Danes Versus Alfred: The First Test

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State University ol New York -'. Albany-
FRIDAY
September 1 2 , 1 9 7 S
stAntmivManYorMn»Tc«t*i*ui*irtr
Danes Versus Alfred: The First Test
Well, next year is here, and the
there werea lot of alibis offered by
Danes will have to prove that last
the visitors, including poor ofyear's excuses were, indeed, only exficiating, bad weather, and the usual
cuses and alibis.
promises of revenge the following
There is no doubt that winning at
season.
Alfred will be a challenge/The Alfred
fans arc well known for their hostility, and most coaches agree it will
take a very poised and well disciplined team to win there.
The Saxons are coached by a
legend in his own time, Alex Yunich.
Yunich sports a career mark of 17594-11, ranks fourth amohg winningest coaches in college football
today.
Last year the Saxons limited their
opponents to 7.3 points a game and
only 153.6 yards a game total
offense. Of equal importance, the
Saxons lost only two players to
graduation.
The stars are All-East defensive
end John Van Gura and left
linebacker John Peterson. VanGura
is very quick and strong, and Ford
calls him their best defensive player.
Peterson at 6 feet one inch, 205
pounds is a very smart team leader.
Alfred plays out of a basic 5-3
defense with multiple adjustments.
The key for Albany is quickly
reading the different tipoffs given by
the defense.
Danes' coach Bob Ford believes
this is 80 per cent of the battle.
Albany offense in preparation for tomorrow's season opener against Alfred. Danes will
"Our quarterbacks must be ready
face the leading defensive team in their division last year.
to receive and move the ball very
by Craig Bel -.
When the Albany State Great
Dane football team takes the field
Saturday at Alfred, the Danes will
pit the number one rushing team in
the nation (Division HI) against the
number one defense.
Lust year, in the first meeting
between the two teams, Albany eked out a 7-6 win. After the game
quickly, and the backs will have to be
extra alert against their defense."
Ford characterizes Alfred's offensive unit as "hard nosed and hard hitting."
They like to run up the middle but
will also run off tackle if they have
to. In addition, they throw the football well."
Alfred's ground game will rest on
the shoulders of seniors Tim O'Neill
and Frank Yorio. Yorio, the
fullback, is a strong, powerful
runner, und, while not exceptionally
fust, is a deceptive and effective
runner, according to Ford.
Greg Thomas, the Saxons outstanding wide receiver, has been
shifted to quarterback, and thercure
some questions as to whether be hus
enough experience running the
offense. Ford, expects a "very, very
difficult game, but one which the
Danes certainly are capable of winning."
Analysis;Albuny must take it to
Alfred early und set the puce. The
crowd and atmosphere at Alfred are
factors which must be ignored by the
team on the field, or the Danes will
fall, as have so many others.
The key will be defense. Can
Albany run through Alfred, und can
Albany out-defense the top defense
in the nation? The question is better
left to the men in the purple, gold,
und white on Saturday than to
•peculation now.
Siena Clouts Danes, 7-2
by Mike Piekarski
Freshman Dave Smith powered a
two-run homer and doubled in the
go-ahead run and teammate Kevin
Ncvins spun a three hitter leading
Siena to a 7-2 victory over the Great
Dane varsity baseball team at University Field, Wednesday.
With the game tied 2-2 in the sixth,
Smith lined a one-hop shot off the
leftfield fence to drive in Gary Holle
from second with what proved to be
the winning run.
The loss left Albany at 0-2 on the
season with all of the State University of New York Athletic Conference
games yet to be played.
Siena struck first in the second inning. After Dune starter John
Dollurd—pitching on two days'
rest -had retired the Indians 1-2-3 in
the first, Tom Paradise led off the
visiting second with a base hit upthe
middle. Smith then slugged a 2-1
pitch over the leftfield fence, to the
right of the 330-fpot marker to put
the Indians into a quick 2-0 lead.
Dollard appeared a bit shaken and
Aquilar Scores Lone
Goal In Booters' Win
by Nathan Sulunl
The Albany Slate varsity soccer
team ran their preseason record to
2-0 Tuesday by edging Fulton Montgomery Junior College, 1-0.
Freshman Jorge Aguilar took a
pass form Frank Selca and dribbled
around the visitors' goalie to score
the lone goal five minutes into the
second half.
Both teams failed to capitalize on
several scoring opportunities, including a Fulton-Montgomery
penalty kick saved by Albany'sgoalie, Henry Obwald.
"Our team play was generally
good," said Booters' coach Bill
Schicffelin, "but we still have to
make some changes and improvements.
Considering we were doings lotof
experimenting at different positions,
things went fairly well."
According to Schicffelin, the
visitors proved to be stronger than
expected.
"We knew they had a good, solid
squad, but they were stronger,more
poised and disciplined than our
reports hud led us to believe," explained Schicffelin. "All of us were
really impressed with them,"
As for the Booters, Schicffelin was
particularly pleased with the performance ol Aguilar.
"That kid's a winner and a
hustler," said Schicflelin. "He has
the sense lor the net and goals that
we needed last year. He's alreudy
shown us a lot, and if his performances remain at their present level,
he will probably start."
Schicffelin also •'said the defense
"turned in its usual strong showing,
and John Rolando appeared to be
back in his ourstanding form of two
yean ago."
The Booters host the Annual
Albany Invitational Quadrangular,
Saturday, versus St. Lawrence,
Southeastern Massachusetts, and
continued on page II
walked the next batter, Jim Moran,
but settled down quickly, picking
Moran off first and striking out the
next two batters to get out of the inning.
"It was a slider that didn't break,"
said Dollard ol his home run pitch to
Smith. That pitch was to be the only
bad one Dollurd would make as he
did not allow a hit after that. In fact,
he has allowed only three hits in his
nine innings of work thus fur this
year.
The Dunes, menwhile, were clawing their way buck into the ballgame.
Jim Willoughby led off the home second with a full-count walk, stole second, moved to third on a groundnut, und scored on a wild pitch by
Ncvins.
Iracc llomcrun
John lracc tied the score with a
long home run over the leftfield
fence leading off the third; the first
Pane four-bugger of the season,
Albany threatened to tuke the lead
when shortstop Bob Cooke walked
und Paul Nelson bunted his wuy on,
but Murk Constuntine forced Cooke
on an attempted sacrifice bunt, und
second baseman Jeff Silverman
struck out into u double play to end Albany first baseman Jeff Bregllo makes late tag on Siena's Tom
Paradise In second Inning Wednesday. Pitcher John Dollard kept
the threat.
them close all day notching one pickoff.
John Dawson relieved Dollard in
the fifth, and pitched out of a two- eighth for the Danes und immediate- last six innings allowing only one
on, one-out jam to keep the score ly found himself in hot water with a bad-hop single over that stretch in
deadlocked before he ran into trou- hit batsman, a base on balls, and an his route-going performance. He
ble in the sixth.
error. But a pickoff at second base fanned nine Danes and walked three
Holle led it off with a walk, stole and a 390 foot flyoul off the bat of while not allowing u runner to reach
second, moved to third on a sac, and Smith, prevented any further scor- second base after the third inning.
scored on Smith's drive to the fence. ing,
Tomorrow the Danes face
With two down, DH Brian Plunkett
In the ninth, a run scoring single- Potsdam in a twinbill us they go on
grounded a secing-eye base hit to by Holle und a three-base error by their first "roud trip" of the season.
right to score Smith with the fourth Nelson on Paradise's long fly, allowDollard is expected to sec some more
run and the Indians were on their ed three more Siena tallies and iced action and Bob Kronenbcrger is
way.
another possible starter us Albany
the contest.
Paul DiLeilo came on in the
Nevins was sensational over the begins its SUNYAC schedule.
VOL. urn no. 31
le.ieis
A&S Dean Controversy Unsettled
Vice President for Academic Affairs Phillip Slrotkln.
by C.S. Santino
Although SUNYA President
Emmett Fields announced in his first
address to the faculty that he would
not appoint a dean to the College of
Arts and Sciences, he is inviting
comment from the Arts and Sciencesfaculty to determine how he should
organize their college,
As President Fields sees it, there
are three alternatives to the problem
of structuring the A & S College:
The first choice, according to
Fields, would be to "leave things as
they are now, but strengthen the
three divisions within the college."
The three divisions are Behavioral
and Social Sciences, Humanities,
and Science and Mathematics.
Secondly, Fields says he could
"organize the A & S College so that it
conforms to the demands of a
college, which would include the introduction of curriculum requirements." At this time it would be
necessary to appoint a dean to the
college. "The way the College of
Arts and Sciences is set up now,"
says Fields, "it just doesn't hold
together as a college in the
traditional sense of the word."
The third alternative, as he sees it,
would be to "make colleges out of
each of the three divisions, at which
time the division heads would be
come deans of their own college."
President Fields says the reasons
he originally announced that he
would not appoint a dean to the A &
S College are that "the cost is high,
and the benefits are not clear. There
is no real college, except on paper."
The A & S College has been
without a dean for more than two
years. The last Dean was 1. Moyer
Hunsberger who resigned in May of
1973. Since that time, the division
heads have worked directly with
Vice President Phillip Sirotkin in
deciding academic policy.
Sirotkin says that at this time he
Campus Center Will Host
Activities Day Tomorrow
Should you get in deeply with
Scuba Club? Map things out with
Geography Club? Build up in the
Crafts Guild? Get to the top with Ski
Club? Help out Students of Nursing
Organization?
This Saturday students will be
able to talk to representatives from
every campus group, from Albany
State Cinema to Women's Recreation Association.
Activities Day is a semi-annual
event designed to permit new and
returning students to join groups.
Every group will be set up around
the main lounge in the Campus
Center, refreshments will be served,
and there will be music by the
Hogcye Stringband,
Activities Day is sponsored by
Student Association through its
Albany Campus Events group,
which is a new group combining the
old Special Events Board and the
Campus Center Governing Board.
The coordinators arc Renec
Rosenthal and Mark Rosen.
"Students can go and see what
groups they want to join," said
Rosenthal, "it's the best opportunity
to become aware of the groups involved in this school."
Rosenthal said that icecream will
be served, and that some groups will
be havingdemonstrations. Last fail's
Activities Day included a
demonstration of climbing equipment by the Outing Club.
Dean of Social and Behavioral Sciences Richard Kendall.
doesn't want an A & S Dean. "The
President's decision was a sound
one," said Sirotkin, "and 1 will concur with it." He feels that the position of A & S Dean is superfluous,
and says he has been operating very
well without one for the past two
years. Richard Kendall, head of the
Division of Behavioral and Social
Sciences, echoes Sirotkin's sentiments. "The relationship between
the Vice President and the Division
heads has been very satisfactory,"
says Kendall.
Has the A & S Dean been missed
by the faculty? "Yes and no," says
Kendall. "Some have, some haven't.
President Fields' inquiries should
determine how the faculty feels and
what should be done. That's the
main item of business now—to
define the A & S College and decide
what to do with it."
As yet, Fields has not formally initiated the process of polling the
faculty. Exactly how he will do this
has not been disclosed.
Should the President organize the
A & S College so that it meets his
criteria for a bona fide college, a
dean will have to be chosen to
preside over the college. The Search
Commiltee for the Artsand Sciences
has already recommended a dean to
Sirotkin, selected from the candidates that the Committee has interviewed for the position.
Because of Fields' decision not to
appoint a dean, the candidate
selected by the Search Committee
has not been informed of their
choice. Sirotkin declined to reveal
who was picked for the job because
he feels it might "reflect badly on the
other candidates."
The three candidates were:
Seymour Geisser, Director of the
Schoolof StatisticsattheUmversily
of Minnesota; George H. Stein,
professor of history at SUNY
Binghamton; Ivo Ledercr, professor
of history at Stanford University.
Ithaca: The Big One
by Nathan Silant
and Craig Bell
The chant, "We're number one"
may become a reality Saturday,
September 20, when the Albany
State Great Danes host the Ithaca
Bombers in what Danes'Coach Bob
Ford calls, "the biggest game in
Albany State history."
Never before has the number one
team in any NCAA Divisioncome to
Albany, or even met a Circut Dunes
squud, but tomorrow, number one
ranked Ithaca plays number six
ranked Albany Slate at I p.m.
Last week the Danes faced I974's
lop Division 111 defense at Alfred
und were winners by a 19-13 score,
but Ithaca and Alfred are worlds
iipurt, according to several coaches
who've seen both squads.
"Their offense is awesome," says
Ford. Last year the Bombcrsuvcraged 40.3 points u gume, und they
rolled right over St. Luwrence in
their season opener last week, 20-6.
The Bombers copped the 1974
Lambert Trophy, the symbol of
supremacy in the East, and were
number two in the nation behind
Iowa Central State.
The Bombers, like State, are a triple option offense, but they operate
out of the "1" formation.
Quarterback Jerry Boycs.a 6 foot
2 inch 190 pound senior, run far 158
yards und three touchdowns last
week and is extremely capable of
running the offense. In addition he
has a strong arm.
According to Ford, his split end,
Bill Bryant, is an excellent
reccivcr."Hc has great hands to go
along with his blazing speed," said
Ford.
Like to Run
The running game will be handled
Albany's Great Danes lace their greatest challenge when they play Ithaca's Bombera tomorrow.
by halfbacks Duve Pilzer und Bill
Carney and fullback Alan Howell.
"Ithaca likes to run inside with man on the linesoourjobisdcfinite- llutlerl'icld considers him u definite
pro prospect, and Ford considers
power and just blow you right out of ly cut out lor us."
INDEX
"They'll probably try to stop him their best lineman.
there," explained Ford.
Classifieds
11
Analysis:
In
a
nutshell
this
is
what
DcBlois,
contain
Griffin
and
"Our job will be to continuously
Columns
14-18
the
whole
1975
Great
Dane
football
give them different looks on the cor- Sowalskie, and make Bertu/./.i run."
Crossword
2a
ner und stop Boyes from turning up- "1 think you'll see us go to the air season is all about.
Editorials
13
If the Dunes heal Ithaca, chances
field." We have got to muke them go more just to keep them honest."
Graffiti
10
According to Ford, the key to arc good that the Lambert Trophy
to the uii und then sec what happens.
Letters
12
"If we hold them to twenty points Ithaca's defense is their middle might find its way to Albany Stule.
Newsbrlets
2
linebacker Ron DiMurtino, "who is In addition, the Danes could find
we have a fighting chance."
Preview
2a
"On defense we figure Ithaca to try their spiritual leader and loves to themselves in the Stagg Bowl gume
Sports
1T-19
vying for the national Chamto contain, try to squeeze us in and hit,"
Zodiac
News
•
pionship.
Defense tackle Larry Czarnecki,
try to out slug us."
Coach Ford just sums it up
"They, operate out of the basic pro the Bombers co-captuin who missed
Patty Hearst Captured
4-3 defense and they do have pro last week's game against St. perfectly: "What a challenge to be
see page two
size," said Ford, "We will be giving Lawrence, will be back. At'6 foot 3 pluying the number one team in the
awuy an average of thirty pounds a inches and 250 pounds, Coach' nation."
iais&sii**- v.
KSW8SWBBMM&3K2
m>
Patricia Hearst Captured
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) Fugitive
newspaper heiress Patricia Hearst
and three radical comrades were
arrested Thursday, ending one of the
longest and most bizarre manhunts
in American history. Almost by
chance. FBI agents spied two of Miss
Hearst's fellows in the Symbionese
Liberation Army jogging on a San
Francisco street. William and Emily
Harris were taken without a
struggle. Miss Hearst and Wendy
Yoshimura, an artist linked to the
radical movement, were apprehended about an hour later,
taken into custody at an apartment
in the city's Mission District.
"Thank God she's all right," Miss
Hearst's mother, Catherine, said in a
barely audible Voice when informed
of the captures.
Her husband, Randolph A.
Hearst, was in New York on business
and said as he boarded a plane for
San F-rancisco, "I am very pleased
thai things turned out the way they
did." Hearst said that despite the
bank robbery charges against his
daughter. "I don't think anything
will happen on that score; after all
she Wlis a kidnap victim, you must
remember."
In a crowded courtroom 2'/j hours
alter her arrest, Miss Hearsi was
arraigned on charges that included
bank robbery and federal weapons
violations. Her haira reddish-brown
color, cut in a shag style, the slightly
built Min Hearst listened as the
charges against her were read by
U.S. Magistrate Owen Woodruff.
She wore tinted glasses and
appeared quite pale.
Asked by the judge if her name
was Patricia Campbell Hearst, she
answered, "Yes." Mils Hearst was
kidnapped from her Berkeley apartment Feb. 4, 1974 by the thenmysterious SLA. Within two
months, she had joined her captors
and declared herself a revolutionary.
In addition to federal charges,
Miss Hearst and the Harrises face
state charges that include kidnapping and robbery. Asst. Dist. Atty.
John Howard in Los Angeles said
the three would be brought there
next week for arraignment.
William Harris, 30, and Emily, 28,
were arraigned after the 21-year-old
Miss Hearst was taken from the
courtroom. As he entered the room,
Harris raised both fists and said
loudly, "Hey, comrades, keep on
truckin'."
Bail for all three was set at $500,000.
Miss Hearst, who at one time posed in. military fatigues with an
automatic rifle in her hand, wore a
mauve-colored long-sleeve shirt,
brown jeans and sandals at her
arraignment. As she stood before the
magistrate with her attorney,
Terrence Hallinan, her arms were
folded acrou her chest. She had
what appeared to be a silverband on
the third finger of her left hand.
Prior to Miss Hearst, Miss
Yoshimura, 32, was brought before
the magistrate. As she was escorted
from the courtroom, she reached
to where Miss Hearst satatadefense
table and squeezed her hand. Then
she was led away to be turned over to
authorities in Alameda County,
where she faces charges of possession of explosives.
End of the SLA?
Before the hearing, FBI agent
Charles Bates, in charge of the case
from the start, said "This effectively
puts an end to everybody we know
whowasintheSLA. Heheldoutthe
possibility of further arrests in the
case, however.
The Harrises were arrcsied at 1:15
p.m. as they jogged down a street in
the Mission District. Misses Hearst
and Yoshimura were arrested at 2:35
p.m.
The FBI said Patty and Bill and
Emily Harris were the only members
left of the SLA. She was "sighted"
hundreds of timesjrom the hills of
Tennessee to a Colorado cafe, from a
Los Angeles freeway to Cuba, Hong
Kong, Algeria and Mexico City.
Virtually all checks on the reports
proved fruitless. The case began a
new phase with odd clues in April.
Pinball Change to Be Made in Campus Center
Jordan R«|act« US Arms Sal* Proposal
AMMAN Jordan (AP) Jordan on Thursday rejected conditions set by
President Ford for the sale of Hawk anti-aircraft missiles as "insulting lo
national dignity" and indicated it may buy Soviet SAM missiles instead.
Prime Minister Zaid Rifai's office announced he had informed the U.S. Ambassador that Jordan would "regretfully decline to sign the Hawk missile contract under the conditions and limitations contained in President Ford's
message to Congress." In that message, Ford assured congressional eri.ir-,
that the 14 missile batteries in the proposed $270 million deal would be
stationary and could not be used by a multinational force. Congress \ai
demanded theguarantees so that the Hawks could not be moved within range
of Israel or used by an Arab alliance against Israel. The missiles have a range
of 35 miles.
Azevedo Forms New Provisional Government
LISBON Portugal (AP) Premier-designate Jose Pinheiro de Azevedo
succeeded in putting together a new, more moderate government Thursday
after three weeks of difficult negotiations with mutually distrustful political
parties.
Socialist par./ officials said Azevedo would present his new cabinet to the
coumry within 24 hours. It will bethe sixth provisional government Portugal
has hail since the new regime was established by a military coup 17 momlis
ago.
Christians and Moslems Call Truce
BEIRUT Lebanon (AP) A cease-fire was proclaimed Thursday between
warring Christians and Moslems, but gunfire and explosions shook Beirut
after nightfall. Lebanese residents said the truce was being observed in some
suburban combat zones and ignored in others, with the tempo of fightine
picking up at dark. A government announcement said all sides agreed to
cease lire at 4 p.m.- II a.m. EDT.
by Jim Shaugnessy
Acting ona proposal submitted by
Student Association Vice-President
Rick Meckler some two months ago
which was subsequently accepted by
FSA, the Campus Center will
transform one of its first floor
lounges into an arcade.
The conversion, which concerns
the four small lounges situated
above the cafeteria and the present
game room is expected to be completed by late October.
According to Meckler, the
proposal called for the transference
of the game room from its current
location so that pinball, ping-pong,
cards, chess' a n d t e l e v i s i o n
enthusiasts may each occupy one of
the four lounges mentioned above.
The game rooms' present location is
adjacent to the pool room on the first
floor of the Campus Center.
The main changes necessary to accomodate the move will be concentrated on the first west side lounge
and will include walling off its two
open sides, changing the lighting
system and installing the electrical
sockets needed to allow the installation of several game machines. The
excess furniture presently in the
lounge will be moved to either the
Fireside Lounge or the present game
room.
A general complaint of congestion
WASHINGTON (AP) President Ford met Thursday at the While House
with Prince Saud bin Faisal, minister of state for foreign affairs of Saudi
Arabia.
The prince is in the United States as head of the Saudi delegation to the U nited Nations. The President and prince discussed a wide range of issues, including the possibility of an oil price increase later this month by the oilproducing and exporting counlries.
IfefaonthaaaaMvii. IfeaceMwatioa.
Postal Service Announces 3 cent Hike
WASHINGTON (AP) The Postal Service said il moved Friday to increase
the cosl of a first-class stamp from 10 to 13 cents, effective shortly after
Christmas.
The proposal, filed with the Postal Rate Commission, alsowould increase
on a temporary basis the cost of a postcard from eight lo 10 cents.
The proposed increases in first-class mail, postcards and other classes ol
mail would provide the Postal Service with an additional $2.4 billion yearly
in revenue, a spokesman said.
1
US Renegotiates Grain Sale
WASHINGTON (AP) Agriculture Secrcuirj Earl 1.. Hut/ said today
"genuine progress has been made" on a grain agreement with the Soviet Union. Another high-ranking administration official said it would asure the
Russians 5 million lo H million metric tons a year.
Uui/ testified before the House Agriculture Committee one day alter the
administration disclosed the Russians have agreed to pay higher shipping
rates, meaning American tankers can be pulled out of mothballs to carry
grain to the Soviet Union. Using U.S. tankers could mark a major step
toward a grain-lor-oil swap with the Soviets.
Coleman Fights for Approval of ConRail
WASHINGTON (AP) Transportation Secretary William T. Coleman Jr.
urged Congress Thursday lo approve the administration's financing plan for
Con Rail and not to build a "gold plated railroad" that would put competing
railroads out of business.
Coleman told the Senate subcommittee on surface transportation that the
I ina ncing plan, which calls for spending of less than $2 billion to get Con Kail
started, was adequate.
ConRail is the name of the quasi-governmenl corporation the government
hopes to set up by consolidating the massive Penn Central and six othei
financially ailing northeastern railroads.
II
Protests Continue as N.Y.C. Teachers Return
IS
NEW YOKK, N.Y.(AP) A Board of Education spokesman said most of the
city's 050 schools opened normally, but some parents picketed at a Brooklyn
school and kepi Iheir children out of class to object lo a reduction in class
time for the I.I million pupils. The pickelcrs were protesting the shorter
school week that was a key element insettling the strike by65,0O() teachers.
Teachers' strikes continued in five other stales, with several of the walkouts
tied up in court actions.
Friday and Saturday,
Prosecution of EPL Called Off
September 19 &20
$.50 with tax card $1.00 without
7:00 and 9:30
m
LC-18
ALBANY N.Y (AP)The New York secretary ofstate'a office reversed itsell
Thursday and said it would not request prosecution of the Environmental
Planning Lobby, a statewide environmental-action group, for failing lo lilc
lobbying statements on schedule. The F.LP had been listed among 211
businessmen and special-interest organizations ciled by the stale Wednesday
for supposedly failing to report what they paid their lobbyists. The reports
are required by slate law.
compiled by Kim Sutton and Malt Kaufman'
PAGE TWO
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
SEPTEMBER 19, 1975
Student* playing the pinball machines In trw Campus Canter gamaroom.
cooperation and self-discipline of
the students, the company has
agreed to install rows of pinball
machines and possibly football and
air hockey. The original proposal,
cited Meckler, suggested a combination change of person/security
guard hul a penurious budget
demands locked doors. However, if
the door system doesn't work aswell
as the pinball company likes, the
guards will be called in. The com-
pany also agreed to periodically justified in spending the $1,000.00
replace machines that don't do well, necessary to supply the Plant
insuring a wide and varied selection
Department with the materials
of games.
necessary for the operation.
A lot of people, or rather a few,
The change occuring in the Camare relaxing at Ihe pinball pus Center lounges will not effect Ihe
machines. SUNYA netted around pinball machines elsewhere on cam$28,000.00 last year (despite thcrip- pus. Although they are trying to
ol'fs) which indicates that the keep ihem somewhat centralized, il
machines are grossing upwards of . is feasible that they might have one
$50,000.00. Since Ihe game room or two implanted in the Rathskellar
business is so lucrative, SA felt bar when it is completed.
8 Positions Cut from Astronomy Department
Ford and Faisal Discuss Oil Prices
8. 'S
la the game room instigated the
proposal, while the noise of the
machines and the disruptiveness of
the ping-pong balls added heavily to
its acceptance. The only other alternative suggested was the removal of
the machines.
The noise emanating from the
current game room cannot be contained because of its opencss. The
noise tends to echo although advice
was given on acoustics in the hope*
of toning the noise down. Because of
its location immediately above it, the
Fireside Lounge has been rendered
almost useless for study and unappealing for socializing. Thus walling off the west side lounge will aid in
sound proofing.
With pinball and Ihe other games
centered in a relatively concentrated
area, SA is hopeful that those
students searching for a semi-quiet
place to congregate and meet people
without trudging back to dormitory
lounges, will make better use of the
Fireside Lounge than they have in
the past. Especially those students
living off-campus.
There are presently eight (not
necessarily in order) pinball
machines in the game room, which
the pinball company claims are
damaged or ripped-off weekly. If the
security of the new room is satisfactory, depending mainly upon the
by Margaret Marino
Having received their notification,
live out of six faculty members will
be released from the Department of
Astronomy and Space Science by
the end of this academic year. Iniidd i l i o n . three
non-leaching
professionals will also be released.
"Increasing financial restraints" as
well as a "review of academic
priorities" were the reasons cited for
the departmental dismissals hy
former University President Louis
T. Hene/.et.
Although the undergraduate
department has not been officially
terminated. Dr. Curtis llemenway,
the only professor expected to
return, commented that the cuts in
staff will essentially put an end to the
undergraduate
program.
Recommendations made by the
Select Committee on Academic
Priorities did result in a decision t c
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phase out the graduate program by
the end of Ihe academic year.
"The decision to dismiss members
of the astronomy department is like
a breach of contract with those
students who came'to SUNYA for
the express purpose of majoring in
astronomy."
en m m c n 1 e d
sophomore Alan Silverman. Alan,
who had been considering majors in
either astronomy oraslro-physies is
now considering a major in math as a
possible alternative.
Early last September, a group of
"outside experts" began a review of
the astronomy department, a practice that is required for all programs
at Albany. Reports that were
generated by the State Education
Department, the committee that initialed the year long review, were
used as Ihe basis for the recommendations made by the Select Committee. These recommendations
were sent to twoadditionalcouncils.
the department itself, and then finally to President Benezct for a decision.
Questions were raised by members
of the astronomy department in
regard to Ihe integrity with which the
SUNYA councils and committees
acted. A lack of communication
between the parties involved was one
of the major accusations,
Explains
Dr.
Don a I d
Sehmalberger. former acting chairman of the department asof August
.11. 1975: "No one from the department was ever heard in a committee
meeting." Although one interview
did take place, be explained that its
purpose was only to gain additional
information on the department and
certainly was nol a hearing. Dr.
llemenway likens the situation in
general, to not being able to speak at
your own trial.
SKYDIVING
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Two letters were written lo Presi- approach from President Itenezel's
dent Hcnezet in the form of a rebut- point of view.
tal. The letters, written May 2o and
The options available to the
June 12. challenged every point the graduate students fall into two
Select Committee made, said Dr. categories. Either they will have to
Sehmalberger. The fact that no one complete their theses before the
got in touch wilh any one asa result academic year is up, or they will have
of those letters raised a q uestion as to lo transfer. According to Dr.
whether they were properly con- Sehmalberger, Ihe State University
sidered.
of New York al Stony Brook has a
Il was also pointed out thai the small undergraduate and gmduate
reports submitted by the State astronomy department, lie pointed
Educiuon Department were only the oul. however, that there are so many
p r e l i m i n a r y r e p o r t s. I- u r I h c r fields of astronomy, it sometimes
questions were raised as to the time may be difficult to transfer. About
element involved. Dr. Sehmalberger four or flvcgrud students are in this
claimed that the ninety days in which difficult position becausetheirwork
the Select Committee had lo review lias been in close association villi
all ihe programs HI SUNYA was un- one professor's work. To try lo
reasonable. He also pointed oul that duplicate this at another school
the committee meetings and final would he hard, he continued.
decisions took place during the
Co-operative Program
summer when few people are
One possibility thai is under inaround.
vestigation for the undergraduates is
Chairman of Ihe Select Com- that of a co-operative program with
mittee, Vincent O'Letiry, agreed that neighboring schools such as Union
it was a small amount of time in College or R.P.I. Howei er, said Dr.
which to operate. He explained that llemenway, "At present R.P.I.'s
all decisions to phase out the astronomy department is also cutastronomy department were meant ting back and they arc without a
to occur over a longci period of lime. president. Union only has a small
Out. he continued, the Slate budget program." As of yet, no specific
culs came out and it was probably no recommendations have been made
longer possible to consider such an by Dr. llemenway in this regard.
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PAGE THRE1
a
• • •'•• • •
,=^--. ..•.•^^,»^ J ,,» |l ^ rfr .yj nrrnv - B j \mftli
Friedan Denounces Wmen* Yew Conference
by Jill Cohen
She talked about a •traumatic experience," a "Kafkaesque, James
Bond4ype" venture into a tumult of
"enormously, frightening'' international intrigue. She didn't really
look like she could be
News
frightened by much,
- with her aggressive
I'rature ' manner and tough,
world-weary features.
Bui Birily Friedan's involvement in
the International Women's Year
Conference last su mmer set off a personal and international melodrama
thai she could only consider to be a
farce.
A farce. A "great cosmetic deal,"
she called it. Garlands of flowers
adorned the Mexico City site of the
conference, parties of women were
hired to line the streets and welcome
the delegates. A plastic facade of
support and compliance masked the
political maneuvering in the "kind of
machismo" that Friedan called an
"outrageous attempt lo manipulate"
the women at the conference in order
to secure for Mcxical leader
Echeverria greater leverage in the international political scene.
The highly political tenor of the
conference, which Friedan claims
was played down by the news media,
Brought her to Albany last week lo
publicize the "real story behind the
International Women's Year Conference." • '
Friedan, author of "The Feminine
Mystique," spoke at the Colonie
Americana Inn on Tuesday,
September 9. She was the founders**
the National Organization of
Women and helped pioneer the
feminist movement in the U.S. during the past decade. Consequently,
Friedan took an important, though
unofficial, role in the Mexico City
conference.
"I don't think much came out of
the conference," she said. "The Communist powers were very threatened
. . . the Latin and Third WorM
women took a back seat in the conference . . . the Mexican government
tried to portray the whole conference
as an American i mperialist bag." She
laughed, Tilled with anger and
amusement. "It was a mindblowing
experience to be considered an agent
of American imperialism."
Fear that the American feminists
might "infect the Communist and
Third World women with American
ideals" resulted in suspiciously welllimcd mechanical
snafus.
"Whenever the women began to
speak out," Friedan said, "the mikes
mysteriously were not working . . .
actual attempts of women to get
ing semester loan will he withdrawn
will receive a personal letter and be
offered some other alternatives
through the Office of Financial Aids.
Whitlock expects to rely heavily on
the work-study program and the
guaranteed loan.
Higher Kate
The disadvantage to the New
York State Higher Education Corporation is that the loan is given at a
7'/:% interest rate as opposed to the
.1% interest rale of the NDSL.
There is a third alternative to the
NDSL which Whitlock strongly
urges students to try. The Basic
Educational Opportunity Grant is
generally available lo students
whose family income is no greater
than $ 14,(XX) This year 765 students ut
SUN YA are receiving the grant with
anaverage of $1000 per student. The
grant may be awarded in uny
amounts up to $1,100. The grant is
presently r available lo freshmen,
Nyquist Pushes Proposal for CUNY Tuition
Commissioner of Education
Ewald B. Nyquist today amplified
the proposal he made last week that
the New York City Board of Higher
Education imposetuition chargeson
all students attending City University beginning with Spring 1976
semester. The Commissioner's
recommendation was attacked by
some Board members who claim it
could cause a strain on students
from low income families.
In a letter to Board president
Lib leader Batty Friedan, who spoke at the Colons* Americana Inn last week.
together were threatened, there was
some power of powers that did not
want the women to get together."
To the women who did manage to
get together, and to the Mexican
government, she said, "1 was
evidently some sort of a symbol."
Friedan claims that the Mexican
semi-facist regime saw her as being
"threatening . . . and threatened."
"I was being followed." Her eyes
ignited as she recounted her night-
mare. "When I confronted the
authorities with that, I was tola,
"Don't worry, there will be someone
here to protect you." She was irate.
• "Protect me from what?" Her words
fell on silent faces with blank stares.
"Protect me from what?"
Life Threatened
Whatever it was that was to have
endangered the life of Betty Friedan
is still unknown to her, but thcthrcat
was strong enough to send her back
to the U.S. Her reports of the conference were discou raging anddisap-
sophomores and juniors. Seniors
may apply to Ihe BEOG starling
next year, as ihe program is being
phased in one year at a time.
Applications for the BEOG may be
picked up at Ihe Office of Financial
Aids.
Whitlock docs nol feel that any
student will be forced to drop out of
school because of thecutbacks
poinling, butshcisstill undaunted in
her role as a leader in the feminist
movement.
"We have some urgent business
here is the U.S.," she said. I he
"business" includes a "well-financed
campaign" to aid the passage of the
Equal Rights Amendment, and efforts lo increase the economic and
political strength of American
women. Hetty Friedan is still as
angry, as assertive as she was ten
years ago. "We have to watch mil
we can't relax."
by Susan Michael
The University Senate met on
September 5 al Mohawk Campus.
The purpose of the meeting was to
allow the Scnale, in a more informal
atmosphere, to discuss the problems
which Iheyfacc. These problems include alack of attendance and the inability to gel things accomplished
quickly.
Towards the end of solving these
1
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AC
H
lift
/', 1
in excess of tuition to meet other
costs of attending CUNY.
Nyquist says the Department
analysis demonstrates that the only
students who would be required to
pay the full tuition charge out-ofpocket are students who come from
fa milies with adjusted net taxable income over $20,000 a year. This is the
equivalent of a gross income in excess of $25,000 a year for a family of
five with one child in college, the
Commissioner explained. "No more
thai. 15 percent of the New York
City residents who are full-time undergraduates at City University are
in lis group."
'•nd'.r the State's Tuition
A '«!•• i' Program, CUNY now
recives only half a million dollars a
ycur. because only students who are
charged tuition of at least $200 arc
eligible lor tuition assistance. If the
University charged tuition at the
State University rate. Ihe C o m '
missioner explained, it could bring
in alsmost $25 million in TAP
funds for the Spring 1976 semester
alone.
In addition lo the Tuition
Assistance Program, students from
families with net taxable income of
about $8.00(1 or lessa year (gross in-
passage of a bill that they are proposing. New procedure will also forbid
the making of amendments that are
contrary to the intent of the original
bill.
The first regular meeting of the
University Scnale for this academic
year will he on Monday September
22. All Senate meetings arc at 3:00
pm in the Campus Center Assembly
Hall. All interested members of the
University community are invited lo
attend.
Saturday, September 20, in and around
the Campus Center!
Parklane is the "source"
for
Danskin Leotards
and Tights
ft goestoyour head
Have The New^brkTimes
delivered on campus
at special low rates
dancing, and for just plain wearing around.
Did you know that you Albany, State
students, own and operate a campus over
three times as large as the Albany campus'.' It's itue, Camp Dippikill consists of
840 acres of forested land dedicated to
wilderness recreation. Located on the
Hudson River, 70 miles north of Albany,
Ihe camp has several buildings suitable
fo r o vein ight accommodations. There are
over six miles of hiking trails traversing
the rugged southern Adirondack woods.
And nestled near the center of this
magnificent property is one of the last
remaining wilderness ponds in N. Y. state.
Our 40 acre pond (* mile long) is destined
to remain in its forever wild state by a
mandate of the student governing body
and so is a perfect place to relax on the
shore or in the canoes provided.
p r o b l e m s several procedural
changes were introduced. These include the writing up of committee
reports and the distributing of them
between meetings so that time will
nol be wasted by Ihe reading aloud
of these reports. Also suggested was
a limit on the length of speeches.
In the future, members of the
Senate will be required to specify
what interest they have in the
come of about $13,000) would be
eligible for various sources of aid
from the Federal government, the
Commissioner says. "Thus, almost
two out of every three full-time undergraduates from families with net
taxable income of $6,000 or less
(gross income,of about $11,000)
would have their entire tuition
covered by Stateand Federal aid and
would not 'pay any tuition out-ofpocket," said.the Commissioner.
The Commissioner goes on to
point out that freshmen and
sophomores from these families
would receive more aid than thecost
of tuition, so they would have
amounts varying from $188 to $1,200 a semester after tuition to help
defray other costs of attending
CUNY. Juniors and seniors in a
similar situation would have
between $93 and $1,100 more .aid
than needed for tuition.
Students from families with net
taxable income between $6,000land
SK.000 a year (gross income of about
SI 1,000 to $13,000) would pay less
limn $150 tuition per semester outof-pocket in their freshman and
sophomore years, and between $140
and $250 per semester in theirjunior
and senior years, he says.
IES
For partying and playing, exercising and
CAMP DIPPIKILL
i
$800 a year for juniors and seniors,
which is the same as charged by State
University.
Nyquist citesfiguresjust compiled
by the Education Department which
show that if this tuition is charged, 55
percent of the CUNY undergraduates who come from
families with gross incomesof $11,000
or less a year would not be required
to pay any portion of the tuition out
of their own pockets. In fact, he
says, most would very likely have aid
Come see SA
Oanikini are for everywhere and everyone.
1
Alfred A. Giardino, the Commissioner pointed out that theexact
opposite would be true if his
recommendation were put into
effect. The increased State and
Federal aid which would be
available to most students if tuition
were charged would more thanoffset
the additional cost to students from
low and middle income families
In his personal last week," Nyquist
had called for a yearly tuition of $650
for freshmen and sophomores and
Senate Conducts First Meeting
Grad Student Aid May Be Cut
by Hmidi B. I'oler
graduate students applying for a
National Direct Student Loan for
the enming Spring semester face the
possibility of their loans being
withdrawn, according lo Director of
Financial Aids, Donald Whitlock.
The NDSL program has overcommitt'ed its funds and as a result
graduate students and first time
borrowers may become the first to
feel I lie blow.
There have been no loans
wit lid i awn as of yet. The bursar's office has not yet finished computing
trie loans available. Director
Whitlock expects the statistics to be
in well before the spring semester.
However he stated that there may be
a "lew left hanging."
Whitlock feels that more students
accepted Ihe loans this year than in
previous years due to the poor job
market this summer.
I'very graduate student whoscspr-
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MOHAWK MALL
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PAGE FOUR
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iiimflMH^i—fci
m
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
SEPTEMBER 19, 1975
SEPTEMBER 19, 1975
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
PAGE FIVE
Feminist Groups Hold
Fourth Rally in Albany
by AdrieniM Rabinowiti
The fourth annual Women's Day
was held here in Albany on Sunday,
August 7. The day's program began
at 12:00 in Washington Park. Approximately 25 tables were set up in
the park representing a wide spectrum of interests including such
groups as: The League of Women
Voters, Albany Women Against
Rape (AWARE), Tri-City Women's
Center, Forum of Women in New
York State Government, Speak-Out
(a feminist journal), National
Organization of Women (NOW),
Women's Political Caucus and
Planned Parenthood.
District Women, Marxist-Feminist
Study Group, and Speak-Out, will
serve as a central home for women's
activities. The center wants to conduct discussion groups, speakers,
workshops, and feminist performers
in the arts. The center hopes to encourage all organizations with a
feminist orient; tion to make use of
their facilities.
The need for women to become involved in politics and government
was also stressed. Women were urged to exercise their power as voters,
especially concerning the Equal
Rights Amendment (ERA), which
will be on the ballot in New York
The program in the park consisted
State this November, and In support
of several speakers, music by a the increasing number of women
women's band called Medusa
presently in government or running
Muzic, poetry readings, workshops
for office.
in self-defense, women in education
Perhaps the strongest concern
and bicycle repair. Among the that was expressed was thai <>l esspeakers present were Theresa Cook
tablishing a sense of cohe.sneiusn,
and Rezsin Adams, who are running and interaction between theilillcmit
in the Democratic primaries for women's groups in Albans. I he iiocounty executive and county
porta nee of mainta in ing a n u pen exlegislator respectively. At 6:00 pma
change of ideas and inhumation in
covered dishdinncr was scheduled in
order to effect real and Mgniliutiit
the First Presbyterian Church on
change was one of the pi unan conl.ark Street, to be followed by a cerns,
dance at 8:00 pm in the YWCA.
Women's Day was Miece-ssltikind
Relocation Discussed
rewarding in that it informed uomen
Several items were emphasized of the many organizations! hat CM.S|,
during the day. one of which was the exactly what they a re doing and him
relocation, at the YWCA, of the Tri- they can become involved, in adiliCity Women's Center. It is hoped tion to being an opportunity lot
women to get togethci'and exchange
that the new center which a!s<
houses NOW, AWARE, capital ideas.
Dollar daptoymant dacltloni: Sophomore claaa prttldant Mare Bameka must make thaia.
Classes Collect, Distribute Dues
by Frank Cualc
Did you ever wonder exactly how
your class dues are spent? . Is
somebody hoarding the money for a
vacation in Rioorforan illicit affair?
Discussions with Bob O'Connor,
News
senior class president,
and Mark Benccke,
Analysis s o p h o m o r e class
president, proved the
above speculations
false. The class dues, which arc
collected by the Bursar's office and
deposited with the Faculty-Student
Association (FSA), are spent by the
respective classes on a variety of
functions.
Senior week activities and class
parties arc the biggest spenders but
also included are picnics, movies,
and miscellanea like class T-shirts.
This year, O'Connor said, "We also
may give help with finding jobs to
the graduating seniors."
The money thateach class rccicvcs
during the year does not arrive in one
lump sum. It comes from the Bursar's office as student bills are
processed. Bills are processed
throughout the entire semester.
It is difficult to determine how
many students will pay the optional
class dues. Therefore, according to
O'Connor, "the individual class
council has no way that they can
budget it [the money], fhey can just
estimate from previous \ tars.
Out of the initml amount of
money, which O'Connor says can
vary from S3.000 to S6.000, the
various class activities are funded.
He estimates that from $2,500 to $3,000 is saved yearly by each class for
their senior week. Each class varies
in size, meaning that larger classes
have more money at their disposal.
O'Connor stresses that, "we are trying for quality rather than quantity,
but we arc still trying to do as much
as we can."
Benccke's attitude towards class
spending slightly differs from that of
O'Connor's. It seems that the
sophomore class is a large one and
has a high percentage of dues-paying
students — about 80 per cent.
Bcnccke feels that their purpose is to
cater not only to that particular
class, but also to the university as a
whole. Commenting on the lack of
social life here on campus Bcnccke
SIASDE
stated, "We feel that since we have
the funds We should spend it on all
the students."
Decisions on class spending are
made by the class council. This body,
which varies in number from class to
class, meets at regularly scheduled
intervals. O'Connor alluded to the
fact that these bodies often have
limited manpower.
Henecke points out that, "the
whole philosophy of class government is not only a social one. It
should be a channel where peopleexpress themselves and should not be
devoid of politics." He also defended
the integrity of the council. "We have
a very open class council, and have
taken many precautions to avoid the
abuse of power," said Benecke, "The
president has no veto power and is a
regular voting member."
NYPIRG Handbook Available
As was previously reported in the
ASP, there have been instances in
the past where classes have had large
The New York Public Interest Research Group, Inc. (NYPIRUl has
sums of money left over after they
published a handbook showing consumers how to take safeguards against
graduate. Commenting on this,
overbilling by the phone company.
Bcneckc said,"Throughout the years
The booklet will he available at the NYPIRG table at Activities Dav.aml
there has been a conservative
at the NYPIRG office in the Campus Center, room 332.
philosophy on spending."
SUNYA Graduates: Facing the Outside World
by Ed Moser
of which were negative. So I went to said prevented blacks and women
Recently I talked to a number of 2 interviews, and I acceptance."...
• from gettinggood jobsasonly "a few
people who graduated this spring
Most stressed the importance of are allowed into graduate school."
from SUNYA under either the the impression these interviews
One person saw it differently, sayMasters orBachelors programs. The made on the employer. "A resume is
ing that a young teacher friend was
interviews were nothing likea 'socio- not enough," said a graduate of
denied tenure to make room for
economic study of the Social Welfare, currently a social minority teachers so that alleged
News
participants; as a worker. "They test to see if you can "quotas are fulfilled." His friend
social
s t u d i e s handle questions quickly, if you can moved to Texas, where he landed a
Feature
professor might term handle people . . . you really have to job.
it, but were more like sell yourself."
This brings up the question of
an informal chat.
where these grad uates look for work.
One unemployed English teacher,
Many felt the New York State area
Naturally, in light of the recession, formerly of SUN YA, had a bitteratwas a bad place for a young person
most talked at length about looking titude toward the job market. "The
for work. What they said backed way to get any job is to know on the up and up.
Bill Brina, a veteran who just
today's popular image of the pen- somebody . . . Quality is involved,
received his Masters, said of New
niless college graduate wearing out of course, but there are so many
York City,"Hey man, 1 was in Vietqualified people and so few jobs."
his shoes searching for a job.
nam. One war is enough. I could live
The same person was angry at
"I wrote 33 letters asking for interthere." Others joked of New York's
views," said Ken Klane, a Business what she said was the prejudice she
budget crisis, or of the teachers'
major graduate. "1 got 27 replies, 25 had observed as a teacher, which she
strikes in both New York and the
Tri-City area. Laura Petrochko,
with a Masters degree in Russian,
said "the Albany job market is very
bad, unless you want a government
job. As for myself, I'm thinking of
Boston or Washington."
Bill Brina said of the state
economy:"lt's already done here, the
economy is developed . . . it might
takemc 30 years to becomeadeputy
commissioner (of environment)
here; it might take only 10 years in
the Southwest."
Despite what the above may indicate, many found work easily, and
for obvious reasons. Sandra
McGurrin, although holding'only'a
Bachelor in music, is director of a
choir in Nassau, N.Y. The catch is
she's had the job since she was 16,
and has the credentials of being first
in her class to back up her experience. "I was nominated to Phi
Beta Kappa, but I wasn't accepted. I
think perhaps because I'm a music
person, they (the electors) thought 1
Recent SUNVA graduates have faced a tough Job market.
was a little strange," she said jokingly.
WE KNOW
WHAT YOU'RE
GOING
THROUGH.
by Daniel O'Connell
During a tempestuous meeting
replete with dclctablc expletives and
a pounding gavel, the Central Council on September tenth passed and
then voted down bill 7576-17 which
would have set aside a separate seat
on the Council for students now living at the Hotel Wellington.
Unfair Classification
The sponsor of the bill.Greg
Lessne (State).said he proposed it
because he felt that classifying the
Wellington students as commuters
for election purposes, as they are
now, might lead to unfair representation for one of the constituencies
involved. Lessne said that if no one
from the Wellington was elected it
would be doubtful that that group
with its unique needs and problems
would be adequately represented by
someone who doesn't live there. On
the other hand, he pointed out, if the
people at the hotel organized
themselves they could conceivably
capture all six commuter scats and
so leave the true commuting students
with a weakened voice in the Council. He concluded his bill would prevent either of these occurances by
giving the over 200 students living at
the Wellington their own seat.
Councilperson Lessne's argument
proved effective and the bill passed
by a vote of 12-5-0; however, the victory was short lived. Soon after the
vote was taken debate was reopened
when Roger Herbert (Commuter)
complained that he had not been .
given a chance to express his opinion. As the discussion progressed
more and more questions were raised pertaining to the bill's constitutionality and the basic theory of
representation. When a second vote
was taken the result wasalmost completely reversed from the first as the
bill was defeated 6-11-1.
In other action the Council voted
to charge $1 admission to non-tax
card holders at the Albany-Ithaca
football game that will he played
September twentieth. The profits
will be used lor future capital expenditures requested by the Athletic Advisory Board and approved by the
Council.
The meeting itself was often unruly and several times required
Chairperson David Coyne to calm
down the more excited members.
Tab oar warn!!
F
Fri„S*t..9 6*0 fm
All interested are welcome.
Swimming test will be given.
FEE CHARGED
GENERAL MEETING
NME $#. 14 7.-00 fm IC tO
Further info call Bill or Mike 457-7768
Funded by SA
ENGLISH
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LQ/Jaf„.M...'A BOY AND HIS D O G ' r ^ D O N JOHNSON SU6ANNE BENTON-, ALVY MOORE
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PAGE SIX
Council Cops Out
Wtnt * htn km k ud» Mm?
Add these words to your basic vocabulary
now, whether or not'you're planning a trip
to Mexico soon.
Here at Jose Cuervo, we believe
an informed consumer is an
informed consumer.
were common refrains. Some,
however, put down the social aspect
of the school.
One. grad spoke at length on this
subject:"l'm from a small town, a
small college . . . It took me longer
to make friends at SUNYA than at
my other college. The people at
SUNYA are a little more remote.
They're suspicious, at least some of
them are. If you tried to be friendly,
maybe they'd even think you were a
little strange . . . perhaps it's
because so many arefromNew York
Citv and Long Island.'
SCUBA CLUB
MIGOS:
SPANISH
chocho
gargarizando
sacamuelas
bulla
manteca
pantufla
Aggressiveness, it wassaid, is essential to find work. Said one grad,
"One's name tends to get lost in the
shuffle of papers (applications, i.e.).
You must personally put pressureon
employers. You just can't wait
around."
SllNYA Praised
Besides jobs, the grads were asked
about their feelings toward SUNYA
in general. Most were grateful for the
fine education Albany State had
given them, and the opportunities
that have ensued. 'Albany's a good
school' and 'It's highly respected'
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
SEPTEMBER 19, 1975
MO O N E A D M I T T E D AFTWF* P E R F O R t V t A N C E S T A R T S . .
NO
Q W C B u . ™ i ^ me^ggeM g g g r y j T H E BBOINNMSJOI
SEPTEMBER 19, 1975
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
50
\m
^BCERS
UNDER. THE
SIV.0 fcesr.
uie*T«T*u we.
J
PAGE SEVEN
University Concert Board presents...
JEAN LUC PONTY
• formerly with Mahavishnu Orchestra
Elton John
k Frank Zappa
& THE HEATH BROTHERS
Monday, September 29th
7:00 p.m. & 10:15 p.m.
$ 1.00 w/tax
^
* L'b U W / °
Tickets go on sale
Mon., Sept. 22nd in the |
SA CONTACT Of HCE
Beginning 2:00 p.m.
A landmark marijuana case1 is unerway. in Alaska that could very
well determine how the federal
government will deal with states
which decriminalize pot.
The Alaskan legislature and
supreme court have both repealed all
state laws which treat marijuana
possession with criminal penalties.
Last month, however, the police
revealed that an undentified Juneau
resident was apprehended for
allegedly growing seven small marijuana plants. The cultivation of pot
is legal under Alaskan state law
but cultivation is a violation of
federal law.
As a result, the plants have been
over to the Federal Drug Enforcement Agency which says it has
forwarded them for further tests to
its San Francisco laboratories.
Federal officials in Alaska say that
if the material turns out to be marijuana, the U.S. Attorney in Alaska
may decide to prosecute the offender
under federal laws since there are no
longer state laws outlawing the
offense.
The federal decision is expected to
have repercussions in Oregon,
California, Colorade, Maine, and
Ohio
stated which have already
acted to decriminalize marijuana
CRIMES COUNTED
booked by SASU
funded by SA
"I
Whatever you've got planned for tomorrow
(Saturday the 20th) save it for another
time because
"Albany Campus Events"
presents
The new government in South
Vienam says it lias set up a "war
crimes" museum to commemorate
the American presence in Vietnam.
The government says the "Museum
for American War Crimes in Vietnam" is now displaying such things
as howitzers, tanks, rockets, those
15,000 pound bombs known as
"daisy cutlers" and torture instruments allegedly used by pronmcrican officials of the former
Thicu government. The War Crimes
Museum also has one room featuring Playboy pinups, pornographic
films and records which the Saigon
administration says were used by
Americans to "corrupt Vietmunesc
society".
X
ACTIVITIES DAY
MOTHER WANTED
A West Coast Sunday school
teacher has been running classified
ads for—of all things, a woman to
woman to bear his child.
According to the man, however,
there is only one problem: hedocsn't
want to see the woman or to have
sexual relations with her.
Cellar Door productions, the'
promoters who handle many big
name rock acts, say that some of the
big name stars write nearly impossible clauses into their performance
contracts.
Take Elton John, for example:
when Elton is schelduled to do a
show, his contract requires that the
promoters see to it that a hot sitdown meal for a least 20 persons is
served back stage, featuring a full
menu drawn up personally by Elton.
Elton also requests large bags of taco
chips and a quart of guacamolejeight
bottles of french and german champaign, with the brand and years absolutely specified; fresh vegetables
and fruit for 20; and a case of
Heineken beer.
The Grateful Dead are no easier to
please: they usually demand (and
get) 60 quarts of milk: six cases of
Heincken's beer: and steak, lobster
and vegetarian meals to feed up to 30
people.
The Average White Band isa little
easier: Their only request is "no fried
chicken." John Mayull, meanwhile,
asks for nothing else: Mayall always
9 b a n d in CC cafeteria
ice cream in the main lounge
to "trips" being experienced by
laboratory rabbits and mice.
Doctor Voss suggests that it can
be injected into humans to treat a
person who is suffering from an unpleasant L.S.D. experience.
The Village Voice, however,
says:"The government will probably
start vaccinating high school kids so
that they'll never be able to get high
WHY BUY IT?
People across the country are apparently taking Abbie Hoffman's
advice, and have been ripping off
copies of Abbie's book, which is
titled Steal This book.
The Erie Metropolitan Library in
New York reports it recently discovered that all three copies of the
yippie leader's book had been
removed from its shelves.
Library worker Ronaleen Lee says
that the Erie Library is connected to
requests fried chicken, particularly
700 libraries across the United States
from Kentucky Fried Chicken.
.The 700 other libraries, Lee states,
Cellar Door reports it did turn
found that only about 15 of them still
down one request from an unidenhad copies of Steal This Book
tified big name rock group that abLee says that "very few of the
solutely demanded six limousines.
That demand was vetoed, Cellar bookstores we've contacted even
Door says, because the group has bother to order it anymore. They j ust
can't keep it in the shelves"
only five members
Off«r expires
fixtures October 31 •
Offer
The Ground Round
£OLONIE
72 Wolf Rd
459-1411
.
497-1411
Medical researchers —— believe it
or not - — have developed a vaccination against L.S.D. trips.
Medical World Newt reports that
the "anti-acid'' vaccination is die
work of microbiology Professor
Edward Voss of The University of I l linois.
The vaccination has been tried
only on animals thus far; it has been
used successfully to bring quick ends
wm^mmmmmmmmmmmmmmm
The dealt On any check ol 12.00 or mora, w«'ll
alv* you 50« back. All you hem to do I* bring
your body and tbli coupon. Eat your way through
a big lusty hamburger, drink at the bar. luit «i|oy
youitili and s o n money at tilt tarn* urn*.
mUS C b y t h e H o g e y e strjn
'
in cash. Friedman reportedlycnrried
the suitcase with him at all times
because he feared someone would
take away all of his money.
Someone did. Friedman was
brought before a judge, who heard
the story and committed him to a
psychiatric hospital against Friedman's will. Friedman was ordered to
pay court costs, lawyer's fees and
psychiatric testing costs, as well as
$60 a day in hospital fees.
Friedman's lawyers report that
this has cost $1200(1 so far, and that
unless they can convince authorities
to set Friedman free, his total life
savings will he eaten up in another
six months.
DEVILS WORK
Colorado Senator Floyd Haskell
has called on the F.B.I, to investigate
the growing number of cattle
mutilations which have occured in at
least 10 western states.
Haskell says he met with F.B. 1. officials in Denver last week in an
attempt to have them enter the case.
Haskell states that the bizarre
killings have occurred in Colorado
and at least nine other states. He
says:"in virtually all the cases, the
left ear, left eye, rectum and sex
organ of each animal have been cut
away. Blood has been drained from
the carcasses and no blood has been
found around the carcas-.es."
The senator also says he believes
that who ever is behind the
mutilations is using helicopters to
land in the middle of fields before
butchering the animals.
Investigators speculate that some
sort of satanist or devil-worshipping
cult is bching the hundreds of ritual
slayings reported in the Midwest and
the West.
An earlier federal investigation
into the killings was abruptly halted
by the U.S. Treasury- Department
for no apparent reason last spring.
The Fori Star-Telcgramreponal at
the time that the investigation was
dropped shortly after the home of
the agent heading up the investigation was smeared with blood
an
action interpreted as some kind of
occult warning.
STARS SPOILED
50C ,
•
to meet all the campus wide organizations in the: CC LOUNGE 10:30-2:00
1? 1?
DREAMS COME TRUE
A Chicago man who claims to have
had recurring nightmares that all his
money would be taken away from
him is having his nightmares come
true.
According to Boston's Real
.Paper, it all started when 43-year-old
Robert Friedman was stopped by a
policeman for panhandling in
Chicago. Friedman assured the officer that he really didn't need the
money and promptly opened a suitcase to show the policeman $24,187
NEWS
In a classified advertisement
appearing in the San Francisco
Cronicle. the man stated he is
urgently seeking a woman who
would agree to being artificially impregnated by him
and who
would then turn the ba by over to h im
at its birth.
The man explains that his wife is
infertile, and that he would pay as
much as $10,000 for a "test tube
baby," which he and his wife would
then raise.
The man, who wished to remain
anonymous reports he hasn't received even one answer to his
advertisement
ior your body!
EVERYONE ( uptowners, commuters,downtowners, wellingtonites) is invited
TflU
SUP** OOWHsWt
SMOKE IT DONT QR6W rr
I
I
I
I.
SEE WHAT'S HAPPENING!
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Color Film
Brighter, richer, more trueto-life color makos your pictures come alive. For prints,
slides, movies.
I we offer the finest in
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•; Everything lor the draftsman
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we'll Help you expreej yourself. Fail end Inexpensively.
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funded'by student association
\
SEPTEMBER 19,1975
"~
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
PAGE NINE
INTERESTED
FOLiX
VIVAIA CAUSA! Importantnieeting o» SUNYA M M * e»»fie farmworfcenon Wed. Sept. 24ot8 p.m.
In the CC Fjraiid* lourige. All Interested in the struggle of the United Farm Workers Union should attend, Hm»o la victoria siemprel
Kappa Delta and The P i i i o Hut invites all university women to a study break Monday Sept. 22 from 8
to 10 p.m. in Ten Broeck Hall.
The Albany Student Frees Aits Section
State University ol New York at Albany
September 19, 1978
Italian-American Student Alliance invites youtocomeseeMarcelloMastrolanniand Anita Ekbergin
' l a Dolce Vita Friday, tonight, at 7:30 in LC 3. Price is $.50 with tax card and $1.00 without.
*
Attention ell t o l a feta • • f a member* there will be a mandatory meeting of ALL members on Tues.,
Sept 23, at 8:30 In Bio 248. All members MUST ATTEND. A $2.00 fee will be collected. Refreshments
provided.'
#
# »
#
*
The Science Fiction Society is a stranger in a strange land in Physics 129, Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. Come
and have a time enough for love with us, or call Dave at 7-5352 because I will fear no evil.'
*
*
*
'
*
*
*
Off-Campus Association (O.C.A.) is holding an informal discussion with a person from the Food
Stamp Dept. All students are welcome to discuss any topic in relation to obtaining food stamps.
Wednesday Sept. 24 at 7:00 p.m. in the Woterbury 1 st Floor Lounge.,
Free keg and information for Graduate Sfudenfipresented by theGraduate Student Association on
Friday Sept. 26, at 7:30 p.m. in the basement lounge of Brubacher Hall.
All Business Students are invited to lind out what Delta Sigma Pi is all about and how you can
enhance your future in the business world. For information call Gary at 457-7749.
•
t
•
Siddharfha—the movie version of the novel by H. Hesse will be shown in connection with German
240: The World of H. Hat—. There will be three performances onMonday Sept. 29 at 2:10 in LC 23
and at 7:00 and 8:45 p.m. in LC 7.
*
•
4
TAP/JAZZ Dance Classes for beginners, sponsored by Exp. Theatre, will be held in the PAC, Lab II.
Beginning Mon., Sept. 22—Jaiz 3 p.m.-4p.m.; Tap 4p.m.-5p.m. Free non-credit. Sign up, 2nd floor
PAC Theatre Call Board.
Continuing/lntermed. Tap—Meeting, Sept. 22, 5 p.m. following classes. For Info call Janet 482
2496.
' . . * * . * '
The Acting Company, formerly City Center Acting Company, will hold workshops at Skidmore
College on Sept. 24, 25. Classes will include: on Sept 24 (p.m.) Arts Administration and Voice and Die
tion. on Sept. 25 mmasks, wigs, and makeupwill be covered. Performance on Sept. 25,8:30p.m., at
Saratoga Summer Theatre of the The Robber Bridegroom. Tickets are $5 and $6. Sign up2nd floor
PAC, Theatre Call Board. Transportation to performance from Skidmore will be provided. Forinlo, call
PAC Box Office 7-8606.
GET
Women in Business—Phi Gamma Nu—Professional Business Sorority—pursuing a better understanding of the business world, and career opportunities in it. If interested coll Karyn (or Sharon)
457-7729.
INVOLVED
Volunteers are needed to work on a SASU/PiRG voter education/ registration drive. If you can give a
few hours call Gary at 457-6542 or Larry at 482-2822.
New and old members are welcome to attend the first meeting ot the Protect YourEnvironmentClub
on Monday, Sept. 22 at 7:30 p.m. in SS 148. For more info, call 457-8569.
SPORTS
MINDED
The Music Departments of SUNYA and the Collge of St. Rose are joining in two performances of the Requiem by Hector Berlioz conducted by Nathan Goffscha/fc, Chairman of the SUNYA music depart
ment on Oct. 27 and 28. Singers, interested in participating in these performances are invited to con
tact Stephen Osmond, 4-6889 or Robert Sheehan, 489-4929.
Harness Racing Club Meeting Sunday Sept. 21 at 9 p.m. in LC 5. Bill Heller, ace handicapper of the
Timesi Union will be the guest speaker. A dinner trip to Saratoga will be discussed. New members are
welcome.
Scuba Club. Want to learn who to Scuba Dive? Take our coursel 1 st pool session Fri. Sept. 19.6 p. m at
the pool. Bring a swimsuit. All interested are welcome. Also there will beaGeneralMeeting Wed. Sept.
24 at 7:00 p.m. in LC 10. Anyone interested in joining the club is welcome. For further info, call Bill or
Mike at 457-7768.
Albany Stale Archers meets 6:30 p.m. in the Women's Auxiliary Gym on the 2nd floor of the Phys. Ed
Building. Credit will be given, instruction and activities planned. New members welcome. For information call Dale at 7-5228.
Judo Club meets in Gym Wrestling Room Tuesdays at 7 p.m, and Thursday at 6. Beginner's class starts
at 7:30 on Thurs. For info call Andy at 7-7705 or Bonnie at 7-787 .
vVSUA Sports proudly presents Week 2 of Albany Great Done Football. Join Doug and Harv for the
play-by-play action, starting at 12:55 p.m. tomorrow with Al's Attic—thepregame show. Also, an added feature—ex-Great Dane John Fallon will be on the field during the game talking with the players
and coaches. That's Albany Great Dane Football, tomorrow, Sept. 20, the game of the year as they
take on lhaca College. And you can hear it all on the Sporty 640—WSUA.
GET
Very Video
*
Feelln' Hog-Tied? Come hear Hog-Eyed String Band. Sat Sept. 20, Campus Center, 11 a.m. fo 2 p.m.
Duplicate Bridge Game meets Weds, at 7 p.m. Beginner's class at 6 p.m. All welcome. Cash prizes,
refreshments. For info, call Andy at 7-7705.
#
*
Informal discussion of Solihenlfiyn'i new book "From Under the Rubble" 3:00 p.m. Friday Sept. 18,
Chapel House. Students, faculty and staff welcome.
HELP
G o i n g fo Church? But don't know how to get there? Pineview Community Church sends a busto Dutch
Quad ot 10:40 every Sunday morning. Fellowship in the Lord with us.
Looking for Christian Fellowship? Albany Evangelical Christians meet every Fri. at 7 p.m. in CC 315
for prayer and sharing. Come and join in God's love.
Need a roommate?? Interested in meeting people?? People passing through Albany need a place to
crash for a night or two. If you've got the room and the interest drop into Middle Earth , 102 Schuyler
Hall on Dutch, and become part of the Crash list we're compiling; or call Marc, Jim or Pati at 7-7588 or
Marc at 7 7950.
•
.,
.
If you are interested in assisting students who have physical disabilities, please contact AI De Graft
Rehabilitation Service, CC 130, 7-1296.
OFFICIAL
NOTICE
Free tickets for Parents Weekend Continental Breakfast Sun, Sept. 28. Please limit to four only. First
come first served basis. Pick tickets up in CC 361 from 9 to 4 starting Monday, Sept. 22.
ATTENTION FRESHMEN There wilt be an interest meeting to organize the Class of 1979 on Wed. Sept
24, at 9 p.m. Refreshments will be served!
Students who failed to come to Community ServiceOrienfafion may be DROPPED from course. Come
to LCB 30 immediately (7-4801).
All new Freshman who took college work while in high school or this past Summer are advised to check
with the Office of Undergraduate Admissions to be sure that they are aware of your work and that they
have received your transcripts.
ID cards are required for entrance to Physical Education Building and Tennis Courts.
Attention; Mathematics and Science Teaching Majors in the Classes of 1978 and 1979. There w.ll
be an information meeting on the AlbanyMafhematics Science Teaching Program (AMST) on Mon
day, Sept. 29, at 7:30 p.m. in Education B-13.
Mass Media
Amassed
When Things Were Good...
by I dward J . O'Neill
A storybook sits before you on your
IV screen. A page begins to turn,
and promptly tears, and somehow
yon know thai Wednesday nights
will never be the same again.
I've just described the heginningof
When Things Were Rotten, a new
comedy series from the demented
mind of Mel Brooks. Brooks has
been making people laugh for years
with movies ( Young Frankenstein),
albums (The 2000 Year Old Man),
and TV series {Get Smart), and this
new show is no exception to the rule.
When Things Were Rollen is a
riotous re-telling of the Robin Hood
legend, starring Dick Gaulier as a
super-heroic Robin who swings
from a tree to the dinner table and
calmly says, "Pass the salt."
Sherwood Forest has been peopled
with hilarious characters such as
gluttonous Friar luck (Dick Van
Fatten) who fights and cats at one
lime, scatter-brained Maid Marion
(Misty Rowe), who knits a secret
message on an Afghan, and the evil
Sheriff of Nottingham (Henry I'olic
II), whose dungeon-imprisoned
enemies must sing "Get Happy" to
appease him.
With this show. Brooks seems to
be getting away from the recent style
of talky, topical situation comedies,
and back to a more basic approach.
When Things Were Rouen is filled
with slapstick (a tumultuous fight
scene, duri ng which R obin calls for a
sword, and is pelted with ten), sigh!
gags (Sir Ronald of MacDonald
wears a shirt proclaiming "Over I,000,000
Dispatched"), and puns
(Robin gives the Sheriff an "arrow"
shirt), in the style ol Brook's hit film.
Mazing Saddles.
Watch When Things Were Rollen
on ABC, Wednesdays at 8, and I
guarantee that you will laugh. Watch
especially closely the crowd scenes,
which I feel are brilliant. The crowds
do and say everything in unison,
providing for a great comiccffcct. In
one such scene, the peasants are
commanded, "Hold your tongues!"
Immediately, they all slick out their
tongues and grab hold.
Now, lhal's funny!
media madness:
The Television Invasion
Of The Madison Avenue
Body Snatchers
mmm«-?mmmm:<mmtimikmtyxtmmm®:
Community Service make-up Orientation for those who missed Orientation—Mandatory attendant.*-'
in order to insure a passing grade—Mon. Sept 22, at 4:45 in LCB 30.
Just a reminder; All those who plan on attending tomorrow's Football Game (SUNYA vs. Ithaca] MUSI
show their tax card for free admission. Otherwise, you will be charged $1.00.
Information regarding Fellowship
Competition for 1976-77 is available in AD 218, 457 8301.
U Q Q ; T h e international Film Group
The alternative filmic experience since 1954
presents
Part 1 of
TIE CINEMA i t IHi MUSICAL
by l,im Levin
Robin and the Seven Hoods
with Peter Falk, Sammy Davis Jr., Edward G. Robinson, Frank Sinatra, Dean Martin
7:15,9:45
LC-l
$1.00 without
[united by student nnsncti
lhi.idt.-tl by Mullein association
PAGE TEN
.50 with tax card
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
SEPTEMBER 19, 1975
It is too early in the season to criticize the new shows
fairly. Although thepremicrewcek has been disappointing, perhaps with character and situation development
they will get belter. Because Ihc medium to T.V. relies
on familiarity, a lew shows must be seen before a judgement can be passed.
T.V. is the only medium in which the entertainment
we are viewing becomes our friend. Close-ups arc Ihc
si/.e of our own heads and not some huge, towering
visage as on the screen. Kojak talks to us and wc listen,
surrounded by the security and comfort of our rooms,
unlike a cold movie theatre or playhouse, with strangers
all about. Anything can come inloour house. Wc let Ihc
Bunkers or .leffcisonsor MASH Unit 4077 come into
our living room oncea week, but can Ihey come into our
neighborhood?
And then there are commercials. Because of our
secure surroundings we let their messages creep into our
skulls. Our brealh begins to smell like our feet, our feel
begin lo smell like our breath, we need a pill to sleep and
then a stimulant to stay awake. The home, Ihc safest
place in the world, is being invaded by the Madison
Avenue body snatchers.
But Ihey haven't conquered yet! There are two ways
lo overcome Ihc advertising invasion. One way is to just
leave the room. The second is lo concentrate on the
commercials and analyze them into the absurdity that
they are. As soon as the commercial comes on say lo
yourself, "OK, whal do Ihey want me to buy nowT If
you say that before Ihey finish Ihcir message, then
you've beaten the "snatchers." From there it is fun lo
analyze frame composition, editing, shot angles, etc. so
your mind stays stimulated.
I hope you feel safer in living room from now on.
Stay tuned next week.
. . . O r W e r e They?
by t".S. Santino
You've seen "Blazing Saddles"
and "Young Frankenstein." You
may have even seen "The Producers"
or "The Twelve Chairs." Very funny
movies (though not without Ihcir
faults).
Pick the lamest, unlunnicsl scene
you can think of from any of those
movies the cjuicksand bit from
"Blazing Saddles" or the opening ten
minutes ol "The Producers." for instance. Now set il in Sherwood
Forest, stretch il out to a full half
hour, sprinkle liberally with commercials, tack on a laugh track, and
the rcsull is 'When filings Were
Rotten," the new Mel Brooksinspired television flop.
"Rotten," which premiered last
Wednesday, is Mel Brooks' first
television effort since "Get Smart."
After " G e t Smart," Brooks
successfully made the jump from
television to the movies, reaching his
peak with "Young Frankenstein."
On the rebound. Brooks has
stumbled over his Raisincttcs and
fallen on his face. His new show is so
strained, so silly, so pedestrian, that
only people who laugh at cream pie
flinging and banana peel pratfalls
could enjoy it.
Robin Hood and his merry men
are the vehicles'this time around,
show, created and co-written by
Brooks, takes every opportunity to
pass up the good jokes and use only
the bad ones. (Robin Hood, by the
way, is pluyed by Dick Gauticr, who
is stiller in this scries than he was as
the arthritic robot, Hymie, in "Get
Smart.") Here's a sampling of the
kind of humor that Brooks will be
clouting us with in the long weeks to
come—The sheriff of Nottingham
announces to the peasants that Ihc
King is repossessing their land. The
peasants (a hundred or so), in unison, chant "Uh-oh." The sherifl
shouts, "Hold your tongues!" ai
which point the peasants, in unison
again, stick their tonguesout of theii
mouths), grasping them between
Ihcir thumbs and index fingers.
Brooks must he commended on
his technical virtuousity heregrabbing one's tongue is not the
easiest thing in the world to do, Try It
yourself.
Ihc "Robin Hood" theme v.
nothing more than an excuse to b<
juvenile. If ihc show would emplo
the satiric poking of the Brook
films, then it might get some laughs
When the show docs mock thi
swashbuckling genre, still, the effon
is fantastic; for example, Robin, in
one scene, having been disarmed,
shouts to his men, "A sword, lads!'
file camera remains focused on
Robin as he is inundated by a showei
of rapiers.
"Rotten" 's humor, more annoying than "Batman" ai best, falls
into five basic categories: a) the
group response in unison joke (as ex
plained above), b) the ethnic joke
F.g-Renaldo, a merry man with a
Puerto Rican accent, c) the food joki
(a Brooks favorite), eg.—among the
d u n g e o n t o r t u r e s is eating
asparagus, d) the anachronous song,
e g - prisoners break into "Get Happy." e) the horse joke, a la "Saddles,"
"Frankenstein" (too stupid to
detail).
Almost all the gags fall into these
live categories and the ones thai
don't arc even dumber. In addition
all the jokes, a,b,c,d,c, or whatevei
arc shouted at full volume by the ai
tors, who must believe that we're sli
laughing so hard from Brook
movies that we can't hear whu
they're saying. This is comedy?
ji&mmmmi*-
* •
preview * leisure
tiimt'ft ko|)(»ewi(g?
FRIDAY
Palace Theater
T o m Mitchell 8:30 p.m.
Original country
Free w / t a x card, $.75 w / o
G i l Scott
Italian American Alliance Film
7:30 p.m. L C 3
10 MASH 8 p.m.
comedy
6 Midnight Special 1 a.m.
Helen Reddy, Dave Mason, Jim Stafford,
13 Space 1999 8 p.m.
Heron
science fiction
TUESDAY
10 Good Times 8 p.m.
comedy
SATURDAY
13 Star Trek 11 p.m.
science fiction
Activities Day
CC Main Lounge
Albany C a m p u s Events
12 noon - 4 p.m.
C o l o n i a l Q u a d Party
Fuerza Latina Picnic
Mohawk Campus
Freeze D r i e d Coffeehouse
9 p.m.
WEDNESDAY
13 When Things Were Rotten 8 p.,
comedy
Without Really Trying
$1.50 w / t a x c a r d , $1.75 w / o
movie 11:30 p.m.
r—I • r
Tom Mitchell 8:30 p.m.
Original country
Free w / t a x c a r d . $.75 w / o
Sienna College Center
Chris H i l l m u n B a n d
8:30 p . m .
T-
5~" 6
13
14
17
18
Sunday, Sept. 21
8:30 a . m . - 1:30 p . m .
LC23
Doc Cheatham
40
48
47
49
KJG0OG0
59
456-4883
Delaware
Return of the Pink Panther
Fri. 7:00. 9:10
Sal. 6:50, 9:00
The Fortune
hri. & Sat. 7:20. 9:2(1
Fri. & Sat. 7:30. 9:30
I.C7
Albany State
A But and His Dog
that's Entertainment
Fri. & Sat. 7:30. 9:30
LC 18
Hellman
Fri. & Sal. 7:00. 9:00
Ruck 11 R o l l Your Eyes
459-5322
Fri. & Sin. 12 midnight'
IFG
I.oie and Death
Fri. 7:20, 9:25
Sat. 6:00. 7:55. 9:50
Rnhin and the Seven Hoods
Fri. 7:15.9:15
LC I
Madison
489-5431
Chinatown
Hellman T o w n e
785-1515
Fri. & Sat. 7:10
Murder on the Orient Express
OFF C A M P U S
•la«s
Fri. & Sat. 9:20
l-n. & Sat. 7:00.9:45
Cine 1234 459-8300
Turnpike Drive-In 456-9833
Iceman Cometh
Hri. & Sal. 7:3(1
Mohawk Mall 370-1920
M o n t ) Python & the Holy ( i r a i l
l-n. & Sat. 7:10,9:00
Farewell M ) Lovely
Fri. & Sal. 7;45, 9:45
A Boy and His Dog
Fri, & Sat. 7, 8:45. 10:20
If You Don't Slop It, You'll C o Blind
Fri. & Sat. 7:30, 9:25
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More damaging is a quirk in her plotting. Heroic fantasy naturally requires
mightv deeds against mighty Iocs. But at several crucial junctures in her
narrative, Kurtz has her "good guys" win through pure luck, or through lastminute aid f r o m some totally unexpected source. She carefully builds up
tense confrontations, only to ruin them by throwing in a new factor that
destroys all tension. This is particularly true of the climatic scene of the whole
trilogy, which thus ends on a flat note.
Yet in spite of her faults, Kurtz is a worthy descendant of the great names
of fantasy. Her own special writing strength is precisely the quality which is
most important to a good fantasy novel: she can construct a believable world.
She makes her j o b somewhat simpler by drawing on medieval Wales for
much of her background, as Tolkien drew on many sources (Norse sagas,
etc.) for his own Middle Earth.
Hut even so, she can do what many writcrsare unable to do. Byprcscsnting
an effortless How of vividly depicted scenes, she makes her world come alive.
I here is never the fatal sense of artificiality. The author seems to be reporting, not inventing.
Tolkien achieved a believable world mainly through sheer mass of detail.
Kurtz gets the same effect through a more deft feeling for physical description. It would appear that she is aware of her strength and always willing to
use it to the fullest. This is admirable, and more than makes up for her faults
as a writer.
15 Lawrence Welk's
dance
21
your old man
23 Pulled a hockey
maneuver
25 Arabian watercourse
26 Sudden jerk
29 Guthrie
30 Poor living area
31 Confused
32 Forms a curve
33 Smell
34 Inactively
35 Shoemaker's tool
37 Old pro
39 Telephone-dial trio
41 Nonsense
42 Welk's
and
DOWN
a-two
43 Wallace's brother
1 College in Maine
49 Clean a blackboard
2 Jim Ryun ran
50 Stage parts
In 3:51.1
3 Oriental measure of 52 Cribbage piece
53 Bridge structure
weight
54 Slow, in music
4 Tennis racket
55 Near East natives
material
5 Association (abbr.) 56 M1ss Adoree
6
Fuehrer
57 Part of a carpentry
7 Last Greek letter
joint
8 Elaborate style in 58 Mortimer
art
59 Spanish cubist
9 Wide awake
60 Declaim vehemently
10 Geometrical points 61 Verdi heroine
11 Deserve
65 Part of a phonograph
12 Cozy
66 City in New York
53 Decorations of
honor (2 wds.)
59 Horse in old song
(2 wds.)
62 Inexperienced
63 Harsh bird
64 Nautical aid
67 Boleyn
68
European
69 Double
bookkeeping
70 Word pair in Hamlet
line
71 Mr. Musial
72 A few
73 Dispatch
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In recent years underwater
archaeology has come into itsownas
a recognized academic speciality. It
has an a i r o f excitement and adventure about it, and some o f its findings
have been spectacular. But even
before the advent o f underwater
archaeology the sea occasionally
yielded some of the vast treasure of
antiquity that it must hold.
C a p e A r t c m i s i u m , o n the
northern end of the island o f Euboea, is famous for t w o things. Here.
in 480 B.C.. the Greek and Persian
navies fought each other fiercely but
without either side winning a clear
victory. Here also was(mind one of
M M
Treasure
This Weekend: Warhol's 'Frankenstein'
by Eddie Rader
If you're the kind o f person who gets off on blood and
guts, especially guts, then you'll love Andy Warhol's
"Fra nkenstein." Nobody gets off on guts quite as much
as this Dr. Frankenstein does, except maybe his assistant. If, however, you were hoping to see an interesting
new version of the great old story, forget it. Any
resemblance between thismovieand the 1931 classic is
purely i n the title. I don't think anyone in this moviehas
even heard of the book.
What Paul Morrissey has written and directed, and
Andy Warhol produced, is a perversely funny, perversely sexy film that is sometimes simply gross. This time
around, Dr. Frankenstein is no victim of circumstances,
but an evil doer f r o m the word go.
He's interested in creating a whole race of little
monsters and the monster and his common-law wifeare
both on hand to act things started. Problem is, thcy'rea
terrific looking couple and the doctor can't keep his
hands out of her (and 1 do mean out), while his
frustrated wife is interested in what the big guy can d o
for her.
Somewhere along the line enters the hero—played by
Warhol's favorite star Joe Delasandro, the most boring
and untalented good physique ever to appear on the
screen. He comes into the castle looking for his best
friend's head, which had been sheared off and plopped
on t o p of the monster. By the time he leaves, he's seduced the wife, run the doctor through, and fallen victim to
two creepy kids who have been skulking about the
whole time.
The film's funniest moments could easily be mistaken
for its most disgusting moments, depending on how
strong a stomach you have. There's an amateurish leeling about the script that suggests the whole thing was
done in a partying mood, and somehow this is the film's
saving grace. Except for Delasandro. who can't do
anything, the actors all ham it up awfully.
I walked out of the theatre with u smile on my lace
and my dinner only slightly rising.
WE ARE ACROSS THE STREET
AT STUYVESANT PLAZA
73
Col l e g i a t e :W75 _ T
New Sounds
R o l l find a hiige selection of rock,
classical, Woes, jaa,csountry and folk L P *
HIS NEWEST AND BEST
»™mAffi$Ai 489-8346
Bruce Springsteen
Greetings from Asbury Park, N.J
The Wild, the Innocent &
the E Street Shuffle
,
,
J
Bruce Springsteen
Born To Run
M o n t y Python & the Holy Grail
Fri. & Sal. 7:15. 9:15
A p I T
S A R 0
E T I R
B
T
VE
N
B
The first lask of a go. J fantasy writer is creating the propcrmood. causing
readers to "suspend disbelief." Kurtz falters in this aim a lew times by using
terms that arc t o o modern. References to "charisma"and "mediation teams"
remind the reader of current politics, not the heroic pseudo-medieval milieu
thai is meant to be portrayed.
£
"
© E dwar d Ju l i u s , 19 75
1 Large letters for
short
5 Smell
9 Red Cap and Bass
13 Do not Include
14 Clean the floor
again
16
shark
17 Wingless insects
18 Jose or Buddy
19 Beige
20 W.C. Handy's forte
22 Wedding band,
usually (2 wds.)
24 Wasp (2 wds.)
27
Paulo
28
Park, I l l i n o i s
29 Smart
whip
32 Colorful solo
36 Roman 555
38 Hoi li man and
Hines
40 Colors on Costa
Rica's flag
44 Pablo Casals'
instrument
45 More than enough
46 State of unconsciousness
47 Old TV show, "
King"
48 Mauna
51 Siesta
56
5
Once Is Not Enough
Fri. & Sal. 7:00,9:20
A
D
E
L
1
N
Maneaters
Fri. & Sal. 7:30. 12 midnight
House That Vanished
Fri. & Sal. 9:00
last House on the Left
Fri. & Sat. 10:30
•• L 1
69
71
52
55
54
ACROSS
F o x - C o l o n i e 459-1020
t h e Wind and the L i o n
Fri. & Sal. 7:15.9:15
51
64
462-4714
68
Andy Warhol's Frankenstein
46
1
63
Guilderland Plaza
Tower East
p
A
R
A
S
0
L
60
38
50
5T
ON CAMPUS
19
45
44
Free 8:00 p . m .
16
28
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-dixieland
12 '
23
37
36
R u m a d a I n n , Schenectadj
'
KT i r
26
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Jazz Concert
I
22
25
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1
^
21
20
7
The Deryni Trilogy - Katherine Kurtz (Ballantinc)
Unfortunately for lovers o f the genre, fantasy does not seem t o attract
nearly as many good writers as do the technological and/ or socially relevant
types or SF. After the Tolkien boom, publishers reissued most of the classic
works of fantasy - f e w authors even tried to produce new material. Most who
did turned out hackwork or worse, as evidenced by the Blade series or the
novels of Lin Carter.
But in the past few years, the books of Katherine Kurtz's Deryni trilogy,
Deryni Rising. Deryni Checkmate, and High Deryni, have won this new
writer much praise and have caused her to be compared with the (mostly
deceased) great names of fantasy.
Kurtz, docs not use science fiction to investigate the con dition of woman. Rather, she writes "pure" fantasy, having practically no
connection with modern issues. Kurtz's womanhood is strictly incidental to
her writing.
10 Beacon Hill 10 p.m.
drama
13 How to Succeed in Business
$1 w / C o l o n i a l Q u a d card
,ISC Services
10 Phyllis 8:30 p.m.
comedy
10 D o n Kirschner's Rock Concert I a.m.
Paul Williams, Phoebe Snow, Nitty Gritty
Dirt Band, David Bowie, others
Saturday, S e p t . 2 0
Class of '78 Mixer
"Golden Oldies"
CC Ballroom 9 p.m.
MONDAY
Ashford & Stafford
B r i a n J a c k s o n & t h e M i d n i g h t Band
the b r e c k c r b r a s .
• 55 i n a d v a n c e . $ 6 a t d o o r
Open to all 10 a.m. - 6 p.m.
SUNDAY
by Paul Impola
Friday, Sept. 19
Freeze Dried Coffeehouse
A Deep Sea
I n Science F i c t i o n
17 Monty Python 10:30 p.m.
comedy
authorities learn of the find and intervene.
The statue b that of a nude mile,
slightly more than life-size and in a
carefully balanced pose. It possesses
such awesome majesty and. such
tremendous vitality that it surely
must represent a, god. That god is
either Zeus hurling his thunderbolt
the most precious possessions of the or Poseidon balancing his trident.
National Museum of Athens; the cir- The statue isan extraordinarily fine
cumstances are rather unjsual.
example of Greek sculpture in the
In A p r i l , 1926, some Greek Early Classical, or aevere style and
fishermen, plying their trade in the can be dated to about 460 B.C.
Bay of Artemisium. got their nets Traces of the earlier archa ic style are
fouled. Diving to the bottom of the to be seen in the stylized treatment o f
bay they found their nets tangled up the hair. The eyes, now hollow, were
in a bronze statue. When they were once inset with semi-precious stones,
unable to dislodge the entire statue as was often done i n Greek bronze
they broke o f f one a r m , just to prove casting.
their story, and took it triumphantly
Who created this masterpiece?
to their island o f Skiathos nearby.
Where d i d it stand? Where was it beMore than two years later, in
ing taken? When or how did it suffer
September, 1928, some sponge
shipwreck? T o none o f these tandivers raised the rest of the statue.
talizing questions do we have the
Only then d i d
government
answer.
T h e C l a s s i c a l Pom•muuirojwauuuwuunww
R e t u r n to Heroic Fantasy
i.y.
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Including:
Nlgnt/Jungtolsnd
B«iiilre«lii|Thun<l« Rmd/SbrtTlM Om
last week's
solution
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PC 33795
an Q
His n.w album finds Bruce Sprlngstjen
at the peak ol his creativity, and Is brimlull of °he street theatrics that hsve become the Springsteen trsaemsrKi
iiiU
PAGE 2A
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
r. .• .U...-1 ,.
t.i..:.'i i i -til'.p.i , , i .
IM'.:I.U'.
3.97
n
LIST $6.98
SEPTEMBER 19, 1975
SEPTEMBER 1 9 , 1 9 7 5
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
PAGE 3A
„A~.;..^--;,
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^^^^^iigj^^
Performing
Arts Center
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Above: twostudents rehearsing a dramitAoment Irom "Marigolds".
Below: the Lab Theatre, at peace Hfween productions.
WOftfl
Above: the fine art of face painting. Below: Lights! A crucial element In
a successful production.
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PAGE 4A
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
SEPTEMBER 19,1975
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
PAGE5A
8&ii&&&s*j0!.
Friday: Mi Jnight Band
Plays Poetry
Siena College presents
Nitty Gritty
Dirt Band
8. SPECIAL GUEST APPEARANCE
CHRIS HILLMAN
BAND
FORMERLY OF SOUTHER, HILLMAN & FUR AY
SIENA COLLEGE
CENTER
TICKETS $4.50 - $5.50 - $6.50
Saturday: Country Stomping Bluegrass
by Alan D. Abbey
There still are some groups playing lively danceand swing music that
aren't named Disco Tex and the ScxO-Lcttcs. They a re the country-rockhillbilly-blucgrass groups that today
form a distinct subculture on the
rock scene, and this Saturday at 8:30
Siena College will present two of the
best of the genre, the Nitty Gritty
Dirt Band and the Chris Hillman
Band.
The opener is the recently formed
Chris Hillman Band. Its namesake
has impeccable country rock credentials. Originally with the Byrds, he
one of the founding members of the
Plying Burrito Brothers, one of the
pioneer groups of country rock.
When the Burrilos broke up a few
years ago (they reformed recently
with two original and a passel of new
members) Hillman went into the illfated return of the Byrds.
Imported
by Mutt Kaufman
l-'or several years now, it's been
either: "Frank Zappa and the
Mothers of Invention, featuring
Jean-Luc I'onty". or "llonky
Chateau, by Elton John, featuring
Jean-Luc I'onty", or even
"Mahavishnu Orchestra, featuring
Jean-Luc I'onty." By the spring ol
1975. Jean-I.ue I'onty decided il was
lime for a change. Thought quickly
turned intoaclinn.and the violin virtuoso from France decided to split
from the suecesslul Mahavishnu
Orchestra and do a record and tour
on his own.
His music isa combination ol\i\n
and electric rock, which is featured
on his new solo album. U/MII llw
Wings nl A/ii.v/con Atlantic records.
The album features Patrice Kushcn
Jazz
on keyboards, Kalphe Armslrongon
bass. Ndugu (Leon Chancier) on
drums, and Ray Parker and Don
Sawyer on guitar.
I he opening group lor this show,
to be featured al the Campus Center
Ballroom on Monday, September
29lh. is the Heath Brothers. Ibis
group is u truly unique quartet, with
three of the lour members being
brothers.
Jimmy Heath is tin reeds, Albert
"lootie" Heath on drums, Percy
Heath on bass, and the sou I outsider.
Stanley C'owell on piano.
I lie group performs a combination ol ja/v standards and original
tunes. I hey have gotten favorable
write-ups in many papers from recent perlormances during the past
year, and seem to be a solid warm-up
lor the Jean-Luc I'onty baud.
.-
Tickets available at all Ticketron Locations, including Macy's
at Colonie Center.
Special discount price available to SUNYA $6.50 Tickets
down to $5.50 in sections C ^ K.
WHO A£EYOU? APE you J U S T )
pEona WHM HAVE foopo/wcrlA"*- THCTUT'sAmsaimos
TU£f>£VOLUTWWS (,0H£/&Tf*#MmH.
UP- X « T 'rbU/Re M
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BURNT OUT TURK
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This is what we believe: that love can explode the universe and it
can save the world. It can break the sound barrier, cross generations
und galaxies. It is fantastic, and it is fabulous.
II is the most marvelous of voyages through space and through
time.
"Lelouch's triumph... his major work
-Judith Crlll, NEW YORK MAGAZINE
Joseph E.Levine pmsoms
And Now My l^ye
SCOTIA ART THEATRE
LONG <JOfV£
' IftTALISOAPON'T,
r P l<j IT PEOPLE.}-,
( YA WAfV/VA ?LM?)
WAqoTTAPAY/)
Jt-W REEFER/
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From:
Lclouch has always been an independent filmmaker in every
sense of that word. "I make films
the way I make love," he has said,
"and no one can tell me how to do
that." He treasures his arlislic integrity so passionately thai one
of his films, "La Icmme Spectacle," made in 196.1, has never
been released. The reason? Censors wanted lo cut out 40 minutes,
and Lelouch wouldn't eliminate
a frame.
117 Mohawk Ave.
SEPTEMBER 19, 1975
'DRYUP.ACipWfAP!
»-THE60'sAEe
(-(AVE THE <5UT$
344-4960
ASK FOR THESE SECTIONS FOR BEST SEATS.
Heron is a talented and creative
spirit, so put aside any fears you
might have that his music suffers or
is lacking. His message is put forth
with a mellow combination of percussion, bass, keyboards, and flute.
You will seldom hear their musical
poetry on the radio, not because it is
unworthy, but because the stations
arc afraid to play it—it is not
footstomping or linger snapping
music. For those whoattendtheconcert. it will be a revolutionary experience, if you accept the "offering."
m A'CHMM-
Sat., Sept. 2 0 ,
8:30
ATTENTION SUNY ALBANY
been a success. Since his final years
of high school he has reached status
in New York City as a fine black,
revolutionary poet, but seeking to.
reach more people has led Heron
into musical pursuits which he has
likewise accomplished with thecompctcnt assistance of Brian Jackson
and the hand.
*-m Tlfll£SjTH£Y„
Sue lu &ci£TVj^^^r£?M£Wwrfae(iei
YJ
It netted one desultory album
which was a financial and artistic
Hop. Hillman then popped into the
first country "supergroup." another
highly touted but subsequent failure,
the Souther. Hillman, Furay Band.
Now on his own, the Chris Hillman
Band will hopefully live up to the
reputation of their leader.
The hcadliners,, the Nitty Ciritty
Dirt Hand, are one of the longest
lasting groups in rock music. They
were founded in 1966 and with very
few personnel changes continue today, stronger than ever. Primarily a
country rock band, their music
ranges from soft ballads and pop to
I95()'s parodies and acoustic
bluegrass. The four hand members
play just about every type of instrument except horns (one plays the
harmonica), and their onstage
presence is engaging and entertaining.
Perhaps their biggest claim to
fame was their association with
many traditional country artists
which culminated with the best selling three record set. "Will the Circle
He Unbroken." They have a new
album which should be out soon
although there have been problems
with it. It was supposed to be released in March.
Both groups should play more
than their share of toe-tapping, feet
moving music, pleasantly devoid of
silver pants and ten inch heels.
by Rick Knuth
They have something to offer you.
"They," are Gil-Scott Heron with
Brian Jackson and the Midnight
Band. Their offering is singular, a
unique
combination
of
revolutionary poetry with music that
inspires a mood. One never loses the
poetry in the music or the music in
the words because the Midnight
Band plays poetry.
Music is the medium through
which they are able to reach the
musses and they do so rather
poignantly. The product cannot he
likened to other bands or poets who
have tried to accomplish that which
only Oil-Scott Heron and his band
have successfully managed—an artistic synthesis. The Midnight Band
will perform lor your listening
pleasure on September 19th at the
Palace Theatre.
Although only in his midtwenties, Gil-Scott Heron has long
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
»»t • -i 1 1 » • it. ( '
BLAKE GAUERV of DENVER
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Indian Jewelry
40% OFF
$13.00 Chokers- $ 7,80
45% OFF TO
Puka Shell
COLLEGE STUDENTS
Feather Jewelry
(with student I.D.) QPEN
11 am to 6 pm Tues. ondjhun.
Til 9
PAGE 7A
iiii><itii«Mtti'<tii('(i!i<it|i'iti<'iai'ii(i"i<i>iii
sSsSuSfc*
successful studio musicians in
Canada. Legend... has it that he grew
up on a farm in the Western prairie
province of Sakatehewan... He
somehow acquired' a guitar, and
taught himself to play it, analyzing
the harmony of Stan Kenton records
byear. Whichexplainshisincredible
harmonic hearing". Noted jazz
writer Gene Lees' use of the word incredible to describe his playing is accurate.
recordings
born to the breed .. ./Sixteen years solute minimum (the only plays it
by Karen Sdiottbetf
old/January child/Tryin' to get to once), and she has even been reducJudith-Judy Colons (Elect™)
ing her piano-playing, which is a
the sky."
Will Judy Collins become the BarBickert justifies any such comHer choice of songs to recreate is shame because' she is a fine pianist.
bra Streisand', of folk music? One
pliments with this opening solo on J.
quite wide, and serves as a showcase Other than that small complaint, the
might be tempted to think so after
Kern/ J. Mercer's "I'm Old Fashionof the versatility of her lyrical, ex- technical musicianship on Judith is
listening to her latest effort, Judith.
ed"; his tone and fluency in the guitar
It is a commercial, slick album that is pressive voice. They range from the excellent. It is well-orchestrated,
are superb. As with the old Bruberk
Stones' "Salt of the Earth," to the crisp, and tight. The arrangements
almost completely in contrast to the
Quartet, Desmond enters into a
hauntingly lovely "Send in the fit the songs, and most importantly
old-style Judy Collins the folk-singer
form of conversation, this time with
Clowns" (from the Broadway they fit her voice, the main instruwith a guitar. But the answer to that
a guitar rather than a piano. This inment
on
the
album.
It
has
matured
musical
A
Little
Night
Music);
and
question is definitely not
terplay between the sax and piano
from the Depression tune "Brother from being high, thin, almost likewas one of the strengths of the
Collins has grown, rather slowly,
Joan
Baez
in
tone
to
being
full,
rich,
Can
You
Spare
a
Dime"
to
the
newQuartet ] Ed Bickcrt has managed to
to be a wonderfully unique per-.
yet
still
delicate
and
flexible.
classic "City of New Orleans." She
Through the perssitent coaxing of re-open this form of musical comformer. Judith is a marvelous blend
Judith is a magnificent album. Ina Hall, Desmond returned to doing munication with PaulDcsmond.
of old and new, original and styled'
"way, it is a debut Tor Judy Collins. public performances. It was during
songs that have al been stamped with
She is trying new things, and she September of last year that he played
Collins' personal mark of excellence.
T h r o u g h o u t the r e m a i n i n g songs,
succeeds beautifully. She is the his first show on his own at a Toront h e t w o a i m at m a i n t a i n i n g t h i s r a p "Why do I think I'm dying
"Singing bird/(With rainbows on to nightclub. He was accompanied
p o r t , as in t h e i r i n t e r p r e t a t i o n o f ,
sometimes in my dreams/1 see
her wings).
by Ron Carter on bass, Connie Kay D j a n g o K h c i n h u r d l V ' N u a g c s " , a n d
myself a child . . ./Searching for
on drums and a Canadian session C . W i l l i a m s " S q u e e z e M e " .
myself/Searching for my life.. ."On
guitarist, Ed Bickcrt.
A n i m p o r t a n t f a c e t o f t h e success
Judith, Collins has achieved a new
The end result of those shows is o f t h e a l b u m is t h e s t r o n g w o r k o f
level of depth and maturity in her
the recent release of a solo album by R o n C a r t e r a n d C o n n i e K a y .
*
original pieces. Her lyrics are more
Paul Desmond, entitled Pure Des- m a n a g i n g t o s u s t a i n the r h y t h m o f
poetic than mere words for a song,
Pure Desmond-Paul Desmond mond. The title is quite descrcptive t h e s o n g s , t h e y d o n o t i n t e r f e r e w i t h
and they could easily stand alone
(CTI)
of Desmond's playing— a clean, t h e c o n v e r s a t i o n b u t a d d t o it a n d
with the grace and beauty of her
Since the end of World War II, even, pure sound. The eight selec- s t r e n g t h e n it.
delicate imagery. At her most
Paul Desmond has been immutably tions chosen for the album include
thought provoking and elusive shows herself to be just as competent
Pure
Desmond
marks
the
associated with the Dave limbeck jit//, standards such as ColePorter's r e s u r g e n c e o f o n e o f j a / / . ' s best
("Houses") she is reminiscent of Joni in one style us in another. She was
Quartet. For over two decades, Des"Everything 1 Love" and Duke m u s i c i a n s . P a u l D e s m o n d . S i n c e t h e
Mitchell. Her best original song, able to make the transition from the
mond played alto-sax for the quartet
Ellington's "Warm Valley".
though, is less poetitthan powerful sixties' folksinger to the diversified
time w h e n the a l b u m was edited,
and emotional. It is '.Born to the sound of the seventies without losing and wrote the group's most famous
Paul D e s m o n d has rejoined
F.d
The performances by the
piece,
"Take
Five".
popularity,
or
quality.
Breed," describing the feelings she
Bickert to do some more playing.
musicians is cohesive with a strong
Today
though,
Paul
Desmond
is
Unfortunately, in her growth, she
has towards her sixteen year-old son,
M a y b e in t i m e there w i l l be a Paul
interplay between the guitarand the
who has none on the road to make has been leaving behind some on his own, it's been that way for
Desmond
Quartet,
touring
and
saxophone.
Hickert's
playing
is
exover
seven
ycats—
and
in
that
time
music. As she says, "The lit; of a elements that once were staples in
recording with this Western Canacellent.
'guitar man'/Is a hard life to her performance. She has cut down he has only done some session work,
"F.d Bickcrt is one of the most d i a n i n i i t a r i s t .
lead./What can I tell you/You were her playing of the guitar to an ab- primarily with guitarist Jim Hall.
FOR
19S9
JAGUAR
Restored.
$4200.
Yamaha
skis
with
Marker
black
buckle
Bindings$100.
XK150
boots 10Vi$15, Call Ken463-1898
Also
convert.
1937
Fred Dester 4 8 2 - 6 5 9 0 eves.
miles.
pair
Power
manual
shift, recently o v e r h a u l e d , perfect r u n radio
$250
call
Nafie 449-8404
C a r f o r sale 1968 F o r d custom 5 0 0 4 door,8 cylinder.
Excellent
1969 Olds cutlass. O r i g i n a l o w n e r 7 0 , -
siz.
9%
milage. Contact Maurice alter
gas
4:00
Tues. a n y t i m e W e d . 3 5 6 - 1 1 7 1
Very r e l i a b l e . $ 4 0 0 . 4 3 8 - 1 2 3 3
70 Olds', 3 5 8 c y l i n d e r , runs w e l l . 4 tires,
2 snow's , a l l r i m m e d . $ 3 5 0 . C a l l 4 5 6 -
Y a m a h a 72 2 0 0 electric, excellent cont a k e s it. Must sell
1973 Suzuki TS250. Excellent c o n d i tion, only 3 , 0 0 0 miles, b o o k rack, $ 6 7 5 .
Ends—
At Roney's Junk a n d Jems. 6 0 0
Clinton A v e . , A l b a n y . O p e n M o n . t h r u
Stereo- g o o d c o n d i t i o n , a b a r g a i n at
20
watt
amplifier, like new, $ 2 0 . 0 0 . Call 438-
g o o d c o n d i t i o n . C a l l Joe a t 4 3 6 - 8 9 0 4
HiFi C o m p o n e n t s — a l l
major
brands.
5ervice. S o m e u s e d . Jim 4 5 7 - 7 7 3 0 .
SERVICES
I Vi
pickup/delivery.
Funky
Alabaster,
Shit
Neon
ex-members
Park,
Dynaflex
$130
or
best
offer. 462-5210
THE BIRD WILL RETURN...
this Saturdoy...ALL DAY!
•
•
And don't forget our $1.99 & $2.99 EVERYDAY SALES
The best selection of $1.99's this side of the GRAND WAZOO!
PAGE 8A
Sat 10 am - 5:30 pm
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
carpeted, large
BEAST-
a n d , of course,
i love y o u m u c h o l
The BEASTRESS
D e a r Mickey-Dee Q u e e n :
a n d live music b y DICE
get a code in your d o z e .
C o l o n i a l this S a t u r d a y
No Rookie
W e d o n ' t t h i n k y o u ' r e w o n d e r f u l but
you know w h o d o e s !
a l t e r 10:30 p . m .
high,
thereltlllUIH
on C o l o n i a l a t 9 : 0 0 .
D e a r Football Stars:
W h a t ' s b e t t e r than b e a t i n g A l f r e d ?
O j o s , y o u m a d e the last t w o years m y
B e a t i n g I t h a c a , n a t u r a l l y . Send those
most b e a u t i f u l . Yo te a m o , p e r r o - l o c o .
turkeys r u n n i n g home. You can d o it.
G o o d luck,
R e a s o n a b l y p r o f e s s i o n a l a p p r a i s a l of
lessons from music g r a d u a t e .
Beginners
and
advanced
students
C o m m u t e r s , V o t e Risa C o h e n l o r C e n -
t r a l Council, S e p t . 2 3 , 2 4 , 2 5 .
C a r p o o l sought to SUNYA l o r 6-9 p . m .
tral Council, S e p t . 23, 2 4 , 2 5 .
Randi:
class o n W e d n e s d a y s f r o m H a r r i m a n -
Nineteen
years
ago
Wednesday,
For free to a g o o d h o m e . Adult m a l e
Kingston a r e a . Please call (914) 9 4 4 -
a l t h o u g h I d i d n ' t realize it a t the t i m e ,
cat, l i t e r - t r a i n e d , p e a c h colored; also
3 4 0 4 e v e n i n g s f o r Jim.
joy e n t e r e d my w o r l d . H o p e your t w e n -
a d o r a b l e p u p p y , p a p e r - t r a i n e d . 393-
M a n u s c r i p t Typing Service. Mrs. G l o r i a
w e e k d a y s , l i g h t h o u s e k e e p i n g , some
869-5225.
overnights
Registration for Rathskeller type enter-
necessary.
t a i n m e n t . 1, 2 or 3 p e g roups. Call 4 5 7 -
evenings. 474-4962 days.
formation.
it
faculty
home,
at
the
Square
W h e e l Cyclery. W h e e l w o r k , tune-ups,
r e p a i r s , Call Tom 4 8 9 - 1 5 1 7 .
PHOTOGRAPHER.
Weddings,
traits,
etc.
albums,
All
poryour
Dear Barb,
Ziggy.
Hillary:
W e l l , here is the Personal I n e v e r
sent y o u b e f o r e . A l l m y love f r o m n o w
The Student Association o f the State
University of
N e w Y o r k , Inc. (SASU)
needs
ambidextrous,
til f o r e v e r .
and for
To M y V i r g i n Island Lover:
in-
H a p p y Anniversary! Only 14years, 2
m o n t h s to g o . But I k n o w w e can m a k e
'*•
Elizabeth
still needs o n e w o m a n
Vice-President,
Pohanka,
109
Executive
State
Street,
All my l o v e , Mrs. Bink
tising,
production,
M i c h i g a n Rummy M a r a t h o n " . C o n t a c t
sciousness. If y o u c a l l e d b e f o r e a n d
P h o n e (518) 4 6 5 - 2 4 0 6 . S A S U is a n af-
PARTY-Anthony
O r i g i n a l l y $ 2 1 0 . 0 0 . Sell l o r $ 1 6 0 . 0 0 .
w e r e told t h a t w e were no longer look-
firmative
Saturday,
Call Brian 3 7 1 - 7 7 0 3
i n g , call back a t 4 3 e - 3 8 8 6 .
employer.
opportunity
377 9 9 2 4 .
Ir, Bi. or Ra (or d e t a i l s . '
Hall
9:30
State
p.m.
Beer
Quad,
Bash
M
B
Baobab Bookshop
BUY 2 GET 1 FREE
ROAST BEEF—HAM—PASTRAMI
173 Fourth Street Troy
6 doors south of Ferry
Used Books all kinds
Fiction- Nonfiction
Hard cover-Paperback
TREAT-A-BUDDY
40 Central Ave., Albany
Central S. Colvln Ave., Albany
157] western Ave., Albany
Rte. 9 4 155 Latham
466 Stale St., Schenectady
Rte. 5 at Schenectady crosstown
• expires 10-5-75 Open
g
7 Days a
Mon-Sat 12:00-5:30
CLIP THIS COUPON
THIS C O U P O N !
DRIVE OUR CARS
FREE
BUY 2 GET 1 FREE
COLD CUTS—CHEESE—TUNA—TURKEY
Tuesday. Sept. 23 8:00
EAGLES
TREAT-A-BUDDY
•
•
•
•
•
•
40 Central Ave., Albany
Central & Colvln Ave.. Albany
1573 Western Ave., Albany
Rte. 91155 Latham
466 State St., Schenectady
Rte. 5 at Schenectady crosstown
To F l o r i d a , C a l i f o r n i a a n d
all
cities in t h a j U S A .
MIKE'S-S
/SAACON AUTO
TRANSPORT
SUBMARINES
expires
Commuters, V o t e Risa C o h e n for C e n tral Council S e p t . 2 3 , 2 4 , 2 5 .
Munchies.
• • • M U M • • • C L I P THIS COUPON
• • • • • • • • • C L I P
Guess w h o
distribution.
C a l l N e w Citizen,
lor b i n d i n g s . O l i n m a r k IV's,205 cm.
equal
and
W o r k o n v o l u n t e e r or subsistence basis.
1 p a i r skis, n e v e r u s e d , n e v e r d r i l l e d
action,
W e ' l l send B o b o u t f o r SUBS
Come one, c o m e a l l , to " Y a M u t h a ' s
A l b a n y , N.Y. 12207. Resume r e q u i r e d .
Feminist
treat
A n d then to m a k e your d a y c o m p l e t e
N e w a r e a p a p e r seeks staff for a d v e r -
con-
with
A f t e r the victory which will be sweet
a n d enjoy b a c k r u b s
(hours f l e x i b l e a n d n e g o t i a b l e ) . Contact
m a y b r i n g you f a m e
but don't trip up
C e l e b r a t i o n a t Sutlers w i l l b e such a
skills essential;
students a n d their
The Ithaca g a m e
you may g o l a m e
Alan
highly
e n e r g e t i c , d e d i c a t e d p e r s o n to w o r k
T h a t lovely 3 b e d r o o m a p t . o n busline
(or
Re
Love, H a r v e y K a u f m a n
any
h o u r , call a f t e r 3 : 0 0 p . m . a t 4 8 9 - 6 9 7 7 .
terests. G o o d t y p i n g
Thanks so m u c h f o r m a k i n g m e t h e
bestest b i r t h d a y ever. Love a n d kisses,
day.
s h o r t h a n d h e l p f u l . S o m e t r a v e l com-
a g e 24+
are),
Stevie W o n d e r f o r m e , a p e r s o n a l
for y o u . Fair e x c h a n g e ! H a p p y Birth-
mittments. S a l a r y S ! 1 0 / w e e k . F u l l t i m e
HOUSING
Love, Phil
C a l l Mrs. Ross, 4 7 2 - 9 2 1 8
G i r l n e e d e d f o r house c l e a n i n g
with
you.
D e a r G a n g ( a h a ! I d o k n o w how you
car
an
I h a d a r e a l l y g r e a t t i m e this w e e k .
Thanks so m u c h t o r e v e r y t h i n g . I miss
Danny
w e e k d a y a f t e r 3:30 p . m . , $2.25 p e r
rejuvenated
Dear Joan,
b e c a u s e of y o u .
S t u d e n t to l o o k a f t e r o l d e r child 4-6
Ceccherti, 24 Wilshire Drive, C o l o n i c
4 6 1 4 or 7-3205, for e n t e r t a i n m e n t in-
tieth y e a r w i l l b e as h a p p y as m y l i f e is
HELP WANTED
at
Barbara .
C o m m u t e r s , V o t e Risa Cohen for C e n -
s t a m p collection. 438-.1233.
on
a t 9:00111 Be
Love, F a n d E
30"
Rich
Guitar
beer,
will be
THE p a r t y this S a t u r d a y is h a p p e n i n g
Dear David,
WANTED
(or b u m )
A p o w e r f u l p u n c h , y o u r basic
ly g o t a p e r s o n a l ? M u c h love & d o n ' t
thereabouts)
SEPTEMBER 19, 1975
2\.
— A r i e s Rob a n d Aries B o b
S65. plus utilities. 7 6 7 - 9 7 7 3 .
36"
d e a d yetl
Marj and Fred
HAPPY
H e d - d o e . H a p p y 2 0 t h . So, you f i n a l -
a l l inclusive. Contact John M o r g a n 4 5 7 -
Get
But, I'm not
JAP
yard. Call Cathy at
about
Matt,
Furnished,
w i d e , 12" d e e p . Call J o h n , 4 7 2 - 8 1 8 2 ;
Free Records courtesy of Record Town
SEPTEMBER 19, 1975
campus.
A u t s r i a . Jan 4 , 7 6 — J a n 1 4 , 7 6 . 5 4 4 9 .
Tune in 640 AAA
FREE ALBUM GIVEAWAY
HMTJliJg Mon-Fri 10 am - 8 pm
Love, M a r a
Has t u r n e d e i g h t e e n !
457-7933.
Group of the Week
CHECK IT OUT!
Irom
BOOKSTAND,
Album of the Week
Monday. Sept. 22 8:00
PINK FLOYD
Wish You Were Here
•
H a p p y Birthday, C u t i e .
D o n n a of t h e Spanish A r m a d a ,
5th SUNYA E u r o p e a n S k i T o u r S c h r u a s ,
WSUA
SPECIALS!
$3.59
miles
4753.
l^>C>Cg<^>g^*r^3*7sg^y^-s3r^-s^^^i^^
24 New & Recent LP's $6.98 list at
Rob-
room
22. Fifteen m i n u t e ride f r o m C a m p u s .
Boots
reasonable
wants
Selkirk. Two miles I r o m T h r u w a y exit
a n d othes. For bookings a n d i n f o r m a -
Men's 9Vi like n e w $ 4 0 . ; p o l e s - $ 1 0 . ; All
above
Student
Commuters, V o t e Risa Cohen for C e n tral Council, S e p t . 2 3 , 2 4 , 2 5 .
H a p p y B i r t h d a y (finally), M a u r e e n !
Sweatband,
at 4 5 7 - 3 0 0 2 .
of
Grad
I need you to keep m e w a r m , my^-is
To a n n o u n c e t h a t o u r Treasurer:
or
of
L o o k - N e v a d a B i n d i n g s , v e r y g o o d conHumanic
Couple
N t M
Love, J . W .
It Is now our p l e a s u r e ,
R o o m m a t e n e e d e d . M o d e r n c o t t a g e in
p h o t o g r a p h i c needs. C a l l Joe IngogMa
$100.
immediately.
••-"•"•"•
FG,
so cold a t night, hurry or 111 d i e f r o m
H a p p y 21st! You're a b i g girl n o w .
Ski e q u i p m e n t : H e a d 3 6 0 ' s 200 c m . ,
dit.,
8:30
t r o l Council, Sept. 2 3 , 2 4 , 2 5 .
Person w a n t e d to share m o d e r n h o u s e ,
7568
Used M i n i m o o g f o r s a l e . 1 y e a r o l d ,
Wednesday,
Commuters, Vote Rita Cohan for C a n -
furnished,
C a l l Brian 4 5 6 - 0 3 3 4 .
Does your bicycle h a v e a condition?
Round Robin Sale last Saturday,
we are
HAPPY TO ANNOUNCE THAT:
apt.
472-6762.
4895.
&
LaFayette
bedroom
w h e r e he c a n w o r k m u c h , n e a r b u s .
a c c e p t e d . Kyle 4 5 6 - 5 2 4 1 ,
within S e p t e m b e r . 3 7 4 - 1 6 8 9
Also,
1
bast.
Attention;
u s e d — b r a n d n e w . C h e a p . Call J a n i c e
4831.
4975 a f t e r 6 p . m .
$45.00.
Lovely
every
trombones,
lack o f — .
w / b o a r d $100. 377-3977.
tion call Bill 482-3402 o r M a r k 4 5 6 -
V W . 1966 B u g . M e c h a n i c a l l y s o u n d .
trumpets,
Love, (sorry w e ' r e late) M o m , Pub a n d
PEARL
Excellent
100 cans of prunes. Uh-huh.
PERSONALS
l o c a t i o n . $ 8 0 per month
History
Sat 12 noon till 6.
ice some of you have missed our super-popular
Convenient
Eric
N e e d e d to round out S U N Y A S t a g e
O n e room- i n large 3 bedroom flat.
single. $ 1 4 5 / m o . C a l l 4 6 3 - 6 7 1 9 .
R e a s o n a b l e , my h o m e , call Pat, 765-
Asking $ 8 5 0 . 4 6 5 - 4 3 1 0
& comm. Call 4 7 7 - 5 2 7 9 .
Band:
G i l e t t e Supercurl (curling iron) n e v e r
3655.
etc.
library privileges, utilities, a m p l e o f f
C a l l a f t e r 3:00 p . m . a t 4 8 9 - 6 9 7 7
i n g . A M - F M r a d i o , a u t o transmission.
Used l u r n i t u r e i — O d d s
kitchen,
available
TYPING—Ltd.
offer
Includes
Everything
1968 F i r e b i r d - p o w e r b r a k e s a n d steer-
d i t i o n , best
Strlck,
$80/mo.
h e a t e d , c l e a n , sunny, n e a r b u s l i n e —
tuition m o n e y . $ 5 0 0 . f l e x i b l e 4 8 2 - 3 7 2 4
R-10
Come to Morris to pick u p your prize of
SUNYA.
skis,
condition.
W e congratulate you on your " e x cellent" efforts o n winning the 17th a n r . j o l toilet p a p e r t h r o w i n g contest.
t w i n mattress a n d b o x s p r i n g , $ 2 0 . 0 0 .
is i n e x c e l l e n t
mc
Mag
W a l l to w a l l carpeting, a n d furnished.
$15.00.One
;
M o d e l s w o n t e d — n u d o s — c o m . rates.
C a l l Bob 4 5 9 - 6 3 2 6 a f t e r 5 .
$ 5 . 0 0 e a . C a r ski r a c k ,
. •
To the M a r a t h o n Toom:
very quiet, g o o d location, 12 m i n . from
$ 1 5 . 0 0 . l a d i e s Austrian skies, w i t h b i n -
p a i r s o f c h i l d r e n ice skates, sizes 4 - 5 ,
newspaper—
p l a n to d o a b o u t b e i n g 2 1 ?
;
Rooms available in beautiful house,
d i n g s , a n d poles, $ 5 0 . 0 0 , ski boots, size
size 3, $10.00 a n d a size 6 $ 1 0 . 0 0 . 2
now
commission b a i i t . C a l l K. Lombard! 1 -
Rehearsals
boots
available
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• C L I P THIS COUPON
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
PAGE ELEVEN
,1
Quote of the Day
letters
us at least a lifetime of stagnation should we
persist in exploiting this stunted topical
vocabulary.
It is not Mr. Kojan's categorizations with
Which 1 dispute, but rather his indictment of
To the Editor:
what I say, and should the day come, what 1
The undersigned history professors front inthink. If for example 1 choose to talk institutions outside New York State happened
cessantly about Bruce Springsteen, whose
to be visiting Albany on Friday, September
third album by the way is his most innovative
12., and we must ssay that we were appalled at
and technically perfect work, though my
the judgments expressed on your editorial
favorite song is still "Sandy" , should I be
' page, One of us knew Dean H unsberger when
chastised by some leprotic blasphemer — a
he was' at" the University of Massachusetts,
study hall Savanarola?
before he came to Albany. All of us know
Had Mr. Kojan allotted a little more
Dean Kendall. Having had the opportunity of
conferring with Dean Kendall, we are in a thought to his exposition rather than, in his
position to assure you that he is deeply in- frantic quest for notoriety having rushed it to
terested in students and teaching, as well as print — had he not typed and submitted it
scholarship (as if there could be a contradic- before the ink was dry, before he'd even
tion of purposes). We feel confident that the dotted his t's and crossed his i's, he would have
commentaries about Deans Hunsberger and realized that the very rationale for six such
Kendall are completley off the mark. Further- prosaic topics renders his postition absurdly
more, we would I ike to point out that rudeness untenable.
Harvey (If 1 may be so bold , you may call
in editorials in no proper way to make any sort
me Norm) naturally abhors the intellectual
of point.
vacuity of SUNYA life as demonstrated bythe
Walter Rundell[
phattic ocean in which we flourish. Though 1
University of Maryland
am sure we cannot help but admire his conRoland Stromberg,
cern, I speak for all of us when I answer him
University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee
with an unequivocal "So what!". I defy you
Robert H. Ferrel,
Harvey Kojan to respond convincingly to any
Indiana University of the followint questions and display to me
the folly of my ways.
Rude Awakening
A Gay Hallo
To the Editor:
Allow us to introduce ourselves...weare the
Gay Alliance and we are half of ' the
organization! available to gays in the Albany
area. We don't have an office or phone yet, but
we do have meetings (9 p.m., Tuesdays,
Patroon Room Lounge). Our meetings are
open to all, "straight", "gay", or otherwise,
and they are pretty friendly and informal. We
discuss and plan activities, and share our feeling about what it means to be gay, and indeed,
what it means to be a person in this world. We
talk about where we've been, where we're going, and what we can learn. We share alotcome share it with us.
We also invite you to share with us your
comments, questions, problems and feelings
about our columns and their topics of concern. Write to us at: "Flaunting It", Box 1000
A Void to the Wise
To the Editor:
It rarely happens that 1 become so offended,
so outraged, so inflamed to the very linits of
my being, that I am compelled to get out of my
chair. Such an occasion actually arose a few
days ago, the details of which I shall now
recount.
1 was in the process of rolling a fewjointsof
some new dope using the latest issue of the
ASP as a working surface, as is my practice.
Doing so, my gaze wandered mindlessly over
the page before meand eventually came to rest
lip on a article by Harvey Kojan entitled,
"Conversation Piece." Perhaps it was the
novelty ofcomprehension.or a nascent particle
DD, SUNYA Station, Albany, New York of curiosity which drove me to read on.
12222. If your problem requires a personal Neverthless, my brief affair with the written
response, leave your name and telephone word, which I embarked upon armed with
number, and a qualified person will call you. only the best of intentions was rewarded not
Or better yet, come to our meetings, es- with instruction and entertainment, but inpecially SUNYA women. We understand that stead horror and.revulsion.
in previous years, lesbians have felt uncomMr. Kojan as you may know posits six basic
fortable with male dominance in the move- areas of conversationamongthe inhabitants of
ment. There is, of course, only one way to deal this vencral institution: sex, drugs, food,
with that: Make your presence known. grades, weather,and vacations. Hcfurthcrim"Power" is something that we must give to bues these subjects with the properties of
other people; we canalso take it for ourselves. boredom and familiarity, and concludes his
The SUNYA Gay Alliance diatribe with a cynical admonition promising
Why should I either seek or desire to learn
anything not recompensed with credit towards
my graduation, or read anything not assigned
me by some professor'.' (And none of that
"Joy" of knowledge stuff. Please!) Why
should 1 be inspired within the framework of
the university when even 'my teachers are
seldom educated beyond the rigid confines of
their own fields? Why should 1 engage in any
productive endeavor when eyen the most
evanescent glow of creativity is summarily
doomed to extinction by my good ol' buddies
and pals? And finally, why should 1 not be a
willing pawn of the credos and conventions of
an arbitrary age, swaying with the tides of
fashion and bowing to the desultory dictates
of a misguided majority when clearly the
alternative spells hardship (Surely you jest?),
self examination (Not for me!), ultimate
failure (I'm no martyr.) and perhaps, should
conditions grow absolutlcy intolerable, "rank
outs" (Oh dread)? Or so 1 am told.
render myself to assimilation by that immense,
implacable mass: The Greatest Common
Denominator.
You see Harv, you cannot win. You are
a lone whisper whose message islostwithin the
cold gray walls of our cavernous, aggregative
skull...Take my advice noble warrior: gather
up your tapes and tables, reascend your ivory
soap tower and forever wash your hands of
sermonizing, for We are happy and it is you
who is sad. Bother not to save our lives, go instead resolutely about your own business and
save your breath.
Norm De Plume
Editor's Note: Norm de Plume is a
pen name used at author's request.
It is my opinion that I was discriminated
against very unfairly and unjustly. Mainly.
because 1 am an out-of-state resident, and
maybe because of my race, sincehe gave me no
reason lo believe otherwise.
1 feel very strongly that the manager that
night definitely owes mean apology for his unjust and rude behavior. He also owes my
friends an apology for hesitating to return our
money after this incident.
1 am new to New York state and Albany
and when Heave, 1 will tidl of the unfortunate incident I encountered here.
Rosz Lei A Student at SUNYA
The Albany Student Press reserves the sole
right to print or edit letters to the editor.
Submit letters TYPEWRITTEN to Campus Center Room 326.
ftimr tm-ntHK*
In Washington
Rockefeller:
Trying to Crap the Croppers
: by Ron HenArenittttttttV*ttttXV':;tt"Vlitiii-S
WWSS
LATER-
MV
j urn
I
When Vice President Nelson Rockefeller
visited Mobile, Alabama and Columbia,
South Carolina recently to blast welfare
cheats, deplore thedemise of Stales' rights and
laud to merits ol balanced budgets, there was
so much winking going on you'd have thought
the man was surrounded by a swarm ol gnats.
Rockefeller sounded so conservative that
Gov. GcorgeC. Wallace was moved to wonder
aloud whether his speech might have been
written in Alabama.
When news of his speeches reached New
York, where people know Rocky's lavish
spending nearly bankrupted the stale, a
laughing epidemic spread from Manhattan's
lower East Side dear up lo Buffalo.
IWHeRir MY POUXR.
TBRSOR.
fWf0P5.
r^X
Southerners are more discreet. They'll give
a hot meal to any stranger in need, and they'll
even listen politely when he talks drivel. It's
after he leaves they do the laughing.
Rockefeller would do well to heed the advice to crook-turncd-politician Willy Brock, a
character in Carson Kanin's award-winning
play "Born Yesterday." "Never crap a
crupper," Willy admonishes
mm am* nm»mtm mmcm.i
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
SEPTEMBER 1 9 , 1 9 7 5
editorial /comment
Pruning Professors
During the p u t five years, student concern has shifted from the ideological,
worldwide and general to the economic, personal and specific. Partly due to financial
insecurity and partly due to improved political conditions on campus, the change has
meant that successful excercise of student power has occurred most often in issues
directly affecting students. Thus, issues like rents, board rates, bus service and tenure
cases have increased importance.
Tenure cases affect the fundamental reason students are on campus: Education. A
good professor, from the student standpoint, is able to communicate information with
efficiency, clarity and in amanner that makes material morea learning experience than
something akin to remembering telephone numbers. There are other reasons to be at
college, of course, but ' students who, for example, feel that grades are the only
reasons to come can still be inspired.
Many administrators and faculty have taken the position that students have little or
no business influencing tenure decisions. As a result, students have noclearchannel to
use in making their feelings known. Demonstrations, letters, this newspaper and sit-ins
have all been used at SUNYA to express student opinion.
The arguements against student participation in tenure decisions are silly; the vital
interest faculty and administrators must take in j o b security and conditions in their
department color their judgment, and students without vested interestsadd significant
perspective at least to the kind of teaching a professor is doing.
But students have been denied a vote on tenure cases. If their voice is heard during
t he various stages of the tenure process a n d if that voice carries weight, a vote is not essential. But some departments at SUNYA make little use of the teaching evaluation
material they have a n d , more importantly, do not attempt t o ii prove it.
President Fields will have some difficult tenure decisions this year — nothing unusual. His task is doubly hard because the faculty is no longer increasing in numbers
and thus the ranks of those tenured cannot grow. A healthy university must attract and
keep quality professors and this involves constant pruning of the' teaching staff. Fields
understands the situation here. He has pointed out that relative to theacademicquality
of students here, the faculty is deficient. He has given high priority to bringing the
faculty up to a level more appropriate for SUN Y A's student body. Indoing so. we hope
Dr, Fields will not underestimate the importance of good teaching.
To the Editor:
On Friday, July 25,1975, after a long hard
day of studying, I had very high hopes of going
out and having an enjoyable evening. Some
friends asked me if I would like to go to the
Varsity Inn in Colonie. My reply was "sure, 1
could use some excitement!"
Upon our arrival, we were stopped at the
door and our I.D.'s were checked presumably
for age. After my friends' I.D.'s were approved, they paid the admission fee and began
ed and I was detainedfor some very vague and
absurd reason. Obviously I know it couldn't
have been age, because my date of birth
appeared on my out-of-state l.D. along with
my photo and social security number. Later 1
was told by one of the managers to present
some New York identification. I responded by
card. I was told to step aside and wait, as the
other patrons passed through. This was very
annoying as well as embarassing. The
manager was very obnoxious and said that I
wouldn't be admitted that night.
FI6HT
WITH
LAT95
PAGE TWELVE
"Well find out if it's a gusher
after I open it up"
VI ID
LAMP-
J HAP
• A spokesman for the New York Slate Police Division In reference to the 30,000'
applications for state troopers they have received.
Therefore it is with smal'l regret that I sur-
I HAP A
HIM
V6W-
"It's a sign of the times. People are out of work We're « • • : , . «... .'.
f ta lc
applications-people with aU kinds of degrees."
"**
" "
Rockefeller is a rich man whose hard-nose
bargaining around boardroom conference
tables and in Albany's political back rooms
has earned him a reputation as a hard-ball
player, but when he goes south to compare
himself with the likes of Wallace and South
Carolina's Republican senatorial institution,
Strom Thurmond, he is launchinginloa futile
ellorl to crap the world'schampioncrappers.
The most Iruitful outcome he can hope for is
that his real friends will be kind enough not to
take him seriously.
An objective analyst of Nelson
Rockefeller's problem in holding on to the
Vice Presidency would adhere to a few simple
beatitudes known well throughout the Bible
Belt;
Blessed is ihe liberal who does not attempt
to tackle Ronald Reagan in South Carolina,
lor he shall obtain mercy.
Blessed is Ihe Vice President who turns to
his real friends in time of need, for he might
obtain the help he seeks.
Blessed is Ihe man who realizes that in the
real showdown against Ihe Democrats, his
Boss needs him more than he needs his Boss,
for he shall succeed in sitting at the right hand
of Ihe President.
Blessed is the man who does not appear lo
want too badly thai which he has no real
reason to care much about anyway, for he may
be able to slay on the ticket.
In short, the Vice President and his advisers
should remember thai there is a time for just
about every purpose. A time to laugh and cry
and embrace and refrain from embracing and
even a lime to punt.
Bui there is never a time locrapacrapper.
On Borrowed Time
Whether New York City is to blame for its own crisis because of mismanagement
and overly generous spending, or the banks arc at fault lor pushing interest rates
beyond what the risk would justify over the years, the city is in trouble. And with the
State's new plan, the state and the banks may be in trouble too.
It is essential that the new seven-man board controlling New York City's finances
succeed in straightening them out. If they fail, the State will have simply delayed
default at a tremendous cost.
The banks are trying to sell the various bonds, but most will remain with them. The
major risk-takers under the new aid plan will be the banks and the state, whose funds
arc being tapped for loans, including the state's employee pension funds. I h e state is
indeed taking a chance, since default is still likely in December. The probability that the
city will at least be credit-worthy by then is low.
Default means the Federal Reserve Board would have to shore up the city banks,
resulting in inflationary, nationwide increases in interest rates. The State would be in
some trouble, though the M AC-proposcd plan passed earlier this week includes setting
up a legal process to handle default, expected to protect the stateasmuchuspossiblc.
The city's last chance runs from now until December. If it can handle the money flow
by then, it may be safe. Otherwise, iyige amounts of money will have been wasted on
obtaining a few extra months.
EDITOR IN CHIEF
MANAGING EDITOR
NEWS EDITOR
ASSOCIATE NEWS EDITORS
PRODUCTION MANAGER
ASSOCIATE PRODUCTION MANAGERS
ASSISTANT EDITOR
ASPECTS EDITOR
EDITORIAL PAGE EDITOR
ARTS EDITORS
SPORTS EDITOR
ASSOCIATE SPORTS EDITOR
ADVERTISING MANAGERS
CLASSIFIED-GRAFFITI MANAGER
BUSINESS MANAGER
DANIEL GAINES
SUSAN COLEMAN
STEPHEN D/.INANKA
BETTY STEIN, DAVID WINZELBERO, RANDI TOLER
PATRICK MCGLYNN
LOUISE MARKS, CAROL MCPIIERSON
MARC WEIGER
NAOMI FRIEDLANDER
ANDREA HERZBERG
HILLARV KELBICK, SPBNCE RAGCIO
NATHAN SALANT
MICHAEL PIEKARSKI
JERRY ALBRECHT, LBS ZUCKBRMAN
KENNETH COBB
DANNY O'CONNOR
OUR OFFICES ARE LOCATED IN CAMPUS CENTER 326 AND 334, AND OUR TELEPHONE IS457-8892.
we ARE FUNDED »Y STUDENT ASSOCIATION
,:,?fErf
••ssfSEEsarSfiPSHBC?
columns
Castles Burning
Some Sex
G«, ft loundi boring. What decides whta
westop?
Odids are you will, sonny. After a while
you'll spurt out spine stuff, then you'll return
to your old size, and leave me. This is known
as coming and going . . .
Fm going to puke inside you? Why would
you want me to do that?
It's okay, I'm safe. I've protection, so dbnt
worry...
Mafia, huh? Now rm sure I don't want
anything to do with
this!...
*?
KPSSw
******
by Ken Wax
Hello. Who are you?
Er . . I'm a penis.—And you?
Oh, I'm a vagina. What's up?
Funny you should ask—I am. I'm not sure
what's going on here, but all of a sudden I
started growing. Whew, I'm kinda dizzy . . .
You're new at this eh, sonny? Cm'ere.
Who?
Come here and visit for a while.
Me? In there? You're crazy, I'd never fit
And it's dark in there ' Goway . . .
Listen, shmuck, I'm talking about sex.
Y'know, screwing, fucking, making love . . .
Love? Why, I hardly even know you . . .
What is this sex stuff?
Well, you visit me for a while, then you
leave, then visit, then leave, then visit . . . It
goes on like that for a while, then we stop.
But we humans are a resourceful bunch. It
was observed that there were only a few days
each month when a woman was pregnancy
prone. You could screw around the clock as
long as you abstained during those days. This
method of controlling pregnancy was called
the rhythm method.
fuck the whole thing up. And the idea of
withdrawing right before ejaculation does go
contrary to what the body wants to do at that
instaiit. So for these reasons, the withdrawal
technique was dubbed the Gee, I'm s o r r y . . .
method.
(to be continued in future columns)
But this rhythm method often lost the beat.
Various factors, such as climate, stress, illness,
or God's mischievous nature would affect the
arrival of that fertile interval, much to
everyone's surprise (You're going to have a
what?) Soon there evolved a name for people
who practiced the rhythm method of birth
control: Parents.
So to thwart mother nature, the withdrawal
school was developed. The male would
withdraw the instant before ejaculation, and
Ms. Egg would be none the wiser. It sounds
good on paper, but some of those agile sperm
brothers would sneak out a little early and
"Listen baby, 1 don't want you to think that all
I want you for is your body, 'cause that's not
where I'm at, ylcnow. Really, hey, let me get
you another drink, I have to know the person,
1 don't even dig sex unless there's a mutual
respect between the two people. Yeah, that's
the way 1 am. Lemmee order another one, you
look almost half done with that drink there.
But anyway, I gotta feel real comfortable with
the w man, see, for me to go to bed with her. If
you gulp it down quick you won't feel the
alcohol, y'know. Too many people will go to
bed with just anyone, but I'm not like that. Er.
what was your name again? . . ."
After the moans have stopped, and you
both lie sprawled out on the bed catching your
respective breaths, it's comforting to know
that mean ol' Mr. Sperm isn't on his merry
way swimming upstream to fertilize bashfull
Ms, Egg.
This shall be installment one of the Castles
Burning Contraception Course. This week
we'll touch upon two methods, neither of
which are recommended. Repeat: Not
recommended! I want no letters accusing me
of being an accomplice in a paternity suit. And
before we begin to discuss birth control, I
promise there'll be no menstruation jokes.
Period.
Our creator, the great cabbage in the sky,
saw fit to make our senije of touch exquisitely
condusive to propogation of the species.
When sex is good, it's very good. And when it's
bad, well, it's still pretty good. The same is not
true about pregnancy, however. And there has
been shown to bea definitecausal relationship
between the two.
Rembrandt's
Cellar Pub
and
Underground at Rembrandt's you
can relax around the meandering bar
with a fifty-cent drink in your hand,
or sit by a table eyeing one of the
Master's Classics on the wall. You
can dance or listen to all the finest
music, chosen with the taste of
talented disco jockeys.
Tiffany
lamps surround you, the most considerate peopleserve you. And it's all
just down Fuller Road from Ihe University. Bring this ad with yau this
weekend, andwe'llcut theadmission
in half to $.50
Disco
57 Fuller R o a d - Colonic!
At Rembrandt's, Tuesday night is
PizzaNight.$1.25admissionandthe
pizza is free. Wednesday night is
Beer Night, and a Gin and Tonic
on a Thursday night will only be
$.35.
_ (
Back
In Mohawk
by Andy Bauimui
The Wellington, a recently foreclosed hotel
located downtown, is filled with students who
were rejected for on campus housing. Why are
we forced into such a desparate plan? Is there
any other alternative? A review of the situation is necessary.
After two years of servere overcrowding,
Albany State is starting the semester with
|ess
of this overpopulation in the dorms.
The Housing office, however, succeeded in
that goal by merely denying requests to about
400 students for on campus accomodations.
Half were thrown into a decaying hotel
located thirty minutes from campus, while the
other half were simply thrown. At the same
time Mohawk Tower, a structure designed to
house 400 students, remains devoid of any.
This is heralded as a victory by well meaning
administrators, A victory for whom? The
faculty members currently working in the
tower? Certainly not the students, the logical
heirs to any dormitory.
The choice for occupancy of the Tower is
between faculty members and students (more
specifically, incoming freshmen and transfer
students). It should be obvious which of the
two deserves priority.
Faculty members use the space for what
amounts to a few hours a day. Kor the
students, it would be their home. Most
students do not own cars for personal
transportation, while most faculty do. Most of
the social, recreational and cultural services
provided on campus arc provided and needed
by the students, not by the faculty. Students
cannot leave, nor can they travel to campus
after the buses stop at midnight. The faculty Antly llmttmm is President of the Student
are not usually here after 8 p.m.
Assovitiiiun
*
»
<
,
do, but with whom we do it. Thousands of
straights marry every week in this country and
all it does, is make the society section; one fay
couple gets married, and not only docs it make
the front pages, but some fool tries to marry
his mule the next day in protest (We wonder
just t»ho the ass in that partnership really was.)'
All that commotion just because two people
love each other.
by the SUNYA Giy Alliance
"Do you flaunt your homosexuality?*
"Well, if by 'flaunting it,' you mean do I
make public statements about my sexuality,
yes, 1 do flaunt it, and until I can feel free to
walk down the street holding hands with my
lover, until I can join in conversations about
spouses and lovers and not change the pronoun, I will continue to, as you say'flaunt it.'"
—from a conversation at a Gay Alliance
meeting.
The irony of the above dialogue is that in
reality, flaunting it is in the mind of the
beholder. Usually, gays who are accused of
flaunting it arc displaying their sexuality less
overtly than straights. Our behavior merely
stimulates more response in the viewer and to
avoid dealing with those feelings, the viewer
passes judgement (and the buck) back to the
gay person. And so. if we hold dances or show
affection in any prblic way, we are accused of
Haunting it. When these activities are performed by heterosexual couples, how many
are judged as flaunting their sexuality.
Haunt. Webster defines it as "making a
gaudy, ostentatious, conspicuous, impudent
or defiant display, as brazen women" (we
won't comment on the brazenly sexist example.) Well, really there ain't no such animal, as
Haunting it. because all those descriptive adjectives (ostentatious, gaudy, etc.) are
subjective value judgements that say a lot
more about the judger than the judgee. Actually, the accusation that a gay is Haunting
her; his gayness says a lot about the personal
discomfort of the observer. And there is a lot
of that discomfort out there (and among us,
too.)
In short, gays are "different." But our
behavior stands out, not because of what we
rn
y
lm
If you think about it, the level to which '
heterosexuality is flaunted is this society is
overwhelming. Practically every wedding
band, worn is a declaration of straightness;
every discussion of children; every deodorant
and toothpaste commercial; every soap
opera- in short, just about every public.
private and med ia statement about sexual and
Tamilian relationships flaunts this nation's
heterosexuality. All we arc demanding, really,
is equal time, and a chance to be what wearc—
openly and freely.
And if you wanna call that flaunting it,
world, if that's your judgement, well, OK,
we're gonna do it, and love it. Everywhere.
Because the second definition found in
Webster's includes"to show off proudly." And
that's what it's all about.
TORCH WANTS YOUR FACE...
,w*e»
COLONIAL
QUAD
PARTY
I do not mean to downplay the importance
of the faculty or their needs, but those needs
must not be met at the disproportionate expense of the students.
There is space for 438 beds in the Tower. Including the necessary staff rooms, this number
almost equals the current demand for additional on campus housing. But what about
those faculty members now residing in
Mohawk?
The displaced faculty members could either
be doubled up in the single offices on the
Academic Podium (doubling faculty can't be
that bad, after all, students are tripled) or else
they could be relocated at the Draper and
downtown campuses where space is opening
up from the retrenchment of the Allen Center
and Milne School programs.
The final ironyof thiswholesituation isthat
the current set-up is costing SUNYA over
$137,000 in required rent paid to the New
York State Dormitory Authority. This figure
is achieved by multiplying the room rate of
S650 per year by the 438 bed spaces occupied
by the offices. Then divide that figure in half.
The reason it's divided in half is because of an
arrangement SUNYA has with the Dorm
Authority (a separate issue).
Once students moved into the Tower, their
rents would cover this cost while the alternative of doubling faculty or moving them to
Draper would be rent free. This windfall of
SI.17.0(10could then be used to restore many of
Ihe faculty or student service lines in
SUNYA's budget that we thought we were
forced to cm.
So besides being logical and ethically fair to
students, it is clearly economical to house
students rather than faculty in the Mohawk
Tower. So why isn't it being clone? This question must be answered, and answered soon!
Besides, even if President Fields bulks at
both the ideas of either doubling up or using
the Draper complex, there is always the
Wellington!
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ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
SEPTEMBER 19, 1975
2
1 '
L.
SEPTEMBER 19, 1975
PAGE FIFTEEN
SA ELECTIONS
September
23, 24, 25
Self-nomination for College Board of Trustees are Sept. 18Sept. 22. Self-nomination sheets can be picked up (9 am5 pm) in the SA Office on Sept. 18, 19 ik 22 and at the CC
Information Desk on Sept. 20 & 21.
POSITIONS OPEN Central
TO . ALL SUNYA STUDENTS
SIATJ AVAIUHI
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Council » • " • • •
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This is Hi* last day for sol-nominations of Control Council, Sonata
and Who's Who In American Collages. Solf nomination shoots can
bo picked up the SA Office, CC room 346 on Sep. 9-19 from 9am-
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(Alio Senior Class elections)
(to vote you need your SUNYA ID and Tax Card)
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m
by B r i m Oral
T w o quick goals in the opening six
minutes o f play proved t o be all
Hudson Valley Community College
needed t o defeat the Albany junior
varsity soccer team in its opener.
Chris Waterbury, assisted by
Randy Cravotta, scored at 4:38 of
the first half to put Hudson Valley
on top to stay. Forty-two seconds
later Dave Loggins assisted Hill
Schcffler for what proved to be the
winning goal.
Albany's only score cumc near the
close of the first half on a free kick by
Steve Harwood.
After the game Coach Evan Congress said, "We played Hudson
Valley's game, not our o w n . Our
play was generally mediocorc with'
o n e or two exceptions."
The second half was filled with
numerous scoring opportunities for
each team, and several outstanding
saves by goalie Hob Jacobson kept
the score 2-1.
Friday the I'ups seek their first
win at R.P.I, at 7:30 p.m.
Ruggers Ram Siena, 10-0
The Albany State Rugby
Club
avenged two previous season's losses
to Siena with a sound 10-0 victory
Saturday. Both teams used several
new players, and also had veterans
playing new postions, resulting in a
sloppy first half. T h e second half,
howcver.saw Albany display some of
the aggresive scrum play and hardrunning back play reminiscent of last
SAVE YOUR ASPI
Take care of your copy of the
ASP. Our press run Is not enough
to cover more than one copy per
person—ami
with newsprint
costs rising, we can't increase it
significantly.
spring's 6 and 3 season. The ballhawking defense of the scrum, particulary Chuck Rappa/.zo and
Wences Rodriguez, helped shut off
Siena's attack. Albany's scores were
registered by Chris Hrown, heating
Siena to the outside, and George
l.uhr's 10 yard hurst after some
effective Slate punting. A more consistent team effort will be required
this Saturday as Suite takes o n the
highly regarded Albany Knickerbockers, in the club's homcopenerat
2:00 on the practice football field.
Shiu-'s "H" learn lost 1K-4 lo Siena's
"H's". as inexperience told the story.
Albany's lone seme was by Mark
Mayci al'tei astrongSuilesetscrura.
Breglio Stars, But Danes
continued from
page
nineteen
cond via a two-tun homerun over the
centcrfield fence o f f the bat o f Mike
Foray.
Breglio put the Danesaheadwhen
in the third inning, after Bob Cooke
walked and Paul Nelson w a s safe o n
an error, he slammed a I-2 pilch into
the left center gap scoring both, and
giving Albany its last lead of the day
at 3-2.
Dollard and Oneonta hurler
Roger Weaver pitched themselves
out of jams until the, fifth. With two
outs and the Red Dragons' Mark
Burlingame (son of Albany's "Bullet
Hob") on with a single. Weaver
Dollard made it exciting in the last showed that he could hit a hall as
in \ing by allowing two Potsdam well as throw it by smashing a
rui'ncrs to reach base before fanning tremendous homerun over the left
center fence to give the visitors the
(iritr.p lo end the game.
lead they would never relinquish.
, The vi\.'ory did not come without
Foray added insult to injury by
a price, how ever, as Mark Fuchshud
to he taken out o f the game after a powering his second homer of the
collision in the seventh, and will be day in the sixth with none on before
Burlingame drove the final run in
out for an indeterminate time.
As lor the home doubleheader. with a bad hop smash over first in the
not much can be said except that the same inning.
For all intents and purposes, the
Danes make it close in the first game.
Breglio knocked in the first run of nightcap was over after the first inning. The Red Dragons jumped on
the game with a base hit through the
Dane starter John Dawson for live
left sidetogivc Dollard an early lead.
Oneonta scored twice in the te- runt in the first before knocking him
Potsdam tied the score in their
half when Parisian reached o n an
error, took second o n a wild pitch,
and scored when Dollard issued
three Walks, t o force in the tying run.
But the Danes were to have the
last laugh as they tallied once more
in the seventh for the tie-breaker.
Willoughhy started it with a single,
but was forced o n a sacrifice bunt
attempt. Breglio singled, Mike
d a m a g e walked, and Markowitz
came into score when the third
b a s e m a n muffed C on sta mine's
grounder.
Lose
out. Four walks, a hit batsman, and
a single gave the visitors three, anil
caused Dawson's removal before
Bob Kronenbcrgcr yielded the final
two runs of the Ira meon D o n F l y n t ' s
double just inside the leflfield line.
Paul Dil.ello and Roger Plantier
each gave up five runs in their two inning stints a s Oneonta just went
wild. Before the game was over, the
visitors had amassed IS runs o n 16
hits including eight walks.
Third
baseman-reliever
Willoughby was the only effective
Dane reliever, as he allowed n o runs
and two hits in his t w o innings o f
work.
I'olanish Two-hitter
Overshadowed by the big O n e o n ta hats was the fantastic pitching of
righty Mike Polunish. The Oneonta
star pitched his second consecutive
two-hitter while striking out five and
walking none. The only hits were
Hreglio's single in the second (his
third of the day), and Nelson's safety
in the third.
tomorrow.
Albany
visits
I'lalishurgh for a twinbill beginning
al I p.m. Dollard and Dawson are
the probable starters.
and IVQBK PROGRESSIVE m
presenting Hue in concert:
RT THE PRIME THERTER, C0RI1ER OF
ainTon & n PEBR15TS
Educational
Opportunity
Program Student
Association
cordially invites t h e
Gil SCOTT HER0I1 BRIflll
JMKSOIK* midnight Band
m> the brecker brothers
Friday, Sept. 19
University Community
PURPORT COnUEnTIOn
with Sandy Denny
to ii's
*>»* CnrUUan
monday, Sept. 22
JOn LUCIEn» JOE BE [K
sftam. €,U65T PETRI!
Wednesday, Ott. B
BLOOD, SWEPT & TERRS nno
THE stanky brawn group
Friday, OHIO
Friday, Sept. 26, 1975
at 7:30 P.M.
in Lecture Center 2
BcaaaaaxMXMXMXMi
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WEATHER REPORT nno
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(GETITJJJ
dauid sanciaus Friday oct 17
Hit TICKETS RRE
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$ 5 . 0 0 in RDURIKE
$ 6 . 0 0 RT THE DOOR
Ticket Outlets:
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Song 84 Central Bue.Jime
[enter Jewelers
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in Schenectady,
(WL\ RP.I. Student Union
SEPTEMBER 19, 1975
am
Albany lefty Roger Plantier lires to first bul too late to catch Oneonta's Mark Burlingame In second
game of doubleheader. The Danes dropped both ends.
HI A FALL DROPOUT-
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iSHMII) O F F I J ( W i l l i THIS A l ) A N D - S U N Y A I'DREGUI.AKY
SEMESTER IN ISRAEL
A program of study in Jerusalem, during
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Wesleyan credits transferable. For particulars, and application form, write to:
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ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
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PAGE SEVENTEEN
iS }t K Is m if. i iil'ittt W i W i a ^ % H t K l i » K ttU&l
mSSS€,s
I
SEES
I
I
'I
it
•i
^ a
if
1
a u t o University ol New York et Albany
ting from the beating the
Munseymen administered to them
last year.
The j.v. defeated Cobleskill, 23',
33. Tom Ryan, last year's molt
valuable runner, performed well
enough to earn himself a varsity spot
beginning next week.
Ryan finished second in 22:52 in
the 4.25 mile course and Don
Shrader finished third at 23:20.
Mark Lavan, Kevin Rother, and'
Jerry O'Conner finished five, six and
seven.
by Hal Bock (AP)
The five striking National Football League teams agreed Thursday
to return to work and thus ended, at
least temporarily, the threat that this
weekend's l3regular-seasonopeners
would not be played.
The latest uproar to strike the
NFL was ended following a
marathon 13-hour negotiating session and a five-hour meeting with the
New England Patriots. Randy
Vataha, Patriots' player representative, emerged from a long session
Thursday in Foxboro, Mass., to say
that federal mediator W.J. Usery Jr.
hadconvinccd theclubwhichstarted
the walkout to play this Sunday and
await a contract offer from management on Monday.
The union revealed it had signed a
two-week no-strike pledge with
management, but there remained a
threat Iron.' the Patriots that they
would strike again on Monday if
they don't like management's new
proposal. The other four striking
clubs—the New York Jets, New
York Giants, Washington Redskins
and Detroit Lions—resumed practice Thursday.
Boston* Mark Duggin edges Albany's Carlos Cherubino In Saturday's cross-country meet.
Booters Open At RPI Saturday
continued from page nineeen
Schieffelin said "the goa Is will come.
We're ready to explode," the coach
continued, "and when we do, those
goals will come in bunches."
As the team readies for Saturday
at least two n'ew faces have won
themselves starting assignments.
"1 can't say enough about the
quality performance Pcpc Aguilar
has turned in at the left fullback position," said Schieffelin. "He has won
a starting job. He plays the game
hard-nosed and aggressively, and
that's what we need."
The other new lace will be Simon
Curanovic, a transfer from Ulster
Community College. Curanovic
started for last years' Ulster squad
which was among the top ten in the
nation.
Henry Obwald will be in the net.
The other fullbacks will probably
be Ricardo Rose and Arthur Bedford, both considered steady
veterans by Schieffelin.
The halfbacks joining Curanovic
will be John Rolando and either
Jimmy Alvarez or Carlos Rovito,
and the forwards will line up with
Chepc Ruano at left-wing, Frank
Selca at right inside, either Matty
Denora or Jorge Aguilar at center
inside, and Pascualli Pctriccione at
right wing.
"Its been a toss-up all prc-season,"
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PAGE EIGHTEEN
:
.
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•
•
iI
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
SEPTEMBER 19, 1975
halftime", said Ford, "but this team
has a real tough personality and we
stiffened."
The Danes came out fired up in
the third quarter as Orin Griffin
opened the scoring by going 23 yards
for the score.
The next time the Danes had the
ball halfback Glen Sowalskie turned
the corner on the left side and
rambled 40 yards for a touchdown.
Ihe Danes missed the conversion
but had what seemed to be a safe
lead, 19-10.
Alfred added a field goal early in
the fourth quarter and those Iwo
missed conversions "began to grow
on us", according to Ford, but
Albany seemed lo be in control of
things.
Then a funny lliing happened.
Alfred was forced lo punt with less
than five minutes lo play and it
appeared Albany would be able to
run the clock oul once it gained
possession. .. But an Albany player
committed a clipping penalty before
ihe Danes had possession of the ball
so Alfred retained possession.
Once again Ihe Danes' defense
stiffened and the offense took over,
but Albany was unable lo move the
ball and was forced to punt.
The Saxons went with a ten man
rush and caught (iriffin before he
could get ihc hall away, giving
Alfred ihc ball on ihc Albany 20yard line Willi one minute, eight
seconds to play.
With no lime outs left, Saxons'
coach Alex Yunevieh called lour
successive passes, all incomplete.
hot*
Great Danes ae they prepare lor "the big one" Saturday.
and the Danes had earned their first
victory of the season.
Alter the game Danes Coach Bob
l-'ord singled out tackle Don Runcoe. and running backs Orin Griffin
and Glen Sowalskie lor outstanding
performances.
l-'ord said he was particularly impressed with ihe defensive play of
tackle Frank Villitnovii, line backer
Ken Sehoen and comerbnek Andv
Matroni.
M a t r o n i , a transfer from
Bridgeport College, intercepted one
pass and recovered a fumble and was
awarded honorable mention by the
coaches in Ihc ECAC.
Saturday Ihe Danes will face Ihc
lough Ithaca Bombers, the number
Iwo team in ihc nation last year.
(Div.lll).
Batters Cop SVNYAC Opener;
Drop Two To Oneonta
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Griffin was named the ECAC
player of the week, a reward for his
line effort. "Griff" rushed for 125
yards in 17 carries and punted six
times for an average of 33 yards in-
cluding one that was blocked.
Albany's defense continued to
shine and gave the ball to theoffense
itl good field position time and time
again.
Alfred's Steve Lasher, though,
decided he would keep Alfred in the
game, single-handedly if he had to.
I'he big defensive end hurst through
Ihe State line n nd deflected a Herluz/i pitch midway through the first
quarter and Alfred took over on the
State eight yard line
Dave Madigan ran it in from one
yard out and the score was knotted
lit seven after the first quarter.
The two defenses continued to
slug il out in the second quarter.
Each time il looked like Albany was
about to score, the Alfred defense
made ihc big play.
Once again it was Steve Lasher
bursting through the line to smack
away a Bertuzzi pitch and set up the
28 yard field goal by Alfred's Mark
Madigan that sent the Saxons into
the lockerrooni, leading 10-7.
"We could have hung our headsat
A New Dimension inCinem«\ Luxury
PREMHEFOR
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said Schieffelin with regard to the
starters. "Edgar Martinez and Paul
Schiesel have shown well up front,
and Doug Runkcl and Mitch Sherman have also looked good."
Schieffelin also said he plans to
play everyone. "JusI because a guy is
not starting, that by no means says
he w o n ' t p l a y , " e x p l a i n e d
Schieffelin. "This is a team of 17
players, and everyone of them will be
out there at various times. Not
everyone can start."
by Craig Bell
The Albany Great Dane football
team survived a last minute scare
and went on to defeat the Alfred
Saxons 19-13 Saturday at Alfred
Junction.
Ranked number six in the nation,
the Danes have now won thirteen
games in a row. and go up against
number one Ithaca Saturday at I
p.m.
The Danes scored first, and looked as if they might blow the game
open easily. Alfred received the
opening kickoff, but the Albany
defense held tight, and the Danes obtained possesion of the hall on the
Saxons'34 yard line the second time
they had the ball. Five plays later,
Orin (iriffin swept the right side for
seven yards and a touchdown. Al
Martin converted and the Danes led
7-0.
goodman
Pascuali Perrlclone scores against S.E. Massachusetts Saturday.
Booters Open Saturday
by Nathan Sulant
"We are ready to open our regular
season at RPI Saturday morning, al
10:30," said Albany State varsity
soccer coach Hill Schieffelin after his
Hooters ran their exhibition season
record to 6-1 by sweeping a
triangular with Ulster (1-0) and
Orange (3-0), Tuesday.
"1 believe we are substantially
ahead of where we were at when we
opened last year's dissappointing
campaign," Schieffelin continued.
"Our defense is stronger than ever,
our offense has shown some imp r o v e m e n t , and we've been
dominating play."
The Hooters'lone loss came Saturday versus St. Lawrence, by a 1-0
score d u r i n g t h e
annual
Quadrangular.
"We outshol them 11-I," said
Schieffelin, "but just did not get a
break. I'heir goal was not the best.
Our defense made a mistake, and we
gui burned."
In Ihc olhcr games played Saturday, Albany downed Williams, 2-1,
on goals by Jorge Aguilar and Frank
Selca; Albany edged Southeastern
Massachusetts, 1-0. on a 10 yard
shot by Pascuali Periccionc;
Williams edged St. Lawrence, 1-0;
Southeastern Mass. beat Williams,
1-0, and St. Lawrence tied
Southeastern Mass., 2-2.
Teams Solid
"We know those teams are solid,"
said Schieffelin, "and I am pleased
that we were able to handle them as
well as we did, because they play the
aggressive, knock-you-down style
that hurt us last season."
As fur as an increased output in
Ihe scoringdepartnienl is concerned,
continued <>n / " « ' ' eighteen
by Mike Piekarski
It's gol to be Ihc "home court"
udvanlagc lor the visitors! Thai
would explain ihe Albany Great
Danes'varsity baseball team travelling lo Potsdam. Saturday, to knock
oil Ihc hosts. 6-5. before dropping a
douhleliender here lo Oneonta 6-3
and 15-11 Wednesday.
I he games were a 11 Slate University ol New York Athletic Conference
contests,so Albany is I and 2 in Conference play and I and 4 overall.
I.
Ij.'
[('
Griffin Named Player Of The Week
'TherelSa *
difference!!!
a
September 19, 197S
Danes Bite Saxons, 19-13
^••••••••••••^1
F
•
sports
Harriers Show WeU
But Lose
by Jon Ltfayette
: Despite losing. Coach. Bob
Munsey felt that his Cross-country
team's performance against a very
strong Boston State team was
"satisfying."
"We ran into » real good team
(Boston State's coach Bill Squires
felt it was the best team he'd ever
had) with the potential to really blow
us out, but we hung in and kept it
tight," said Munsey.
One of the bright spots for Albany
was the performance of freshman
Keith Benman who was named the
Albany runner of the meet. Benman
finished sixth and his time of 26
minutes, 31 seconds was the 18th
best by a Albany runner on the
Dane's five-mile course.'
"Berman did an outstanding job
for a freshman in his first five-mile
meet,"said Munsey. "Hepassedfour
guys on hills and was surrounded by
the opposition most of the race. He
will definitely be heard from in the
fuure."
Captains Carlo Chcrubino and
Chris Burns both looked verystrong
taking second and third places.
Cherubino's time of 25:30 was the
22nd best ever run on the Albany
course and Munsey said that
Chcrubino and Burns are "looking
better than ever."
Boston Slate's Mark Duggin, a
two-mile N.C.A.A. steeplechase
champion, finished first with the
twenty-first best time ever run here,
25:29.8. Cherubino and Burns got
second and third, but two Boston
runners came in ahead of Brian
Davis and Kevin Burnett to make
the score 25 for Boston State and 32
lor Albany.
Munsey said he felt "kind of proud
of the guys, they're in the usual legweary state from running hard in
practice but the next day they come
back with morcspringintheirstcp."
Bring on Coast Guard
The team is looking forward to
Saturday's meet against the Coast
Guard where they will try to even
their record. According to Munsey
they plan to run a controlled race,
trying to run in a pack and help carry
along some of the team. After that
come the "Big Ones" against Army
and Syracuse. Syracuse has their
usual strong team and Army is smar-
in ! •
Potsdam turned oul to be a nice
place lo visit for the Danes, but if
Coach Hidi Itiirliiigiunc had his way.
Albany would have stayed there
longer. Alter rallying from a 4-0
deficit lo win ihc first game of the
scheduled twinhill, Albany grabbed
an early 3-0 lead ufter two innings of
Ihe second game before the rains
washed everything out.
In the opener, Dane workhorse
John Dollard hooked up with
Potsdam's Jeff Parsons, and il look-
ALBANY GREAT DANES
vs.
ITHACA BOMBERS
Saturday, September 20
1 p.m.
University Field
Admission: FREE with tax card
$1.00 without
BRING YOUR TAX CARD!
ed like it might be a long afternoon
for the Danes as ihc hosts struck
quickly.
A second inning walk and singleplus an outfield Ihrow to third, put
two runners in scoring position and
Dollard in a hole. A run-scoring
single by John Griffin and an infield
error let two runs in and it was2-0.
Ihc hosts doubled the score in the
third. Another error, a walk, and a
two-run double by designated hitter
Bill ferry, staked Potsdam to a 4-0
lead after three innings -with only
four left. (College doubleheadersare
comprised of iwo seven-inning
games.)
Parsons, meanwhile, had set down
ihe first nine Danes to face him
before Paul Nelson led off ihc fourth
with a walk. Jeff Silverman grounded oul, sending Nelson to second,
and Nelson scored on a double by
Jim Willoughby. One out later, Jeff
Brcglio singled in Willoughby and it
was a"4-2 ballgame.
In the sixth, freshman Howie
Markowitz led off with a walk,
Brcglio hit inloaforceoutatseeond,
but John I race drew a walk, and
Mark Constantine followed with a
single to make it 4-3.
Mark Fuchs followed with a slow
roller to short and when the first
baseman couldn't handlethe hurried
throw, the ball got away and lruce
and Constantine scored to give the
Danes u one run lead.
continued on page,seventeen
:
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Tomorrow Night
(Sat. Sept. 20)
8 PM
Please note early starting
1
<M».
ESDAY
UU1 HO.*»
UNIVmiTY Or NIW YORK AT AUANT VOL
V<XUUIHO.»
Zuckerman Still in Dark
Over Research Grievance
On SUNY's Patent Policy
time
ADMISSION
«
he Dynamite Party
of the Year
$.50 class of '78 w/tax
$1.00 others w/tax
i
$1.25 all other
creatures
Covers 3 Free Beers
and
ALL YOU CAN EAT!!
m
(ill
CLASS OF 1978
ACTIVITIES DAY
GOLDEN OLDIES
PARTY
iw
I
SI
(Si
H
4J|
CC Ballroom
Chemistry professor Jerold Zuckerman: Still In the dark as to whether or not his grievance against
the SUNY Research Foundation Is being seriously considered.
Pres Candidate Harris Advocates
Diffusion of Power in Government
and WSUA's Pat McGlynn
Cheese and Wine Spread
20 Kegs Michelob
Gouda Cheese Wheels
Roast Beef Platters
Chedder Cheese Platters
Blue Cheese Dips
Onion Dips
Assorted Sodas
Tacos
Potato Chips
Pretzels
J
DANCE TO THE GOLDEN
SOUNDS OF YESTERYEAR)
I
I
{ Beatles Chuck Berry Stones Beach Boys |
I Buddy Holly Four Seasons Dion
Supremes
I
«
and much much more
I
Is
J l l U l t J t l t S , M7S
by Ed Miner
Last Saturday Presidential candidate l-'rcd Harris gave a speech in
downtown Albany's Channcy Hall.
In an attempt to raise support lor his
hid in next year's New York
Democratic primary campaign, the
'Populist' former senator from
Oklahoma told some seventy
enthusiastic onlookers where he
thought America should beheading.
Harris said his candidacy is based
on two main principles; first, that
"people are smurt enough to govern
themselves." Harris attacked
America's support for undemocratic
dictators and the resulting loss of
respect for the U.S. abroad. "After
World War II everyone (in the
world) wanted to be like us. It's just
not like that anymore." He compared the U.S. of today to Mettcrnich's nineteenth century Austria,
which supported the conservative
world status quo, and then he linked
abuse of power overseas to corruption at home: "If you feel...you can
do anything you please about
national security outside your own
shores, then it becomes easy to do
the same here in this country."
The candidate's second principle
calls for ;< "widespread diffusion of
political and economic power."
Harris listed a number of concrete
economic measures he'd support to
accomplish this goal. These include:
1) strict enforcement of anti-trust
laws.
2) "a graduated income tax, not
graduated tax loopholes."
3) a further lax cut of some $15
billion.
4) creation of a public corporation
("like the TV A.") to develop oil and
gas reserves.
5) a limitation on (he production
of cars to only those getting over
twenty mile per gallon of gas.
Most of these ideas, far from
radical, come out of precedents or
existing concepts. Harris admitted
as much when he said, "We need
only put into practice whutwe say we
believe in,"
The former senator cunte down
hard on the idea that "some must be
randomly unemployed so thai prices
will full." instead of fighting infla-
tion by laying people off, said
Harris, a massive jobs program
should be started to provide work.
(Thcinflation resullingfromsuchan
increase in the work force, went
Harris' argument, would be offsc'f
by competitively induced price cuts
caused by Harris'enforcement of the
anti-trust laws.) The Oklahoman
added that he believes much of New
York City's current woes stem from
increased unemployment, which
means less city tax revenue (and
more welfare costs) at a time when
prices arc skyrocketing.
Harris thinks that his unique
brand of populism wil lavoid George
McCiovern's alienation in 1972 of the
working class "Wallace people."
George Wallace and his followers
have no love for the present administration, went Harris, for it is
theywho "are overtaxed by government, laid off in large numbers TI
got their boys killed in Vietnam..."
"The Wallacilcs arc shortchanged on
their image," stated Harris. "They're
called rascist anil jingoist, although
it is the ruling elite who are really
(like that)..."
Kielding questions from the
audience, Harris humourously put
down some so-called myths of
American politics. He termed as
"just so much talk," the image ol the
Democratic Party tearing itself to
pieces every four years. "We (The
Democrats) haven't gone past the second ballot at a convention in thirty
years." He also joked about the
'Great Menlioner.' Supposedly for
an unknown to be considered
seriously for the Presidency,
'newspaper items must appear such
as 'lied Harris has been prominently mentioned among the possible
candidates
for President next
year."
Fred Harris' political strategy
seems very much akin to thai of
George McCiovern's in 1972. For the
past few months he's toured the
country, speaking to youngish,
liberal audiences ol the ty pe who are
likely to volunteer to work actively
in
grass-roots
campaign,
organizations. Such people would be
invaluable in the innumerable
primaries which Harris plans to
enter.
One young 'reformer', after the
meeting had broken up, expressed
fears that upon his nomination,
Harris will lean McGovcrn-likc
towards the political center. Interestingly, what Harris said about
the CIA may give backing to that
misgiving. "Dismantle it," said
Harris upon being questioned about
what he'd do about the intelligence
agency. That was quite a radical
sounding statement, wh ich he fuzzed
however by suggesting that the
various functions of the CTA be
merely transferred to other areas
("you might switch the electronic
surveillance to the Defense Department", e.g.). Thus Harris may be
suspected of sounding more liberal
than he actually is, perhaps in order
to attract that activist support we
mentioned above.
by Betty Stein
After a month of letter-writing,
fact-finding, telephoning and
waiting, chemistry professor Jerold
Zuckerman is still in the dark as to
whether or not his grievance against
the SUNY Research Foundation is
being seriously considered.
Zuckerman has raised several
questions about the legality of a new
patent waiverand release form being
circulated by the Foundation. The
form was release at the beginning of
August and was described by its
c r e a t o r s as a simpler, less
bureaucratic version of past release
forms.
Trie Foundation, in order to insure the protection of patent rights
for research sponsors, requires that
some sort of formal patent agreement he signed by all individuals
working under grants within the
SUNY system.
Hut Zuckerman claims the new
agreement goes too far. He says it
threatens his academic freedom and
has been unsuccessfully seeking
clarification of certain significant
phrases in it for the past month.
"I'm tired of this and I wish it
would go away," said Zuckerman.
sitting in his office amongst a pile of
forms, letters and documents.
"Maybe they wish I would go away
. . . and think I will." he continued,
referring to the Research Foundation. "If they do, they're making a
mistake."
Zuckerman's grievance deals
mainly with the section that compels
all those who sign the form not to
"disclose any information . . .
relating to. . .discoveries or inventions to others, without the written
approval of the Foundation." According to Zuckerman, this conflicts
with the SUNY Hoard of Trustees
policy
which
guarantees
"unrestricted . . . dissemination
. . . of the conduct, progress, and
results of. . . research."
4
One person who concurs wlffl..
Zuckerman's interpretation of the
agreement is Steven Ney, attorney
for the American Association of University Professors. He outlines his
own reading of the form ina letter to
Zuckerman dated August 28.
According to Ney, "a plausible
reading of the language. . .is that it
appears to require a faculty member
to refrain from disclosing to all
'others' any information relating tba
discovery unless he has received the
. . . approval of the Research Foundation."
Ney suggests thata clarification be
made of the language in the agreement since, in its present form, it
"may constitute an infringement
upon protected areas of academic
conduct."
President Intervenes
President Fields intervened personally in the matter just hours
before Zuckerman was to have
presented a resolution condemning
the agreement at the first full faculty
meeting of the year on August 26.
Zuckerman agreed not to present the
resolution, with the understanding
that Fields would discuss the subject
with the SUNY Central Administration while he pursued the formal
grievance procedure outlined by the
Foundation.
Since then. Zuckerman has been
trying to get a formal hearing with
Foundtition^pirector Mort Grant.
In accordance with the grievance
guidelines, Zuckerman wrolea letter
to Grant on August 29 requesting
this hearing. So far. Grant has not
responded, even though the
guidelines require that an answer he
given within five days.
"Is he going to follow his own
procedure'.'" asked Zuckerman. "I'd
like to know." Phone calls to Grant
were referred to his lawyer, who
could not be reached for comment.
Populist Fred Harris is seeking the 1976 Democratic nomination tor President.
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