Group Speaks Against War Peace inMudville

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Peace
inMudville
I 1.1
by the MWdle East Committee of
Youth Against War and Fascism
by Mitchell Zoler
Branching out in a geometrically
lerfect semicircle were the aproximately fifty hard-core
layoff-game spectators who
rammed into a corner of the first
oor of the Campus Center, the
edasteled television located at
heir focus. Streaming out of the
ides were the constantly in flux
standees who fleetingiy took in an
inning or, obviously late for a class,
only asked for the score.
Applauding in unison a barely
scratched-out run by the Mets, or
laughing at the omnipresent sneer
on the face of Pete Rose, this small,
but representative cross section of
not only the campus, but most of
the southern Hudson River Valley,
e x h i b i t e d the seldom seen
camaraderie that can descend on
such a diverse group of people.
Totally reminiscent of 1969, a
$ mass uplifting of spirits has taken
$ place, concurrent with the rise of
if our home team through the stand i n g s and then their decent
$ (although at this time, yet to be
4 resolved) showing in the playoffs.
I Numerous baseball
watchers
1 have tried to analyse this in terms
"\ of the short duration of the rush, or
% the way it came, from a nadir of
\ such seemingly devastated propor\ tions. Perhaps the means might
!? add or subtract one or two grains
of sweetness to the end effect, but it
% truly made little difference. We all
ijj would like to see a winner, and if
8 the Mets had started out a house of
ii fire, their post-season praise would
'k not have been diminished, while if
g t h e y had fallen short, the sour
•JSnoises about Berra and the other
i-3personnel would have begun again
gain mid-season form.
m But, of course, the happy fact is
a that they did really pull it out dur•Hing that hectic last weekend, and
most people are probably a l o t «
better off for it. These past two •$
weeks of baseball euphoria have :•:•
also been accompanied by more jiji
than its share of dismalness.
:$
The carle blanche given tog:'
Agnew t o investigate leaks in hisgij
case was a fairly unexpected^
development. While it surely com-ig
es as no surprise that Agnew would!?,
like to destroy free
Press &
this country, the fact that he:;;:
might now have the tools to make aj|:
few dents in it is not only s u r p r i s i n g
but scary. Dominating the newsg
though, was, of course, the Arab-g:
lsrcali conflict which has now£:
come back t o haunt us. F o r thegj
past few days it has been only t h o s e g
scanty and contradicting govern-jg
ment reports that have been m o r e g
eagerly awaited than the inning b y g
inning score.
IS
Today, in the midst of the
fighting, the latest fighting in the
Middle East, it is of the greatest importance that progressive people
here not lose sight of the fundamental issues which have
described the Middle East conflict
for many years:
That the Middle East conflict is
not, and has never been, a matter of
religion or a question of Arab versus Jew. Golda Meir and Moshe
Dayan are not fighting for the
Jewish people who suffer from unemployment, racism, poverty and
war under the Tel Aviv regime, lnfact, the Israeli government was
one of the first countries in the entire world to extend diplomatic
recognition to the fascist and antiserritic Chilean military junta
which today is rounding up,
arresting thousands and executing
hundreds of Jewish
progressives. The junta has actually permitted the Chilean daily
newspaper El Mercurio to broadcast the threat "there should be a
Jewhan$in[!lrom everylamppost."
That the Middle East conflict
has always taken the form of a
deliberate campaign against all of
the oppressed in the Middle East
specifically Palestinian and Arab
And for those who had no senti- | j
ment about the war, the playoffs j:j:
were a pleasant way to pass the g
time.
i|:j
Music is the most soothing and
pleasing remedy lor the despair
that one may be confronted with
It has the unique quality ol creating
solace and tranquility. Furthermore, music has heen proclaimed
as the "International Language"
In short, music is something that
every man. woman, child, cat or
dog can derive pleasure from.
However, like all lorms ol
culture, music
has continued
,„
venture
through the cycle ol change, l o r
after all. change is the natural ordei
of all things. In turn, it's virtue ol
pleasing everyone at every given
time is slighted in many degrees
One may find it dillicult to pop Ins
lingers to Bach or Beethoven and
stomp his leel to Gershwin, but
perhaps he can find Ins proper
stimuli from listening to Mandrill
oi Earth, Wind, and Fire. He
might even find pleasure Irom the
"Anchorage Steel Pols and Pans
Band " (if one does in fact exist).
• Nevertheless, fhe variety of
music is out there and at our disposal Keeping in mind that the in-
PAGE TEN
dividual must seek his own personal pleasure I hey mustn't allow
the biased "I orces ol Evil" thai
attempt, and al limes, succeed in
stagnating the vibes ol the uiubased Universe
I wrote this briel article with the
hope ol bridging the gap ol "flat
notes" lhat have heen playing in
counterpoint in the area of one
another's music. In other words,
there has been a presence ol sarcastic, dis-respectlul, malicious
and sardonic viewpoints, at certain
intervals by well known individuals I )readlul enough, it has
been employed by oui very communications personnel here at
S.ll N Y A
We. as intelligent human beings,
should stnve In eradicate these
condemnations ol individualistic
music
Por when you condemn
one's music, you condemn one's
culture and consequently the individual hunsell.
Fortunately, the campus radio
station; WSUA, has a personal request a n d dedication formal in
which enables one the opportunity
to exercise these loreineiltioiied ac-
to punish any Arab country which
dares to try to take control of these
All progressive people should
support the just struggle ol i InPalestinian and Arab peoples to
gain control of their hind anil
resources and to build ;i free
Palestine where all its people.
Arabs and Jews, can live in peace
and justice. This is the only solution to the conflict in the Middk
East.
The Feminine Mystique?
In the beginning of this term, I
registered for English 313, Women
in Literature. Besides this particular course being in one of my
majors, my interest was touched
off by t h e relevancy, consciousness, and enlightenment only
ii course like this can produce. Like
a great many males here at Albany,
1 personally have a great need to
readjust my concepts and values of
women in general. It was my impression that Women's Studies
would benefit females as well as
Your Own Thing in Music
by Bro. Michael Barker
people. The Palestinian people
were driven from their homeland
and have been subjected to many
years of 'bombing, detention, disease and poverty. The Arab people
of the M iddle East have been killed
or maimed, their homes reduced to
rubble, their lands occupied with
the help of U. S. - made
napalm.chemicals and bombs used
by the Israeli military.
That the main responsibility for
the Middle East conflict has always
rested with the very same military
and economic forces and interests
which unleashed the bloody conflict in Southeast Asia. U. S. big
business, and particularly the major oil companies and the U. S.
government which protects them.
The oil in the Middle East is more
plentiful cheaper and easy to get
out of the ground than anywhere
else in the world and so the prolits
to the U. S. oil companies which
control the oil wells in the Arab
countries are astronomical. Intact
the annual profits are nearly three
billion dollars to U.S. oil companies from sales of the Middle
East oil to Europe and Japan and
represents half of the total return
from all U.S.foreign invertmcnts.
Israel is the most reliable battering
ram U.S. biginrsrnBshas in order
oil resources from the filthy rich
foreign oil companies. And so the
U.S. government, which allowed
Jewish victims of Hitler's death
campsto perish during World War
II rather than permitting them to
emigrate and escape to America,
does not give Israel billions of aid
in Phantom jets and other military
hardware out of humanitarian concern for the Jewish people but out
of a greedy concern for oil profits.
In their greed to acquire and main
tain control of Mid East oil and
other resources, U.S. big business
has done everything from helping
to o v e r t h r o w
progressive
governments as happened to the
Mossadh regime in Iran, following
an oil nationalization there, to sending the Marines as they did to
Lebanon in 1958 in order to rescue
the regime of one of their allies
there who was about to he
overthrown.
Eng 313:
by Al Thompson
For those of us who listened in:£
panic to the initial reports i h a l g
territorial losses had been sustain-jj:
ed by the already meager holdings:|
of Israel, the games were a salve loigj
assure us that, perhaps in the end j j
things will turn out the way w e g
would like.
ii
arts and leisure-
Group Speaks Against War
comodations You )ilsl simplv extend >mii lell or right indcs m the
designated holes on Mi Hell's
"Voice Box" I hen bv moving
your linger in a clockwise direct ion
live times anil commence to unci
selections thai you mav lauev
I bus you can he obliged wuli no
duress.
Again, it's your thing. So do
what you wanna do. By the way.
I hursday morning between the
hours ol 6:30 and 10:00 am would
be the appropriate time, il you
don't have the lime during the day
Needless to sav, but whalcvei be
you desire, or whim that you mav
lancy, I would like lo add hv saying
that it has been a sublime pleasure
in expressing my viewpoint as an
un-biascd lislenel
So helore 1 sign
oil with IIIV special regards lo us.
Ilhe lisieiung audience) I must
traditionally depait in the highest
loim
ol
Peace
and
Paradise
CIAO
P S . "SUCCESS IS l.MINI-.NI
WHEN
I WO C O M M O N
G O A L S A R E EQUA1 I Y
S I N C E R E " - DIAL ON 457-M74
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
males, without prefudice towards
either one. The sexist notion lhat 1
was in the class "because of the
women" or lor some social gain is
groundless, despite the surprising
discovery that 1 was the only male
in a class of twenty or more
women.
Upon my first appearance in
class, the instructor, a woman, asked my to stay alter class which 1 did
She rapidly told me she preferred
only females in the class because
the presence of males might hinder
and intimidate women in the
course from speaking up on some
issues. Furthermore, she stateil
lhat il I were lo slay in the course. I
would have to play a docile role. In
other woids. she told me. "let the
women speak, il is their course." 1
promptly despite the suggest ions ol
m\ male and lemale friends lo
"stick n out", dropped the course.
Seeking not lo blow this
liopelullv isolated incident out ol
us Hue proportion, it is inyconlenuon ihat exclusion ol males from
vv o m e n ' s studies is lemale
chauvinism and sexism.
1 his
sickness, whether practiced by
male or lemale, is unjustified,
deplorable, and sell-deleanng.
Some serious questions must he
asked and answered. Are males
now the victims ol sexism al
SLNY,V» Whvaie'WJ.avasliiHilority, ol the individuals in
Women's Studies courses leninlcs' 1
Ate males not interested and
apathetic, oi aie they being harassed and systematically kept out ol
these courses'? I hcAlro-American
H i s i o i v D e p a r t m e n t , which
leaiuies courses basically pertaining lo black history and contemporary black thought can boast
lhat us courses are balanced
helween blacks and whiles and that
no ellorts are made to exclude
whites. Shouldn't the Women's
Sludies classes then he balanced,
when possible, with males and
females?
My appeal now is that males .il
SUNYA must be accepted into all
Wonem's Studies
couises
wholeheartedly. What good does u
do for the consciousness ol .i
woman to be raised and uplilicil
when her male is left as a stumbling
block'.' T o undertake such a battle
is like throwing pearls before s w i n e
or like one trying to go through a
s t o n e wall.
Certainly, the
classroom would be more ol .i
realistic setting lor interraciion
between the sexes than Wall Sli eel
Psychological and social caslia
Hon ol males, along vvuli k-mali
chauvinistic rhetoric, will divide
women rather than unite them
Sonic may attempt I" call this .on
cle "male hitching". Inn this c u,a
the leal issue.
Sexism should be called l"i ivli ii
il is; sexism, nisi as I.KISIIJ
racism, chauvinism is chaiivnn •'
whether il is practiced hv the -T
pressor oi the oppressed Ii is ni|\*
lime that blacks, women, e a v
I h u d World people and who, u i
else leels oppressed, icach iluo
p e a k ol c o n s c i o u s n e s s and
awareness. Yet these gimips iniisl
retrain from seeking siipe
elitist positions,"bcltci llraiillim
oi "moie oppressed than vou .>'
ntudes. Such nariowiumdediii lalse security, and ethnoeeiutu i n
only retards the progicss and go.il
ol a movement
l-uially, the exploilatio
I
ilchuiiiaiii/aiion ol women ">" '
cease and the practice "I SC\MU
coiiseinned in all cm les s ''
sexual union ol tannics and u u h
socially, p h y s i c a l , and spinitiall-.
must emerge, bunging mutual
icspccl lo both sexes
Sttw Univtrtity ol New York at Albany
Amerika Falters
by Nancy Miller
The 1973-74 Experimental
Theatre season got off lo a
r a t h e r inauspicious start
with
the s t a g i n g
of
"Amerika: An Evening of
Song and Dance" this past
weekend in the PerformingArts Center's Lab II Theatre.
The format was that of the
durable musical review and
the
result
was
the
anthologizing of some of the
best that the popular and
show music traditions have
to offer.
But the difficulty with the
show lay not in the format,
but in its essential lack of
s u b s t a n c e . Although the
ensemble's self-professed intention was to present the
cultural differences among
the
"people, ideas, and
traditions" of Americans, it
did not succeed in conveying
this vision lo the audience.
The selections seemed arbitrarily chosen and the
order in which they were
presented lacked thematic
coherence. Because of these
basic deficiencies, the show
lacks a certain intensity and
the momentum which is so
essential to a good theatrical
performance.
This is not. however, to
detract from the individual
performances of the players:
•loriy
Hiatt,
Bruce
Kellerhouse, and Debbie
Zusman. Singing in various
c o m b i n a t i o n s the trio
brought to life such sentimental favorites as "The
Telephone Hour" (Bye Bye
Birdie), "There
Ain't
Nothing Like a Dame"
(Sorth Pacific), and "Singin'
in the Rain" (which, contrary
to popular belief did not
originate with (A Clockwork
Orange). Especially effective was their sympathetic
r e n d i t i o n of " M r . Bo
Jangles," In addition, the
solos by both women"You
Made Me Love You, I Didn't
Want To Do It" and "My Funny Valentine" focused attention on individual talent
most favorably. One only
wishes there were more
choreography to supplement
some of the numbers.
The transitions from song
lo s o n g were achieved
smoothly, and the revue
proceeded rapidly to the uplifting strains of the finale,
"Before the Parade Passes
By" (Hello Dolly).
The show was amply supported by the spirited accompaniment of pianist Stancey
Patterson.
Good Open Air Entertainment
The fourth annual "October
sing" will take place on Sunday afternoon, October 14.
from 2:00 to 5:00 on the Altamont Village Green. Sponsored by FACT a humanrelations
organization
whose initials stand for "For
a Commitment Today.' "Octobersing" is good open air
entertainment for all ages
with folk music, dancing,
craft demonstrations and
plenty
of
do 1i c i o u s
homemade refreshments
The performers, all of
whom arc known locally for
a p pc a r a n c e s
at
folk
g a t h e r i n g s and
coffee
houses, will include Kay Andrews. Joan Mullen. Maxine
Wanko, Pole and Dottie
Spoor, Greg Clarke, Del
Spohr. Hick Itowlev and Jack
Reekner and "Doc Murphy's
Boys." Kennig's
All-Star
String Band will be there to
provide some old time country music for English country dancing and the Altamont Station Squares, with
c a l l e r Al Capetti. will
demonstrate square dancing.
Joan Pefton will introduce
the performers.
Admission and refreshment charges for "Octobersing" are minimal and all
proceeds will be used by
FACT in its program of support to the inner-city community. Those coming
should dress warmly and bring chairs or blankets to sit
on. In case of rain the event
will be held at the Altamont
Elementary School.
UNDER INDIAN
tWIt T«f UP
ThCnLi
SUNYA Music Happenings
The first of four concerts of
the 1973-74 season by the University
Community
Symphony Orchestra of
SUNYA takes place on Tuesday, October 23, 8:30 p.m..
Main Theatre, Performing
Arts Center.
Nathan Gottschalk, conductor of the orchestra, announces the
following
program: Handel "Water
Music:"
"Essay
for
Orchestra, Opus 12" by the
contemporary American
composer, Samuel Barber;
Haydn "Symphony No. 49,"
"La Passione"; and "A night
on Bald Mountain" by
Moussorgsky. lrvin Gilman,
of the SUNYA Music Department faculty, is the guest
soloist in Mozart's Concerto
for Flute and Orchestra,
K.313 in
major.
Mr. Gilman graduated
from the Oberlin Conservatory of Music and received
his master's degree from the
Manhattan School of Music.
His teachers were Robert
Willoughby. William Kincaid, and John Wummer. He
has been a faculty member of
the Manhattan School of
Music, the University of
Michigan and Wayne State
University. He has performed many times as flute
soloist with the Detroit
Symphony Orchestra as well
as in chamber music and as a
recilalist in New York and
the Mid-West. He is also principal flutist of the Albany
Symphony Orchestra and
the Lake George Opera
Festival Orchestra.
The concert is open to the
public free of charge, but
tickets are required for admission and are available
beginning October 8 by mail,
phone, or at the box office,
telephone 457-8606.
An evening of Baroque
music is scheduled for the
Recital Hall, State University al Albany Performing
Arts Center, when lrvin
Gilman, flute, Rene Prins,
oboe,
Ruth
McKee,
bassoon, and Ernest Knell,
harpsichord, perform "Baroque I" on Monday, October
15, at 8:30 p.m. There is no admission charge.
Works to be performed include the "Italian Concerto"
of Johann Sebastian Bach,
and additional works by
Ruggieri, Geminiani, Fasch,
and Lotti.
P r e s e n t l y a'
m e m b e r of the Albany
Symphony, Mr. Prins received both his B S. and M.S.
degrees' from the Juilliard
School, and has performed in
orchestras under the direction of Stokowski, Shippers,
and Leinsdorf. Formerly on
the faculty of the New
England Conservatory, Mrs.
KcKee studied with Sherman
Walt, principal bassoonist of
the Boston
Symphony
Orchestra, and has performed with the Rhode
'Island Philharmonic and the
Boston Symphony.
SUNY Graduate Photo Exhibit
Photographs by SUNY
graduate Martin Benjamin
will be shown at the University Art Gallery from October 14 through November
4.
Mr. Benjamin, a native of
Saugerties,
currently
teaches photography at St.
Rose College in Albany.
While at State University he
was editor of the 1971
"Torch," the shool's yearbook
and
a
staff
photographer for the University's office of Community
Relations.
The close-up view of subject matter which the artist
uses to establish intimate
contact between subject and
viewer reflect Mr. Ben-
j a m i n ' s h u m a n i s t i c approach to presenting slices
of everyday life. The point of
view one shared by many
y o u n g p h o t o g r a p h e r s is
often
called
Street
Photography.
A reception for the exhibition's opening will be
held from 3-6 on October 14.
University-Community Day.
The public is invited.
HENWAY'S
Saturday, October 13
Bai Cper
Hcippy Hcui
8-1
8-0:30 PM
The Place to be this Weekend:
Friday, October R
Can Open
Q -1
FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 21, 1973
no cower charge
no cower charge
BEER $.25 & $.45 PITCHE
B E E R $ 15 $ 3 0 &
,L25
I he lihel.i
lion ol males and Iclaiiics I i " ' "
I hen stereotypes and luiieiionini'
inusl he a unisex elloil anil ""' '
battle ol I he sexes.
FRIDAY, OCTOBER \:> I '/
one ol Ihe L O N G E S T
Qpen
e m y
^
^
p
^
& Safur(jay
B ARS in Albany
h'HIIiAY, ' >' T< >HKH !.' n'/M
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
njg|lt$
jukebox
pinball
PAGE 1A
preview//eisure/preview//e/sure/preyew/leisure/p
eview
WSUA-640^
Chess
ASP Crossword Puzzle
Blitzkrieg and War
Friday, October 12
Experimental Theatre: presents
"The Deceitful Marriage" at 7:30
and 9:00. Free at the PAC.
Experimental Theatre: presents
"The Deceitful Marraige" at 7:30
and 9:00pm. Free, at the PAC.
Eighth Step
Coffeehouse:
American folk with David Jones.
English Dept: the Royal Nonesuch
Play - Readers will present scenes
from "The Last Analysis", "Heartbreak House", "The Importance of
Being Ernest", "The Way of the
World," and "A Midsummer
N i g h t ' s D r e a m . " F r e e in
Humanities 132, 1:30 to 3:00 pm.
C.C. R a t h s k e l l e r the music of
"Trek"8 pm-midnight. No cover
Eighth Step
Coffeehouse:
American Folk with David Jones.
Samuel Betances: "Puerto Rican
Youth - Race and Search for the
Wider Identity." 7 p m in LC3.
•
Saturday, Oct. 13
PAC: "Gertrude Stein's First
Maharishi Mahesh Yogi: "An In- Reader" by the SUNYA Children's
t r o d u c t i o n to the Science of Touring Ensemble. 1:00 and 8:00
C r e a t i v e I n t e l l i g e n c e . " On pm.
v i d e o t a p e c o n t i n u o u s l y from
Sunday, Oct. 14
l l a m - 4 p m inLC21.
Okt oberfest: on Alumni Quad with Rafters Coffee House: music and
a r t s & crafts, music, and German speakers in the Chapel House at
food. Starts at 2:00 pm. $1.00 with 8:30 pm.
tax.
All Transcendental meditators: a
Dancing & Casino: at Sayles Inter- refresher course sponsored by
national House on Alumni. Come SIMS at 8:00 pm in LC 24. Free
after dinner.
Movie
On Campus
Timetable
Off Campus
Albany State Cinema
Hellman (459-5300)
Madison (489-5431;
' L a s t of t h e R e d H o t L o v e r s " " A m e r i c a n Graffiti"
"The Stone Killer"
F r i . 7:30, 9:30
F r i . a n d S a t . 6:00, 8:00, 10:00 F r i . a n d S a t . 7:35, 9:30
A N i g h t at the Opera"
3 a t . 7:00, 9:30
Colonie Center (459-2170)
"Monsieur Verdoux"
S u n . 2:30, 7:00, 9:00
"Jeremy"
F r i . a n d S a t . 6:00, 9:55
Tower East
Fox Colonie (459-1020)
" T i m e to R u n "
F r i . a n d S a t . 7:00, 9:00
"Avanti"
F r i . a n d S a t . 7:35
Delaware (462-4714)
"Bang the Drum Slowly"
F r i . a n d S a t . 7:00, 9:00
IFG
" H e a v y Traffic"
F r i , a n d S a t . 7:15, 9:00
C u 1-de-sac"
Towne (785- 1515)
Beta Phi Sigma
"Hit"
fc
Targura CW73-36
42 C i t y I n s o u t h e r n
France
46 Give up
47 Part o f a c o a t
49 S e n i o r : F r .
ACROSS
1 Sort of blockshaped
9 "I wouldn't
for the world"
50 Soft drink
15 Fancy f l o u r i s h I n
handwriting
16 Hydrocarbon found
In n a t u r a l gas
17 Creator o f
"Gargantua"
18 Reddish-brown
pigment
19 Pulpy f r u i t
20 California live
oaks
22
23
25
26
27
Total
Swampy areas
Roman emperor
out a l i v i n g
Founder o f psychoanalysis
29 Racer Gurney
30
offering
31 Deviser of famous
I.Q. test
33 Make fun of
34 Expert at sleight
of hand
38 Hebrew tribesman
39 Nabisco cookies
40 Chemical prefix
41 Chemical suffix
51
voblscum ( t h e
Lord be w i t h y o u )
53 Specific Dynamic
Action (abbr.)
54
Tin
56 Household gods of
the ancient Hebrews
58 N a t i v e o f a n c i e n t
Roman p r o v i n c e
59 Using o n e ' s
imagination
60 Hade of i n f e r i o r
materials
61 Combined w i t h w a t e r
DOWN
1 Back o f the neck
2 Tremble, s a i d o f
the v o i c e
3 Suave
4 Malt and hops
5 Anger
6 "
Get Started"
7 Committed h a r i k a r i
(colloq.)
3 Satchel P a i g e ' s
specialty
9 High plateaus
10 S u f f i x : t n f l a n n a t o
disease
11 Pronoun
12 Very o l d language
13 D e r o g a t o r y reman
14 Jimmy Hoffa, s.n
21 Sister
24 Abate
26 Very large
political regiv
28 As s a i d above
30 " I w o u l d n ' t
—
it"
32 Never: Ger.
33
castintj
34 Posters
35
readi fit;
36 T h a t which bui'o,
case
37 F o l i a g e
41 " I t h i n k , ther..
fore
43 Poor stroke '< "-.'
sports
44 Salad green
45 Sewn togeU.c
47 Boy's nlckna-'e
48 Enticed
51 Past p r e s i d e ' • '
Mexico
52 West Germai ',••!"•
55 Spanish aunt
57 School o r g a n . ' i ' y
Contest Rules
P u z z l e s o l u t i o n s m u s t be s u b m i t t e d to t h e A l b a n s Si
d e n t P r e s s office (CC 334J b y M o n d a y , 12 n o o n follow in
the Friday that the puzzle a p p e a r s .
correct solutions have been chosen.
E a c h of t h e t h r e e w i n n e r s w i l l b e e n t i t l e d t o a $ 1 0 nil 11
tificate to the c a m p u s b o o k s t o r e . C e r t i f i c a t e s mil si
c l a i m e d w i t h i n t w o w e e k s of n o t i f i c a t i o n .
No o n e w o r k i n g o n o r for t h e A l b a n y S t u d e n t P ,
e l i g i b l e to win.
Solution To Previous Puzzle
" S a v e the Children"
F r i . a n d S a t . 7:15, 9:30
F r i . a n d S a t . 6:30, 9:45
PAGE 2A
*
Cinema 7 (785-1625)
3 AST
4 Qxx
f XXX
• XX
Jf A.Ixxx
•
AKJIOXXXX
<M
f XX
*Qx
Bidding
S
W
4S P
6S P
N
5S
P
B
P
P
O p e n i n g lead: 1 0 %
T h i s h a n d w a s taken e x a c t ly as s h o w n from a local
d u p l i c a t e game.
Unfort u n a t e l y , t h e bidding is
a v a i l a b l e , and the only exp l a n a t i o n for it is that NorthSouth w e r e h a v i n g a bad
g a m e t h a t night, and needed
the s l a m to " c a t c h - u p " . T h e
o p e n i n g lead w a s the 10 of
h e a r t s by West. See if y o u
c a n p l a y the hand better t h a n
the S o u t h d e c l a r e r did.
Even if s p a d e s break e v e n ly, there aro o n l y 10 q u i c k
tricks: e i g h t s p a d e s and A, K
of h e a r t s ; so, the Jack ^f
m u s t by finessed on the first
round to p r o v i d e d i s c a r d s for
two losers.
.
" H e a v y Traffic"
F r i . a n d S a t . 7:00,10:00
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
XX
WEST
1} void
|> Q1098x
• AJlOxx
#1098
sr<
T h e Stone Killer"
"Bridge on the River Kwai"
S a t . 7:00, 10:00
"Dirty Little Billy"
F r i a n d S a t . 8:05
NORTH
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 1 2
12 N-N5? w a s a b l u n d e r .
Black m u s t h a v e o v e r l o o k e d
w h i t e s 18th m o v e . T h e b l a c k
k n i g h t w i l l be t r a p p e d o n
QR8 b u t w h i t e s k n i g h t on
QR8 is defended by 20. N5B7. In an a t t e m p t to a c t i v a t e
b l a c k s k i n g rook, 20
N-N5
followed by P-K6 a n d R-KB1
w a s tried.
This however
weakened blacks
king
k n i g h t and black h a d g l o o m y
continuations
had
he
a t t e m p t e d to k e e p t h e k n i g h t .
After t h i s k n i g h t w a s g o n e .
white could g i v e up h i s
k n i g h t on QR8 for b l a c k ' s
other k n i g h t and go into a
favorable e n d g a m e . After 44.
K-B4 w h i t e is h a r d p r e s s e d to
p r e v e n t 45. N-B5 a n d 46. R-R6
mate.
Lo and Behold! South is a
lucky m a n : the .lack holds.
Next, he c a s h e s the two top
h e a r t s and t h r o w s oil h i s two
worthless
diamonds.
S o u l h ' s next duty was to pull
t r u m p s and c l a i m his contract with 8 s p a d e s , 3 h e a r t s ,
1 club. But alas, as fate would
h a v e it, West showed out of
t r u m p s on the first round.
With still some hope left.
South led a s m a l l club and
played h i s King h o p i n g t o be
able to next finesse s p a d e s .
But East would hear of no
such t h i n g .
He q u i c k l y
grabbed h i s Ace and played
back a club. South won but
e v e n t u a l l y had to concede a
s p a d e trick to E a s t ' s Queen.
It's a s h a m e that the hand
was doomed to failure after
the h e a r t s behaved so nicely,
but s o u t h can easily fulfill
h i s contract.
He was fortunate in that one "I the
defenders' Aces didn't t a k e
the first trick, but that was no
excuse fur c a r e l e s s n e s s On
the Ace and K i n g of Hearts,
South should d i s c a r d h i s two
clubs, instead! When the bad
spade break i s d i s c o v e r e d . he
can reach d u m m y by p l a y i n g
u d i a m o n d to h i s King.
Hut e v e n t h o u g h
this
a t t o i n p s fails, South can
a g a i n p l a y on d i a m o n d s , and
t h u s finesse s p a d e s to claim
ii h a n d s o m e s l a m bonus.
How do I know so much
about the play of the h a n d ? I
was South.
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 12, 1973
Live Coverage beginning at 4:25
|
Community
University Day
|
j
Open House - 10am-4pm
§
1
Parents' Weekend 1
Live coverage from the fountain
1
Contest Winners
Saturday
Night
of Gold
David Bloom
Brien Dowries
|
With Eric Lonschein
Louise Sachter
Tricks and Trumps
SOUTH
Name, address, phone number, a n d social
n u m b e r m u s t a p p e a r on y o u r s o l u t i o n .
13. N-B7 ch K-Q2
14.NXR N X P oh
15. K-Ql N X R
16. B-B4
18. N-B3! N-B3
19. N-N5 ch K-Q2
20. N5-B7! N-NS?
21. R-Kl
P-K6?
22. K-Bl P-B4
23. P - R 3 R - K B 1
24. PXN P X P
25. N-Q5 RXN
2(i. NXP P-KR4
27. K-Q2 R-KB1
28. RXN R-B7 ch
29. K,Q3 RXP
30. R-KB1 K-K2
31. R-QB1 K-B3
32. R-B7 P-KN4
33. P-QR4 P-N6
34. K-K4! P-R5
35. R-Bl R-R7
36. R-Bl ch K-N3
37. P-Q5 RXP ch
38. K-K5 R-R8
39. R-B6 ch K-R4
40. K-K4 R-B6
41. P-Q6 R-Bl
42. P-Q6 R-Bl
42. P-Q7 R-Ql
43. R-QB P-N5
44. K-B4!
resigns
by H e n r y J a c o b s o n
t AKJxx
• KQxx
Jr-Kxx
F r i . a n d Sut. 7:00, 9:30
" A T o u c h of C l a s s "
F r i . a n d S a t . 7:15, 9:15
F r i . 7:15, 9:45
©Edward Julius, 1973
One of t h e w i n n e r s in t h e
9th annual Capital District
Open (Oct 8-7) w a s the •*•*!
master Matthew Katrein who
w o n all 5 of h i s g a m e s . T h e
g a m e s r a n g e d from " s u d d e n
v i c t o r y " in t h e 3rd r o u n d to a
c o m p l i c a t e d g a m e in the l a s t
round. In t h e 3rd r o u n d M a t t
w a s black in the following
blitzkrieg:
1. P-Q4 N - K B 3
2. P-QB4 P-K4
3. P-QS? B-B4
4. B-NS?? N - K S !
5. B-K3 BXB
6.PXB Q-R5 ch
7. P-N3 N X P
8. r e s i g n s
(It m u s t by said t h a t w hilt
m i s p l a y e d t h e opening.)
The last r o u n d g a m e wi is a
little h a r d e r :
M.K. L.B.
I. P-K4
PK-4
2. B-B4 P-QB3
3. P-Q4 P-Q4
4. K P X P B P X P
5.B-N5 ch B-Q2
fi. Q-K2 P-K5
7. P-KB3 Q-R4 ch
8. N-QB3 BXB
9. QXB ch QXQ
10. NXQ N-QR3
11. P X P P X P
12. N - K 2 N - N 5 ?
P u z z l e s o l u t i o n s w i l l b e d r a w n a t r a n d o m u n t i l ll.i
Cine 1234 (459-8300)
'2001: A S p a c e O d y s s e y "
F r i . a n d S a t . 7:00, 10:00
SUNYA vs. Siena J
by Jack Uppal
Black Roots
Unity - Front
Brother
Malcolm:
Of F3Ct^
Waste Limit
lo a b r u t h a w i t h the
c o u r a g e to m a k e an a p p e a l
for unity to the t h i r d world
s t u d e n t s at SUNYA i takeoff
my hat. the initial p l e a for
u n i t y however, m u s t be m a d e
to s t u d e n t s of the fourth,
fifth, and six worlds, u know,
t h e m b r u l h a s and s i s t u h s o n
t h i s c a m p u s who t h i n k t h e i r
world ain't y o u r s and mine,
there was some discontent
a m o n g s t u d e n t s who had
w h i t e roomates. t h i s i can understand, it would be the
h e i g h t of irony to a d m i t
t h o u g h , t h a t t h i r d world
s t u d e n t s d o n ' t w a n t to live
with themselves, campus
live is f
d u p we say. so
we move off c a m p u s , t h a t ' s
cool, but d o n ' t be so i g n o r a n t
a s to believe t h a t we no
l o n g e r h a v e a c o m m o n interest, when we s a y c a m p u s
life is I
d u p we a r e only
s a y i n g that the p e o p l e suffer
the s a m e i n a d e q u a c i e s , t h e s e
a r e our people, we can run
but we s h o c a n ' t hide.
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
s i s t u h s and b r u t h a s on
c a m p u s a r e no belter, we
form our little c l i c k s as if to
s a y to the r e s t of o u r people,
"u a l r i g h t long as u stay in
y o u r place." and t h o s e of u s
who sit in o u r r o o m s and say
forget t h e m j i v e folks a r e
only being p r o g r a m m e d into
b e l i e v i n g t h a t we c a n ' t be united.
if you'll notice il isn't
whitey or the
system
d i v i d i n g us. it's we the people c o m p e t i n g a g a i n s t each
other, we c r y a b o u t the lack
of funds but even if we had
them we couldn't u s e t h e m
selflessly. it's t i m e to stop
h i d i n g u n d e r the i l l u s i o n of
U MOJA" and m o v e from the
level of r e a l i t y a s a w a r e n e s s
to the level of reality as
change!
y o u r s in the s t r u g g l e , (with
a p o l o g i e s to those w h o d o n ' t
want to get involved)
Matsimela Lasana
He said A REAL REVOLUTION
to c h a n g e the s t r u c t u r e
of the society: m o n e y in the
bank
and not in the d r e s s e r d r a w e r
he m e a n t
he a l s o m e a n t a lack of
killing
of the self
which the peak of white
society
i m p o s e d on the bottom, the
back p o r c h
of the e m p i r e
He said A R E A L REVOLUTION
for m e n No l o n g e r the w h i t e
interpreter
of t h i n g s for the w o r l d
of n o n - w h i t e s No l o n g e r the
garbage cans
by the front door
No l o n g e r the petty
arguments
between t h e v i c t i m s
But he did not live to see Unity
the p e t t i n e s s got him with
metal
PAGE 3A
HI
u
Desperation
Rooks:
StrangeStory
of Grey Owl
S e l f - m a d e Indian, G r e y
Owl w a s a n eccentric, a n impostor and one of the few
g r e a t n a t u r e w r i t e r s of t h i s
century. Hia m i s s i o n w a s to
defend the land from exploitation, the Indians
a g a i n s t h u m i l i a t i o n , and
a n i m a l s from cruelty and
s l a u g h t e r . Still, G r e y Owl
w a s no s a i n t and beyond t h e
exotic m y t h of h i s e x i s t e n c e
i s a s t r a n g e s t o r y . He i s t h e
s u b j e c t of a n e w b o o k ,
W I L D E R N E S S MAN: The
S t r a n g e S t o r y of Grey Owl,
written by h i s friend and
publisher, Lovat Dickson.
Grey Owl w a s k n o w n to
n a t u r a l i s t s and a d v e n t u r e r s
here and in B r i t a i n a s a halfbreed ( A p a c h e mother), w h o
spent m u c h of h i s life in the
Canadian woods trapping,
h u n t i n g and l i v i n g a m o n g
t h e Ojibway tribe. His b o o k s
were c o n s i d e r e d to be to life
in the C a n a d i e n w i l d e r n e s s
what t h e R o b i n s o n C r u s o e
story w a s to life on a d e s e r t
island. G r e y O w l ' s l e c t u r e s
were
enthusiastically
received
a n d he
was
applauded
as
the
c h a r i s m a t i c s p o k e s m a n for
conservation a n d the I n d i a n
way of life. Therefore, the
n e w s at h i s death that h e w a s
Arohie
Belaney,
an
E n g l i s h m a n by birth and
u p b r i n g i n g r e a r e d by two
spinster auntswas shocking
to the public t h a t had adored
him.
Lovat Dickson pieces
t o g e t h e r t h i s s t r a n g e s t o r y of
G r e y Owl's life. A n d in
a c k n o w l e d g i n g G r e y Owl the
m y t h , M r . D i c k s o n discovered Archie B e l a n e y , a
m a n of rare t a l e n t s and sensibility.
Lovat Dickson was born in
Australia and brought up in
Central Africa a n d Canada.
In England he founded his
ownpublishing
firm, which
p u b l i s h e d . . . b o o k s of
Grey
Owl. Subsequently
he was
with Macmillan & Co. in London for twenty-two
years.
His previous
books
include
THE ANTE-ROOM
THE
HOUSE OF WORDS
and
HM- WELLS: His Turbulent
Life and T i m e s .
Star-Spangled
Concert
The
Star-Spangled
W a s h b o a r d Band, based in
the C a p i t a l District, h a s been
s c h e d u l e d to do a live radio
c o n c e r t on WRPI (95.1 FM).
T h e show will be b r o a d c a s t at
9 p.m. October 15, from the
McNeal R o o m at the c a m p u s
of T r o y ' s P o l y t e c h n i c Ins t i t u t e . F o r live attendance,
a d m i s s i o n is $1.00'
Combining blue-grass,
c o m e d y , j u g band, and
" w h a t e v e r else s e e m s right,"
t h e W a s h b o a r d act drew
critical praise nationwide
d u r i n g a t o u r of b l u e - g r a s s
festivals t h i s p a s t s u m m e r .
T h e g r o u p j u s t r e t u r n e d from
N a s h v i l l e where they taped
p e r f o r m a n c e s for s e v e r a l
country musicTV programs.
FLU SHOTS
NOW
Students with serious
basic health
problems such as
diabetes,
heart,
asthma should report
to the Student He <lth
Service during clinic
hours, 8:30 am to 4
pm, for flu shots.
These will be given at
cost-, less than $1.
Ed. note • Regimentation in
education is a controversy within
the university. The place of imagination is often overlooked.
Harry Staley, of the English
Department,
discusses
the
managerial aspects as opposed to
the intellectual aspects of the university in this first of two essays •
by Harry Staley
Albany Symphony Debut
The Albany Symphony
w i l l p r e s e n t its first s u b s c r i p t i o n c o n c e r t on S a t u r d a y October 13th, at t h e
P a l a c e T h e a t r e at 8:30 p.m.
T h e p r o g r a m w i l l include
B e e t h o v e n ' s S y m p h o n y No.
5,
CHARLES
Ive's
S y m p h o n y N o . 2, a n d
S c h u m a n n ' s Manfred O v e r ture.
T h i s is t h e o p e n i n g of t h e
43rd s e a s o n of t h e A l b a n y
S y m p h o n y O r c h e s t r a and
t h e 7th s e a s o n u n d e r t h e
direction of J u l i u s Hegyi.
On F r i d a y , October 12th,
t h e S y m p h o n y will perform
the first p r o g r a m at the N e w
Arbor Hill
Elementary
School at 8:30 p.m. under the
s p o n s o r s h i p o f t h e New Y o r k
S t a t e Council on the A r t s and
the A l b a n y H u m a n R e l a t i o n s
Committee.
Beethoven's
Symphony
No. 5, l o n g the favorite of
c o n c e r t goers, fell out of
favor in the last ten y e a r s
b e c a u s e it w a s h e a r d so
m a n y t i m e s in the c o n c e r t
h a l l . A l i v e p e r f o r m a n c e of
It seems to me, and indeed to
many others at the moment, that
the sense of development in our universities reflects the two opposing
conceptions of the character or
structure of the university: the one
has been called managerial, the
other called collegiate, or if the
latter seems closer to cheer-leading
and our corrupting football ethic,
then we are free to invoke the
adventitious dignity of Latin and
call it the Collegium. In any event,
the prevailing conception oi the
character of the university will
shape and define the intellectual
imagination, and 1 submit, the
moral imagination of the undergraduate, or, as they are called
at Oxford, not ironically I believe,
our younger scholars.
B e e t h o v e n ' s Fifth is a r a r e
performance now.
The
Charles
Ives
S y m p h o n y No. 2 w r i t t e n at
t h e t u r n of t h e c e n t u r y
p r e s e n t s a n o s t a l g i c v i e w of
the r a m p o s e r ' s y o u t h . I v e s
w a s a v e r y s u c c e s s f u l insurance agent whose traini n g at Yale as a c o m p o s e r left
h i m with a s p l e n d i d a v o c a tion. I v e s is p r o b a b l y t h e
most
famous
of
the
American Composers prior
to the l a t e r t w e n t i e t h c e n t u ry
masters.
T i c k e t s for t h e A l b a n y
Symphony concert
are
available through
the
A l b a n y S y m p h o n y office, 19
Clinton Avenue, Albany
12207 o r by c a l l i n g 465-4755.
Although I know of no one at
this institution who publicly endorses the managerial conception
of the character of the university, it
is possible to describe the essential
attributes of management on campus with an eye to guarding against
it. It tends and intends to reduce
the power of the leaching and
•scholarly faculty, abandoning its
traditional role of facilitating those
policy decisions arrived at by faculty and usurping the right to make
these decisions for
faculty.
Hierarchies of rank are narrowly
and mechanically established and
imposed. The student is el fee /ely
denied his place among the company of scholars; he is indeed not
considered a younger scholar, but a
kind of consumer whose occasional and serious criticism ol
uhe condition of the university . ol
Cheech
&
Chong
On S u n d a y n i g h t October
14. R and B P r o d u c t i o n s will
p r e s e n t at the
Palace
T h e a t r e , Cheech a n d C h o n g
a l o n g with a s p e c i a l g u e s t artist for one s h o w o n l y .Show
t i m e is 7:30 and t i c k e t s a r e
a v a i l a b l e at s e v e r a l a r e a
l o c a t i o n s and in the t h e a t r e
box office.
Cheech and C h o n g a r e
p r o b a b l y the h o t t e s t c o m e d y
t e a m in the n a t i o n ut t h i s
given time and a r e e n j o y i n g
a h u g e s u c c e s s with t h e i r
new single
"Basketball
J o n e s . " T h e i r c o m e d y is inv e n t i v e and witty and t h e i r
s a t i r e is q u i t e u n i q u e .
RESEARCH
Thousands of Topics
$2.75 per page
Send for your up-to-date, 160-page,
mail ofder catalog. Enclose $1.00
to cover postage (delivery time is
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reitarch assistance only.
'he collegium, is discounted as "unprofessional," or exploited as part
of the strategy to separate teaching
faculty from student, The student
takes his place and gathers his
meaning as a consumer, not a
colleague.
The managerial system speaks
the computer dialect. One hears of
"input for the decision-making
process"; evaluation forms are
"instruments to supply such input." One hears words like
"opinionnaire"! There is an empirical piety verging on idolatry:
thus a matter as subtle, and one
might hope, imaginative as student
evaluation of courses is reduced to
spurious and frequently disingenuous statistical discourse.
The clearest indication of the antihuman character ol the managerial
system, at least in my experience,
reduces even essentially human
issues to numbers. I have occasionally asked my more promising students whether we could talk
to one another on a "first-number"
basis, or in exceptional cases I have
even asked what the nick-number
was. I his gives a new possibility to
the term "I wo-toyer."
lo summarize then, at those
moments in the history ol the
academy when administration
transforms ilsell into management,
it tends to reduce the power of the
laciihy, separate the (acuity from
the student, that is. di\ idc the community ol scholars, assign the role
of "consumer" to the student,
maintain rigid official hierarchies,
reduce issues to "guanti liable"
solutions, encourage careensm at
the expense of professionalism and
a sense ol vocation. I hat is not, lo
he sure, a comprehensive catalogue
of the behavior ol management,
hut it may serve to describe its
nature and ellecl on the academic
community. It serves also lo
eliminate lull', two indispensable
educational eneigies humoi and
imagination, both ol which
llourish in the true collegium.
John Mayall
:
CUL-DESAC
Friday, Oct. 12
Friday-What's Up, Tiger Lily
Saturday-Fearless Vampire Killers
Dr. Hook ond the
Medicine Show
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
by l.ynne J a c k s o n and " f r o g "
Do you ever have nightmares
about being buried under mounds
oi garbage'.' Or of being locked in
the trash room of Livingston
I ower with the residents throwing
their day old (or semester old) apple cores, orange peels, used
kleenexes, unwashed tunafish cans
and soggy tea bags on you? 1 do!
Solid waste is a large and smelly
problem. Kvery American (that includes you) produces about 5
pounds of garbage a day. Where
docs one put 210 million tons of
garbage a year, especially now with
a nation-wide shortage of garbageeaters?
Hut il such action lor humanity
is unpossil lc, then will someone- in
the name ol evolution please tell
me why'1 I in the houses on both
sides ol me are binning, and I don't
know wnV I hey are or what I should
do.
7:00 and 10:00
Fri., Oct 19
SUNYAGyni
Sixty per cent of this garbage is
paper which can be recycled. You
can help by recycling your paper
waste. A program for recycling is
now being started in the dorms. All
paper except magazines, wax
paper and carbon paper can be
recycled. Use a two-basket system
where one waslehasket or box or
paper bag is only for paper and the
other lor the rest ol your garbage.
When you take your garbage to the
trash room, you can also take your
paper and put il into the ap-
LC 7
:
Tickets only
$2 with tax $5 without
Tickets on sale in CC Lobby 1 0 - 2
fumf«il hy .ui.lrui irawiuttuii
FRIDAY, OCTOBER L2, L973
propriate place for recycling. If
your trash room docs not have a
place for paper recycling, please
call me. L.ynne Jackson, at 4578569.
If you arc wondering about the
purple and yellow barrels that you
don't see in the dorms, they are for
can recycling. The reason that you
don't see them yet is that they are
stitl being painted. If you would
like to help, call the above number.
Any kind of can will be recycledexccpt arosol cans. If, however,
someone should put garbage into
the barrels, the cans will not be
recycled because no one likes to
sort through melting popsicles or
gooey ice cream wrappers. Please,
just put cans into these barrels.
The problem of solid waste can
be partly solved through recycling,
but it takes the help of everyone.
Please help end my nightmares of
destruction with the pleasant
dream of community ecoeoopcralion. Recycle your paper
and cans.
This has been a guest column.
Send all replies atut frog cartoons
lo: The Frog's Mouth, c/A> Albany
Student Press, Campus Center
.126.
OCTOBER 1 9 V \ SUNYA GYM
Doors Open at /
\ ^ Homecoming
8:30 pm X J O H N X
Concert
/MAYALIA
/
OCTOBER
12 and 13
0
and
\
M)R. HOOK AND THE
X
MEDICINE
Ki.75 with stale quad curd
SI.25 without
STANLE'
200|:ASPAGE
o ODYSSEY ®
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 12, 197!)
PAGE 4A
Is there not even one Jew here on
campus who will make the initial
move ol walkingtothe University's
Arab community lor the purpose
ol warm friendship'.' Is there not
even one A rah on campus who will
go directly lo those of Jewish faith
and speak ol creating bonds of
love*.'
II there is, 1 long lo hear immediate news of such action. I
want to know that such is possible.
I want lo be one of the "outsiders"
present to help where asked.
From the Frog's Mouth
&
LCI
admission: $.50 w/tax
$1.00 w/out
As a non-.lew and a non-Arat
striving to understand why there
must be sides and why one side
must "win," I cannot bring myself
to believe that each group is lined
up lOlK'f against the other and that
neither group has even one
member who is desirous of taking
that first step. Howcan humans be
capable of making one "giant step
for mankind" on another astral
body and not even make a small
step on earth'.'
Friday and Saturday
Doors open 8:30 pm
7:15 & 9:45
Time is not important as too
many years have already been lost.
At the end of this first "sharing"
perhaps nothing will have been
gained except that two friends
from different cultures found each
other. Bullet there be another day
of seeking, and another, and
another - each filled with an unplanned agenda containing
declamations of similarities. All of
us know the differences and the
hates- they no longer need be expressed.
cine cum taude
state university of new
yorkat albany
The Cinema of Roman Polanski
continued from page nine
slowly to his feet and open the corner of his heart which is feeling
sorrow for the tribulations of those
holding the opposite view. And
may there be at least one more person from the conflicting culture
who also gets to his feet and returns
the understanding- And let these
two stand side by side- if necessary,
i with tears and embraces and gently
lead those present into the vale of
hope.
tower east
H O M E C O M I N G CONCERT
funded by student associationthe other film group
EmxronmenUa Action:
PARENTS Will. BE ADMITTED
FREE
Villi' I'ukfls arc to he sold I hour in
IHIVUIIII: a/ eiiili show
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
PAGE ELEVEN
-J-J
want. Univemity Family SorvkM (Agency).
(t.iker SU t o o n , leather, $23, S i n 10'A
mam.
C o l Joa, 438-4774
Blizzard Skill; Nor diets Buckle Boon, mens
CLASSIFIED
tizo I O V I medium
Sewing Machine, Sean Zig-zag. Walnut
RIDES/RIDERS
456-0998
Need School Money - Married college
Ride needed to Long Beach or area 1 0 / 1 8
couplet earn extra money by babyiitting.
or
( 1 1 7 per week - car needed • free room
10/22. Coll Toby 4S7-7725
1255 after 5:30
M),
(or sale; slightly used; cheap. 482-
Returning
10/21 or early
and board. University Family Service!
Skiing out west-Cheaply! Ride needed to
(Agency). 456-0998
cabinet. Excellent condition. Call 472-
Nicely styled women's suede jacket (size S-
10/19.
Jackson Hole, Taos or comparable spot for
Cook - Man, and Son. DinnerMon.-Fri. No
Christmas vacation. Will share expenses,
dishwashing.
driving, and a good time. Call Les, 482-
Pay and dinner.
Near
SUNYA busline. Call Shellord, 474-0877,
0523
438-1033
FOR SALE
Electric Organ: Farflsa Combo Compact,
$300.
Speaker:
Fender
Leslie, $100.
Howard, 462-0255
1965 Otdifnobwe com. Runs great, good
tires, $150. 439.1662
ludwig drum set. Bass, snare, bass tomtom,
M y m o u t V ' M , " 42,000 miles - needs body
hi-hat assembly, small ride. Custom
made cases worth $65. Used 2 years, excellent shape. $325, not firm. Skip, 457-
work. $75 firm. 482-4844
WANTED
3002
Amp.
w/shiHd.. $550. Bony, 482-3278
For Sale: Empire 999-VE stereo cartridge.
New condition. Only $50. List $75. Call
lee,
482-7505
excellent shape. $325. 869-2585
Ladies Rieker Ski Boots. Size 7-8. Good
condition. $25. Call Barb, 7-4984
Helpl Must sell skis. K2 competition (4), (Us-
WARM YOUR COCKLES
with
D e a n Swift fancy Sniffing; Snuff.
ed only once). Look-Nevada Bindings.
Also. Dover Poles. Call 434-0682, Eddie
Skis-Fischer 2002 RSL 210 centimeters.
Send n a m e , etc. for f r e e samples.
New, unused. Factory guarantee, tist-
D e a n Swift l t d . Box 2 0 0 9 San
$200, Price-S 100. 457-7931
legislator in the New Fifth Ward, which is
Dept. P-2, P.O. Box 2049, Port Angeles,
an Inner city ward (Arbor Hill) needs
Runaway wives (thought of it? done it?)
tial. Call 482-6543, 489-3019, 237-4555
University Directories 1966-1972. Might
pay. Ted, 436-0262. Mark, 272-6197?
Wanted:
gatMatoxVisTx
1972 Torch
Yearbook
(or
HELP WANTED
Student with artistic ability interested in
making some extra money call 457-8523,
482-1066
Car a necessity - work as much as vou
3rd
ANNUAL
SKI
TOUR
Mayerhofen,
Call 458-9246
A d Express, Inc.
m
Austria
All transportation; hotel; 2 meals
per d a y ; taxes & gratuities- $306
School of Criminal Justice
4 5 7 - 4 8 3 1 - office
8 6 1 - 6 2 1 6 • home
297 Ontario St.
Happy Hours 9-11 Fri. & Sat.
7 This weekend
Scarecrow Jones
Direct from National College Tour
INC.
(760
Modlwn
Avenu.,
Fantastic
Openings
T i r e d of the
same old low
paying part-time
job?
Like to
have a great job
guaranteed this
summer? See
Mr. Lamontagne
between 2 8. 4
and 6 & 8 p.m.
Thurs. Oct. 18,
Hyatt House (We
also have full
jtime openings).
Aflwlff,
Israelis h a d decided " t o (each Syria
the Syrian capital was the objec-
a severe lesson. T h e main part of
tive.
this lesson is that the road f r o m
N.Y.
Apartment mate needed. Large own
room. Near busline. No rent til November.
Call George, 457-4664 and after 11:00
489-4928
Near busline. Call 438-1463
dining
bedroom. Rent and utilities. Call after 8
appealed to the Seeurits
Council
on I hursday to stop the war.
your
weekend.
delivered
Every Tuesday
6:30
P.M.
Meetings held at
the studio in the j
Gym.
|
on
this
campus,
fresh to y o u r
room
REAL
NYC
Albany
b a g e l s ) . A v a i l a b l e in
BAGELS(NOT
a l l v a r i e t i e s . T o p it o f f w i t h lox
8,
cream
cheese,
also
d e l i v e r e d . Donufs fool C a l l 74683
Sun.
anytime
for
Sat.
and
morning delivery.
Israeli television.
the wider
THOUSANDS
THOUSANDS OF
I Come
1
down
and
Campus Center
-STUDENTS
SPECIAL-
[•"gyptian reintorcing operations in
to e n d the l i g h t i n g c o n t i n u e d at hte
tion m a y create."
the S i n a i .
I hey said their artillery
United
Nations.
Golan Heights t a n k a n d i n f a n t r y
" n o detailed solution to suggest."
and vvarplanes were punishing the
powers
remained
see the
tax
264 Central Avo.
Albany
also
reported
heavy
into
to w i p e
the
out a
Sinai
Israeli
as
front
he
soldiers.
I
heroic
loured
I gyptian
trouble
had
grime
Iorces
troops
M A S P A L O M A S ( C A N A R Y ISLANDS) - J 2 8 9
(alio
radio
lias
l%7
claimed
ai as 10 m i l e s i n l o theSiti.itdesert
commando
tour escourt; welcome Sangria party; one sightseeing trip; a n d continental
TO YOUR
breakfast and full dinner every night (choiceof five restaurants in the hotel
CAMPUS
complex), PRICE DOES NOT INCLUDE a n American breakfast (eggs etc.), or
•
any lunches.
1
• H Syracuse Departure is $10 more a n d one day a n d night longer.
AVI
K M I I V I I . M I I I U S
l-KOM 'itil
A
Albany, N.Y. 12203
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 12, 1973
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 12, 1973
thel
the
US
S i d c w n u l e . a n d S p a r r o w air t o a i r
missiles
were
being
shipped
lo
Ihe
United
reported
in
Slates
also
Washington
was
to
be
prepared to h u r r y a r t i l l e n and a n titank
ammunition
to
W,
WAN.
defined
Wednes-
day night as a n a t t e m p t to shove
the Syrians a n d Egyptians beyond
the six-year-old cease-tire lines but
she did n o l say w h e t h e r ihe Jewish
slate
wants
to
capture
more
territory f r o m the A r a b s .
Ihe
Israelis
said they also hit
Syria's
Mediterranean
l.atakia
a n d the Banias sea ter-
port
ol
m i n a l lor a 4 0 0 - m i l e oil pipeline
1 hey c l a i m e d sinking
t w o S y r i a n missile boats and said
their
attack
boats
all
returned
h o m e salely.
Damascus c l a i m e d its shore a r -
Isi ^ * \ t o
replenish I el Aviv's taxed a r s c i u l s .
Meir
tillery and naval delenses took o n
Ihe Isiaelis in a t w o - h o u r sea battle,
sinking eight
Israeli
boats.
I he
indication how far it w o u l d try to
Israelis sank a G r e e k cargo ship
advance a l o n g Ihe 4 0 miles of r o l l -
and d a m a g e d a Japanese vessel, ihe
ing
plains
separating
Damascus
Syrians charged.
I h e I r a q i news
I r o m the G o l a n H e i g h t s , a 1.250-
agency
12
squarc-milearea innortheasj
l a n k s burst i n t o flames when they
1st. a, 1
reported
oil
storage
were hit by the Israelis at Hamas.
D i p l o m a t i c etloits lo I n u l a way
• M-irwu Bgosapgac^acM «•»*•»«'
1
j
j
2. Cift
Golda
Irom Iraq.
'•si .ici i r o m N o r f o l k .
mm/mm®
to discuss input to negotiations
,
REPRESENTATIVE
WANTED
Were looking for part-time
help to promote the campus
mar.ket for film developing.
Our rep will distribute promotional materials, posters,
"free" processing coupons,
etc. No photo experience
necessary.
Good money-maker! Your
efforts backed by college
newspaper ads. Don't pass
this one up.
for master contract and to
IOII.-AK,
receive feedback from statewide
negotiating committee.
•
Mo
Ms Honda lyler
lOOSunrowi Si
Coolville Ohio 4672
Yos, send me the
Room CC 315
ft- • »
12 Noon
information:
s Rime
I Address
I w
1ST
Siito
I College or Unlv
L . . . - - - - - -
j
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
PHONE: (318) 482-5544
Ledger-Star
thai was seized I r o m S y r i a i n i y h / .
raids o n lite westel n
' Further inlo. Call Alumm '#<<• 4i ' -to.*/. </«"'* ""'<''"'
,„ Gary Smyrna,,. 4.S7-4MI7. at mKhi
GROUPS W
Va,
acknowledged
I lie Isiaelis claimed they made
INTERESTED?
COME TO A MEETING:
OCTOBER 18 at 7:30 in LC 24
ford, Jan. 8th from Syracuse
their
DISAGREE
3. Free phone tall to anywhere in
the continental US
DEPARTURES Jan. 5th, 1974 from N e w York.Jan. 6th from Boston or Hart
to t u r n
MAJOR POWERS
1 gyptian lotces h a \ e advanced as
F o r those w h o help: 1 - f r e e dinner
incl. t a x e s 8, services
\\\:L-L\
Premier
Israel's general strategy
published a r e p o r t by the N o r f o l k
I he Tel Aviv c o m m a n d gave n o
DATES:
OCT 29 thru NOV 29
(Mondays thru Thursdays)
'
ucie
Israeli
reply. Hut its official news organs
I2!wmlc-widc
i
PRESENTS:
il any
public
artilleiv duels \ u i h the e n e m y . "
sei/ed the
|
$®Wfr/&&l$%/JkW®M
I \i\ pi
i i o l l u n g a n d claimed ilsloices were
1
Mon-Fri,
loi
•'locked in lieice l a n k battles and
war
I94K.
retrained I r o m
UNCLEAR
the
since the b i r l h of the Jewish stale in
Moscow
It also could spell
I )amasciis
T h e p u r p o s e o l t h e A l u m n i I ' l l O N O I H O N is t o cull „ n
through
as
was in liberate
peninsula l i m n I g\ pi ill llle
o n his
treated
grain ol sand polluted lis
IM.ICI
lank
was
STRATEGY
in
that
litts to resupply Egypt a n d S y r i a
lirepovu'i on ihe S i n a i front.
encins l e d "
the
il!.cll
loss Uii Syria
"c\ci\
with
lad
I he claim nl ,111 Israeli advance
icllccling emo-
friciais
0
w i t h arms l o pursue the w a r , the
1967 victory.
beyond (lie I'M,"' G o l a n cease-lire
saul live mission ol
u s
charged
f o u r t h m a j o r A r a b - I s r a e l i conflict
its celebrated
line would lepieseni a significant
Ins unce
a n d
Soviet U n i o n was c o n t i n u i n g air-
some A r a b capitals
W e are eoiilideni sour ad-
Ismail
terms
Israeli
something ol a m o r a l v i c t o r y in
soldiers, you are
major
in dis-
win
1 hat
0im&to0*0*0*0*0l
DOES N O T INCLUDE ANY F O O D ( except on the p l a n e ) , but a n optional 7
PAGE TWELVE
Alumni
bank ol ihe S u e / I anal i " harass
the hotel; all gratuities, taxes, lips, etc., all b a g g a g o handling, services ol a
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
Cieii
was raging
the
mired
beyond the six days Israel l o o k to
m a i k s a big step o n the m a d to Me-
Willi
goggles a r o u n d his neck and smiled
the battle
tnlinslel
began S a t u r d a y
Hut
agreement over possible cease-lire
Washington
lon
tion,
Ministry
mixed
He
wai
/cvl and elliciciics as before."
reported e t m -
and
ehiel.
vances w ill coin i n or with I he same
fleeing
said an Israeli g u n b o a t sank one ol
came
Egypt's ciiiiini.indei-in-
Y t u n gieal acltieu-iiienl in battle
nil the coast of S y r i a , in w h i c h the
northern
In
u v i M i i g 1 g> pi's hi m o i and dignity
[liiling versions of a naval battle
Greek M e r c h a n t M a r i n e
ment
"Dm
column ol Israeli a r m o r .
Istael a n d Syria
radio hioadeast a state-
Ism.til. w liu soul
C a i r o said that
farther
peninsula
miles
defenses
a b a n d o n e d hv Isreal earlier.
that
Cairo
the Heights. E g y p t i a n tank Iorces
punched
the S u e / C a n a l
Hut the air a n d ground l i g h t i n g
long the S u e / f r o n t . 250 miles f r o m
INFORMATION
6 4 5 C o r t l a n d Street
BROADCASTS
iorces
muniques
CALL O R WRITE
M A R Y ELLEN JUKOSKI
Syrian
com-
tips, taxes, etc.; all b a g g a g e handling; services o l a tour escort. PRICE
Dec. 2 9 t h trip is to the Holiday Inn Hotel, deluxe a n d right on the beach. This
that
Egyptian
brand now deluxe hotel (tennis courts, saunas, etc.,); transfers to a n d Irom
trip sells for 4 3 3 9 .
inside
and
FOR M O R E
H
CAIRO
l o r pledges t o help b u i l d the A l u m n i ( o n l c i e n c c ( ente,
$6.50
8:30A.M.-5:00P.M.
>fv stir',•>'••''*
beyond
Israel's
Syrian
first class C O R A l REEF HOTEL: transfers to a n d f r o m t h e hotel; all gratuities,
REPRESENTATIVE
ignored
hilly area rich w i t h f a r m l a n d s seiz-
Price Includes: round trip jet with moals and t r e e liquor; 6 nights at a
night d i n e - a r o u n d p l a n is a v a i l a b l e at $59 extra.
along a line three or l o u r
Damascus
,
Open:
cor, No. Lake Avo.
air
support.
•
a
Cut
Nov. 30 - $5.00
included.
I g y p l i a n s badly, c o n t a i n i n g t h e m
available.
styling,
v a l u e , now
ALSO
$3.99,
by massive
H e saiu he had
Riga & R.K. products
&
I A carton of CIGARETTES" for
the
VOLUNTEERS
I
NEEDED FOR
I
ALUMNI PHONOTHONf
Shampoo-Razor
| you'll EVER seel
| QNLY
backed
said
fact.
&
LARGEST selection o* earrings
threat to international
breakthrough came after a n a l l - d a y
through
BARRINGS
t i o n today. ( A P ( a b l e p h o t o )
peace a n d security which this situa-
command
Dayan's prediction ol vielorx in
SEIDENBERG
JEWELRY
Is raeli a r m o r e d personnel carrier f o l l o w s a r m o r e d c o l u m n t h r o u g h sands o f S i n a i Desert t o w a r d s Suez C a n a l i n ac-
He
said he was "deeply concerned ai
its ships, killing t w o c r e w m e n .
SUNY BARBERSHOP
Of
his
ed Irom S y r i a in the 1967 w a r .
breakfast
Now
told
soldiers in a report broadcast over
Syria
HOME
Dayan
Israeli air losses.
club
12208)
night this front w i l l be finished off
in our favor,"
and reported
785-3050
Enjoy
K urt
Nations
were h o l d i n g f i r m o n the H e i g h t s , a
l o w as $ 2 5 / m o n t h .
Council
Syria
"Non-
Syria past the 1967 cease-fire line
a p a r t m e n t f o as
Call Chet. 482-7052
LIMITED
P r i o n I n c l u d e : round trip jet with meals a n d free liquor; 7 nights at the
hnre the chalked slogan:
claims of being six miles
r
A complete
Grad student looking for room to rent.
I
room
FROM
ALBANY SHERMAN
FURNITURE RENTAL
Roommate wanted immediately to share
tanks
into
W a k l h c i i n ol the l u l l e d
offensive
living room a n d
S£)J
said
- I think that by t o n i g h t or over-
The
^ 5 j
radio
the offensive
S e e re t a r y - g e n c r a l
personals...
HOUSING
state
leading
EXPECTED
stop to Damascus."
for
Typing done in my home, 482-8432
SPACE
1774 from H a r t f o r d .
I r o m l e i A v t \ to Damascus."
I he
See page 15
Typing done in my home, 869-2474
[Dance
radio quoted
lightning victory b u t did not say if
H A W A I I • $ 3 3 » (Incl. taxes & services)
Departures Dec. 2 9 t h 1 7 7 3 a n d Jan. 14th 1974 from N e w York a n d Jan. 7th
The Israeli state
hint as telling a newsman that the
5765
HURRY
H A W A I I - * 2 9 9 (Incl. t a x e s & service.)
Defense
predicted
Damascus to T e l A v i v also leads
Typing service-prompt, experienced. 439-
**>>»»>>:»»»» > » ' ^ :
TRAVEL,
Damascus.
BREAKTHROUGH
P.M. 465-7455
Contact:
THE
SALTY Q00
leading to
Call Sue, 482-3474
Dec. 3 1 , 1 9 7 3 t o J a n . 8 , 1 9 7 4
Opening Friday, Oct. 12
SIXTY
describe. Call Fran, 7-4720
apartment on Willet St. On the park. Own
SUNYA
John M o r g a n
SSVEN
Found: watch (in LC 7), must be able to
Apartment mate needed. Own room.
Girls needed to do babysitting evenings.
i4m&n&m6>*0'itt0*0*0*<0 4h*& *
I Grand
Gram
SERVICES
914-562-4486 evenings
Car Required
TEACH SYRIA A LESSON
and were r u m b l i n g a l o n g the r o a d
Minister M o s h c D a y a n
lost: Black kitten, white collar. 436-1991
Washington, 98362
graduate. Witling to pay $$$. Call collect
No Selling
command
Large custom-made floor cushions. $20.
wanted for research project. Confiden-
Delivery of advertising
material
3 to 5 hours per week
m
Red & Black CPO jacket at Henway's
Saturday night. Please call David, 7-5023
to vote. Fund raiting and various other ac-
Students - Work
Part-time
military
through S y r i a n defenses T h u r s d a y
volunteers. Campaign worker to man red
phones, door to door educating voter how
Israeli
claimed its tanks blasted their w a y
pay.
career. Serd$3 for information. SEAFAX,
Francisco, C a . 9 4 1 2 6 .
Local Jewish Bakery
offers you Lox«V Bagels p l a i n , s a l t , onion,
sesame, poppy, pump. (cream cheese & butter).
Delivered fresh from our
ovens to your dorm room
door every Sunday morning! To place your order
phone
489-5135
between 9-4 on Sot I
Excellent
Worldwide travel. Perfect summer job or
1971 Honda, 350CB, good condition,
5000 miles, padded sissy bar, helmet
required.
Gordon D Van-Ness candidate for county
tivities.
Vox Jaguar Organ and Vox Essex Boss
LOST & FOUND
WOMEN! JOBS O N SHIPS! No ex-
perience
AP Compilation
The
2241
MEN!-
Israel Claims New
Plunge Into Syria
PAGE THIRTEEN
ZODIAC/ZOWAC/ZOWAC/ZODWC
The Fighting Is
Far From Over
night, thegovernmenthad made the
Associated Press
TEL
tough political decision not to
AVIV AP,- The new Middle East
strike first. He said the governwar enters its sixth day today, but
ment did not want to be hit with
unlike 1967, when the Israeli
new charges of aggression that
military machine at this juncture
might affect relations with the Unhad decimated its Arab foes, the
ited States, its chief arms supplier.
fighting is far front over.
But it was equally apparent that
"It is not going to be a short
the government was not expecting
war," Maj. Gen. Aharon Yariv, the
the Arab attack, which came on
deputy chief of staff, told newsmen
Yom Kippur, the holiest day of the
Tuesday night. "The people of
Jewish calendar. Israel's front-line
Israel can expect no easy and
forces were greatly out-numbered
elegant victories. We will have to
in tanks and troops.
do a lot of fighting."
This time the Egyptian and
It was a different story six years
Syrian air forces also had the
ago on the dawn of the sixth day of
protection of advanced Soviet anbattel. The armies of Egypt and
tiaircraft missiles, installed since
Jordan were defeated. Only Syria,
1967. Spurred by the humiliation
staggering under punishing Israeli
of their defeat six years ago, the
attacks, still held out along the
Arab forces also have been fighting
Golan Heights. By nightfall it, too,
better and with more fervor.
fell.
The Arabs are not shattered on
In the span of six June days,
the sixth day of the new Middle
Israel in lightning series of attacks
East war, and that in itself has
had destroyed more than 400 Arab
almost wiped out the shameful
planes, many of them still on the
trauma of the last war in 1967.
ground, set ablaze or captured 500
Whatever the eventual outcome
tanks, killed more than 20,000
of the new fighting, just the fact
soldiers, and captured thousands
that the Egyptian and Syrian armore. The Sinai Desert was a tank
mies are still shooting today is a
graveyard as Egyptian soldiers fled
source of cautious Arab pride after
across the Suez Canal.
six years of living with the taste of
This time Israel's forces find
humiliation.
themselves entagled in a savage
On the last day of the six-day
struggle against a stubborn Egypwar in 1967, the Arab armies lay
tian army in the Sinai desert and a
p r o s t r a t e , their w e a p o n s
determined Syrian force on the
destroyed, their men dead or pennGolan Heights.
ed behind the barbed wire or Israeli
Since the Arabs attacked last
prison camps.
Saturday, Israel's losses have been
Israel had made a mockery of the
Arrow indicates where Israel claimed its ground forces pierced Syria's Golan Heights defenses Thursday and
high not only in tanks and planes,
boastful threats uttered only a
but also in the lives of its young
advanced six miles beyond the 1967 cease-fire line to battle retreating Syrian troops on the road to Damascus.
week before by the leaders ol
men.
(AP Wirephoto Map)
Egypt, Syria, Iraq, Jordan and
Israel's costlyl and complicated
other countries. Sinai, Ihe Golan
system of fortified bunkers along
Heights and the west bank of the
the Suez Canal, the Bar-Lev Line,
Nasser expelled Ihe U.N. peace
Jordan River were lost, and the
was all but demolished. The Egypforce from the Sinai Desert and
Moslem shrines of East Jerusalem
I'he> are hopelul that Hie> can
tians regained the entire east bank
Thursday evening, over 50
closed the liian Strait leading to
were under the control ot the Jews.
of the canal, driving the Israelis
Albany Stale students showed up lease Stindas when dads Iliyhts
southern Israel. He virtually inBut as dawn broke on Ihe sixth
three to 10 miles back before they
ai the Albany Jewish Community will be inking oil trom .11 K lmei
vited the Israelis to strike. Worse
day of the new war, the Egyptians
could extabiish a new defense line.
Center to volunteer to work in national Airport, bin 1m ni;in\ it
still,
Egypt.
Syria
and
Jordan
had a foothold in Sinai, having
But why wasn't the speedy
Israel. They will work in Kibbut- week's wail will be necessary,
papered
over
their
leuds
only
days
driven the Israelis out ol their first
r\rrangemcnts are being made
success of 1967 duplicated?
zim, fa-dories, farms, medical
belore the war began and luught
line of defense on the Suez Canal.
In a word, surprise.
facilities or wherever they are need- through ShenM l a Am in New
The Syrians, who gave up their with practically no coordination.
The Israelis used it to victorious
ed to take the place ol Israelis Ynik Anyone interested should
vaunted fortifications in two days
This time. Presidents Anwar
advatage in 1967 with their precontact /vi Abbo ol the Judaic
called up to tight.
in 1967, still were slugging it out Sadal of Egypt and Hafez Assad of
emptive attack on the Arabs. On
They will he committed to work Studies Department or Steve Shaw
with the Israelis across the Golan Syria evidently coordinated their
the first day Israel won complete
for six months and pay their own at the Jewish Students Coalition
Heights.
, military moves in advance and in
aerial superiority!
fable in the Campus Center.
air fare (approximately $420.00).
In 1967, President Gamal Abdel secret.
This time, Yariv said Tuesday
„
MBUHMHHMawaPt
SUNYA Students Ready To Leave
CAMPUS CENTER
SNACK BAR
1/2's of BEER For Sale
for your dorm parties
Friday, October 19
SUNYA Gym
E
a
©
en
••
Budweiser - $18.00 + tax
Rheingold - $15.50 + tax
Budweiser - $17.00 +tax - 4 or more
TWO Days Notice
on All Orders
$5.00 deposit on tap equipment
$10.00 deposit on each 1/2 purchased
00
w
j
ana
Six Paks for sale nitely at S pm
$1.55 f tax -each
PAGE FOURTEEN
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
(7.NS) Sex-movie star l.inda
I civelace ot "Deep I hroat" lame
has hied lor divorce Irom her husb.ind i.l ivuncars.t'hailes Iravnor
Colitoimo Dreamer-
H „ „ a dam., good Irme hell yeah'
No belle, br.thdoy pres.nl lhan 10 scy
we re 3glad you won't huve tobedreamin'
'
anymore
Bubo el Cimex
love ya.
[A.
Dear loose Ellen.
, ,
,.
1 ,
. D ,.,
Stop gettmg iaiutktn ooned. Reality n
for O'usif who con handle it
lia, ha}
Love
Puppieee
Van Ren men aren't worth a buck.
Dutch Women
...
..
Sam. This is Dick. I knew about everything right from the start. Prove
il. This tape will self-destruct in five seconds"...Poof!
coffee from 1.1.1 -Canteen vending machines: stay at hotels and
motels »u tied by l.l.l -Sheraton;
rent an I I.l.-A\is car; purchase
books from I I , 1 's Hobbs-Merrill
publishing division: or attend one
Christmas
It couldn't have happened to a nicer
Toy make me smile
love.
D M F.
,._
Kentucky
H29-924,
I mus) see yolJ
Vuai Mr H
, , - , . .
Congratulutioni! You tound it! Aren t
,.._.,
. ,
,
,,
«o,, thrilled?
you don't
sticlc with
well, you
know' IfWhy
youme
try it?
Love,
"D"
Dearest Onch,
Larry
4654111
time
together
is
beoutitul-
St Matthew & St Brian-
Take my hand-
Please pick upihe new batch My socks
Love,
Shorty
Happy Birthday Cmdy'
beautiful
Our
wheiever it is! I love you,
Talley
We've a lifetime.
Dear Sarah
Sincerely,
Ranger
.
Happy 18th Birthday Hope your doy .b
Hi Punk,
ol l.l.T.'s technical and business
schools.
When you die. you're sale: I . I T .
has no; gone into the luneral
business . . . yet.
Congratulations Spiro,
H o p p , B.ol.do,'
(con't)
PERSONALS
***
(Z.NS) - It's almost impossible to
escape the corporate tentacles of
1. I.l, these days.
According to the University of
Wisconsin Economics Department, you can buy a home and live
in one ol I. I . l . -Levitt's planned
communities; you can buy furnishings lor your new home with
loans Irom an I I , I. subsidiary;
you can fertilize your lawn with
1,1.1. Scott fertilizer; you can insure your home with l.T.l.Hartlord 1 ire insurance; and you
can buy hie insurance Irom
another I.I.I, subsidiary
II that's not enough, sou can invest your savings in I.l. I .Hamilton management mutual
I u nds: m unch on
I.I.IC'onimental bakery products such
as Wonder Bread and Hostess
Cupcakes: devour an 1.1.1Smiihheld ham. buy cigarettes and
are worn out
C.SW
Inc. VP
iust like QUI Inendihip,
love Ya
Love
Both Pot, Gary. Yolanda & BE
Bunches
H E I L M A N S COLONIC
m CENTER
*&*
^B>
OPPOSITI
MACY S
459-2170
T H E A T R E
NOW SHOWING
JEANS
'Love Story"...
'Romeo and Juliet'
Brushed Denim and Corduroy
Reg. to $10. - Now $5.99
Now $3.99
&
o
3
<D
O
o
^ 3
1 10ft. HOOK AND | n
o
O
I THE MEDICINE t
t
SHOW
|
luiiikil by tiutUrn muciBtion
CLASSIFIED
***
Ms. Lovelace, in a petition with
a Los Angelescourt, cited"irreconciliablc differences" as the
problem. Her petition did not
elaborate on what the irreconciliable differences were.
Assorted Colors
3
o
***
(7.NS) - The more medical
researchers learn about pot. the
more the illegal weed seems to be a
wonder drug.
Various doctors have recenlK
reported using pot to treat the eye
disease glaucoma, to lesson the
symptoms ol the common cold and
even to reduce tooth decay.
Sow, a team ol physicians at the
University ol Pennsylvania
Hospital are conducting tesls to see
if marijuana might be used as a
general anesthetic during surgery
Iwelvc volunteers are currently
undergoing tests where extracts of
marijuana are injected into the
blood stream.
Doctor Theodore Smith, who is
heading up the research, reports
that many surgery patients are
currently being given a combination of tranquilizers to calm them,
narcotics and barbiturates to
sedate them and belladonna to
counteract the harmful effects ol
the other two drugs.
Doctor Smith says that concentrated marijuana appears to perform all three (unctions. He
predicts that in a year's time, manlu.ma extracts might be used instead n! the other drugs
Doctor Smith admits that there
is at le.ist one nutating side elleel
Irom the marijuana-anesthetic experiments: He say st hat most of the
subjects emerge Irom ilieir marijuana induced trances ravenously
hungry
TURTLENECKS
1 JOHN MAVALL 1
¥
(ZNS)- The Grateful Dead will
release their latest L.P. - titled
"Wake of the Flood" - in midOctober.
The new album is the first record
ever to be produced and released
by the Dead's newly-formed company called Grateful Dead
Records. The album consists of entirely new material that was recorded at the group's studio in
Sausalito, California.
The Dead are planning a midWest tour beginning on October
17th to coincide with the L.P.'s
release.
3
n
a
$5 w/out
3
Tickets only $2 with tax
Tickets on sale CC Lobby 1 0 - 2
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 12, 1973
FLANNEL SHIRTS
All Plaids
Now $4.99
BAGGIES
'Jeremy^
Special Selection
0
25% • 50% Off
COME IN AND SEE OUR HEADGEAR DEPT
LARGEST SELECTION
Elliott Kastner pirwnii"Jeremy"
Wuiiin .mil Diirdr-il IK, Arthur Barron
SidMint: Kobby Benson inijoriuunn Glyr.nis O'Connor
MUMC l»v Lee Holdridge l'io< ed by George Pappas
United Arhsls
A Kenassct Film production
21 Central Ave. 434-3639
Northway Mall 459
("ORIGINAL MOTION PICTURE StORL ALBUM A Tltt HIT SINGLE |
\ "BLUE BALLOON AVAILABLE ON UNITED ARTISTS HLCOWrJS
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 12, 1973
iDix
'ID'S
StudentsSun. -Fri-
Effl
~i=-*(£3&
PAGE FIFTEEN
Ave. entrance to uptown campus.
anytime.
Hall, 8:00 p.m. C C Ballroom.
* **
Protest the
Jews
Oppression
- Rally
at
# * #
* **
of
Temple
Soviet
Israel
on
information
W e need people who like to talk • on
M o n d a y , Oct. 15th. Buses provided
n e e d e d tor the Alumni
from 4 p.m. to 5 p.m. a t the A d -
beginning
ministration Circle. For more info, call
refreshments will b e served a n d t h e r e
29.
Campus
IS THERE ANYTHING1CAN DO?
information a n d student events. In-
Phonothon,
October
Services:
Center Information Desk for general
the phone, that is. Volunteers a r e
fone:
Dinner
for
questions
on
university
policies a n d procedures. SUNYA Line
Joel Passick at 4 5 7 - 5 1 6 7 . Sponsors.-
will b e a gift for those who help. In-
for daily campus events of g e n e r a l in-
JSC - Hillel Soviet Jewry Committee.
terested? Call 457-4631 during t h e
terest.
Yes. You can reach out to demonstrate your solidarity w i t h the people of Israel.
d a y , 4 5 7 - 4 3 0 7 a t night.
fnfernafionaf
dayOct. 19,at5:30p.m.atthePoltsh
Team:
Community Center, Washington A v e .
Majors & Minors
a n d Rapp Rd.
* **
There will b e a meeting of the Society
of P h y s i o Students
of
the
Nuclear
Accelerator
Laboratory will follow the meeting.
has b e e n
jors, a r e welcome.
Attention Sou students: Our
next
1 2 6 , 7 p.m.
A l b a " by Alejandro Casona. Cost is
Student Association.
$ 8 . 0 0 . M e e t i n g will b e on M o n . Oct.
-
the
first
meeting
of
the
will
a
meeting
of
Linguistics Colloquium on M o n d a y ,
Chemistry Club on Oct. 1 7 a t 6 : 3 0 i n
the
Humanities
Refreshments will be served. Funded
from
354.
Faculty
different
members
departments
at
Chemistry
Reading
UNIVERSITY
Seniority
Oct.
To ensure that you may meet with
as soon as
drug
with DA Arnold Prosktn, DACC
Brown, on Tuesday, October 16, 1973
in CC Ballroom from 1 • 3 p.m. SponEarth.
by Student Association.
linguistics.
19-21 w e e k e n d . Cost: $19 in-
cludes round
trip a n d
comodations.
Sign up at CC 3 3 5 .
will
have
an
3 d a y ac-
You.
your academic adviser before your
scheduled
date
for
drawing
class
you must schedule an appointment
JSC-Hillel
is sponsoring i- w e e k e n d
Mo Dippikillon
October 2 6 - 2 8 . Cost is
with your adviser by October 1 9 t h ,
Appointment
books
are
now
$ 3 . 0 0 for members a n d $5.00 for
available in the University College.
non-members on a first come, first
EOP students a r e reminded that they
must see their EOP counselor
meeting with their University College
tickets for the Parents'
(Transportation will be provided.)
Weekend
7-7883
if
you
want
to
go.
C h i l d r e n ' s T h e a t e r Touring Ensem-
must have a ticket.
ble
presents Gertrude Stein's Frist
Student Affairs Council of University
Are you interested in discussing social
Cometo a Succofh p a r t y on Sunday,
Information and applications for the
pus for student approval of PIRG.
Senate, please call Kurt at 7 - 3 0 6 1 .
influences
October 14, at 7 p.m. Israeli dancing
October
Regents
Meeting will be M o n d a y , October 15,
We
need students for
Drop by BA 115 on Thursday nights at
for
at 7 p.m. in the basement of O n e i d a -
this committee. Please call 5-7 or 10-
7 P M for a n informal g r o u p . This is an
in
O n o n d a g a . There will be a meeting
12 p.m.
ideal opportunity
Osteopathy
Tuesday, October 16, at the same
Scholarship
Examination
Professional
Medicine,
Education
Dentistry
or
in choosing
a
career?
for anyone con-
cerned with career influences.
are available in University College
time and place, for those who can't
People are needed-to Trick or Treat
ULB 36. APPLICATION DEADLINE Oct.
attent Monday's meeting.
for UNICEF,
l a n g u a g e in Education - A lecture
sponsored
by
EDUCATION
TESL
paign
Interested Folk
/BILINGUAL
PROGRAM,
DEPART-
do
Trick or Treat
cam-
Office of Education - October 15, 4 - 6
p.m., LC 20: Hernan La Fontaine, Executive
Administrator,
Bilingual
Education, New York City Board of
Education: "Bilingual Education a n d
Halloween
Anyone interested in Volunteering in
the
Community
Service
Program
for UNICEF.
please call the Community Service
Other
Contact Office (7-4801) or stop by in
and
tribute
The Pre-Law
Society will sponsor a
en Espdtfol con musica salsa. Es por el
bus to the exam if there is sufficient
F M radio WFLY. Los invitamos que es-
interest. Please sign your name to the
cuchen y envien noticias d e la Univer-
list in CC 346 if you need a ride.
sidad.
groups
parties?
of
planning
Can
the
you con-
earnings
sure you come<to o n e !
thousands of immigrants we have helped to bring to
Israel, including a g e d
3-5 p.m. Bring your m e a l cards.
newcomers.
handicapped and unabsorbed
. .::.. I
Community
Service
William
For
People
poems on Tuesday, October 23, at 4
from
NYC
p.m., in the Humanities Lounge (Hu
the 9:00 or 10:00 Trailways out of
354). The event is under sponsorship
NYC, there will be a Western Ave.
of the English department.
bus waiting to pick you up at 11:50
Everson
will r e a d from his
a n d Big Sister Programs. Call Mrs
October
n e e d e d lor Big Brothe
ty on 5unday, Oct. 14, a t 7:00 p.m. in
returning
to
SUNYA
Quad
Record
Co-op
open
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 12
every Thursday 5:30 - 7:30.
on Sun. nifes, a n d take
up Western
downtown
Ave. to
campus,
Draper
and
Hall,
Please note: GRAFFITI
IFG presents: CUL-DE-SAC
DEADLINES
; •404904
N e e d a friend? A friendly ear?
p a p e r - 10 p.m. W e d .
Western
on
place to rap? Call the 5 3 0 0
by
Earth
Switchboard
with
*44944444tf444e40*40*44440*444444004000440444440*44040
i
/
Middlt
an)
guest lecturer Steven Richter, Tues-
problem. If w e can't h e l p , we'll refei
day Oct. 16, 4:00 p.m., CC Assembly
to someone
Food Service has
\-l-.\-4
Mull
Op wrung Nig hi
<x*u2 Fr,
.. .. f
weak Sun -tT
$£
To pull off a job no one would ewer dare,
you need a team no one would ever believe.
fftSTOJI HdJU) rlKWtS
IWIWHJN
Itt
ira«*XL0R»
AWW.ONTHJIUt
*tl6
^AU
- d'™er
10 am to 5 pm
STATE FAIR 11 am to 3 pm CC Gardens
TOWER EAST cine cum laude... presents: 2001
2nd HIT WEEK
for all university guests.
(SI
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 13
COMMUNITY - UNIVERSITY DAY
...
Bulltmui IM. Silmh
HELD OVER!
LC 1
FOR ALL THESE, PARENTS GET IN FOR FREEI
Having company for the weekend?
Tired of scrounging for food?
who can. Give a call
NitrtliwiiN
7:15 and 9:45
TOWER EAST cine cum laude.... presents:
2 0 0 1 : A SPACE ODYSSEY 7:00 and 10:00 LC 7
ALBANY STATE CINEMA presents: LAST OF
THE RED HOT LOVERS 7:30 and 9:30 LC 18
For Tuesday's p a p e r - 1 0 p.m. Sun.
For Friday's
Seaver at 4 6 5 - 2 3 6 1 .
House.
Meditation
G a m m a invite all
university women t a n D o u g h n u t par-
Registration
November 5 - November 9.
sary o f t h e T u r k i s h Republic
lecture
Thesisters olPsi
break!
All those interested please
a n d 12:50 at the p l a z a . This bus goes
p.m. Sayfes International
8 p.m., to be held in Ten Eyck Hall.
V a n Rennselear Hall: Take a study
call Claire, 7-3003 or Jim, 7-5350.
( IM
PAGE SIXTEEN
ment sheet, until Thurs. Nov. 1. M a k e
to
Volunteers
Transcendental
AH student subscriptions
$ 1 2 for a l l 8 p e r f o r m a n c e s
S i n g l e ticketsall students: $ 2 . 0 0
Send check with letf addressed
stamped
envelope
to
Albany
Symphony,
19 Clinton
Avenue,
A l b a n y , New Vork, 12207 or c a l U 6 5
Service
tinue, as indicated on your require-
Commemoration of the 50th anniver-
introductory
Saturday October 13
at 8:30
Palace Theatre
SCHUMANN Manfred
IVES Symphony No. 2
BEETHOVEN
Symphony No. 5
makes possible care and assistance for hundreds of
in the lower
lounge of Ten Eyck Hall Friday from
State
15 - 16 (Monday and Tuesday) 8:00
its general membership meeting Fri-
party with APA
Evaluation
Are any Q u a d Boards or
1.00 depending on
CSEA SUNY at Albany 691 is having
Group
presenta Los Domingos a Las
Dos d e la Tarde un p r o g r a m a radial
Clubs & Meetings,
Community
Students:
Seminars begin Sat. Oct. 2 0 a n d con-
some
UNICEF?
so is
campaign
student
Halloween
LCB 30B.
Albany
is coming
S l i N Y A ' s Trick or Treaf
El Santa A n a Puerto ftican Club de
how many students sign up.
sorori-
C r e a m Social, Sunday, Oct 14 from 6Attention
Seniors taking the SLAT on Oct 20:
C h a r g e 50a *
The sisters of Chi SigmaTheta
ty invite all university w o m e n to an Ice
Claire, 7-3003 or Jim, 7-5350.
English as a Second Language in
N e w York City."
continuation of great humanitarian programs. The f u n d
Thesisters o f C h i S i g m a T h e fa sorori-
For information call
MENT OF INSTRUCTION, SUNY AT
ALBANY, with support from the U.S,
Official Notice
lost y e a r raised $ 6 0 0 ; can w e
it again?
"Contributions to the Israel Emergency Fund assure the
around the Succah. Refreshments.
h
man collection tables at
lings SyNYA's
DON'T WAIT. Help n o w w h i l e there is still t i m e ! Keep the promise.
Send your check or better still, bring it yourself to the Campus Center,
Saturday and all next week, October 13 through 19. Or mail your
check to Israel Emergency Fund, Box 369BB, SUNYA via Campus Mail
ty invite all university women to a
the campus center a n d at the dinner
19.
You can play a historic role in these hours of crisis. How? By bringing your check... bringing your cash dollars to the table set up in the
Campus Center for the Israel Emergency F u n d /
school ID a n d $1 for all children.
financial
desperately
of the
What To Do-
Sat. Oct. 13 at 8 p.m. in the
15
Studio Theater. Admission $1 with
meeting for all those who have sign-
1973
Committee
adviser.
e d up, or desire, to petition the cam29,
Aids
before
* **
this Sunday, October 14 a t
10 a . m . Each person who attends
You can encourage the people of Israel w i t h your dramatic response.
STUDENTS:
Affects
at
Any students interested in serving on
organization
COLLEGE
Registration
cards for the Spring, 1974 semester,
Limited space for 80 persons.
Reader
PIRG
Assoc, a n -
Don't forget to pick up your free
SUNYA will present papers reflecting
their interests in several areas of
Students
served basis. Contact M a u r y or Carol
Breakfast
room.
You can show your identification w i t h the people of Israel.
of the Campus Center (across from
nounces the annual trip to Montreal.
457-4307
•••'• m
w e need
SUNYA D e a n of Student Affairs Neil
the
October 15, 1973, at 7:45 p.m. in
At
International
at
s o r e d b y Middle
be
Lunch.
Chief Counsel David Diamond, a n d
del
welcome.
There
Kosher
Sussman
Phonothon
Students a n d Faculty are invited to
attend
drop it in the "gripe box" in the Lobby
and
your responses soon. Please call G a r y
law
15, 7:30 p.m. in Hu 290. All a r e
COLLOQUIUM
T r a d i t i o n a l Service at 9 : 3 0 a.m. with
info desk).
Panel discussion on the N e w
on th&Spanish C l u b trip to NYC Nov.
restaurant a n d see "La D a m a
Fri. 1 0 - 12. Come in, or fill it out and
C h a p e l House, on hill, beyond g y m .
possible.
nterest
and repair. Refreshments. Funded by
morning
Kiddush;
uptown soccer field.
for those interested in going
4. W e will have lunch at a Spanish
a r e M o n . 1:30 - 3:00, Tues. 1 - 2, and
Saturday
with
on the
about Alumni
PYE meeting M o n d a y , Oct. 15, FA
17, 8 p.m., Hu 354, on oral structures
C o m m i t t e e . Office hours in CC 308
p.m.
To all groups who received letters
speaker will b e Dr. Fisulo, W e d . Oct.
friday
Service a t 7:30 p.m.
Creative
Shacharit
located a t the studio, in the g y m .
meeting
JSC-Hiffef S a b b a t h services:
Night
Players, please show up!
There will be a n important
* **
Got a Gripe? Bring it to G r i e v a n c e
scheduled for Sunday Oct. 14 a t 4
D a n c e C/ub - 6:30 p.m. every Tues. -
All students, especially science ma-
LINGUISTICS
next g a m e
Soccer
on Thursday,
October 18, at 7:30 p.m. in Ph 129. A
tour
Our
Students'
^§
• I
7:00and 10:00 LC 7
PIZZA PARLOR with a Dixie Land Band SPONSORED B* CLASS OF 19/5
CC Cafeteria 9.30 to 1:00 am Pizza and Beer will be sold.
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 14
BREAKFAST WITH THE PRESIDENT
CC Ballroom
y O N S O B t o B» UASSEb Ol
good on all quad dinner lines
10:00 am
74. 75, 76, and 11
toih (J"'>°" must p r m . n l o rukol foi . n r r a n r . lo
hteMmt
pick them up: Mon. - Frl. 9 - 5 pm
Fulton Hall 108 - State Quad
/I
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
sponsored by special events board
not available for sale on dinner lines
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 12, 1973
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 12, 1973
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
PAGE SEVENTEEN
Cagers Begin
by
by U»r»e,v K °J* B
Kenneth Ardulno
Last Tuesday the professional basketball season started. Here is a quick
rundown on the prospects of the teams.
NBA
East
BOSTON: The Celtics with Cowans, White and Havlicek should take
the division. Their starters are fine but depth might be lacking. Another
question mark is can they beat the Knicks in the playoffs.
NEW YORK: The starting five is back even though Monroe is presently
injured. The depth is there too. Age might be a problem but experience and
pride should propel.
"BUFFALO: With new faces MacMillian and DeGregorio joining
McAdoo the talent is there, but experience isn't. Lack of depth will be a factor.
PHILADELPHIA: Doug Collins will help but the team is still poor. No
big guy; no depth. Inevitably they will be better than last year as they can't
be worse.
Capital Bullets: The teamwork teamwork should be much improved.
Hayes, Unseld and Riordan are an impressive front. Clark will play all
year. Lack of depth and a new coach might hurt.
ATLANTA: Maravich and Hudson are allstars. Bellamy is getting old
and no backup is in sight.
Houston: Walker and Marin give a good offensive but Otlo Moore is no
champion center.
CLEVELAND: Carrand Wilkins are great guards bui what are they going to do for rebounds. Too many question marks up front.
West
CHICAGO: Love, Walker, Sloan and Van Lier arc a tough four. They
seem to get enough out oftheirthree centers. Depth is better than average.
MILWAUKEE: Jabbar and Dandrigge are scorers and the Big O is
healthy. If he stays that way they will be tough. The bench is questionable.
DETROIT: Lanier is super but the rest of the team is barely adequate.
K. C. OMAHA: Archibald would get even more assists if he had
somebody to pass to.
GOLDEN STATE: The key is Kevin Joyce, if he can run the team they
should wiry if not they won't be championship material. Barry, Thurmond
and Mullins are the central points with Russel off the bench.
L.A.: Without Wilt they are hurting. Smith is a decent but an inexperienced center. MacMillian's scoring will be missed. West and Goodrich
must score heavily.
PHOENIX: Hawkins and Scott are great players but too bad Ihcy don't
play as a team.
SEATTLE: Bill Russell must turn the team into a cohesive unit.
Haywood becomes the center but how good of support will he gel.
PORTLAND: The run and shool machine led by Petrie. Too bad
nobody plays defense.
ABA
ic Danes Ready For
Canadiens Should Take Cup
by Bruce Maggin
How can a hockey team lose one
of the top goaltenders in the NHL
and still be odds on favorites to
repeat as Stanley Cup Champs?
The Montreal Canadiens lost
goaltender Ken Dryden, who left
for a law practice, but Les
Canadiens should remain on top of
the NHL. Montreal has more
depth than any other team in the
league and should be able to
replace Dryden and some of the
other skaters who jumped to the
rival league. Michel Plasse, Wayne
Thomas and Michel Laroque are
ftibbed to replace Dryden.
If Stanley Cups were decided on
paper then the New York Rangers
would probably have a shelve full
of them.
Unfortunately the
Rangers have failed to even win
once. Every year the Blueshirts
find anolher way to lose or come
up with another excuse for losing
other than thai of choking. Tills is
because [here are no real
weaknesses on this team. Maybe
new coach Larry Popcin can
turn pcrenial bridesmaids into
brides.
The Boston Bruins once again
face the same problem they have
faced in yearspasttlack of goaltending. Right now Gil Gilbert is the
top netmindcr and only time will
tell whether the situation will improve. There is also Ihe question of
Phil Esposito coming of I a knee
operation.
The Buffalo Sabres have made
great strides in only three years of
existence, primarily due to some
smart draft picks. The big problem
may be dissenlion on Ihe club as
many players don't get along with
'72-'7.1 coach of the year Joe
Crorier.
Last year was a disaster for the
Toronto Maple Leafs but this year
could be different.
General
Manager Jim Gregory has completely revamped the goaltending
situation, getting veterans Doug
Favell, Ed Johnston and Dune
Wilson. If some of the Leaf rookies
can develop, then Toronto might
just sneak back into the playoff picture.
The Detroit Red Wings missed
the playoffs by two points last year
and probably haven't improved
themselves enough to make it this
year. The netminding situation is
still shaky. New Coach Ted Garvin
should have his hands full this year.
The most improved team in the
league this year could be last year's
big losers, the New York Islanders.
With Ihe arrival ol highly touted
number one draft pick Denis Potvin. the Islanders are not going to
he patsys ol the league any more.
I he team has been very impressive
in exhibition play with many of the
younger players performing quite
well.
Ihe Vancouver Canucks should
ball le California tor I he worsl lea in
in the league honors. One plus for
the Canucks is in the goaltending
department with the addition of
Gary Smith Ironi Chicago lor Dale
Tallion.
The Chicago Blackhawks losi
more quality players to Ihe WIIA
this year then any team oilier than
Montreal.
Ihe loss ol Pat
Stapleton and Ralph Backstrom
should hurt but there is slill enough
talent here to take the western division title. The addition ol Dale
Tallion should help.
ThePhiladelphia Livers were the
surprise team of Ihe league last year
with a hard hitting style
remenscient of the Boston Bruins.
The big change for this year is in
the goal with Bernie Parent returning and Doug Favell going to
Toronto. This could backfire.
The Minnesota North Stars
might make a run for the top this
year with the addition of Fred
Stanfield from the Bruins. The
Stars possess some fine veteran
talent. Gump Worsley is back for
another shot in the net.
The St. Louis Blues have never
missed the playoffs but they will be
in a big battle to make them again
this year. The Blues hopes rest in
rookie goaltender John Davidson.
The defense corps have been
slrenghened with Ihe addition ol
Don Awrey. obtained recemiv
from the Bruins.
The I.os Angles K ines ha\ c been
building loi the l.i-l tew w.ns ami
might make live plusolls ilns veal
Coach Bob Plllkiid bus a voting
club bin is k'd b\ u'lcran
goaltender Rogatien Vaehou.
The Pittsburgh Penguins missed
Iht playoffs lasl year and wil have
trouble making themthis year. I he
defense is very weak and a backup
goaltender most belound for Jim
Rutherford.
1 he Atlanta blames were some
whal of a suprise last year but will
not be taken so lightly this year.
Rookie lorn l.ysiak should
provide alot of scoring punch.
Atlanta is very strong in Ihe goal
and Ikr.iietieollrionisa real
competitor.
1 he California Seals have been
ihe problem child ol IbeN HI since
their inception.
General
Manager-Coach hreddie Glover is
slill looking for a coach to replace
himself. I he minuses far out weigh
the pluses but thev do haven young
gulsly goaltcndei in (ill Melodic
Optimism is perhaps the
most appropriate word t o
describe the feeling of the
Albany Great Danes football
S m as they ready themselves
o r game number four of the
,973 season, the opponent beL
hometown
rival
Siena
College. This attitude, which
Z permeated al. of the Danes
radices, is a direct resul ol
L , week's slaughter ol a
hichly-ovcrmatched Niagara
University s q u a d by the
these statistics: The Siena
quarterback. Skip Carte, has
amassed big yardage in the two
games thus far, throwing 52
times and completing better
than 50 percent of his passes.
He has four touchdown completions to his credit, while
neither Niagara nor Hudson
Valley was able to sack him for
a loss. Bob Denmcn heads what
appears to be a competent run-
ridiculous score of 75-9.
Commenting on the victory,
in which the Danes gained 583
yards, coach Bob Ford said:
'•The first unit played almost
flawlessly-l Ihink the defense
was almost to the point where
wcinishcil Inst year." But l-urd
is also cautious, for he noted
with a I ing ol dismay the excessive number of fumbles
which once again plagued the
team. Although they had no
consequence as far as the
Niagara game went, they could
move to he very costly against a
good team like Siena which, according to f o r d , "is 100 percent.
better than they were last year."
And that statement should
not betaken lightly, in view of
Grid
by the Blonde Bombshell
After a super 11-2 week for a 3517 record we Iry it again.
Buffalo over Baltimore by 7.
O..I. right, O..I. left and O..I. over
the middle. Baltimore can't match
his running yardage wilh Iheirown
passing yardage.
Atlanta over Chicago by 2.
Atlanta needs a quarterback but
should have enough running to
INDIANA: The Champs are back and are about due to win 1 heir division control the ball. The Bear's dreams
lor a change.
are over.
UTAH; Ihcy are gelling old so they will have lo conserve energy I or playDallas by 2 over I..A. All things
offs.
must end and it Slaubach can stay
SAN DIEGO: The uncoachable Wilt is now coaching. With him alcenter alive Ihe Cowboys should squeak il
out. If they don't score TD's forget
it's possible for the newcomers to win it all.
DENVER: They are good but the division is loo tough. Ralph Simpson Ihe kicking game.
leads Ihem on.
Denver over Houston by 1. I wo
SAN ANTONIO: Moving from Dallas to San Antonio doesn't change
ihe I earn.
^RminiwiuiuiiumnitmiiiiiiuiiiiiimMiniiiiiiaanMMM«nnHH«MitaHnniManiiMiw4HMii
luiiiiiiiiMiMMiiiuiniiitinimiimiiiiiHHiiiitiiiiHnwiiiiri
JSC-H1LLEL SOVIET JEWRY COMMITTEE
like the Dolphins.
St. Louis over Philadelphia by K
The Cards gel back on Ihe Hack
after two straight losses. Playolt
visions die with a loss,
Oakland over San Diego by 9.
The Raiders offense will find itself
while Johnny llnilas might be
sealed.
New York over Washington by
3. Bel ore you laugh. Johnson and
Clements are expected back
and alter Washington's unimpressive ollense the Giants have a
Miami over Cleveland by 7. I he
Dolphins will he challenged bin
they slill have enough lo heal a
team thai barely heal the Giants
PAGE EIGHTEEN
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
CN I M
I)|Vf:R KWAI
playei
(and
t he next home mali.li is
scheduled loi Naluidas against Si.
l.mrcncc |-"or a line exhibition ol
u , n n „ ,,hdn\ win no! come and
roul I or the team al ihe Dutch quad
a H I | ., h ,„ ,, ., m
Presents
^ *
(j)
* Chug - A Mug is at the comer of
* Vly Rd. and Watervliet Shaker
: Rd. (Rt.
(Rt. 115)
115) in
in uoiome
Colonie
S,Rd.
Mixed
Drinks 50<P
W e d . - S o u r H o u r - Your
favorite sour 65C
Thurs.-WineNite-AJi
Wi ne
brinks
'/iiprioo
Fri.-Happy Hour3PM8 PM Redu ced Prices
*
i*
#
#
#
F r i . & S a t . N i t e - Live
Folk M u s i c
--
!
*******************************
PAGE NINETEEN
ALBANY STUDEN- PRESS
NO ADMISSION CHARGE
i,v,v.v.v.y.v,v.v.vW.%vs:.:.y^^
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 12, 1973
*
Mon. - S p o r t s Nite
#
Come watch the game 2
Mugs25<PFreeMunchieSQ
Tues. - Ladies Nite - Girls #
Pizza
Sandwiches
LC2
|
I K'-.pitf ihe losing record, coach
l'cgg\ Mann asserts that she is \ ei \
pleased with the level ol plus and
competitive spirit hei team has
been showing, and is looking
lonvaid to the remaining matches
v\nil gieat optimism.
CHUG-A-MUG
Clams
7:00 PMand 10:00 PM
Mayor Erastus Corning
Monday, October l5.More Info call Joel Passick at 457-5167
singles
Saturday, October 13
Speakers include
Buses provided from 4 p m - 5 pm at the Administration Circle on
1 MSI
8 pm Midnight
the OPPRESSION OF SOVIET JEWS
RALLY AT TEMPLE ISRAEL
\i\iuisi (he I' imciMtv ol Ycimont
lliu'c singles plawis ptuveded the
spail in .1 close deleai: bran
Stluilbeig. I oui.se tovilt. and I'at
I'odgotski, uho showed nerves ol
sled as she won in a liebieaker in
the ihud set libaca lived up to it's
upiii.iiion. winning all hut two
singles in.itches and winning 5-2
I one uctoiicslni Mh;in\ were b>
I muse I "Mil and I'at I'ndgniski.
(ilovwnskv has recenth recovered
limn an injury and hopelulK she
slum Id return in her winning \va\s.
as u ill (aplain Carol Hovwi and Jill
1 men. who have been playing
shongei as the season progresses
********************* **********
Fri. night
Oct. 12
PROTEST
Whatever the outcome of the
game, it should be quite interesting, especially since there
are lew teams on the
Dane's schedule who throw the
ball as much as Siena. The
Danes will play their usual style
ol football, which means John
Bertu/vi calls signals and then
lets his backs control most of
the ollense. Thus far it has
worked quite well, and if the
fumbles can be avoided, it
could turn out to be a long
afternoon lor Siena. The game
will beginat the unusual lime of
4:.10 p.m.. with local air
coverage beginning on WSUA
(MO) al 4:25.
liuighainioii in be abbreviated,
and a 4-Uosss uas the icsult. Vacl tines In I'at I'odgoiski. Keine
Mull, and Ihe above doubles duo
accounted Itn the wins. I he next
luo opponents ucic verv lough
I cams vwi.li some excel i-in
lv»i nkners,
plavers.
*w''.W.|.W.W.!'!'.'
SPONSORS
Another factor to be considered is the lack of team
Action in lasl Saturday's romp.
Picks
teams which can look good or awful. Denver has a little more
material in which to work wilh.
Lions over Saints by 7. Two in a
row is unheard of in New Orleans.
Saints are up against a quality
lea in.
K.C. over Green Bav by I. It's
thai close but Dawson at quarterback has to give ihe Chiefs an edge.
Scott llunler should gel a start.
Minnesota over San Francisco
by 5. Ihe Vikings are undefeated
and 49'ers can't gel their offense
together.
New England by 6 over New
York Jets. Ihe next victim is Bill
Demoiy Even il he lasls Ihe game
he miglu make ihe Patriots look
depth of Siena, which could be
a key if several of their starters
who were injured in the last
game, a brutal, hard-hitting affair which Siena lost, cannot
return. As far as Great Dane injuries go, J o h n Cage, the big
running back who has looked
impressive since joining the
t e a m ' after transferring from
Syracuse, has a badly sprained
ankle which is currently in a
cast. Center Andy Lee is still
out with a knee injury, and
there are several other ailments
which may prevent some of the
Danes from playing at full
effectiveness.
Therefore, if the scouting
reports are correct, look for
George Hollie and Orin Griffin to play an integral role in the
outcome of the contest. As far
as Marvin Perry is concerned,
he is ready to play, and in fact it
was learned that he was actual ly prepared to enter last week's
game if needed.
Albany's Women Netters
Are Playing Tough
East
KENTUCKY: Losers in the play-offs, Gilmore and lssel are the leaders.
They do everything right bui win ihe championships.
NEW YORK: Erving comes home and improvement should be obvious.
Depth lacking up front but starters unmatched. Is there enough basketballs
for everyone.
CAROLINA: Cunningham and Caldwell are tough but the league
catches up with Ihem this year.
VIRG1N1 A: Without Erving the Squires are not contenders for anything
but last.
MEMPHIS or PROVIDENCE or whereever they are this year: IsFinley
still boss? The team can't change umil these problems are cleared up and the
team can worry about basketball.
West
ning attack, while Jerry King
provides capable receiving for
Carte's passing.
Defensively, they are bigger
and stronger than Albany
State, but do not possess much
quickness, which could lead to
their demise. The Danes intend
to run right at that weakness
with a running game with the
emphasis to the outside, where
speed is more of a factor.
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 12, 1973
State University of New York at Albany FRIDAY, OCTOBER 12, 1973
Harriers Easily Beat New Paltz
by Kenneth Arduino
With Saturday's big match
against Colgate on their minds
the Harriers went out and
whipped their weak SUNY
sister, New Paltz, in a c r o s s country meet Wednesday.
Leading the Albany charge
were Bill Sorel and Jim Shrader.
Albany placed the first four
men ahead of the awfully weak
New Paltz team.
Also having a good meet today were Vinnie Reda who
finished third and J o h n Koch
who finished fourth.
Jim Shrader and Vinnie
Reda looked impressive as they
try to get ready for the touch
Colgate
meet.
Carlo
Cherubino, Nick DeMarco.
Chris Burns and Herb Waisan
did not run.
No one was really worried
about New Paltz as they are
really no competition for a
team like Albany. In fact they
hurt Albany more by cheapening the schedule. The cross
country team plays some tough
s c h o o l s but s c h o o l s like
Plattsburgh, who Albany shut
out and New Paltz does not
enhance the schedule.
JuMt
year
Albany's
entire squad beat the first New
Paltz men across. Absent from
that meet were both Nick
DeMarco and Vinnie Reda.
Next year Plattsburgh will not
run Albany. Maybe Albany
should try to get some of the
tougher SUNY schools like
Brockport or Cortland. It
would improve their reputation
greatly.
But Saturday's meet versus
Colgate is no easy meet. This is
a very high class one with
Albany trying to revenge their
loss last year at Colgate. That
meet was away on a course that
is advantageous to the home
team and Albany was soundly
beaten. Albany did not have a
good performance that day and
tried to revenge it at the Invitational. They missed by one
point and were shut out of a
medal.
Many members of this year's
team want to make up for it but
Colgate has a good team after
beating Cornell. I he meet is
home this Saturday at 2:00 and
the team needs the support of
the crowd in this tough one.
The .IV with super runner Rich
Langford takes on Colgate's J V
at home also this Saturday.
Harriers host Colgate tomorrow •fiernoon in one of the biggest meets of the season.
Booters Bomb New Paltz 8-2
by Nathan Saiant
Perhaps it was the shifting of
players, or maybe it was the bad
press; perhaps it was Coach
Scheiffelin's exhortations, or
perhaps the team decided finally to
play soccer but whatever it was, the
booters put it all together Wednesday, and whipped host New Paltz,
8-2. The game was reminiscent of
the type of play the booters had
demonstrated during the preseason exhibition games, with
good strong defense and a balanced offense combining for a convincing Dane win.
The game was actually decided
within a three minute span, when,
early in the first half, Martinez,
Bedford, and Rolando all scored.
What followed was Dane Domination, and three more goals, one
each by Ruano, Louis, and Renda.
More important than the scoring
barrage was the impregnable
defense which shut the hosts out
for the first half while permitting a
mere 5 shots on goal. The Danes
pounded out 26 shots on goal
(more than they have managed in
any single game this season, let
alone in one half).
The second half was more
balanced, as the booters seemed to
relax with their wide margin.
Although New Paltz managed to
score twice, goals by Schligeland
Scheisel balanced the<scales. The
Danes sent another 13 shots on the
New Paltz net, while New Paltz
managed a mere seven. Dane
goalie Henry Obwald had another
relatively easy day, as he made the
few necessary saves, and could
have done nothing about the two
goals.
A very satisfied Coach
Scheiffelin had this to say about
the game: "It was a total team effort. The passwork was much
better than it has been this year,
and our play was 100 percent
better. They (New Paltz) made mistakes, and we took advantage of
them. Also, we made several player
shifts on the field itself which were
very effective."
Coach Schefflin also emphasized that New Paltz played a less
aggressive style game when compared with Cortland or Fredonia
slow ball control game and one
which the Danes arc much
better at handling
booters should, and must beat. If
they do, they will be over the .500
mark when Oneonta makes its annual appearance here Wednesday.
Last year, Oneonta was number
two in the nation, but this year,
they have been having their
problems, since "you never
know in Fenway," Things might be
^L
After tapering off for about a year, it
seems that campus crime here at SUNYA
is now back on the upswing. The latest
report just issued by the University Police
shows a 30% increase in all criminal
offenses this year over last. 622 criminal
offenses have been reported so far this
year, while the same figure for last year
was 476. The total value of stolen property has been $62,640, while the valuation of
property stolen up until September of
1972 was only $34,507. an increase of
some HI 1 ,
I he figures lor last month seem to bear
out this general yearlong trend with some
I 16 crimes reported to the police compared with S2 in September of 1972.
I wenly seven
ol these offenses were
felonies, and with the exception of five of
the offenses, all were property related
crimes. Four of the IK burglaries
reported, interestingly, occurred at night
while the occupants were sleeping in their
rooms, presumably having left their
doors unlocked.
Ihe police report also revealed that a
massive ticketing campaign is now underway, with over 5000 parking tickets
issued just last month, as compared with
only 4 in September 1972.
Police Director James Williams commented on the latest statistics, saying that
the chances ol getting "Ripped off around
here are not that great." He claims there is
a one in live chance that a student will be a
crime victim if he stays here for four full
years. Figures compiled hy the School of
Criminal Justice, however, give the
probability as one in two.
Williams said that some of the increase
may be attributed to more students reporting crimes that would normally not have
been reported, and that they may be
reporting thefts of smaller items than
before. He commented that "simple
minded people" often reach the conclusion that "hall the students here are
criminals," and thai, much ol thectime is
in fact committed by transients from the
surrounding area.
Adds the police director: "We don't
want lo cover these things up, however."
Hxamining all ol the figures so lar tins
year, it appears that reported crime in all
ureas is up. especially in burglary, grand
and petit larcens and loitering.
Below is a compilation ol selected
figures. I lie first number is Ihe total
reported fin 1972. up until October, while
the second numhei is that same figure as
applied lo 197.1
Coach Scheiffelin cited the excellent play of John Rolando, and
with good reason. Rolando is
definitely the Mr. Hustle of the
soccer team-"he could run all day
and not get tired," was the way
Coach Scheiffelin put it. Hob
Schlcgelcontinued his fine play, as
he and veteran Mark Solano
anchored the defense with the help
of newcomer Leroy Aldrich.
Offensively, Arthur Bedford showed the first signs of the fin play
that has been expected of him, as
he tallied once and had three
assists.
This Saturday the Danes host
Oswego, and this is a team that the
interesting.
Hopefully
there may be some surprises,
but as Coach Scheiffelin says:
We'll play them one at a time.
SUNYA Police Report
Surge in Campus Crime
Robbery. 3,7; Assault. 4.7; Sexual
Abuse. 3,2; Rape 1,0, llaiiassinent, 7.5;
Menacing, 1.0, Burglary. 41,86; Grand
Larceny 35,53; Pent Larceny. 236.274:
Criminal Mischief, 63,78; Issuing Bad
Check, 0,2; False Incident Report, 39,49;
Criminal Trespass, 7,3.
Also, Leaving Scene of Accident,
13.20; Loitering, 1,7; Possession of
Dangerous Drug, 3,1; Public Intoxication, 1,2; Possession of Stolen Property,
2,2; Public Lewdness, 8,9.
University Police also reported that
two actual fires and six false alarms occurred on campus last month, and that
205 n o n - c r i m i n a l complaints were
reported which required dispatch of a car
to the scene. Finally, 54 safety hazards
were
reported to tiie Plant Department
lor correction.
(umpus police, whose job it is to
maintain security...
and their boss Jim Williams
Campus More Aware, Benezet Says
Ed. Note: The following story is the first
part of a four-part series concerning the mood
of the students on this campus. The series will
he presented each week in an attempt to give a
general overview of how students feel about
issues facing them, and whether, as people
suspect, the feeling of apathy is prevalent here.
Among others, the series will focus on the
political climate, social and academic, and
how it manifests itself.
by Sue l.eboff
What is the political mood ;ti Alhiiny Slate?
Militant'.' Apathetic, as the cliche goes? Or
somewhere in between these two extremes?
It is not easy lo ascribe one political mood
to 15,000 lull-lime equivalent students, but
this reporter tried to discover a mood by talking with President Bene/.el, Student Association President Steve Gerbcr, representatives
ol various politically-oriented groups and
committees on campus, and a number ol random students. What these people had lo say is
ihe subject ol this series.
I he word from the lop is that despite the
rumored apathy, this campus has become
more politically aware in recent years. This is
I* reside ni Benezet's observation. Re attributes
ibis raised consciousness in pari to the increased proportion ol downstate students.
"We were up in ihe sticks
a
couple
ol
years
ago
politically."
He
adds thai the growth ol such professional
schools as the School ol Social Welfare, the
(iiaduale School ol Public Affairs, and the
School ol Criminal Justice have hroken down
the isolation ol ihe campus Irom events in the
surrounding area Communit\ Service has
had the same effect.
Home Backgrounds
When asked it students have a particular
political profile that separates ihcin Irom the
nation as a whole. Bene/et said that yes. ihes
do, He said the American student's general
political outlook reflects his age bracket.
S indents are more interested in human justice,
social welfare, and tend to be impatient
Specific political attitudes lend to vary with
the home backgrounds ol the students.
Agricultural and Technical colleges will lend
to he either non-political or conservative, A
university lends to have more liberalstudents.
At a highly selective university such as
SUNYA, students lend to move lo ihe left
politically during their college years. While
students ai this University are supposedly
somewhat pre-occupied with "stiff academic
requirements" they are more politically invoked than students at private schools.
Association, says it is very hard to gauge student opinion. He is hoping that the Political
and Social Positions Committee of the Central Council w ill provide an accurate picture of
student views by conducting surveys.
Continuing, Benezet says that this university is too new to have evolved "certain political
traditions," that is, modes of expressing itself.
As time goes on, the paper, the theatrical
' productions, and student organizations will
create these political traditions.
Students are dissatisfied with the Administration. Dr. Benezet links this dissatisfaction to a larger disillusionment with
government processes in general, and he says
I ai lure of the national government to level
with the nation has caused students to mistrust
every governing body.
Stever Cierber, President of the Student
Cierber said that students prefer to work inside legitimate channels, that is, the student
government. It is more frustrating but the
results are more rewarding. Hut going outside
channels, and into the realm of petitions,
protests, and dramatization of issues is
justified if students feel they are morally right,
have tried to achieve results first through the
system, and still find they are not being listened to. Gerbergivesasanexampleofresorting
to unusual action" the press conference he
called in order to publicize how campus police
were being armed with handguns.
Part II on Friday
A WAR 4'u*
*\
:l-
^
(v
MayoralCandidatesProfiled...see pages 9,10,11
Booters entertain Oswego tomorrow at 2.
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