot
with the match out of reach.
Next up on the Danes' slate will be on
VOLUME
L XX
I
NUMBER
\
Reagan re-election plans heat up '84 campaign
Campus group F^
rallies to
show support
T
....
...
.
.
ED MAHUSSICH UPS
The Albany wrestling was upended by a tough Division II Springfield team 38-7
Wednesday afternoon to drop their dual meet record to 8-3.
Saturday afternoon In a triangular meet
against St. Lawrence — a club that defeated
Springfield — and Hunter College.
TAKE DOWNS; Former Dane wrestler Ed
Gleeson has rejoined Ihe club and is expecting lo be inserted in Ihe lineup next week.
DeMeo says he plans on some major shuffling once Gleeson starts . . , Andy Seras was
In the crowd watching Ihe Springfield meet.
Seras redshirled the season so he could concentrate all his efforts on tyring oul for Ihe
1984 Summer Olympics. Seras still practices
with the Dane squad . . , Over the four week
winter break, Albany Stale scored victories
over Williams (23-19), Potsdam(40-20), and
Oneonta(23-19). Against Oneonta, Ihe meet
wasn't decided unlit Ihe heavyweight match
when Papo Rivera recorded a pin.
•
^ZlgSH
. J l E
9
! I l l
Reaganends
end*
Reagan
speculation
on candidacy
Washington, D.C.
(ASSOCIATED PRESS) President
Reagan, saying he needs another
Hot on the heels of President
term to complete his work, is a canReagan's announcement that he
didate for re-election with his supwould seek a second term, the Colporters predicting "a close, tough
lege Republicans of SUNY Albany
election," and his oppostion saying
sponsored their first "Rally for
the voters will "reject four more
Reagan," in the campus center.
years of danger, four more years of
The rally, which, according lo
pain."
Rich Schiotis, president of the
Reagan ended any lingering
Albany
County
Young
doubts about his political plans
Republicans, was arranged rather
with a paid political broadcast Sunhurriedly, attracted only 15 people.
day night in which he said, "Our
However, Schiotis claimed attenwork is not finished." The presidance could have been better had he
dent also made it clear he wants
BOB LUCKEV UPS
not overlooked the campus podium
George Bush to continue as vice
Monday's "Rally lor Reagan" In the Campus Center
poster approval policy.
president.
According to Schiotis, the posters Hurriedly planned rally attracted IS people.
On his first day as a candidate for
publicizing the event were put up on again." He also mentioned that many students don't want to admit
since Reagan took office in
re-election, the 72-year-old presicampus at about 10:30 p.m. Sunday several of his group's posters had to supporting Reagan. However, he
January, 1981.
dent's schedule began with a
night. By 8:30 a.m. Monday morn- been torn down as well.
added, "there is a silent majority on
Reagan has "done everything he meeting with arms negotiator Eding, Schiotis claimed, many of the
Director of Campus Life, Jim campus for Reagan."
could have done," added Schiotis.
ward L. Rowny. He had a midday
posters had been removal) from the Doellefeld, whose office is in charge
Schiotis said that students should "A- lot of us arc hoping for speech-' to religious broadcasters
podium.
of poster policy enforcement, said become involved in the upcoming (Reagan's) re-election," he said.
while his wife, Nancy, planned to
"Someone took advantage of it that he hasn't asked people to election because "students are
As for what lies ahead for both
visit his campaign headquarters.
(not getting the posters stamped)," remove any posters since last future leaders." Right now, the College Republicans and Albany
"ft was a mutual decision," Mrs.
said Schiotis, who speculated that semester.
groups are trying to organize the County Young Republicans,
Reagan said in a statement. " I sup"people who were Mondale sup"Nobody who works for me was area and may be circulating peti- Schiotis said that their future acport him fully."
porters got (hem down."
even out there during that time tions to selecl delegates lo the tivities "arc up lo Ihe Reagan camReagan, who turns 73 on Feb. 6,
Sean O'Brien, President for the period," said Doellefeld, who add- Republican Convention in Dallas, paign."
is Ihe oldest person ever to serve as
Students for Mondale Committee, ed that the person who removes according to Will Kamishlian,
Kamishlian said that this past
president and his age and possible
stated that, "No, it was not our dated and unstamped posters on President of College Republicans.
weekend a Ficldman School was
objections by his wife were usually
Mondays doesn't start work until
group."
"Reagan turned the country held here. The weekend seminar is cited in speculation that he might
"It's rather unfortunate that it two p.m.
around, even radicals admit that," designed to gel College Republicans decide against a second term.
did happen," said O'Brien, adding,
According to Schiotis, SUNYA is said Schiotis, who added that "the together and teach them how to run
But the president clearly is ready
"let's hope it doesn't happen a liberal campus, which is why country is in much better shape"
7«»
to run.
In an interview with Newsweek
magazine, Reagan gave a preview of
his strategy against Walter F. Mondale, the front-runner for the
Democratic presidential nomination.
"I think he has tried to be all
By Caryn Mlske
Schaffer said that February 27 is designated as the day SUNYA
things to all people," Reagan said
STAFF WRITER
students will march on the capital to fight the hike. He explained the
of Mondale. "And 1 think he's
Governor Mario Cuomo's proposed budget for 1984 plans to enact
lobbying will not stop there, but will take place over a period of lime.
made more promises than probably
a tuition hike which has generated great controversy among both
He added that other SUNY institutions will be busing in students to
can possibly be kept."
SUNYA student leaders and members of the New York State Sentate
protest against the proposed budget.
and Assembly.
The president was no more
Tierney hopes to work for a $21 million revenue increase to overspecific about his second-term
The budget would increase tuition for undergraduates by $200, even
come the proposed tuition hike, $cight million of which would be used
goals. Neither did he mention trouthough a $300 hike was imposed by last year's budget. According to
to avert a $150 dorm increase. This would be the fifth dorm increase in
ble spots like Lebanon, where more
Student Association of the State University President Jim Tierney, if
five years. These increases are well above the rale of inflation, he addthan 260 U.S. servicemen have been
these two increments are combined this represents a 47 percent ined. "It is cheaper to live off-campus for 12 months with a kitchen, livkilled, or Central America.
crease in two years.
ing room and private bathroom than it is to live in a dorm for seven
• Last year, graduate student tuition was increased by $450 and this
and a half months where you're not even offered full tenant rights,"
year it would be incremented again by $350. Out of state and foreign
said Tierney.
Schaffer said, "Right now the slate is in a semi-good financial stale.
The $20 million which will be generated by the tuition hikes can be
derived from somewhere else." He pointed out lhal ihe state division
for youth, which handles juvenile delinquents, spends $175 million per
year on 2,500 children. "This is about $8,600 per person," he noted.
The Brookwood hospital has 60 patients and 120 slaff members,
Schaffer noted. "The Slate spends wastefully in some areas," he
maintained..
Gary Fryer, Press Secretary for Cuomo, said "Everyone asks 'Why
—Jim Tierney
can't the cuts come from somewhere else?' Menial hospitals are
primarily dependent for Ihe state for survival, correctional faciltics
which are already overcrowded are being clamored for by citizens who
are sick and tired of crime. There is not a shortage of legitimate need,
students have been the hardest hit by Cuomo's tuition hikes, according
only of resources."
to Tierney. This year their tuition would be raised by $500, last year it
was raised by $900.
Tierney said, "Last year Cuomo wanted huge reductions in posi"Stanley Fink, (D-Brooklyn), Speaker of the Assembly, has come
tions. However, in coalition with United University Professions,
out strongly against this increase," said Tierney. "We are looking
(UUP), only 1,400 positions were cut SUNY wide instead of the 4,000
towards him tp_supporl us in fighting Ihe hike." Student Association
proposed by Cuomo."
President Rich Schaffer said that he would be meeting with Mark
This year has been a year of economic recovery, he said. Business,
President Ronald Reagan
Allan Sicgel, chair of Ihc Higher Education Department of the Slate
sales and income taxes are all up, acording to Tierney. Since there Is
Assembly, Ken I.uvalle and other representatives to discuss this mat"Our work is noi finished."
14«*
By Jerry Campione
ASSOCIA TE NEWS EDITOR
Proposed tuition increase meets opposition
"The tuition increases will hurt
university access if they are not
stopped."
n-L.
2
TUESDAY, JANUARY 31. 1984 a ALBANY STUDENT PRESS 3
• 2 ALBANY STUDENT PRESS D TVESDA Yf JANUAR Y 31. 1984
Oral History records memories of Albany's past
NEWS BRIEFS
By Alicia Cimbora
Rowny told reporters after a Half-hour
meeting with President Reagan that the
United States has prepared several packages
of proposals in hopes of getting the stalled
strategic arms discussions going again.
Towny said, "We are now in a position when
we return to the table - t o make a
breakthrough."
Albany
Beirut
"We have some concrete proposals on (ASSOCIATED PRESS) Gov. Mario Cuomo
(ASSOCIATED PRESS) A U.S. Marine died
trade-offs," Rowny said, and moves by the will ask the Legislature to approve a package
Monday of wounds suffered in daylong
Soviets to take up the deployment of Per- of bills to use nuclear power for job expanclashes with Shiite militiamen, a Marine
Washington, D.C.
shing 2 and cruise missiles in the Strategic
spokesman said. Three other Marines were (ASSOCIA TED PRESSjCongress gets its first Arms Limitation Talks (START), in which sion, cut the state's reliance on foreign oil,
and continue energy planning.
wounded.
close-up look at President Reagan's I98S
he is the chief U.S. negotiator, would not be
The measures, announced during the
Ma). Dennis Brooks, the Marine budget this week, as Democrats express automatically turned aside.
weekend, would:
spokesman, said two Marines were slightly suspicions that his plans for slashing deficits
-Give the Power Authority of the Stale of
wounded early in the day and two others suf- by Slut) billion through bipartisan negotiaNew York the power to allocate available
fered graver wounds during an afternoon ex- tions-may be a political ploy.
base-load nuclear power from its FitzPatrlck
change.
In his State of the Union address, Reagan
Washington, D.C.
nuclear power plant to companies that build
One of those wounded in the afternoon; asked leaders of both parties to join him in
died while awaiting a helicopter flight for developing a "down payment" on the (ASSOCIATED PRESS) Two scholars, whose new facilities, expand existing ones or create
research was behind the Kissinger commisnew jobs. Current law says such power can
treatment on a U.S. Navy ship offshore. The deficit, which is nearing $200 billion a year.
sion's warning that the Soviet role in Central
be allocated only to industries that are heavy
other was flown to the amphibious assault
The president later told GOP leaders that
America
threatens
U.S.
security,
say
the
electricity
users and whose power costs are a
ship USS Guan for treatment, Brooks said.
every area of spending would be subject to
The dead Marine was not immediately negotiations, but in the past he has staunchly panel overlooked new signs that Moscow has significant portion of the value of their
manufactured products.
identified.
opposed reductions in military spending or lost clout in the region.
-Clarify and confirm the power of PASNY to
Robert S. Leiken, author of the 1982 book
tax increases as deficit-solving measures.
"Soviet Strategy in Latin America," said enter into contracts for the development of
Democrats have said they are wary of the
"the Soviets have taken a much more reserv- power produced by water, refuse and woodproposal and will wait to study.the budget
ed position in the hemisphere in the past cou- powered electric and steam-generating proclosely before accepting his invitation.
ple of years," partly due to their own military jects.
Rome, Italy
and political difficulties in Afghanistan and -Confirm PASNY's ability to buy hydroelec(ASSOCIATED PRESS)A German accused of
tric power from Canada and other out-ofPoland.
being a Nazi who was aided by the Vatican in
Jiri Valenta, another expert on Soviet in- state sources.
Washington, D.C.
his escape after World War II claims he was
(ASSOCIATED PRESS) U.S. arms negotiator tentions who testified before the commission, -Update the state's energy master plan.
instead a leading figure in the resistance, ItaEdward Rowny said Monday the United said the panel's assessment of the Soviet
ly's largest newspaper said Monday.
States is prepared to consider Soviet pro- threat was "on balance...good," but added
The article in Corriere Delia Sera of Milan
posals
limiting U.S. nuclear weapons in that the report should have noted a recent
followed a statement by the Vatican's official
Europe in a tradeoff for curbs on long-range decline in Soviet optimism about Central
spokesman saying two church historians had
Albany
Soviet weapons.
America.
rebutted allegations in a U.S. government
(ASSOCIATED PRESS) The New York Stale
document that the Holy See helped Nazi war
Conference of Mayors has asked the Stale
criminals flee to Latin America.
Legislature to increase revenue sharing lo
The newspaper said German Willy Nix, 78,
local governments by $95.9 million for the
told journalists he had not been a Nazi but
fiscal year starting April 1.
part of the resistance and that he had been
"There is a limit to how long we can tread
held in a concentration camp before fleeing
water,"the organization's president, Cohocs
to Italy in 1938.
Mayor Ronald Canestrari said Saturday
"We met with Nix...He told us his story of
while releasing a report calling for adjusted
belonging to the anti-Nazi resistance, how he
formulas in the way state aid is given to local
never needed to seek refuge in the Vatican
governments.
and that he never tied to Latin America,"
Gov. Mario Cuomo propsed continuing a
Corriere said. The paper did not directly
cap on the state's revenue sharing program in
quote Nix.
his proposed budget, meaning local governments would share $800,860,900 in aid, the
same amount shared annually since 1980.
The revenue sharing program was originally designed to enable local governments to
share in the growth of state revenues, but the
aid formula was capped at the $800 million
level in 1980 and hasn't changed since then.
tain medical decisions by parents. And he
said there must be ah independent check on
whether a doctor's advice is based on medical
opinion or on bias against the handicapped,
Baby Jane Doe was born Oct. 11 in Port
Jefferson, N.Y., with an abnormally small
head, excesss fluid on the brain and spina
bidifa.
Worldwide
Shlites kill marine
Statewide
Nuke power sought
U.S. budget unveiled
Soviets losing clout
Vatican rebuts charge
Talks may resume
Mayors request aid
Nationwide^
Baby Jane defended
Washington, D.C.
(ASSOCIATED PRESS) The Reagan administration is launching its strongest defense
yet of its position in the Baby Jane Doe case,
saying parents do not legally have the final
say about medical care for a severely deformed infant.
Assistant Attorney General William Bradford Reynolds, head of the Justice Department's civil rights division, said Sunday that
federal law confers civil rights protection on
children separate from that guaranteed to
their parents.
In a speech to the American Jewish Congress New York Metropolitan Council,
Reynolds noted that many state laws require
hospitals to seek court orders overriding cer-
Fire halts Metro North
N
New York City
(ASSOCIATEDPRESS) From I0,000to 15,000
Metro North railroad commuters were
delayed Monday morning when a track fire
broke out in the tunnel under Park Avenue in
midlown Manhattan and hailed all service,
the railroad said.
Thirteen trains were between 125th Street
and Grand Central Terminal around 8:00
a.m. when the service was shut down.
The fire was in the vicinity of 50th Strcel
and service was slopped both inbound and
out on the Harlem, Hudson and New Haven
division, said Danny O'Conncll, a
spokesman for the railroad.
PREVIEW OF EVENTSFree listing?
ASP Interest Meeting will be
held Wednesday, Feb. 1 at 7:30
p.m. In LC 6. Anyone Interested
In writing for news, sports, or
Aspects, or doing production
work please attend.
Five Quad Volunteer Ambulance Service will be the topic
of a free one-day conference on
the past and future of the Civil
Rights Movement on Saturday,
February 4 at the New York
State Museum, beginning at
9:30 a.m. Call the museum at
474-5842 for Information.
A Mathematics Colloquium will Big Brother • Big Sister Interest
be presented by SUNYA Pro- Meeting will be held Tuesday,
fessor Boris Korenblum on the Jan. 31, in LC 6 at 8 p.m. For Intopic "Some Problems In formation call Brad or Sharon at
Fourier Analysis" on Wednes- 457-5245 ot457-5237,
day, Feb. 1 at 4 p.m. In ES 140.
WCDB/91FM will hold an InStudents for Mondale will hold
terest meeting on Wednesday,
an organizational meeting
Feb. 1 at 8 p.m. In LC 2.
Thursday, February 2, at 7:30
p.m. In Lecture Center 11.
Community Supper at Chapel
Anyone interested In working House will be held Wednesday,
for Walter Mondale's presiden- Feb. 1, at 5 p.m. and the topic
tial campaign Is Invited to at- will be Poetry and Song.
tend.
I t a l i a n A m e r i c a n Student
Alliance will meet on February 1 "A Different Image" will be
at 8 p.m. In the Humanities shown at Russell Sage College
Lounge. All are welcome.
as part of a Black Film Festival
on Thursday, Feb.2 at 11:30 a.m.
In Campus Center 105 at 140
New Scotland Ave., Albany. For
more Information call 270-2246.
College Young Democrats will
meet Thursday.February 2 in HU
23 at 8:30 p.m. For Information
call 457-7762 after 5 p.m.
The Clifton C. Thome Lecture's
second annual presentation will
deal with the topic "Health and
Human Services in China
1971-1983: Lessons fo; the
United States" on Wednesday,
Feb. 1 at 7:30 p.m. In the PAC's
Recital Hall.
The University Chorale will perform Carlorff's Carmlna Burana
on Sunday, February 5 at 3 p.m.
Admission Is free to the event
which will be held In the PAC.
Women's Intercollegiate Softball Team practice schedules
and roster Information is
available from Coach Rhenish
In PEC 329 or by calling
457-4535.
A Woman's Mlnyan will be held
on Saturday, February 4 at 10
a.m. at Chapel House. If interested In participating call
Ellen at 457-7746.
STAFF WRITER
If enthusiasm, dedication and competence
were the only ingredients necessary for success Ivan Steen and Katie Gurnett would be
problem free.
Steen, an assistant history professor at
SUNYA, and his research assistant, Gurnett,
arc in the process of compiling a scries of
taped interviews, known as oral history,
which will record the recent history of
Albany. Oral history documents significant
events in history as related by the people who
actually lived through those times. As Steen
said, "What we're doing is preserving
something for the ages." Gurnett noted that
"Oral history is people telling what really
happened. It gels down the stories of people
we wouldn't otherwise have; il is something
you won't get out of a textbook."
The task of collecting oral history is not an
easy one, said Slcen. Interviews arc conducted by Steen, Gurnett and trained
graduate students. All interviews are done on
tape and Ihen transcribed, these transcriptions are then allowed to be edited by the person interviewed before they arc released for
inspection by residents.
The collection of oral history is a time consuming job. It is estimated by Steen that, taking into account the lime needed for
research, interviewing, transcribing,
auditing, editing and the finishing touches, it
takes about 40 hours of work to produce one
hour of interview. "It's a very slow process,"
he added.
When the program was first initiated in
April of 1982, it was with the intent of making the late Mayor Erastus Corning its main
focus, said Sleen. According to Steen, Corning was to have been "our lead-off person in
an oral history program in this region."
When approached about participating in the
oral history project, Mayor Corning was
"very enthusiastic" about it and agreed to
cooperate in any way he could to help, Steen
said. Unfortunately, he added, due lo his
long illness and hospitalization with cm-
LAURA BOSTICK. Inset: WILL VURMAN UPS
Albany City Hall; Inset: the late Mayor Erastus Corning
The collection of oral history is a time-consuming job.
physcma, only a half-hour of interview was
feels that when people die, Ihcir memories go
recorded before his death.
with them, and "if we don't do Ihis, no one
"Il was a great loss in a variety of ways,"
will ever really know-what went on" in the 42
noted Steen. "We lost the memoirs of a uniyears that Corning was Mayor of Albany.
que individual who came from a long line of
The kind of personal accounts sought aflcr in
politicians. The loss can never be recouped;
oral history are nol lo be found in Ihc
he was a fascinating person, part of a
newspapers or in Ihe minutes of a meeting, he
fascinating family," he added. Steen conexplained. "We have lost Erastus Coming's
tinued by saying that Coming's father had
view of 50 years of Albany politics," Slcen
been responsible for bringing Ihe Democrats
said.
into Albany's political machine.
Despite Ihe loss of Corning, Slecn's enthusiasm for the project remains. As Sleen
Steen said that he believes "very strongly
said, "we're recording the Corning years"
in the value of what we're trying to do." He
and there arc still a lot of people around to
interview. Among Ihe people in mind to interview are Vic Lord, who was ihc head of
the liberal party under Corning, and Bill
Hcnncssy, who was the Commissioner of the
Department of Transportation and is
presently Ihe New York Slate Democratic
chairman.
In addition to the Albany project, the oral
By Aileen Brown
history program is also documenting the
STAFF WRITER
years that Nelson A. Rockefeller was goverRoof repairs and new safety equipment are proposed for SUNY-Albany in a $3.3 million
recommendation in Governor Cuomo's 1984 executive budget.
The funds, if approved with Ihc rest of the budget by the slate legislature, will be used lo
repair seven leaky roofs on academic buildings, and to repair and replace fire alarms,
sprinklers, fire doors, fire exlcnguishcrs and other safely equipment according lo Cuomo
hudgcl officials.
By Betsy Eckel
"This money is being allocated as part of-a continuing program in which repairs to Ihc
STAFF.WRIltR
structures of buildings are made throughout the SUNY system," said Hugh Toohcy of
New phones may be installed in Ihe dorms
SUNY Central. "The request for money for repairs initially comes from each individual
as part of a new multi-million dollar
campus, and we allocate money on the basis of these requests. The most pressing requcsls
telephone system planned for Ihe campus, acarc funded first, and then those requests which we don't have enough money 10 fund must
cording lo University officials.
be put aside until the nex' year."
Current plans for the new phone system
"There is a priority system in which funds are dispersed," said Chuck Thompson, an adwould include converting faculty and administrator at SUNY Central, who is involved in the construction fund. "Roofs arc a high
minislration phones lo touch-lone lines as
priority. They gel priority preference, because Ihey arc extremely important. If the roofs
part of an integrated voice and data system,
are not repaired, eventually they will damage Ihe rooms and objects inside the buildings,
said Ihe officials. The user could forward
which will lead to even more cxlensive repairs. By repairing these seven roofs at Albany, we
calls to another extension, transfer calls
can avoid even more extensive and costlier repairs at a later date," he said.
without operator assistance, and inform a
Thompson further indicated that the number of repairs in the SUNY system were extencaller when a previously busy line is open.
sive. "We can never get all the money we ask for for repairs. There just is never enough
This option could save SUNYA $8 million in
money for all the repairs requested. The fight is being won 10 some extent, however."
phone eosls.
University officials are still studying
various options lo determine whether or not
they will include.the dorms in the new
system. A final plan should be ready in
February, according lo Leif Hartmark, Chair
of the Technology Coordination Committee.
Continental Telephone Company, the
lowest of 11 bidders, was recommended by
Ihc Technology Coordinalion Committee.
Continental's bid of $2.9 million would include the plans for faculty and administration phones. For $5.1 million, Continental
will include the four quads in Ihe system as
well.
University Controller, Leo Nevcu, told
University News that "We anticipate thai if
we remained with the present system over a
10 year period, with anticipated increases in
costs during thai time, it would cost us over
$lfi million. If we choose Ihe first option,
(faculty and administrative phones) however,
Ihc lolal payments would be approximately
BOB LUCKEV UPS
$7.3 million, which is almost hull."
Building to be repaired on campus
Whether oi not lo install the new phones in
Number of repairs is extensive in the SUNY system.
State Budget proposal to include
funds to fix leaky roofs on campus
nor of New York. Partial interviews have
already been conducted with members of the
Rockefeller administration such as the then
lieutenant governor Malcolm Wilson.
A new project being worked on by Gurnett
involves using Albany's inner-city youth to
obtain an oral history of Albany's black community. According to Gurnett, the project
will emphasize contact with community
leaders and scholars and will "give them a
rare look at local history."
The oral history program is one of
SUNYA's special programs which allows for
undergraduates as well as graduate students
10 become involved. According to Gurnett,
they have 7-10 students per semester doing
research for the program. The research to be
done in preparation for an interview is extensive and students who participate in the program receive 3 credits, she added. Senior
Michael Slcmpler, who is a history major at
SUNYA, said he found his work with the
oral history program "very interesting." He
>7+
New phone system planned
the dorms is one of the bigger decisions left
to be made, said Ncveu. "The whole purpose
is to save money. If there is a potential for
reducing costs by including the dorms, we
will," he added.
Ncveu explained that along with the other
cost-saving features, the new system will have
"Icasl cost routing". He explained that when
ihc user dials a long distance number, the
system will automatically route the call
through Ihe least expensive line which might
by SPRINT, MCI, or WATS. All the rales
will be Built into the system based on time of
day, destination, and Ihe line used, he added.
Bui the fealure only pays off if there is a
high volume of usage which could come from
Ihc students, he added. "We just have lo
decide whether adding the students and obtaining the high volume will be cheaper than
just including Ihe faculty. If the residence
halls are added in to Ihc system, students
could see a reduction in their long distance
phone bills after the initial cost of the system
is paid for," he asserted.
Included in the contract with Continental
will be an agreement to repair the system if it
breaks down.
Karen A. Zimmers, Director of Telecommunications in the Division of Finance and
Business told University News that she feels
the transition to the new system will be
smooth. "We will definitely be conducting
awareness sessions where all users will receive
hands-on experience and training on the new
equipment," she said.
Continental representalives will oversee the
training and be available lo answer questions
after the new phones are installed, she
added.
•
4 ALBANYSTUDENTPRESS a TUESDAY, JANUARY31. 1984
TUESDAY, JANUARY 31. 1984 a ALBANY STUDENT PRESS 5
View from the Podium
" / think you should be able lo
have beer in your dorm. I'm a
senior and since I've been here
we've always been allowed to have
beer in the dorms and we've never
had any problems. It's a tough
thing now because they raised the
drinking age. I think maybe there
should be a special policy where its
all right to let minors drink ai on
campus events."
—Boh Jojo
"I assume it should be held in a
place where students can drink. I
don 'I think there should be alcohol
in the dorms while classes are in session, (f students want to purchase it •
themselves and bring it on campus I
see no problems. It would be OK lo
have beerballs on the weekend."
—Ronald Franklin
' 7 definitely think they should bi
allowed in rooms. I've been here 4
years and I've noticed they have
been infringing on students' rights,
and beer balls are one of them, ft's
a student's right and beer's beer no
mailer what kind of container it
comes in."
Do you believe that students should be
allowed to have kegs and beerballs in their
suites and rooms?
—Greg Slradtman
"They should be allowed because
of what they've done to the policy
already, not allowing lounge parties. As long as they're keeping it in
the suite there is nothing wrong
with it. They paid for the room. "
—Ted Ober
" / don 7 see why they shouldn 'I
be allowed, but the problem is it
might get out of hand. If they want
to have a party maybe they should
have lo get permission, /think there
should be a limit."
—Marjorie Cole
"I think its fair for them lo say
you can'I have a beerball for
underage kids. It's their campus
and we're jusi here. There should
be regulations about the size of a
party and about age, obviously ii
can go cruzy. They should conform
lo stale laws. "
—Wendy Raymond
Pogue to review alcohol committee final report
By Jim O'Sullivan
EDITORIAL ASSISTANT
Kegs and beerballs might be allowed in
students' rooms and suites i f the recommendations of the Alcohol Policy Review Committee are adpoted by Vice President for Student Affairs, Frank Pogue.
The committee, which was deadlocked on
the bulk container issue, met for 2 hours Friday morning and advised Pogue that the majority supported permitting kegs and beerball
in suite rooms, said Student Association
President Jeff Schneider. Student leaders
later said they viewed this as a major victory
for student rights.
Schneider, however, c a u t i o n e d students
not to be too optimistic because the committee's decision is only a recommendation.
"Just because the committee came up with
the decision doesn't mean that's the r u l e , " he
explained.
The committee was formed by Pogue last
September to draft recommendations for a
new campus alcohol policy because of the
newly adopied New York State 19-year-old
drinking age. In its final report last week, the
committee reported that it was unable to
A dorm party on campus
decide whether or not to allow bulk conPogue would like lo meet with Residential Life Staff before making a final decision.
tainers in student dormitories. As a result,
alcohol in their r o o m s , " said Pogue. " 1 just
Pogue asked them to meet once more to try
would be 10 have the policy implemented by
have the concern that students have the
to resolve the conflict.
the middle of the spring term or sooner," he
freedom to function with responsibility in
Pogue noted that he did not include the
said.
their homes," he said, adding that he could
committee's recommendation on the bulk
Pogue explained that he is waiting for opinot ignore the people affected by parties
container issue ill the final report because the
nions from other SUN YA vice presidents and
either.
Task Force had not reached a unanimous
the 19 Student Affairs Directors, and that he
consensus in that area; though, he said, he
Although the committee's advice is only a
would like to meet with Residential Life staff
would consider the input he got during Frirecommendation, Pogue said, " T h a t advice
before he makes a final recommendation on
day's meeting.
the issue.
will be treated with some importance." He
"There was some consistency within the
added that he hopes to have a final policy
Committee members' accounts of the outgroup for the rights o f students...to have
come of Friday's meeting varied. At least one
recommendation ready soon. " M y desire
LIS* SIMMONS UPS
Task Force member said that the group never
did reach a complete consensus. However,
two other members said they thought that the
decision given to Pogue was supported by the
entire group.
Committee member and Associate Director of Residential Life, Liz Radko, said the
issue had not been resolved, but that " w e
(the committee) discussed a couple of different approaches," She said that her own
7»-
Research Center's staff focuses
attention on ecological problems
Compiled by Jim O'Sullivan.
Photos by Laura Bostick, UPS.
By llene Welnsteln
sr.-iit
ALBANY
STUDENT
PRESS
INTEREST
MEETING
Wednesday
February 1,1984
7:30 pm LC6
H'ttirtiK
While acid rain remains a problem from
above, ihe Atmospheric Science Research
Center will try 10 slay on lop of Ihe situation.
The research center, commonly referred to
as A . S . R . C , is located in the Earth Science
building and concentrates on areas o f national priority, according to S U N Y A Vice
President in charge o f Research and Fiduclional Development; John Shumaker. II is
ihe perogatlve of the director and ihe slaff
" o f Ihe center to decide what is lo be researched," bin they must look lo what issues are
current, he said, adding thai the national
research agendas change from year 10 year.
Ten years ago the concentration could have
been in "cloud-sccding, but today it's probably acid rain and air p o l l u t i o n , " Shumaker
noled.
SUEMINOICH UPS
Atmospheric Science Research Center
Prime considerations are research and education.
Research and education are the prime considerations for A . S . R . C , according to Raymond Falconer, the first full-time employee
at Ihe center and a recent retiree.
The center was founded in 1961 through
the efforts of Dr. Vincent Schaefcr, formerly
o f Ihe General Electric Research Center in
Schnectady. Schaefer, according to Falconer,
"was interested in founding a center at a college in this area and he found the greatest
amount of interest at the state university."
Schaefcr became the first director o f
A.S.R.C. and remained several years before
News Updates.
New SA media head
Stacey Young, a former Student Voice
managing editor, has been chosen as the
new Student Association Media Director.
The appointment was recommended by
Rich Schaffer, SA President, Libby Post,
former SA Media Director, and Vivien
Vasquez, SA Minority Affairs Coordinator, and was approved in Central
Council December 14.
" T w o people submitted applications,",
said Schaffer. " W e held a training session
on the equipment; for the applicants, and
Young was chosen after interviews with
Schaffer, Post and Vasquez.The position
pays $250 a semester.
Young said she has " n o definite plans
as of yet, I'm still getting broken i n . "
Young is a junior at S U N Y A . She added
that the Student Voice would "definitely
continue" to be printed every other
Thursday.
Civic center
University President Vincenl O'Leary
will present plans for a Civic Center and
field house to the Albany County Commission on the Civic Center this Thursday, according to Vice President for
University Affairs Lewis Welch.
The plan will propose " a combined
civic center and field house" to be built on
approximately 70 acres of S U N Y A property on Fuller Road across from the
University, said Welch,
Welch declined to give details on the
University's plan, but called it " a very
good proposal,"
Workforce levels up
Businesses in the United States are
"rebuilding their workforce levels" and
"intend to hire additional workers",
which indicates that unemployment levels
are coming down, according to a survey
conducted by Manpower Temporary Services, an employment placement agency.
"Rising employment is indicated in the
services, construction, finance, insurance,
real estate, and education sectors","along
with high levels in manufacturing, according to Manpower.
Hiring activity in the northeast " i s expected to be greatly improved " f r o m one
year ago, said the survey results, which
were compiled from a sample of approximately 10,900 employers throughout the
U.S.
his retirement, added Falconer.
There has since been only one other director, Volkcr Mohncn, who holds the position
currently. Mohncn is an international expert
on acid rain, according to Professor Bernard
Vonnegut, who is also on staff at the center.
Besides the current research on acid rain
and air pollution, the staff o f A.S.R.C. is
working on research in solar energy, wind
energy, Ihe development of sparks in the atmosphere and the transportation o f material
from bodies o f waier to ihe atmosphere.
Aiding in their research, according to Vonnegut arc Ihe many weather stations, one of
which is located on Mohawk Tower and
another of which is located at Ihe summit of
Whiteface Mountain. These stations " d o
summer and winter f i e l d w o r k , " explained
Vonnegut, " a n d conduct research on icing,
air pollution, and acid r a i n . "
"There is a great deal of overlap in interest
between the slaff at A.S.R.C. and the faculty
of the Atmospheric Science department,"
staled Vonnegut. " O n paper (here are two
distinct groups...but neither really pays attention to the division," Vonnegut said.
Some slaff members o f A.S.R.C. enjoy the
title o f "Research Professors," while some
professors from the Atmospheric Science
department are involved in research. Several
SUNYA students have been involved in
research programs at A.S.R.C. as well, according to Vonnegut.
The resemblance between the academic
department and the research center ends,
however, at the exchange of staff members.
"The chairman of the department reports to
Ihe dean (of the College o f Science and
Mathmatics) and the director of A.S.R.C.
reports to Vice President Shumaker," stated
Vonnegut.
" T h e role of my office is to manage the
center overall, the director manages it on a
d a y - t o - d a y b a s i s , " said
Shumaker.
Shumaker's office also helps to locate
sources for research funding, as well as hiring
the A.S.R.C. staff.
The research center is funded through two
main sources, according to Shumaker. " I t is
the largest state supported facility on campus," he maintained. The other source for
funding is through external grants and contracts. The state's view o f the center is a
"developmental o n e , " said Shumaker.
A.S.R.C. must sue the money from the state
8 ALBANYSTUDENTfRESS a TUESDAY, JANUARY31, 1984
TUESDAY, JANUARY 31, 1984 u ALBANY STUDENT PRESS, f
HEY OFF-CAMPUS
PEOPLE:
HELP OTHERS
WHO A R E MOVIMC " O F F "
Just fill out this quick questionnaire and drop it off at the
Campus Center Information Desk.
f.
Who is your landlord?
2.
Where do you live?
_^_________
number
street
3. Are there any problems with major facilities such as
kitchen, bathroom, etc.? (please explain)
4.
If minor repairs are needed does your landlord
respond promptly and appropriately?
5. Does your landlord impose any rules or regulations
that infringe upon your privacy? (if so, please explain)
6. Are heat and electricity included in the rent?
7. Are you and your landlord bound to a lease?
8. Have you ever experienced problems concerning rent
and/of security deposits?
9.
Rally
until May. Other grants applied for include
the SUNY Research Foundation Orant and
the National Endowment for the Humanities
•« Front Page
(NEH) grant.
a campaign.
"The university is very supportive, but
According to Kamishllan, the attendance they don't have the money to give us," said
was "not as good as I expected but I was hap- Stcen. The program has made a remarkable
_ py with the turnout."
series of accomplishments in such a short
the College Republicans will now be work- time, but they can't expand because they
ing with the State College Republicans as well have "no staff and no money," he added.
as the city and county republican committees Steen said he will "do anything to keep it
to set up a strong Reagan campaing.
alive." According to Steen though, it is
This won't be easy, said Kamishlian, crucial to keep Gurnett "one way , or
because Republicans in Albany "arc few and another." The amount of work involved in
oral history is so extensive that Steen said
far between."
Schiotis said that he has several different Gurnett is "indispensiblc."
types of youth efforts In mind, including
Gurnett is on a temporary line from the
plans to help "teach people about politics." university that terminates at the end of
He added that although both groups will be March. Both she and Steen are hoping that
busy on the campaign, "the main goal is to they will get some money in order to keep her
learn."
• on. If no money is received, Steen says he will
Woman working in UAS kitchen
continue alone but it would be difficult.
Recent technologies haven I reduced women's
The program is shooting ideally for about
$40,000 per year or $190,000 over a four year
period.
If the financial future of the oral history
explained his job as summarizing Timesprogram is uncertain, it is definitely certain in
Union articles from the 1960's that had to do
Ihe minds of its workers. As Stcen said, "we
with Albany. Stempler said the program was
believe very strongly in what we're trying to
"equal to, if not better than, a lot of courses
do; we like to think of it in the same vein with
By Bob Hanlon
in the history department." He described it
historic preservation."
Many modern appliances in American kitas being a kind of "mini-internship."
chens have done little to reduce a housewife's
Diana Marshak, also a senior, was involvtraditional burdens, according to a Stale
ed in a project which dealt with Holocaust
University of New York at Albany
survivors. Marshak found it lo be a "great
Sociologist who has written several articles
experience" and "much more interesting
and plans at least three books dealing with
than most classes." She added that even
-«5
the status of women and technology in Ihe
though she doesn't need the credit, she would
opinion, that bulk containers should not be home and workplace during this century.
like to continue with the program because it
allowed in students' suites and rooms, had
Associate Professor Christine Bosc and a
was "really worthwhile."
remained unchanged.
do7.en other scholars, including Natalie
The program, whose funding is dependent
However, committee member and SA Sokoloff and Rosyln Fcldberg, have compilon grants and donations, is trying to become
Director of Student Programming, Rich
:d essays on many topics. The issues range
self-sufficient, said Slecn. The program
Golubow said "That's ridiculous, we were from sexual harassment and Affirmative Acwould like to get enough publicity and inmore or less reaching a concensus," when
lion to health care issues and the hidden imterest in the project to gel donations from the
confronted with Radko's statement.
pact of technology in The Hidden Aspects of
community, he added.
Women's Work to be completed this fall.
Commitle member and Off-Campus
The original $5,000 donation, made by
Housing Office Director, Karlecn Karlson
Lewis Swyer, is being used for things such as
said that the committee agree on the idea of a
The collection considers the position of
tapes, subscriptions to oral history journals
registration from for bulk containers in sutics women in the home and workplace at Ihe
and Gurnett's salary. The program has apor rooms, that would not require approval turn of the century and traces the progress
plied for a grant from the Hcllman foundafrom staff. "But if you (students) abuse the and failures of their efforts to be liberated
tion which funds educational and historical
privelege...that's going to be it for you and from traditional roles.
projects, but the decision will not be known
bulk containers in your room or suite." Q
Bose, who also holds a Women's Studies
appointment from Ihe University,, describes
the "hidden aspects" involved in a woman's
work as "the kind of work that is hidden
from women themselves, as well as from
society, because it's not thought of as work.
The hidden ways that technologies in the
home have not just helped ease Ihe work, but
also increased the amount of work individual
women can take over."
As an example of this "hidden work", she
mentions picking up children's clothes, emptying ashtrays, and food shopping, all
We want everybody
necessary tasks, usually left to women.
SEXUALITY WEEK
Bose says that recent technologies, small
FEBRUARY 7, 8 , 9 * 10
appliances, and other household aids have
at Sexuality Week
not decreased the volume of a woman's
work. The wire whisk, peanut butter maker,
OS . c* p.,
and crepe maker "certainly didn't liberate us
in the campus center
from anything." Regarding two more recent
devices, the dishwasher and trash compactor,,
she said "it's not clear that these take much"
less lime."
She adds that before many of these
modern appliances, "women used to get help
from the spouses and kids," but that after
Ihcsc, "those people had bought their way
out,"
leaving Ihe woman lo do all the work
Sponsored by Genesis & Middle Earth SA FUNDED by herself.
Oral history
Modern technology not easing
workload on modern housewives
Alcohol
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YES!
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Modern technology has cased housework,
but not the time spent on it, Bose says. Most
of a woman's work is now consumption and
child care: lighter tasks, but just as time consuming, she added. She maintained that standards have risen to require more cleanliness,
which increases the number of jobs which
have fallen to women.
The woman working in an office also has
"hidden aspects" lo her job, she contended.
According to Bose,"a 'hidden aspect' is the
kind of 'social work' that goes on. Much of
the job is not just clerical work, but making
sure people get along, smoothing out differences, training new people and bosses that
come into Ihe office," as well as, she added,
that famous secretarial task: making coffee.
The Hidden Aspects of Women's Work
makes a comparison of women's work today
to that of the turn of Ihe century. With a lack
of electricity, indoor plumbing, and central
heating, women had to light gas lamps in
each room, keep the rooms warm by
periodically stoking fires, and haul tubs of
water from a nearby trough or water source.
"Imagine trying lo do laundry. Vou had to
heat four different tubs of water, for the
washing, blueing, starching, and then the rinsing...it literally became a 'laundry day',"
she explained.
Middle class women, Bose noted, often
had help with tasks from their children, paid
servants, or boarders. The paid servants
usually included working class women and
newly arrived immigrants, both in need of
work, Bose added.
She explained that working class women
"weren't liberated from the home by
technology, because they were already out.
They had to have paying jobs."
Bosc pointed out that the first two decades
of this century witnessed an expansion of the
economy, cutbacks in immigration, and the
advent of child labor laws in many states.
This, coupled with the development of
utilities and the technological infrastructure,
such as running water and electricity, she added, made household tasks slightly easier.
But she noted that the economy was absorbing the traditional house helpers, leaving
many middlclass women to carry a heavier
share of their own housework.
n
HAVE YOU EttR SEEN A FREE
FIRESIDE TMRTER MOVIE?
(Movies like Sound of Music, Funny Lady,
The Graduate, Grease, and Brian's Song)
Well, we need all the help we can get to
continue showing you these great movies;
this Semester and in the coming year.
Find out how you can HELP and also learn a lot
about Films and Promotion.
— We're having an interest meeting on
WEDNESDAY, FEB 1 at 7:00 pm in the Campus
Center Ballroom
(Can't Make It? Call Ron at 462 - 3023 for
more info)
Sft FUNDED
The Season In Cinema
Alice's Restaurants
D
espite Ihe weak selection of Christmas
motion picture releases, there arc
several which audiences around the
country have decided are worth the high price.
of admission. The following are still playing in
or around the Albany area.
phobias caused by the war, a chance to escape
the confining realities of peace, another opportunity to show that they still have It, etc
The first half of Ihe film Is devoted to (ne
recruiting process and the preparation for the
raid of the POW camp In Laos where
Hackman believes his son to be held. The men
practice In an exact replica of Ihe compound
and are forced to feel like 'It Is real again.' After
.weeks of training, the rescue drill can be completed In less than three minutes and Ihe men
are declared fit to face the real thing. Unfortunately, the cost of a quickened pace is a loss
of credibility.
Ian Spelling
Terms of Endearment Is a wonderfully
warm, honest and realistic comedy-drama.
The acting triumverate of Shirley MacLalne.
Debra Winger, and Jack Nicholson Is superb.
From the very humorous opening to the deja
vu ending, everything rings true. I won't spoil
It for you by disclosing the plot. Should you
not wish to trust my endorsement or that of
your closest friends, there does exist a simple
solution: see the film for yourself. Those who
are emotional. should take along several
Kleenexes.
Up to this point the CIA has been Ihe 'Big
Brother Watching Your Every Move.' Once
the mission actually gets off the ground, the
powers that be can no longer remain still. All
of the group's weapons and vehicles are confiscated, but no one is arrested because Ihe
man in charge Is synpathetic toward
Hackman's cause.
I will stick my neck out and declare that
Terms will win the Academy Award for Best
Picture, Actress (MacLalne), Supporting Actor
(Nicholson), and quite possibly garner James
Brooks with Oscars for Best Director and Best
Screenplay.
Christine is a rather lifeless little movie about
a boy and his car (or Is It a car and her boy?)
Arnie (Keith Gordon), the car's young owner,
talks to it (her) and actually loves It. Christine
reciprocates by killing those who dare to mess
with her owner. The blood-letting occurs after
a slow, boring build-up In which Arnie is
transformed from class nerd to a stud worths
of dating Leigh, the new girl in town who 1;
coveted by the entire gang of horny highschoolers assembled In the library. Christine,
of course, becomes quite jealous and tries tc
choke Leigh to death at the drive-In while Arnie gets popcorn.
Whether Christine was Intended to be a horror film or a satire Is of no Importance, for Ihe
film falls completely on both counts. Humor
comes In the form of music. During the opening scene, the car kills a man who dropped
ashes on her upholstery and breaks the arm of
another man, all to the beat of George
Thorogood's "Bad to the Bone." The car's
radio plays only 50's tunes. While she was being totaled her doors suddenly locked and the
radio blared, "I Hear You Knocking But You
Can't Come I n . "
If you're into cars stay home and watch
Magnum P.I. or Knlghtrlder for free. If,
however, you get pleasure from Stephen King
novels, read his latest, Pet Semelary, and
hope that a good film adaptation can be produced.
Earlier In the film, Ihe moody automobile
exacted revenge on three hot shots who totall
ed her. The car needs no driver, and after being wrecked It rebuilds Itself (the film's
highlight). All of this leads to a showdown betD.C. Cab Is a ride not to be taken if Ihe fare
ween good and evil which questions
America's obsession with possession. The en- , is four dollars. D.C. Cab is an ensemble ol
eight
men and two women, all of whom carry
suing junkyard finale Is not scary, just antlroles of equal significance.
dlmactic.
Adam Baldwin (My Bodyguard) arrives in
Christine
leaves one with several
Washington to be a cabbie and nothln' Is gonunanswered questions: Why didn't her potenna get In his way. Max Gall (Wojo from
tial victims simply run Into a house or just get
Barney Miller), who owns Ihe decrepit cab
off the street? During the scenes in which the
company, is a Vietnam vet who lights the
car rebuilds Itself, how did she replace the winlogs in his fireplace with a flame-thrower. Mr.
dows? Penn Auto Glass?
T. Is here too, preaching against drugs and'
prostitution to anyone who will listen.
What passes for a plot can be told in three
sentences. After receiving a reward for
discovering a lost violin, the employees of
D.C. Cab pool their resources and straighten
themselves up. They gain respect and profits.
Mix In a kidnapping, a chase, the old Hitchcockian "wrong man accused of the crime"
routine, marital problems, more chasing, Irene
Cara, kidnappers, the opposing cab company, a pimp, a cab Inspector with a grudge,
Gary Busey as a fun-loving moron, and you
have a silly, Innocuous, and rather fun film.
Easy to like — easy to forget.
I
This scene Is not plausible, but It pales In
comparison to the one that follows. After
deciding that a truck Is necessary lor carrying
on the mission, one of the men questions what
the method of acquiring the vehicle should be
"Should we buy one or borrow one?" To
which Hackman curtly replies, "Steal the
fucker!" The line Itself and the awful delivery
led lo a chorus of laughter from the audience.
Hackman, who still looks like Lex Luther ol
the Superman films, is adequate as the lead.
As bad luck (or bad scripting) would have it,
his Colonel character does not become sufficiently sensitive until late in the film. His portrait of a desperate man trying lo save his son
does come across as honest, although his performance Is often rather cold.
Fred Ward, on the other hand, is terrific asa
soldier who fears tunnels because of an awlul
war experience. Of course, there is only one
tunnel present In the entire film, and Ward is
the man for the Job. The other actors do Ihe
Uncommon Valor Is an Interesting war
best they can to transcend stereotypical roles.
movie that could have been a real winner. Un- Although success varies by degress, there is an
fortunately, Ted Kotcheff, who also directed aura of an ensemble working together for a
First Blood, uses every cliche in the book. The common cause.
plot centers around Gene Hackman, whose
Not all of the men come out of the exson has been missing In action for ten years.
perience alive. And Ihe Ironic Iwisl that befalls
Hackman, tired of bureaucractic red tape,
Hackman at the end Is original. Bul, ii should
enlists Ihe aid of Robert Stack, a rich Inhave been taken further while some of the
dustrialist who also has a son missing since the
end of the Vietnam War. With Stack's financ- other proceedings were severely curtailed.
Uncommon
Valor is a mixed bag: ining, Hackman recruits his son's old war budteresting premise, good performances, well
dies for a rescue mission. After some minor
hassles, each man agrees to go. They join the filmed action sequences, too many loopholes,
mission for various reasons: a chance to purge and not enough emotion for a subject that Is
still fresh in the minds of many Americans.
l l r e d of the same old food? Want
something other than chicken or
spaghetti?
Alice McDermott
Well, there are two new eating spots in
Albany being advertised to students. The first
is the H a l f — M o o n C a f e , a s m a l l ,
semi—vegitarian cafe five blocks past the New
York State Museum. The second is the Dutchess, known affectionately as "the Patroon
Room at right," located on the second floor of
the campus center.
We walked into the Half-Moon Cafe one
particularly dark, stormy evening. The white
walls surrounding us, instead of making us
more comfortable, merely made us stand up
stralghter. 1 admit I've never quite grasped the
psychology of colors, but I don't think the
owners of the Half-Moon really have, either.
The multitude of brightly colored abstract pictures, from Monica Miller's animation (exhibits
change monthly), were interesting, but only
added a small amount of color to the
restaurant. Even the wood tables, chairs, and
counters did little to soften the place.
We arranged our things at the table in the
window and walked up to the counter to
check out the menu.
Semi-vegitarian (and inexpensive) is the best
way to describe the food. The rates ( Espresso
$.50, Cappachlno.Mochach.no, $ 1 . 0 0 ,
Omelettes $2.50,a fruit, cheese and bread
plate $1.50) were all very reasonable.
Four-thirty didn't seem too early to begin
dinner, so my friend ordered the Italian
sausage sandwich and mochachino. I decided
to try something unusual (at least for me), and
asked for a Tofu sandwich, black bean soup
with sour cream, and the mochachino.
We went back to our window seat, worrying
about the poor weather. In a few minutes we
were called and told that our food was ready.
We clambered up and, cafeteria-style,took our
. Ed Marusslch UPS
silverware from the containers, got ourselves
napkins, and went back to Ihe table to munch
away.
The Tofu sandwich (mashed tofu with
spices and celery) was plentiful, but bland.
The black bean soup was filled with
vegetables, and was made much richer by the
dollop of sour cream. The home-made Italian
sausage sandwich, served on 'your choice of
breads,' had the spicy tastiness that the tofu
lacked. "
The mochachino, a chocolate flavored cap*
pachino, seemed a little more coffee than
chocolate, and the chocolate lover in me was
disappointed. But, of course, that's how it's
supposed to be. Certainly one of the most
pleasing parts of ihe meal, since I was treating,
was that the final check came to only $7.35.
The Dutchess was a very different
restaurant. The lights were dim and soothing,
and candles or flowers were placed on each
table. As soon as we arrived, the hostess very
graciously sealed the five of us in this romantic
setting.
Being very hungry, we decided to order
ometimes, at certain anniversaries of
,ife, we examine what is going on In our
Mor\d, taking stock of all that is happening, and, if we're not happy with It. we question and change It.
Rina Young
The first two stages of my life, dependence
and the transition from dependence to in
dependence, are almost complete. The nex
step is to break into complete independence.
With maturity comes a loss of innocence and
dreams, but the trade-In of our romantic notions brings us a reality which can satisfy us.
give us peace of mind, and provide us with a
future lo look forward to.
On turning twenty, it occurs to me that there
is a lack of direction for my life to take. There
once, when I was younger, was an image that
I'd hoped to embody, but upon reaching my
twentieth year, I can only wonder what happened to it. Is It possible lo lose something that
once seemed so tangible, and yet not have
any Idea how or when? What does It mean to
have a vision, In reality and In theory?
The basis for such visions and values starts
when we are young, first being educated by
our parents In their beleifs and morals. From
this basis we hammer - out our own set of
morals and ethics. We also gradually feel out
our parents dreams and hopes, and what they
had to give up In ihe battles of everyday living.
Yet we know, through their stories and an occasional sparkle In their eyes, that they stll
have dreams of grandeur.
If we lose all our dreams, we lose our future,
for what are we without our dreams? What
direction can we hope to move in If the path is
overridden with cynicism and despair? We
have an obligation in life to care, and to forge
hopes in the world of our dreams, a world not
of Ihe possible, but of the actual. For without
seeing what is possible, how can It ever
become the actual? So day by day we live our
lives according to set, dally routines, rarely examining them for any meaning. There is a
constant learning process that goes on in our
lives, sometimes without our knowing it. We
must once in a while look Inward to see how
this process is affecting us, and what we are
gaining Irom it. From these different ideas,
and the struggle with these Ideas, we grow and
struggle within ourselves.
And so we grow, and dream, and try to
mesh our dream with our reality. For a lucky
few, Ihls will be easy, yet for most of us, this Is
a hard marriage to make. A vision is a hard
thing to nurture in Ihls world.
This vision is always under fire. Depending
upon the way we deal wllh our vision, we may
react in different ways. Is this vision something
we may look towards, but never hope to
reach? Or, in securing this vision, may we
hope to achieve It someday? How committee
are we to this vision of ours? And what if It'r
ultimately unfulflllable, and In seeing this wc
lose all hope?
' Lately, these questions have been bolherlnn
me. There is a void in me presently that needs
a purpose, yel how may this synthesis come
about? How may I go about reconstructing
Moving on to the main course, we noticed
that the menu began to look vaguely familiar.
Why, mosl of the foods served in the Dutchess
bear a strong resemblance to the Patroon
room fare. The roast beef and the turkey club
are old hands from the luncheon restaurant.
The spinach fettuchini (without the walnuts)
appears earlier in the day, and lunchtimes
New Yorker becomes the London bridge by
Since we were still on campus, the food was
rated on an A-E scale, and recieved a B.
The interesting differences between the
Half-Moon and the Dutchess is less the food
they serve than their philosophies and ultimate
goals. The Half-Moon provides interesting,
varlated food at low prices, at the expense of
ocation and atmosphere. The Dutchess, on
:he other hand, through it's central location,
offers campus dwellers an attractive, inexpensive, easy to reach place for dinner, sacrificing
a little on the food.
But if you are downtown looking for
something 'interesting' for dinner, or uptown
and not in the mood to leave, the Half-Moon
Cafe and the Dutchess are two very good
eating places which deserve your consideration.
•
A
spects regrets to report the end of a tradition. More than a tradition, in fact, a way of life.
Last Saturday night, we made an appearance at Frank's Liuing Room,a beloved watering hole of ASPies, both past and present. Upon crossing the threshold, we were irked to
discover certain patrons (ourselves not Included — of course) being asked to certify that they
were of the legal drinking age. The gentleman who was requesting the age verification was a
venerable Frank's employee, Andre, the daytime bartender.
This is nothing new to those who frequent the 'Post', or IV.7*. 's, but to a Frank's regular or
even to one who only but occassionally sojourns down the Liuing Room, this Is an outrage and a
disgrace.
In desparate times like these, where we see lines of students waiting io get into bars that play
typical commercial music, or even. God forbid, use coin-operated viclrolas, Frank's offers the
alternative.
Frank's also offers a monetary alternative to the economically-minded student. On Tuesday's,
which is Ladies Nile at Ihe tavern, a gin and Ionic and a glass of Budweiser's finest can be had for
a mere $1.25. On Friday evenings, a pitcher of beer can be yours in exchange for the insignificant sum of $2.00.
We're flabbergasted at how it has come lo be. but of late, undesirables have been crowding
our virgin underground paradise. Hark, ye of The Lamppost, of IV.T.'sand O'Heaney's: take
your business back to those silly sterile playgrounds from whence you came. Leave us to our unfinished floor, prefab bathrooms, crater-faced dartboard, obscure music, roach-infested
cracked-wood bar and. most importantly (!), unpretentious social anarchy. Get out! Stay out!
And don't let us calch you there again!
Sincerely,
It's My Birthday. Read This.
S
side dishes to split as an appetizer. The place
wasn't crowded, but service was slow anyway.
When our dishes finally arrived, we shared
deep-fried potato puffs($1.75) and the combination basket, which Included fried zuchlnnl,
fried mushrooms, and onion rings at $2.75. A
friend ordered New England Clam Chowder
at $.75 a cup. Of the three, the potato puffs
were the big winners. Accompanied by a sour
cream and horseradish dip, they were crunchy
potalos the size of ping-pong balls, not at all
like the frozen Tater-Tots I had imagined. The
soup and the combo-basket tied for second, as
the soup was thick and creamy and Ihe
vegetables appeal rested in the freshness of the
produce used.
night. This is nothing horrible, arid In fact,
there are Improvements In the friday night
menu.
Omelette selections, for example, are Improved. The eleven varieties range from the
basic cheddar or Western, to the more adventurous alfalfa sprouts or tomato. The side
dishes, which include Buffalo Wings and
French Fried Steak Fries, are a welcome addition.
Eying the selection, my dining mates, Marie
and Janet, each ordered the London Bridge
at $3.95, while Sue and Lisa both decided on
Ihe spinach fettucine for $4.95, while I asked
for a Western Omelette at $3.50.
The London Bridge is sliced London broil,
with mushroom sauce and a roll. Although It
wasn't rare (as described In the menu), but
well-done, the mushroom sauce saved the
dish. Lisa and Sue, on the other hand, were
very unhappy with the spinach fettucine, finding it too bland and without the promised
walnuts, although a special request for
parmesan cheese did perk it up a bit. My own
Westerm omelette looked like a three-egger.
and was filled with ham, cheese, and onions.
Aspects
ASPECTS
Metln Ulug
OTIS
such a vision? I have passed the time of my
childhood dreams, and there now comes ihe
realization that there must be somelhlng more,
something to which I may turn all of my
energy. There is a whole life ahead of me lhat
I can't foresee living without dreams and visions.
Moving into one's twentieth year Is a reason
lo pause for reflection. Il is difficult, because of
Ihe idea that life Is no longer something lhat
one can take for granted, lo avoid taking a
closer look at what makes us lick. The loss of
childhood dreams doesn't preclude Ihe option
of putting newer, more stable ones In their
place. By shaking things up. we pick out Ihe
strongest of our values and desires, and
become stronger and more able to deal with
what lies ahead.
In the end, what matters? What will lake- up
mosl of our thoughts? Redefining our values
and taking them down for Introspection every
so often puts Ihem on a continuum thai we
may deal with. We rock the boal, Ihe waves.
settle, and we continue on our way. Perhaps
the vision may never become a reality, bul the
question Is: does lhat make our existence any
less valid? There will always be the light al Ihe
end of the tunnel for us; II Is nol necessary lhat
we reach It, To know what there Is. Is enough
hope.
AND SO, AFfffi THE CIVIL WAR,
I DECIDED TO TAKE IT EASY. I
WASN'T EXACTLY A SPRING
£ H lCKEN ANYMORE,YOU KNOW.
f
l A U T lIOONN - DO WOT MIX
THIS
" TCOh
o M I C STRIP WITH!
GA50LIM~ AND FLAMES,
I VOTED FOR > — J I WASN'T,
iGROVER C LEVEL AN&AALLOWED
BY R A HAYES
WHENEVER HE R A N [ ) T O V O T E
HEY BARTE^ER, YOU
TO HAVE A PLAYER-PIANO
HERE INSTEAD OF THAT
FANGLED VICTROLA
EDITORIAL-—•
—
he final report of the Bus Task Force leaves even more
to be desired. It was pretty clear that the President's
committee was operating within the standard administration' context: outside or service to Alumni, Draper
and the Wellington, students should expect nothing.' Bus service to off-campus students is a veritable luxury.
Although the committee did explore a variety of
But the resolution stops there.
By perpetuating last semester's confusion, strike up some possibilities, with this attitude as astarting point it could only
go
so far.
kind of victory for the people at Residential Life who have
The University cannot provide housing for thousands of
been trying to harass, regulate and thwart the freedom of
choice and personal development of the students. We are, students. The only available housing is several miles from
for better or worse, no longer in an age where forced moral where the school was located. That it should not be conbehavior is an acceptable notion; the only way to expect sidered a priority to provide transportation assistance lo
responsibility from students is to allow them the freedom to these students is ludicrous.
choose it.
Albany is the capitol of New York State. Many students at
The same goes for the question of allowing bulk con- one time find themselves in some association with the stale
tainers, such as kegs and beer balls, into the dorms. It would government, and the many diverse opportunities ii provides.
make Martone's and Radko's job a lot easier if their people To alienate students from this great and unique potential
did not have to deal With the problems they see as accomany- would be a crime.
ing student drinking: But regulation will not foster responOur beloved university is located in an area practically barsibility, and it will establish a precedent of infringing upon ren of social and cultural goings on, not to memion opporthe rights of students. Reportedly, it took an appearance by tunities for commerce and employment. We need access to
Dr. Frank Pogue, who is responsible for formulating a final this city in order to become active and fulfilled citizens,
policy, to sway the committee last Friday to decide in favor
If the University is unable to provide for students the bus
of allowing kegs and beer balls to remain where they belong. service they need as members of the university and Albany
Although it inspired plenty of healthy discussion, it ap- communities, then its time someone else got a shot at It,
pears that the committee has failed to resolve what most
A system could be set up in which service is run primarily
needed resolution. If the permits law truly needs to be ef- by the Student Association. Drivers, mechanics and other
fected in dorm lounges, then a mechanism must be set up to positions could be operated through a work-study program.
make the law workable. And a clear policy concerning bulk This would save a great deal of money, and it would assist
containers must be asserted and understood. Anarchy born many students financially. This system would certainly be
out of confusion and resentment is no substitute for sensible more responsive to the needs of students.
cooperation.
The need for radically more effective bus service at this
Ur. Pogue is sincerely concerned with balancing ad- university is a priority the Task Force preferred lo pass up
ministrative necessity with fairness to students and their Unfortunately, much of their hard work will be in vain unless
rights. Hopefully, he will be able to carry his vision past the something new and constructive is done with It. It's never to
disappointing results of his advisory committee.
late to change.
Committee failures
T
he final report of the Alcohol Task Force Advisory
Committee has dealt very indecisively with the two
key controversial issues the committee had to face.
The issues are how to run functions that serve alcohol on
campus, and how to deal with the use of kegs and beer balls.
The report reflects the internal struggles of the committee
to come up with a coherent and cohesive alcohol policy for
the campus. In one cor'
. ere the student representatives
and other members- w
vere working to safeguard the
moral and legal rights oi the students.
Facing them were those who, in part, were driven by considerations of managing student lifestyles in the most
trouble-free manner possible. Include in this faction John
Martone, Director of Residential Life, and Assistent Director Liz Radko. A third group battling in this arena included
Director of Physical Plant Dennis Stevens and John
Henighan, formerly with Public Safety and now affiliated
with Financial Management. From this cast of characters
came the Committee's nebulous report.
The issue of governing parties in the dormitories was one
of the major causes of confusion over the alcohol policy last
semester, and one of the main reasons for setting up the advisory committee. Yet this isssue was clearly not resolved.
Under pressure to reduce the financial and physical burden
of alcohol-related cleanup and repairs in the dorms, Martone
and Radko pulled a bureaucratic rabbit out of their hat.
They were able to push a resolution through the committee
which stated that any function serving alcohol on campus
and charging a fee would have to secure a special permit
from the Albany County Alcohol License Control Board.
COLUMN
T
Consumer oriented elections
It Is 1984, and as the presidential election primaries grow
nearer, the rituals of the campaign trail begin. Splattered
across magazines, newspapers and television, the candidates
make themselves visible; the media doing its part in producing what I perceive as being nothing short of a publicity competition. We cannot deny the unpolitical nature of this process.
RobbieLitt
j iT's du&r Trie osuaL euBcrjoN-YeaR
j|©TUFF: a FLiGR FROM M0ND3LQ a FLieR
1 FROM GLeNN, 3 FLieR FRoM Re^GaN,
^ a FLieR FROM Jesse JacKSoN...
To the Editor:
This letter is directed toward Campus Center Audio Visual
in response to the article about the International Film Group
which appeared in the Tuesday Dec 6 edition.
Somewhere in the course of1 the interview, International
Film Group's feelings concerning Campus Center Audio
Visual seemed to have gotten a bit confused. We would like
to set Ihe record straight at this time.
We were very grateful to all of the people working at Campus Center Audio Visual for the help they gave us last
semester when we really needed it. Somehow Campus Center
Audio Visual was blamed for International Film Groups's
problems which, certainly, was not the case. We hope this
clears up the unfortunate misunderstanding.
—Richard Golubow
SA Director of Student Programming
—Deborah Sarria
—Rhoda Spira
International Film Group
India's day
To the Editor:
January 26 is India's Republic Day. Thirty four years ago,
India adopted a Constitution declaring herself a Federal,
Democratic and Secular Republic and guaranteeing to her
people freedoms of speech, thought, expression, worship and
assembly. India's Constitution is very much like the U.S.
Constitution and it contains a clearly defined "Fundamental
Rights" and "Directive Principles of State Policy" requiring
the government to strive lo achieve the Fundamental rights.
For the people of India, January 26 is a day of rejoicing,
but also a time of stock taking on what are her achievements
and failures. In the press, one generally reads about riots.
floods, and poverty. It is rather unfortunate that some
significant achievements of India-the largest democracy in
the world-go unnoticed. India has made great strides during
the last 34 years especially in the economic field. The
preindependent stagnant and dependent economy, has been
modernized and made more self-reliant. After a century of
static and rather declining economic standards, a modest rate
of growth in per capita income has continuously been achieved since 1950, despite the growth of population (from 361
million in 1950 to 690 in 1983).
determination on the part of people at large thai the
democratic and secular traditions must be maintained and
700 million people (a quarter of the human race) must live in
peace and harmony enjoying freedoms granted under the
Constitution. India's overall record in maintaining the
democratic and secular traditions has been a notable success
and worthy of commendation by all free and democratic people in the world.
—Dr. J.S. Uppal
Professor of Economics
An outstanding achievement of India is the diversification
and expansion of industry. Before independence, India had
only a few consumer goods industries. Today, India is self
sufficient in all consumer goods industries and also in several
basic goods industries like steel, cement, fertilizers, shipbuildings and railroads. India has built, since independence,
a strong infrastructure: a network of irrigation, canals,
hydro and thermal power stations, regional and power grids,
and transportation system-the largest in Asia.
A real nemesis
Today, Indian scientists, technologists and engineers are
working in many areas, expanding frontiers of science and
technology. As a result, industry is now able to undertake
self-reliant growth in many fields. India is conscious of some
serious lingering economic problems: poverty, population
growth and inflation. The solution of these problems continues to be (he major goals of ambitious Indian Five Year
Plans.
In India today, there arc demands for rearrangement of
center-state relationships, especially from some minority and
regional groups, to safeguard their religious/cultural identities. There have been isolated cases of disturbance on these
issues and sometimes one can identify lapses on the part of
government and these groups in dealing with these difficult
issues. Fortunately, however, there continues to be a firm
Do ytiti think \\v linw ciiniiyli
tions never make politically radical power replacements,
Perhaps our elections are but a charade which satisfies lite
public and keeps one man from staying in office too long and
gaining too much control.
The nature of the presidential office today has much lo do
with all this as well. The executive has become a position in
which decisions of a strong and decisive nature can be made
quickly. The crises of the modern world often call for fasl action and resolve. How can the behavior of candidates be effectively determined on the campaign trail when the nature
of the office and its subjugation to heavy outside political influence will shape the candidates behavior lo the point where
his platform may never be realized. Ours is a nonparticipatory government as well, so the public never sees
the political agendas that await the new president, from the
security council or the CIA.
If elections seem like a charade, it could quite possibly be
due to the fact that our governmental system, our social
values and structure allow little participation, but demand
popular consent. This need not be understood as a bad quality or a danger sign but merely as a demonstration of Ihe
balance between freedom and unescapable social control thai
all Americans live with,
iJrS*
Aspects
To the Editor:
In our opinion, the students and faculty of SUN YA are being willfully misled. A recent announcement for the upcoming literary journal Nemesis, sponsored by the Feminist
Alliance, is being circulated on the campus. This organization has traditionally supported the rights of females and opposed any accusations thai they are anti-male. We respect
these ideas.
However, the new publications's name alone casts doubt
on their intentions. The American Heritage Dictionary
defines "nemesis" as one who inflicts relentless vengeance or
destruction; an inflictor of retribution. Retribution in turn, is
defined as something given in repayment; especially punishment.
By this definition it appears that the publication may well
spark a controversy between those stating the Feminist
Alliance is striving to build a better integration of the sexes,
and those who believe they arc merely attacking men as a
whole. Considering this, one might conclude that this means
of advertisement may be more damaging than beneficial.
—Bill Speidel
—Mark Holland
mwlmrjiivpowcr:
Our government doesn't
think we have enough.
Eitabllshed In 1916
David L.L. Lsskln, Editor in Chief
Patricia Mitchell, Managing Editor
Nsws Editor! . . . .
Assoclsts Nsws Editor
jASPscts Editor
Assocists ASPscts Editors .
Sound Editor
Villon Editor
Sporti Editor!
Assoclsts Sports Editors —
SPORTS SuppMmsnt Editor.
Editorial Paoaa Editor
Copy Editors
Photography Editor
Sieve Fox, Heidi Gralla
Jerry Camplone
. . . . Gall Merrell, John Keenan
Stephen Marks
Jonas Nachsln
Ken Dornbaum
.. Tom Kacandas, Mark Lovlne
.Marc Herman, Keith Marder
...MarcSchwarz
,
Edward Raines
,.. Kelley Grovor, Annette Perot
Ed Marusalch
y; ;.*•
Yet, in being unpolitical, we need not perceive the modern
electoral process as un-American. The behavior is
characteristic of our country, in that we almost 'consume'
our candidates. We are bought with votes of confidence and
are sold on personality images. The behavior of our politicians in the 1984 elections, confirms in my mind that the
American democratic process has well adjusted itself to the
changes our lives experience from the existence of television
and the media as a whole.
Images of The Making of the President: 1968 come to
mind. Candidate Richard Nixon made different television
campaign advertisements for different regions of the country, each one promising something different and often con-
tradictory to other regionally tailored promises. Television
has allowed the candidate to reach large sections of the
population but it has also put him under close visual
scrutiny. He becomes an object that is judged more like merchandise than as a political actor, and to cater to the public
whim, the candidate complies.
A lot of people are aware of this and I bring it up not to
preach, but to pose some thought in an attempt to gain
greater insight into our government. A greater lesson can be
learned from this small display.
Our electorate has not reached an all time intellectual low
with the advent of television. America has never really been
at a point in its history where a president has been voted in
completely on political rationality, and the present is no better than the past in this respect. A study by Columbia University in the 1950"s determined that only 12 per cent of the eligible voting public shows up at the polls today. What does this
mean? Is there an inherent stability in American politics that
real political concern by the general population is not needed?
Consider the fact that our candidates always come from
elite groups of often wealthy, educated white men whose
careers are compltely within the political sphere. Our elec-
Record straightened
ill K*f
',••'.•••'••;
:
"".* * • *
':::'•••':
||
Judy Tore), Business Manager
Lynn Saravls, Associate Business Manager
Jane Hlrsch, Rhonda V/o\t,Advertlslng Managers
Mike Krelmer, Sales Manager
Billing Accountants
RandBo Behar
Payroll Supervisor
Gay Poross
Classified Manager
Joanna Hamilton
Composition Manager
Jennller Block
Advertising Sales: Susan Kllen, Mark Sussman, Rich Golden, Slevo Lolbarman, Danielle Karmel, Advertising Production: Loe Erlckson, Elaine Frledar,
Julie Mark, Ellyn Mulo, Sharon Okun, Lynno Slegel, Charololle Shube, Ellen
Wiseman, Olllce Stall: Chrlslino Bincjh, Jonnlller Block, Mar|orle Rosenthal
im
:;•.•;.•;;•.
Entire contents copyright
1984 Albany Student Press Corporation, sll
rights reserved.
The Albany Studont Proas Is publlshnd Tuesdays and Fridays botwatin
August and June by the Albany Sludent Press Coiporallon, an Independent
nollorprollt corporation.
Editorials are written by the Editor In Chlol with members of the Editorial
Board; policy In subject In revluw by Ihe Editorial Board. Columns are written
by mombors ol the unlvorslty community and do not necessarily represent
.odilorlal policy. Advertising policy does nal necessarily rolled odltorial
[policy,
Mailing address:
Albany Student Press, CC 329
1400 Washington Ave.
Albany, NY 12222
(ftIB) 457-8892.3322/3389
,*.»••.
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the ilni i» Iho center represents
I ho destructive force of itll the
lirepower used during ilic entire
six years pf World Wnr II.
Three million tons of TNT.
Three nicgiitonSi
The oilier dots pnrlnty the fire*
power of ihe world's nuclear
arsenals. Ih.lHM) megatons. More
than 5,000 World Wur lis.
Do you think we have enough?
The top lel'llmnd circle (circle
A) is ihe firepower of just one
U.S. submarine. Think of it:
•.••.'••:•
twice (lie lirepower used in
World Wur II aboiird » single
submarine.
That one submarine could
destroy over ISO Soviet targets.
We have |«" such subs, plus
|5 others with even greater
lirepower.
Do you think we have enough?
The Pentagon doesn't think so.
The Pen I agon wants more. Like
the new Trident submarine. Its
firepower is portrayed by the
lower lefthund circle (circle B).
About seven World War lis.
Just two squares (labeled C)
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Photography principally supplied by Unlvotslty Pholo Sorvtce, a studonl
group.
Chief Photographer Susan Elaine Mlndlch, UPS Stall: Amy Cohen, Sherry
Loo Cohen, Cindy Galway, Philip Hack, Kenny Klfsch, Rachel Lllwln, Robert
Luckoy, Ed Marusalch, Lois Mattabonl, Barry Rolcher, Lisa Simmons, Lauren
Siller, Robort Soucy, Erica Spelgel, Warren Stout. James Valuntino, Jason
Zoppol
.vv-'-i*
' • ' . ' . • : :
Holly Prestl Production Manager
Donna Agular, Sue Pachinaky Associate Production Managers
Chlet Typesetter
Lancay Heyman
Paste-up: Susan Mayhan, Dob Slokl. Typists: Jim Capozzola, Phyllis
Lefkowllz, Chaulfeur: Eric Dorl
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• : • ; ; ;
Mark Oeaner, Senior Editor
Contributing; Editors: Dean Betz, Debbie Judge, Wayne Peereboom, Anlhony
jsilber, Lisa Strain, Editorial Assistants; Jane Anderson, Dean Chang, Jim
iO'Sullivan, Staff writers: Alicia Clmbota, Ian Clements, Betsy Eckel, Ronald
Brant Qereton, Adam Goodman, Ben Gordon, Robert Hayes, Eric Hlndin,
Alice McDermott, Caryn Mlske, Suzanne Murphy, Christine Rolfelt. Liz Reich,
[Joe Romano, Shellah Sable, David Singer, Michael Skolnlck, Alan Somkln,
Ian Spelling, Megan Gray Taylor, John Thotburn, Perry Tlschlor, Koilh Van
Allen, Hone Wolnsloln, Mark'Wilgard, John Wlllmolt, Rlna Young, Spectrum
Editors: Ellen Filzgerald, Ronl Ginsberg
IH
•. •. *
"••.*••.•••
•:":•.••*•'•
• ' • • : : : •
on this chart (more than 250
megatons) represents enough
firepower to destroy all the largeand medium-si zed cities in the
entire world.
Do you think we have enough?
The Reagan Administration
doesn't think so. In the next
decade, Ihe U.S, plans to build
17,000 new nuclear weapons,
If you think we already have
enough weapons, call, toll-free,
l-800-NUCLEAR. We will send
you information about what you
can do to help halt the arms race.
You cat) make a difference.
'/:.•.':!•;•. 1
il|
U.S. Congressional staff have
[reviewed the facts in this ad and
haw found them accurate.
Documentation available on
request.
(*•«*.< ml by PubttC M t d M Cffltff
m
1 2 ALBANYSTUDENTPRESS
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
POLICY.
Deadline*:
Tuesdeyet 3 Pit for Friday
Friday al 3 PM lor Tuesday
Rain:
SI.50 for the first 10 words
10 cents each additional word
Any bold word Is 10 cents extra •
$2.00 extra lor a box
minimum charge Is $1.50
Classified
ads are being ac
copied In the SA Contact Office during regular
business
hours.
Classified advertising must be paid
In cash at the time of Insertion. No
checks will be accepted. Minimum
charge tor billing Is $25.00 per
Issue.
No ads will be printed without a
full name, address or phone number
on the Advertising form. Credit may
be extended, but NO refunds will be
given. Editorial policy will not permit ads to be printed which contain
blatant profanity or those that are
In poor taste. We reserve the right
to reject any material deemed unsuitable for publication.
It you have any questions or problems concerning Classified Advertising, please feel free to call or
stop by the Business Office.
FOR SALE
Chilly?
Sharp-looking young
women's (eke-fur jackals on sals
this wssk lor only $29, call Julian
(457-7971). Hurry, llmltad supply.
DO YOU HAVE TROUBLE KEEPING
YOUR PANTS IN YOUR BOOTS?
ELIMINATE THE BAGGY LOOK
WITH A PAIR OF STIRRUP BRAND
BOOT STRAPS. LIMITED SUPPLY
AVAILABLE. CALL 869-6728 MONDAY THRU WEDNESDAY AFTER
9PM AND WEEKENDS AFTER 1PM.
FOR SALE
World's greeted car stsrso. Con
cord HPt-532. Digital. 50 walls.
Brand now In box. Llal $800. Beet
Pilar. Slavs • 465-3640
4-sale. 180 cm. Head Skis Tyrolla
bindings $100. T-2000 Tennis Racquets $15.
Lisa
457-B927
FOR SALE:
Eric Clapton German Library (13
LP's)
Also woman's black leather jacket
(size 11)
Best o i l e r s .
Call Michelle
457-4716
SERVICES
2 MONTHS FOR THE PRICE OF 1
LEARN KARATE AND SELFDEFENSE
Instruction by 4th degree black belt
holders ALAN LASKER and HARRY
GNACIK. Established since 1969.
Low, low rates, Including no charge
lor promotional testing.
a TUESDAY, JANUARY31,
Housemate wanted:
3-Bedroom,
lurnished apartment ml washer and
dryer, on busllne.J150.00 plus
utilities. Call 4594922
1984
TUESDAY, JANUARY 3/, 1984 a ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
Why d o t * It have to hurt so much
when we break up? What did I do
wrong?.
Did you aver wonder about these
questions? We'll be talking about
them at Sexuality Week, February 7,
8,9, > 10.
Dally and Sunday
New York Times
Call UAS Vending Services
457-4601
Dear Gerard,
Happy 22nd Birthdayl Thank you
for making this past year so special
to me. I love you.
JOBS
Sue
MODELS-Photographlc Females.
Earn $5.00 to $50.00 In spare hours.
Nude and semi. Contact P.O. Box
7143 Albany, N.Y. 12224
WANTED: TRACK COACH FOR RPI
WOMEN'S TRACK TEAM.
NOW
THRU MARCH PART TIMEI4 or 5
DAYS/WEEK). CONTACK STACEY
LEVINE c/0 RENSSELAER UNION
BOX 91, TROY 12181
Wanted:
Commission student
travel sales representatives. Contact, Greg Hogarth at Blyth & Company, 84 Yorkvllle Ave., Toronto,
Ont.,
Canada.M5R
IB9.
1-416-964-2569.
Women Interested In earning up
to $50 per hour as a photography
model please respond. A positive
attitude and appearance are sought
alter- not experience. The Classic
Image Post Office Box 641 Latham,
New York 12110.
GOVERNMENT JOBS: $16,559 50,553/yr.
Now Hiring. Your Area.
Call 1-B05-687-6000 Ext. R-3106.
TEST YOURSELF. Can you manage
your time productively? Work 2-4
nrs/wk consistently?
Are you
success-oriented? Self-motivated?
Marketing position available on
campus. 1-800-243-6679.
PERSONALS
WHY GO OUT IN THE COLD WHEN
YOU CAN HAVE
NEWSDAY
DELIVERED DIRECTLY TO YOUR
DOORSTEPI
CALL TODD 'MR. NEWSDAY'
AT -3018
CandidateCongrats on entering the political
arena.
, I Love You
your campaign manager
Tired of the cold weather yet?
Daytona/FI. Lauderdale' Spring
Break from $135.00. 7 nights accomodations, welcome party, free
beer and more. Low cost Amtrack
and flights
Ighi available. Contact:
John 457-8870
I57-I
BAHAMAS Spring Break Irom
$345.00. 7 nights accomodations,
round trip jet, free transfers and
rum swizzle parties, cruise with
open bar and more. Contact: John
457-8870
STEPPIN'OUT
IS
BACK
AT
FANTASIES
Thursday Feb. 2nd
Hope to see
ya therein
You can pick up the Sunday New
York Times on your Quad brunch
lines. Call UAS Vending Services
457-4601.
ADAMYOUR COAT OR MINE?
-YOUR BIGGEST FAN
Walter Garagekels Is coming to
SUNYA...
direct to you from the Sullivan Catskill's Resort Area.
Dear Lisa and DebbieWhy don't we go to W.T.'s for a
change?
•Guess Who
Rlna
Happy Birthday!
Debbie L
Are you ready to do the psychology
reasearch we talked about last
semester?
concerned student
On Campus Wednesday, F e b r u a r y 1 s t , 10-4
Interviews:
Campus C e n t e r , Rm. 370
For more Information and advance appointments, go to:
NYS Job S e r v i c e , Campus C e n t e r , B54
Or Contact. NJ YM-YWHA Games
ASP Sports would like to apologize
lor not covering the UAD
Wheelchair Hockey game In
December to all those concerned. A
mistake
was
made
when
assignments were given out and
this error Is regretted.
-Sports Editor Tom Kacandes
21 Plymouth St, Fairfield, NJ 07006 (201) 575-3333
I race on Indian? Where? Dayna,
call me before you graduate, okay?
Your favorite Softball coach
449-1739
*0
We Deliver Your
New York Times Daily
Call UAS Vending Service*
457-4601
r
D E U
is nowAOPEN
7 NIGHTS
/=
^\
*
Mexican Cale
a week for
DINNER
*
*
*Ji EAT IN OR TAKE OUT!*
*
Lunches—Wed. thru Frl.
465 Madison Ave.
DAYTONA
DAYTONA
DAYIONA
DAYIONA
DAYTONA
DAYTONA
*
41
436-1855
DAYTONA
DAYTONA
DAYTONA
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DAYTONA
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DAYTONA
ra«.»m«
J5J5JX
DAYTONA
DAYTONA
DAYTONA
5JSSS*
DAYTONA
DAYTONA
DAYTONA
DAYTONA
DAYTONA
YOU ARE
•* THE CAMPUS CENTER
Affordable wordprocasslng(typlng):
SEXUALITY WEEK
*
FEBRUARY 7, S, 9, & 10
Sponsored by Geneala
ft Middle Earth
DAYTONA
DAYIONA
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DAYIONA
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DAYIONA
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t
DAYTONA
DAYIONA
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Thinks Cf
DAYTONA
DAYTONA BEACH. FLORIDA
DAYTONA
DAYTONA
They Think Of
DAYTONA
HAWFORJ TOUHB of ALBANY , DAYTONA
This Year Will Be Our
i DAYTONA
DAYTONA
Best Spring Break Ever! ', DAYTONA
- April 13-2.1. 198'< - i DAYTONA
DAYTONA
The Only COMPLETE
j DAYTONA
-_
Florida Vacation!!! ! DAYTONA
CRAWFORD TOURS \ DAYTONA
DAYTONA
'
0( ALBANY. NEW YORK
! DAYTONA
• 0 h l l r t , , r ' " 1 b "S''° 1«>Y> from SUNYA,
J DAYTONA
I Deluxe Accomnodationa On The Beach
; DAYTONA
• 4t Hie Texan. FREE P a r t i e s , Beor,
J DAYTONA
J S u r p r i s e s & Much, Huch Morel 11
J DAYTONA
DAYIONA
NO Hidden Additional Costs!II
DAYTONA
• Contact Dave Jones. Morris Hall 302, DAYTONA
• Telephone, »m57-B71l't for Complete
DAYTONA
: Details.
Or Call
DAYTONA
8
C r a T o n ' T o u r s o f Albany 1 8 6 9 - 7 8 5 0 ; DAYTONA
S D e p o s i t B i i u d l i n e - F e b r u a r y O, 1 9 » j DAYTONA
DAYTONA
'M
SA FUNDED
ARE YOU INTERESTED IN
STUDYING
SOCIAL
WORK?
An Interest meeting for all students will be.
held Wednesday. February 8. 1 9 8 4 . in ULB 9 5 .
from 4:00-7:00 P.M. Lester B. Brown, chair,
undergraduate social work program, and John
Oliver, associate dean of the school, will be
available to talk with you about social work
courses and the profession. Materials about
social work, the SSW program and applications will be available for those wishing to
know more or to apply to major in social work.
If you are unable to attend, send a friend or call Dr.
Brown at 4 5 5 - 6 2 0 5 , in Richardson Hall.
Attention
SA Groups
Applications for
SA Funding Will Be
Available in the SA Office
0»M0NA
DAYTONA
DAYTONA
DAYTONA
DAYTONA
DAYTONA
DAYTONA
DAYTONA
DAYTONA
DAYTONA
DAYTONA
DAYIONA
DATTONA
DAYIONA
DAYIONA
DAYTOXA
DAYTONA
DAYTONA
DAYTONA
DAYTONA
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DAYIONA
DAYTONA
DAYTONA
DAYTONA
DAYTONA
DAYTONA
DAYTONA
DAYTONA
DAYTONA
DAYTONA
DAYTONA
DAYTONA
DAYIONA
DAYTONA
DAYTOKA
MONDAY, FEB fiTH
ft
*»
ff
J *
~
A
t
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
SA FUNDED
Tuesday Jan. 31 st
LC * 8:00 pm
When Albany State
(between Lark St. & the Park)
Also Visa/Mastercard.
Call 1-80M87-6000 Ext. C-3106
DAYTONA
DAYTONA
DAYIONA
DAYTONA
DAYTONA
DAYTONA
BIG BROTHER/
BIG SISTER
^
J
A workshop will be set up
Feb. 6th at 7:00 PM
in the Assembly Hall
for information on the
Budget Process.
All group leaders are
encouraged to attend.
Paadlina f o r applications is
F r i d a y , Fa». l l n t f at SzOO PM
J3
Criminal Justice
• • Najor
Applications for the
Criminal Justice
Undergraduate major
will be available
on Feb. 1st,
They may be picked up
in the Rockefeller
College Undergraduate
Programs Office LI-95
DRY
NAILS $25.00
Special $ 6 0 . 0 0 Perm
L O N G H A I R EXTRA
_ "INCLUDES PRECISION CUT"
NEW CREDIT oardl Nobody relus-
Fun, upbeat Roomate Wanted to
share 3 bedroom apartment. Just
oil Western Ave. near S.U.N.Y. and
busline. $176.00.
Aak lor Robin or Joe
438-0552
SUNY STUDENT
SPECIAL
PRECISION
CUT AND BLOW
$14.00.
REG.$18.00
GENERAL INTEREST
MEETING
ULB 9 5 is located in the depressed courtyard
between the Library and the Business Administration building on.the uptown campus.
<$4^4&<$4&<$4&4&4&4f£4&4&4&<$|$4i4&JM&
Stop at either center on their
respective nights at 7:00 p.m. to
register and begin.
HOUSING
HAIR
DESIGNERS
Stuyveeant Plaza
438-6668
SCULPTURED
HAVE NEWSDAY DELIVERED TO
YOUR ROOM EVERY DAY.
CALL TODD at 7-3016
COME AS
M
DON'T MISS THE FANTASTIC
SKI PARTY AT WHEELS PLUS THIS
THURSDAY, FEBHUARY 2, 1984.
DOOR PRIZES INCLUDE TWO ONE
DAY LIFT TICKETS TO APOPULAR
RESORT. SPECIAL THANKS TO
ALL WHO SIGNED OUR PETITION
FOR A BEER AND WINE LICENSE
SO THAT WE CAN HAVE BEER
AND WINE AT WHEELS PLUS.
SPECIAL GUEST DJ GORDON.
W H E E L S PLUS IS IN T H E
WESTGATE SHOPPING MALL
NEXT TO JC PENNY'S. FOR INFO
CALL 869-6728 OR 438-2515. SPONSORED
BY
SA.
COUNSELORS and SPECIALISTS
BEAUTIFUL COED CAMPS in P0CON0 MTS
SALARY RANGE S 5 0 0 - S I 2 0 0
Do man have a stronger sex drive
than women? Is this a common
myth or can It be true? Find out the
answer at Sexuality Week, February
7, 8, 9 4 10.
Schenectady JCC
2565 Balltown Rd.
Schenectady • 377-8803
THURSDAY EVENINGS
editing. Cell 4a»*MC,
Ed Marusslch:
Many thanks from the ASP for your
hard work and dedication. We
couldn't have made It last semester
without your help. Here's to happier
Issues.
Why can't my parents accept me
the way I am? Will I ever be totally
Independent? Explore these questions and others concerning changing parent roles at Sexuality Week,
February" 7, 8, 9, and 10.
SUMMER JOBS
NO NEED TO DRESS UP
Albany JCC
340 Whitehall Rd.
Albany • 438*651
MONDAY EVENINGS
Love,
Aspects
Dear Sharon, Elaine and LlsaThe L.O.B. will never be the same!
What would I do without you guys?
- Love always,
.. J.i-ULu
FEMALE
TRAVEL COMPANION WANTED
FOR
PARTYING
TIME
IN
ACAPULCOOVER SPRING BREAK.
BARGAIN PRICE FOR ALL ACCOMODATIONS • $500. CALL SUE
AT 457-5220.
"By Popular Demand:
WORLDVIEW magazine needs
a Business Manager and Ad
Sales Representatives. Leave a
note In CC 329 or attend the
- ASP Interest Meeting.
As Part of Sexuality Week
Speakers Forum Proudly
Brings to SUNY
SHERE HITE
AUTHOR OF
The Hite Report :
A Nationwide Study
of Female Sexuality
&
The Hite Report of
Male Sexuality
WED Feb 8th
CC Ballroom 8pm
•2 w/tax sticker
'3 w/out
sa funded
1 4 ALBANY STUDENT PRESS a TUESDAY, JANUARY31, 1984
Leaky roofs
•813
"There is now an appreciation by the state
government o f the need for repairs to the in*
trastructure of these buildings. Not enough
funds are available. However the need for
these allocations is appreciated," Thompson
continued.
The increasing need for repair and
rehabilitation expenditures stems from the
fact that the majority o f the buildings in the
S U N Y system were built within a small time
frame, according to Thompson. "All these
buildings were generally built in the 1960's
and 1970's. They will all age in a similar lime
frame. Therefore, we see the same problems
arising in many different structures," he
said.
repairs t o these roofs on the podium. This
money has been requested for three and a
half to four years n o w . "
The new roofs would serve two functions,
according t o Stevens. " N o t only would the
new roofs fufill their primary goal in preserving the buildings from further damage, they
would also be extremely beneficial to the
university in terms o f energy consevation.
The old roofs are n o w s o cracked and waterfilled that they are no longer adequate
enough to retain heat. The new roofs are constructed to insulate the buildings much bett e r , " he said.
The money has currently been proposed by
Governor C u o m o as part of his 1984 executive budget. The budget is now under consideration by the State Legislature. Should it
be approved as part of the overall operating
The money allocation to Albany will be budget, the funds would not become
spent on the replacement of the roofs of the available until April, according to a C u o m o
D
Earth Science, Fine Arts, Administration, press representative.
Business Administration, Performing Arts,
Physical Education and Infirmary buildings.
"This has been a long term project," said
Dennis Stevens, director of the university's
physical plant. "This was requested by the
campus after extensive review by university to form its core and to develop a reputation
officials and an outside engineering firm. with which to procure outside grants and
These repairs are crucial to the preservation contracts, he explained. T h e Federal governof the infrastructure."
ment has been o n e o f the largest outside
"It is crucial to the university that we arc sources, giving grants to the A . S . R . C .
able to make use of all our facilities. Wc at through such agencies as the National
this university have a huge investment in Science Foundation.
education, and if we cannot utilize office
Private corporations are a source for outspace or classrooms because of a roof that side funding as well, according to Vonnegut.
needs repair, then that is a sacrifice that we "Companies might wish to have research
cannnot afford to make. It is very important d o n e , " he explained, "but it cannot be done
that we are able lo make use of all our in an academic department." That is an adfacilities," Stevens elaborated.
vantage for having A . S . R . C , Vonnegut addStevens illustrated several examples o f ed, "it rias more flexibility."
Planned Parenthood
TUESDAY. JANUARY 31, 1984 a ALBANY STUDENT PRESS * | 5 '
is n o w at the SUNYA HEALTH CENTER
t w o evenings a Weekl
Mondays & Thursdays
UPPER
from 5:00-8:00 p.n\.
HUDSON
For information or appointments P L A N N E D
call 434-2182
PARENTHOOD
a
T w o Great Sales In O n e "
P I N YOUR aVMRANS
1
AND GO FOR jOSTENS GOLD
AND GO FOR JOSTBSiSGaB
f
1
£ v Vi
Research Center
buildings in which extensive water leaks have
caused major problems, including damage to
the Library, the Criminal Justice building,
and many o f the downtown dorms. " W e
have already made extensive repairs to the
downtown campus and to several academic
buildings on the uptown campus," said
Stevens. "This would be the final stage in
"It is very difficult to d o research at a slate
university," agrees Shumaker, because of
state policies and state auditing. University
policies are, also, a problem sometimes, he
added. Another function of Shumaker's office has been to act as liason between
A . S . R . C . and the administrations of both the
state and the university.
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These students may be replaced by
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Presently, the overall cost o f a
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year.
Along with tuition increases,
Tierney pointed out that President
Reagan has cut federal financial aid
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Tierney said that this means that
there is $500 million less availavle
for financial aid that three years
ago.
Fryer noted that the governor har
said that in an ideal world he
wouldn't raise tuition, he would do
away with it. However, he pointed
out that this isn't an ideal world.
Fryer said that Cuomo feels faced
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order to raise the money, one must
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STUDENT
PRESS D TUESDAY* JANUARY
31, 1984 a ALBANY
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Swimmers
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I f there were any fears that the
Albany State men's swim team
would look past St. Michael's on
Saturday in light o f today's meet
against archrival R P I , they were
erased, as the Danes easily handled
the small Vermont College, 65-40.
The scare was not even indicative
of the meet as Albany held a 60-20
lead before experimenting with
other swimmers and combinations.
Albany coach Joe Shore was extremely pleased with the results.
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If was another good day for Jeff
Kennedy, as he won two races. I n
the I0O0 free, he set a personal best
time o f 10:45.35, which incidently
fell only six seconds short o f the
school record. Frank Parker took
second in the race with a personal
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Ted Ober, Albany's sensational
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to open the afternoon.
Tom Handy, not known as a
sprinter, managed to win both the
200 free and the 100 free (52.7).
These victories were crucial to the
overall meet because the team has
been fairly weak i n the sprints,
primarily due to some grueling
training during the break.
P O O L S I D E NOTES: Albany will
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V.
18 SpOrtS ALBANVSTUDENT
PRESS ll TUESDAY, JANUARY 31, 1984
Indoor trackmen fourth at Cortland Invitational
By Tom Kacandes
SPOUTS EDITOR
People talk a lot about "next,
year" when a young team shows
promise' and sometimes things just
don't turn out the way you think
they would.
Last year the Albany State men's
indoor track team compiled a 7-1
dual meet record, finished third in
the SUNYACs, seventh at the State
Championships, and lost only three
members to graduation. Things
looked pretty good for 1984.
This past Saturday, the Danes
finished a distant fourth at the Cortland Invitational behind Cortland,
Alfred University, and Ithaca College, beating only SUNY Binghamton despite some superior individual performances. The finish
can be explained simply: (his year's
Danes are good, but there just
aren't enough of them.
One of the things that made the
'83 Danes so tough was the depth
and quality of the sprint squad.
Runners such as triple-recordholder Eric Newton, Mike Riggins,
Jeff Jackson, Winston Johnson,
and Darren Pratt are not competing
this year for a variety of reasons,
academic demands among them.
C'est la vie in Division III. As a
result, the remaining sprinters have
to run in two and three events in
order to represent the team.
Take Pat Saccocio for example.
Saturday, the stocky junior ran in
the trials, semis, and finals of the
55-meter dash where he placed second in what he called "a very competitive field" in 6.4 seconds. Saccocio then came back to save the
floundering 4x400-meter relay with
an outstanding anchor leg, finishing
third where he got the baton a distant fourth. His split time of 51.4
seconds was considerably faster
than the winning time in the open
400-meter dash. Four races in one
day will be Pat Saccocio's lot all
season long.
Last week at Williams, he won
his heat of the dash, recording the
best time for the finals, then won
the open 400-meter by diving over
the line. The finals of the dash
followed immediately, but Saccocio
could not compete because he was
hyperventilating too much to stand
up. In order to meet their goals, the
Danes are going to have to knock
themselves out every weekend.
The man the crowd will be watching all season is Ed McGill. Coming off an excellent cross-country
season, McGill figures to be a force
in New York State Division III
track this year. Saturday, he led the
5,000-meter run through the first
two miles trailed by Ithaca standout
James Quinn. McGill slowed
abruptly and forced Quinn, who
has a strong kick, to set the pace.
Unfortunately, the move came too
late. Because of the slow pace
earlier, Quinn was still strong
enough to win from the front,
crossing the line in 15:35.7 to
McGill's 15:35.9.
In the day's last open event, the
3,000-meter run, McGill recorded
another superior effort. After a
slow first mile, McGill moved into
first and began to force the pace,
pulling away from another Ithaca
contender, James Goodcnough.
McGill was unable, however, to
hold off Russel of Alfred, who had
won the 1,500 earlier and had to settle for second place.
It looks like 1984 will be a banner
year for junior Marc Mercurio, who
Gymnasts lose to Ithaca, 167-153
By John Parker
The Albany State women's gymnastics team took their l-O mark on
the road to Ithaca Saturday hoping
to keep their record unblemished.
But as it turned out, it was just a little too much to ask, as they were effectively oulscorcd in a fiercely
competitive contest, 167,1 to 152.7.
Although the scoreboard gave the
bottom line, Albany coach Pat
Duval-Spillane said the real story
seemed to be the personal victories
which the Great Danes accomplished.
"In the all-around competition,
we placed three competitors over
the thirty-point plateau, which is
extremely good for so early in the
season, and also many of the girls
were able to better their own individual scores in each event, a fact
that makes all the hard work worthwhile. Also, our team score is
almost up to the average of last year
and that's a great sign in itself," she
said.
The scoring in the all-around
category for Albany State included
Brcnda Armstrong registering a
31.25, third overall, followed closely by tri-captains Virginia
Lockman, 31.05, and Elicia
Steinberg, 30.45.
Armstrong, a sophomore, started
her high-scoring in the uneven
parallel bar competition by scoring
an 8.0. Last year as a freshman, she
broke an Albany State record with
an 8.4, and this year, although it's
still early, may be another recordbreaking season. Among the other
leaders in the event were Lockman
and junior tri-captain Anne
Thamasett.
Armstong continued to dominate
on the balance beam by placing second overall with a mark of 8.05.
Seniors Elicia Steinberg and
Lockman followed respectively in
the scoring.
The floor exercise was another
event where the versatile Lockman
and Steinberg combination excelled. Each gymnast scored an 8.45 to
tie for the top spot among the Dane
gymnasts. Lockman, a senior
transfer from Nassau Community
College, was a junior college AllAmcrican two years, the same year
Steinberg achieved All-American
status here at Albany. Karen Bailey,
a promising sophomore, scored an
impressive 8.4 in the competition,
followed by junior Lynn Saravis'
high-spirited routine which
registered an 8.1.
The vaulting competition proved
to display Albany's depth as they
placed five of the top eight scores in
the event.
Although the loss does even up
the Danes' record at 1-1, coach
Duval-Spillane seemed somewhat
satisfied.
"Many of the girls have made
great progress this year, and witli a
tough team like Ithaca all I could
hope was that the girls tried their
best, and they didn't let me down,"
said the coach.
The Danes' next meet will be
home Tuesday at 7:30 against Smith
College. Saturday they will host a
tri-meet with Brockport State and
Bryn-Mawr College.
•
is my pick to win both the
SUNYACs and the States in his
event, the 35-lb. weight throw. This
time last year, Mercurio was still
learning what to do with the weight;
now he is chewing up his competition as he perfects his technique. At
Cortland, Mercurio beat his nearest
competitor by more than four feet
with his toss of 49'3.5" and set a
new meet record in the process. It
will be interesting to see if anyone
will even get close to him all season.
Sophomore Bruce Van Tassel is
another continuing success story.
Showing a sort of poise one rarely
sees in freshmen, Van Tassel won
nearly all his races last year and
finished fourth at States. This year
he's been able to win while slowly
returning to top form. In a very
tough final heat Saturday, Van
Tassel beat out Mormile of Ithaca
at the tape, though both were clocked at 8.0 seconds.
Key to the Danes' success this
year will be the development of the
younger runners and those that had
been overshadowed by since
departed talent. Senior Andy
Callari is one of the Danes trying to
fill some big shoes through hard
work and determination. Callari
was able to take fourth place among
a field of talented sprinters in the
400-meter dash with his time of
:53.6 seconds.
Junior Jim Erwin was the last
runner to finish at Saturday's meet.
As anchor of Albany's hurting
4x800-meter relay, Erwin got the
baton more than a lap behind the
other teams. He went out very hard
in order to get Albany "unlapped"
and finished tough to record a very
solid split time of 2:04.4.
Team Results: Cortland, 77.5;
Alfred, 72; Ithaca, 62.5; Albany,
36; Binghamton, 22.
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GENERAL INTEREST
MEETING
TUESDAY, JANUARY 31, 1984 D ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
Sports
JV Danes top St. Rose in fight-marred contest
By Dean Chang
seriously challenged for the lead after that.
With the score 14-10 in favor of CSR, the
Danes were on the short end or a 3 on 1. Instead of going up by six, CSR was thwarted
by Curtis Oliver, the lone Dane back on
defense. The next time CSR had the ball,
Chapman came from nowhere to block a
shot. Spurred on by the fine defensive plays,
the Danes reeled off 12 consecutive points to
lake the lead for good. Behind Ihc strong inside play of Chapman and Oliver and the
long-range shooting of Freeze Storey,
Albany took a 49-32 hairtimc lead.
The Danes kept the pressure on well into
the second half, keeping a comfortable lead
for most of the hair. With five minutes left,
Crach Boland removed his starling learn,
something he's been doing wilh regularity the
past few games. This time it almost
backfired. Thanks lo a' three - minute
Albany mental lapse, CSR managed to cul
the lead down to 12 wilh two minutes remaining. In came Chapman, O'Connell and
Storey.
Against CSR, the Danes needed all the
"1 put Rich in because we were getting bcal
brawn they had; CSR played a very physical
on the boards," explained Boland. "I also
game. Throughout the contest, the players
wanted guards in there who could handle the
exchanged words, elbows, and almost punball down Ihe stretch. I expect a lot from
ches. Midway through the second half,
Duane and Scott (point guards Corley and
Albany's Kevin Mann went down hard on the Jankes). When they lead the team well, the
court. He suffered a large gash over his right
team looks good.
eye and was admitted to St. Peter's Hospital.
"These lapses are whal give coaches gray
Ten minutes later, Dane guard Andy O'Conhair. We got a little disorganized and CSR
nell got involved in an altercation that cleared jumped all over us," continued Boland. "We
both benches.
can't afford to get overconfident when we
"It started when he (the CSR player) gave
have a lead. We've got a lot of players with
me an elbow downcourt,"said O'Connell.
talent but we can'i go one-on-onc all ihc
"The next thing I knew, that guy hooked my
lime- When we play as a learn, we're great.
Bui during that lapse, we were trying to lake
elbow and we both went down."
it lo Ihe basket whether ii was available or
The game was a bit too physical for Assisnot."
tant Coach Kurt Walton's liking. "When
you see someone landing on the court every
One thing the Danes do well is pass. Usualtime downcourt, something's wrong," said
ly Corley will make the perfect passes, but
Walton. "The referees' job is to keep control
Slorey filled his shoes against CSR. Storey
of the game. They've got to be consistent;
made some beautiful passes inside; on one
they can't be lenient early on and expect
play, he drew the defense to him and threw a
blindside pass lo Chapman. "Freeze played
perfect behavior."
For most of the game, the Danes kept their one of his better games," said Boland. "One
Ihing I did like was Ihc way we moved Ihe
minds on basketball. CSR kept the game
ball."
close for the first 10 minutes, but never
EDITORIAL ASSISTANT
Earlier this season, it appeared that the
Albany Slate men's junior varsity basketball
team would have a problem rebounding; not
one player stands above 6'4". Saturday
night's 82-66 victory over CSR's varsity
demonstrated the Danes' ability to outrebound its opposition, despite their disadvantage.
One of the keys to Albany's new-found rebounding success is Rich Chapman. Since his
arrival five games ago, Chapman has added
needed muscle to the Danes' lineup. Saturday's game gave Chapman a
chance to
showcase his talents. On the offensive
boards, Chapman kept the ball alive, often
scoring baskets on follow-up opportunities.
"Rich is a terror on Ihc boards," said
Head Coach Jim Boland. "He's a great
defensive rebounder. In the short time thai
he's been here, Rich has already established
himself as a team leader on the court."
All who wish to get
involved in any aspect of
the radio station
are encouraged to attend.
See you there I
M FUNDED
KIM SHOTS: Chapman played his best game
of the year against CSR. He scored 20 points,
grabbed 11 rebounds and blocked 5 shots.
Oliver also had a strong game, scoring 18
points and snaring nine rebounds...O'Connell recovered from a poor first half to play
an excellent second half...Mann received 25
stitches and must wear a head bandage until
he sees a plastic surgeon. He could return to
action in one week...G.T. Sweeney aggravated a knee injury thai has been giving
him problems all year...Albany shot an improved 70 percent from the line...The Danes'
record stands al 10-2...Albany travels to RPI
tomorrow night lo try lo sweep this year's
series. RPI will be looking to avenge the
81-51 rout II suffered lo Albany last Wednesday.
D
Grapplers topple Hunter, lose to St. Lawrence
By Marc Barman
A SSOCIA TESI'OR TS EDI TOR
Victors in their first mccl of Ihe afternoon
over Hunter College, 31-16, Ihe Albany State
wrestling team put up a valianl effort in their
second meet against injury-ridden St.
Lawrence University, before succumbing to
the number two ranked learn in Division III,
35-20.
When Albany Slate's second triangular
meet of Ihe season was done with, Ihe Danes
were staring at a 9-4 record. St. Lawrence,
Sports Briefs
Wed., Feb. 1
at 8:00 PM, in LC2
ED MARUSSICH UPS
Duane Corley, here in earlier action against RPI, will lead the JV Danes into their
rematch against the Engineers Wednesday.
Upcoming events
The Albany State men's basketball
team will be taking on another SUNYAC
East opponent, Pittsburgh University,
lomorrow night at the Cardinals gym al 8
p.m....The women's basketball team will
also be on the road lomorrow night, in
Binghamton, lo face the Colonials at 7
p.m....This afternoon at 4 p.m., the
men's swimming team will host crosstown rival RPI, at the University
Gym...The Albany Slate wrestling team
will be home lomorrow night to battle
Western New England in a dual mccl starting at 7:30 p.m....The junior varsity
basketball leant faces RPI in Troy, tlpoff
lime, 7:00...The women's swimming team
travels to Binghamton for a meel versus
Ihe Colonials, lomorrow night,,,The
women's gymnastics icam will compete
against Smith College, tonight al 7:30
p.m.
Which, swept both matches on the day, extended their clip lo 12-2 and remain ranked
second in Division III.
The Danes wenl into Ihc Saturday Iri-mccl
without the services of 134 pound John
Balog, who rushed home for personal
reasons. But the loss of Balog had no effect
on the Hunter match because the Manhatlanbascd school forfeited that weight class.
Dane coach Joe DcMco expected a victory
over 8-10 Hunter and wasn't Ihe leasi bil surprised afterwards. "We should'vc beaten
them in Saturday night's contest ai
Potsdam, leaving him with a total of 415.
Croulicr's career assist total surpassed
Ihe old mark of 406 sel by former Dane
Gary Trcvelt, who played al Albany Slate
from 1973-77.
Croutier will now sel his sights on
breaking Ihe single season assist record of
153 also sel by Trcveti in 1974-75. After
the Poisdam game, Croutier lias accumulated 134, only 19 shy of lying Ihe
record.
Croutier sets record
Dane point guard Danny Crotllier
broke the all-time Albany Sialc record for
career assists when he passed for |0 of
Danny Croutier set an Albany State
record for career assists.
them by more," said DcMco.
The Danes got off quickly, taking a 16-0
lead after the first three matches;
ll started off with freshman 118 pound
Shawn Sheldon romping Fabian Thompson,
19-4, giving Albany State a 5-0 lead.
Then, Junior Ail-American Dave Avcrill
annihilated Hunter's Rob Pcicrson in a lopsided battle that would have been slopped if
Ihe spori was boxing.
Following 134 pound Greg Slackel's forfeit
victory, Ihe Danes suffered their first loss of
the day when little-used Howard Fritz wasted
a 5-2 lead when he ran out of gas midway
through the second period and wound up on
his shoulder blades with 43 seconds left in Ihe
middle period. Frilz, who has only wrestled
in two meets this season, had complained of
lightheadedness prior to Ihe match.
150 pound Glen O'Connor upped the
Danes' advantage to 19-6 when he scored a
courageous 4-3 defensive struggle over Mall
Hawkins. O'Connor was wrestling wilh a less
than fit knee in Ihe third period, bul still
managed to hold on to the lead by using
almost all of his allotted two minute injury
timeouts.
Back-to-back defeats by Jerry Clark and
Paul Feltman pulled Hunter within 19-13,
but thai was as close as Ihe Manhattan school
would come.
177 pound Sandy Adelslein put Ihe meel
out of reach'with a sensational pin over a
stunned John Shaffer with 40 seconds remaining in the opening period.
"I wasn't looking for Ihe pin," said Adelslein afterwards. "1 was looking lo bcal him
on poinls and then il just happened."
In selling Iheir goals for the next meel versus Si. Lawrence, DeMeo had said he had
hoped to keep il close.
And that's exactly whal happened. The
Danes were down jusi 23-20 going into the
ncxl lo last matchup, bul were unable lo pull
QUI the 190 pound balllc.
A cause can be made of why the meet was
so close eoing into the 190 pound match. According lo St. Lawrence Coach John Parker,
six out of the 10 Si. Lawrence wrestlers were
out of the line up, including two AilAmericans. All six of Ihc injuries came during a four day span before and after Ihe New
York Stale Championships al Binghamton
held on January 20.
Albany Slate jumped oul to a 11-0 lead
aided by a Sheldon forfeit win and an Averill
shutout victory, 13-0.
At 134 pounds, Ihe Danes were forced to
forfeit because Fritz had been complaining of
light-hcadcdncs •:.
O'Connor was then pinned by Rick
Spalding in the first minute of the first
period to boost St. Lawrence to its first lead,
12-11.
158 pound Clark blew a 5-2 lead for
Albany and wound up losing 18-5.
Down 23-11, Ihc Danes began chipping
away al the lead by winning a decision victory
by Adclstein and taking a forfeil victory in
favor of Feltman.
This pulled the Danes within 23-20 with
190 pound senior Mark Goosens standing on
Ihc mat looking to lie the score or give
Albany Slate ihe lead. Bul Goosens, who was
making his first appearance of the season,
was up against a talented wrestler in Dan
Dischiavo. Dischiavo scored a pin with 1:36
lo go in Ihe first period, preserving ihe St.
Lawrence victory.
TAKE DOWNS: The return or Ed Gleesun is
expecting lo spark the Danes In Iheir next
meet, tonight against Western New England
al Ihe University Gym...St. Lawrence beat
Hunter In the first meet of the day
36-17...Hunter couch Hob Gunden looked
more like an injured wrestler Ihan u coach as
he was parading the sidelines with enriches
and u nisi on Ills leg,..llulog Is expected lo
return •<> the lineup tonight.
D
PUBLISHED AT THE STATE UNIVERSITY OF NEW YORK AT\ALBANYMY
SportsTu
THE ALBANY STUDENT PRESS CORPORATION
tae7$SrTr
JANUARY
*»CHIVVfs
31, 1984
Danes succumb to Potsdam's late surge, 81 -68
penetrating, dishing off, hitting
open shots, and most importantly
playing a smart brand of basketball
while making a minimal amount of
mistakes.
Potsdam, in an effort to regain
their early composure, called
timeout 13 seconds later.
Whatever Bear Head Coach Jerry
Welsh said during that break certainly did the trick as the Bears
outscored the Danes, 26-11 in the
final 6:01.
"We started to run our offense
well in the last few minutes," said
Welsh. "We stayed away from turnovers while at the same time forced Albany into some."
The Potsdam defense forced
Albany into a turnover after
Potsdam's Leroy Witherspoon tied
the game with 5:37 left. Following a
Dane turnover Bear forward Scott
Culler hit a shot and the Bears took
the lead for good at 59-57 with 4:39
to go.
Due to tremendous pressure on
their next possession Albany was
unable to inbound the ball and was
forced to call timeout. Their next
attempt to get the ball in play during the aliened five seconds was unsuccessful.
Potsdam took over with a onepoint lead and the clock reading
4:07. Croutier fouled Culler 14
seconds later. Culler hit both foul
shots, which stretched the Bears'
lead to three, 62-59.
By Keith Marder
ASSOCIATE SPORTS EDITOR
ED MARUSSJCH UPS
Wilson Thomas, shown hare against RPHast Wadnasday, scored
nine points in tha Danes' 81-88 loss to Potsdam on the road.
Potsdam
Sometimes the final score of a
basketball game can pretty much
tell the tale of how the game went.
There are other times when the
score is anything but indicative of
what happened in the previous 40
minutes. The latter was the case
Saturday night at Maxcy Hall in
Potsdam as the Potsdam Bears
defeated the Albany State Great
Danes, 81-68 in a game that was
close most of the way.
By reading deeper into Saturday
night's box score the real story can
be seen.
The most noticeable thing lacking
for Albany was 6'8" center Pete
Gosule, who injured his knee in
Wednesday's RPI game. Gosule's
injury hurt Albany's bench depth as
Potsdam's substitutes outscored
their Albany counterparts, 27-6.
The absence of their tallest player
also hurt the Danes' rebounding
game as the Bears beat them 38-21
in the war of the backboards.
Another fact that shows Albany's
lack of inside play is that 5'7" point
guard Dan Croutier led the team in
rebounding with 4.
The Danes rallied behind
Croutier to lake their second and
last lead of the game. A John
Mracek hoop off of a Croutier pass
made the score 57-55 Albany with
6:14 remaining in the game.
Croutier was doing everything a
From there on in it was all
point guard is supposed lo do-hc
was creating opportunities by Potsdam. The Bears did nothing
wrong for the last 3:53: they hit key
foul shots and shut down the
Danes' offense. A couple of meaningless baskets by Roosevelt,
Bullock and Whitney accounted for
the big final spread.
Albany stayed close early by
shutting down Potsdam's running
game. The Danes got the lead
brfiefly when freshman Adam
Ursprung hit a short shot off of a
pass from Wilson Thomas. That
advantage was short lived as consecutive baskets by Pat Crawford
and Leroy Witherspoon gave
Potsdam the lead until late in the second half.
As Albany State Head Coach
Dick Sauers said,"We were playing
our game and then we stopped getting the loose balls when they were
there."
HOOP-LA: Both teams shot extremely well from the field at 52
percent, especially Albany in the second half 62 percent...Albany's
record is now 10-7 (3-1 in the
SUNYAC Conference)...Potsdam
is 6-0 in the conference...Croutier
was Danes' main bright spot: 6-11
from the field, 9-11 from the line,
21 points; 4 rebounds; 10 assists; 2
steals...Ursprung, also shot well,
7-11 for 14 points...Wednesday
night the Danes travel lo Pittsburgh for another SUNYAC
game...The game will start at 8:00
and will be broadcast on 91 FM
WCDB with broadcasters Adam
Goodman and Rich Udewitz.
D
Women cagers drop Invitational to St Michael's
Poor foul shooting hurts team in loss;
Albany's record 11 -5 for season
By Mark Wllgard
STAFF WRITER
When one associates the sport of
basketball with the art of freethrow s h o o t i n g , the word
"automatic" comes to mind. It's
supposed to be two gift points for
your team courtesy of the opposition. Try telling that to the Albany
State women's basketball team.
The Danes shot only 38 percent
(10-26) from thg free-throw stripe in
the Championship Game of the inaugural Albany Invitational against
St. Michael's. The misses cost them
dearly as they bowed 72-56.
"If you had to pick a weakness,
that was it," commented Albany
Head Coach Mari Warner.
"Overall, we played a nice game,
the difference being the free
throws."
for the Danes, as she popped in 22
points. It was Patterson's precise
shooting that helped Albany to a
30-28 hairtime lead.
Patterson leads Scorers
After Patterson hit a 25-footer to
open up the second half, St.
Michael's reeled off nine
unanswered points to take a lead
they would never relinquish.
Albany's Rainny Lesane, who had
10 points in the game, cut the lead
to 58-50 with 7:25 to play, and it
looked like the Danes were on their
way back. But St. Michael's would
not miss from the floor the rest of
the way as they rolled to the victory.
All in all, Warner was pleased.
"You hate to settle for less, but
they were quicker and stronger than
us," assessed Warner. "On the
positive side, we were physical out
there plus we moved the ball around
very well."
.With 3:05 left, the Danes trailed
64-56. A traveling violation on St.
Michael's gave them a chance to
To reach the title game, Albany
pull within six. Peg Squazzo was had to do away with William Smith
fouled, but she missed the front end on Saturday. In a very physical
of a one-and-one. That was game, the Danes rolled to a 62-39
Albany's last chance, as St. triumph.
Michael's put them away in the
closing minutes. They scored the
The tough Great Dane defense
game's final eight points en route to held William Smith scoreless for the
the win,
first five minutes of the game and
Ronnie Patterson was the big gun built up a 29-12 halftime lead. Kim
Kosalek had 12 points, while
Lesane and Diane Fernandes added
eight each in leading Albany to the
rout.
:
uller Road complex would include a University fieldhouse
y$Py Robert Gardinier
.JJHjMfF WRITER
B If SUNYA President Vincent
O'Leary can sway state, Albany
county and city officials to his side,
a $25M civic center complex would
be built on a now vacant, 77 acre lot
across from the uptown campus on
land owned by the university.
<; Formally presented before the I
Albany County Legislature Thurs-f^
day by O'Leary, the plan provides (~
for a 11,700 seat arena for concerts, i
sporting events and conventions!
and a 60,000 square foot SUNYA|J
field house, all under one roof.
The field house, included in the |
architectural design by Daniel F.
Tully Associates of Melrose,
Massachusetts, would be owned |
and run by SUNYA under the provisions of the plan.
When the uptown campus was II
still on paper, it included u large I
field house for SUNYA indoor '
sports, but because of budget restrictions at that time the
athletic field house was never built.
According to the plan, the field house would cost the state
$6 million with requests that the state would also pay an additional $4 milllion toward construction of the arena "to insure that the University could have a limited access to the
arena," said O'Leary.
"We are not trying to sell you a facility here, only a conI cept," asserted O'Leary to the county legislature attending
the meeting. "It is up to the county now to decide what they
want to do," he added.
According to the university plan, the campus, county and
city of Albany would jointly request capital funds for the
construction of the center. A 35 year loan would be sought
from the state Urban Development Corporation to construct
the center. The debt service or loan payment on the bonds
per year is predicted to be $1,145,000 with the assumed 8.5
percent interest.
A public corporation would be established, according to
the plan, to lease the civic center from the university, build
the facility and then contract with botlrthe county to operate
the arena, and the university to operate the field house.
Monies to operate the facility and meet the debt service arc
anticipated to come from profits earned by the center, and
from contributions from the city, the state, and the university. Much of the responsibility will fall on the county of
Albany, according to the plan.
The University has a clearly documented need for an
Top: ED MARUSSICH. UPS; Inset: UPS I
ZT^ffi
Top: Proposed site lor Albany Civic Center; Bottom: Artist's conception of
Center's interior; Inset: SUNYA President Vincent O'Leary.
f
athletic field house according to vice president for University
Affairs, Lewis Welch. "The facilities we have on campus
now are not adequate for a university this size and in this
climate," he said.
Fourth of several proposals
This latest proposal by SUNYA for a Capital District civic
center is the fourth to surface in recent months and adds even
more contestants to the groups already vying to have a civic
center built in their own interests.
Private developer Joseph Futia, who operates Ihc Colonic
SUNYA signs computer pact
This week, Albany has a pair of
conference games. Tomorrow, they
travel to Binghamton and on Saturday it's off to Pittsburgh for a big
meeting with the Cardinals. A win
over Pittsburgh will help the
Danes' chances of hosting the
SUNYAC Regional on February
21..
—
By J i m O'Sulllvan
EDITORIAL
ASSISTANT
As part of a research agreement with the University, the
Digital Equipment Corporation (DEC) has given the
University a $600,000 price break on its computer equipment purchases, and plans to create a user room on State
Quad, according to acting Vice-President John
Shumaker.
The equipment, purchased from DEC, includes a DEC
systcm-20 mainframe and 96 full screen editor terminals,
Shumaker said.
FAST BREAKS: SI. Michael's
defeated Castleton Slate Saturday
to advance lo Sunday's finals. In
the consolation game, William
Smith got mauled again,
78-48...The split of the weekend
games leaves Albany with an 11-5
record for the year...Tournament
MVP was Becky Bouchard of St.
Michael's. Patterson and Lesane
were both selected to the AllTournament team...The Danes are
averaging 57.3 points a game while
giving up only 49.1 per game.
Warner stated, "Defensively, we're
playing great hall; offensively,
we're
missing
something."...Lesane leads the
team In scoring with 14.7 per game.
Patterson
has
an
II.I
average...Leading rcbnunder Is
Kosalek, 6.7 per game.
CI
'Leary unveils proposal for $25M civic center
"The system is designed to
be user friendly, it's easy to
use for a naive user. "
—Barbara Wolfe
BOB LUCKEV UPS
Albany's Debra Logan battles for a loose ball in the women's
basketball team's victory over William Smith on Sat urday.
• The DEC-20 was purchased with funds raised last
year's tuition increase, and through regular SUNYA
cquipinciii funds. Shumaker said that no private money
was used, as was first planned, because extra equipment
funds became available. Two researchers at SUNYA will
work on specific projects regarding '.'artificial in-
•
——
telligence," and Digital will have exclusive rights to the
research until June, 1985, said Associate Vice-Presidenl
for Computing Services Barbara Wolfe.
The research will be done by computer scientists
Miriam Baiaban and Neil Murray. System Administrator
for the DEC-20 Isabel Nirenbcrg called their work "very
exciting" and said "the language they'll be using is really
frontier language."
Artificial intelligence, Wolfe said, is programming
computers to try and get them to behave as if they had intelligence. But, she added, there arc many different
definitions of intelligence.
As examples, Wolfe cited computer chess games that
played on the World Champion level, and robots that
work on manufacturing assembly lines, "but I lull's a
primitive definition of artificial intelligence."
Currently, artificial intelligence is (lie focus of a $45
million national program in Japan. Many American computer scientists are calling for greater research efforts in
, this country to offset the Japanese program.
Murray said that he and Baiaban had co-authored the
original proposal for the system, but said that the research
topic is in Balaban's field.
Murray explained, "1 work in a subficld which is
sometimes contained...within artificial intelligence
research," He said he is in a field called "computational I
logic," and he described it as "the study of logic with the |
idea toward developing logical techniques ihql can be,o
JJU
Coliseum, offered to personally fund an $11 million civic
center complex to be built on his land adjacent to the Colonic
Coliseum in Latham. Under Futia's plan, he would then sell
the center back to Albany County and the county would
allow him to operate it.
Upsel with the county for "dragging their feet" on his proposal, Fulia recently approached Rensselaer County Executive William Murphy with a proposal to build Futia's civic
center in Rensselaer, across Ihc Hudson River opposite
downtown Albany. Murphy has come out in support of
Futia's plans but the Rensselear County Legislature has yet
to decide for or against the proposal. The Rensselear site
discussed is located along Interstate 90 in East Greenbush.
Futia would not comment on the SUNYA proposal.
Underlying all Ihese plans is one to build Ihc center on vacant land adjacent to the Empire Slate Plaza. This plan is
favored by Albany County Executive James Coyne. "I still
prefer the downtown site," Coyne saiJ after Thursday's
presentation by the university. "We are now involved with
discussions with the governor on whether South Mall bonds
are available for construction," he said.
If South Mall bonds for ihc plaza location are available,
according lo Coyne, Ihe state could pay beiween 50 and 100
percent on the construction of the civic center there. He add
cd that this plan would relieve Ihc lax burden on county laxpayers.
When asked what the Albany County legislature's feelings
were following the SUNYA presentation, Coyne only said
that "The legislators and the commission will keep an open
mind on the issue."
Coyne added that there are three more proposals of sites in
Ihe works and "We are shooting for a final decision by the
end of March."
Whalen favors SUNYA
The only prominent local official to come out in favor of
Ihe SUNYA proposal has been Albany Mayor Thomas
Whalen III. "The most preferable site is at the campus,"
said Whalen yesterday morning before the presentation to
the legislature. "It (the SUNYA plan) is thorough and well
done and by far much more attractive than anything to
date," he added.
According lo O'Leary's report, Whalen has agreed lo provide $200,000 per year lo the center from Ihe city budget to
15»*
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