Danes Receive ECAC Bid Tourney Here Friday and Saturday

advertisement
Vol. LX, No. )fr
Sun Uninnlty ofNnt York tt Albtny
Mtrch 23. 1973
Sale of Waverly Place Approved
Danes Receive ECAC Bid
Tourney Here Friday and Saturday
Council Quizzes FSA's Zahm on 4 % Hike
by Bruce Maggin
After two frustrating years, the Albany State
Basketball Team will finally participate in postseason play with the naming of the Great Danes to
host the initial ECAC Upstate Tournament.
The first round gets underway Friday night, March
9th, when Union College (M-7) takes on Fredonia
State (15-8) at 7 o'clock while at nine o'clock,
Albany hosts St. Lawrence University (14-9). The
finals are the following afternoon with the consolation game starting at two and the championship
match at four. Tickets, which are on sale all week at
the gym from nine to noon and one to four, are
priced at one dollar with student tax and two-fifty
for general admission tickets for each game.
No, decision has been reached at this time concerning the time that the dorms will close. The
problem is that a number of the dorm staff is
needed when the dorms are finally closed.
Next year's board hike and the proposed Waverly Place purchase
were the primary foci of last night's Central Council meeting.
E. Norbert Zahm, Director of FSA, was on hand to explain the
necessity of the projected resident student board contracts for next
year. He attributed the necessity to such factors as rising food costs,
the possibility of a hike in the minimum wage, salary increases, and
the general trend in management and support expenses.
Zahm strove to point out that FSA has undergone considerable
expense reduction in recent months, largely by cutting the payroll,
and predicts that the corporation can decrease its expenses still
more. He said, however, that eventually the reductions will level off
because the operating corporation "can't go beyond a certain low
plateau." "We aren't spending any more than we really have to,"
claimed Zahm.
Zahm emphasized the difficulty the corporation has in predicting
an outlook for next year. The projected hike is supposed to be a
reasonable estimate of coverage, taking into account all possible
extenuating circumstances.
When asked if the board hike wasn't using students to loot the bill
for other FSA operations, Zahm stated that FSA has "backed
anything out of food service that didn't belong there," but he later
conceded that inevitable within the confines of such a corporation
"one end supports another."
Zahm's inclusion of salary raises in the list of causes for the hike
prompted a Council member to question whether these benefits
were intended for student employees. While student employees
would benefit from any increase in the minimum wage, and receive a
standard raise with each additional year of employment, Zahm
indicated that there was no intenion of raising student salaries above
numimuins.
FSA's current debt hovers somewhere around $500,000. and Zahm
would like to see that debt paid off. He feels a gieal deal of money is
wasted on interest payments and wants lo "build a little cash reserve
so we don't have to rely on outsiders." The practice has been to
borrow money lo provide the cash necessary for corporation
operations. "We've got lo slart hack on the road lo some kind of
liquidity." The board hike revenues are supposed in help gel this
lolling.
Not only aie hoaid contracts going up, but FSA is "nosing prices
111 all areas." The kosliei meal plan hike ol WX was explained in
leims ol the greatei expense it entails. The necessity of special
pieparalions makes (he operation lai nunc expensive than regular
lood preparation. Price hikes can be expected on cash lines as well as
oilier FSA-run operations.
FSA Director Norbert Zahm explains the implications of the board hike to Central Council members.
Friday Night
Union vs. Fredonia
Danes vs. St. Lawrence
Albany Finally Receives Tournament Bid
by Bill Heller
The news took an endless week
Lo be announced, hut the Great
Danes finally learned thai they
will host the ECAC up-state
tournament. While not the
NCAA's, the ECAC nonetheless
will give the Danes an oppor
tunily to get some deserved
recognition and offer a chance
for the Albany Seniors to close
their careers in style. More important, it finally gives the Great
Danes a post-season bid. Mem-
ories: 1971 • Hartwick gets an at
large hid over Albany, even
though the Danes beat the War
riors at Hartwick. 1972 - A
ridiculous rule concerning Byron
Miller's eligibility bars the Danes
from post season play.
Then this year: the Danes fluctuate from greatness (knocking
oTf Brockport and Potsdam back
to hack-winning the Capitol District Tournament) to oblivion
(losses to Oneonta and Platts
burgh). But they refuse to give
up, and by winning their last
five, finish 1(1-7, get ranked fith
in NYS, and they earn their hid.
************
The opener will be an interesting matchup between two simi
lar teams. Fredonia, lf>H, has
one of the best defense's in the
nation, sticking exclusively with
a tough /.one. This year, for the
second straight season, they lost
lo Albany in overtime. They like
to play a controlled ballgami'
and are led by Gary Mess
Union, 11-7, has beaten H.P.I
and Rochester this year. A.s Fredonia, they lost to Albany in
overtime. The Dutchmen's top
scorers are Mike Doyle and Tom
Bakker, both averaging in the
low teens.
St. Lawrence, 1 I <>, has knock
ed
off
the hke.s of
32, and worked out his major
problem: inconsistency. John
Quattrocchi averaged 12.9 and
shot B7.fi% from the foul line,
finishing in the top five in the
nation on that category. Bob
Rossi and Reggie Smith rounded
out the scoring, hitting for 1 1.0
and 9.9 respectively. Bob Curtiss
was the second leading rebound
er with a (J.H average.
One question about the tournament remains unanswered:
will Great Dane fans actually
leave a day, a day and a half, or
two days late just to go to the
Tourney? Hopefully, all the diehard Albany fans will. But what
about the rest? What about the
fans that walked out early on
the UB gome, that never showed
up for Oswego, Geneseo, Ithaca?
The same fans that packed the
University Gym to help the
Danes heat Brockport and Potsdarn? Will they be there Friday
night? The Great Danes will
they never give up.
SA President Mike Laniperl addresses Council during session concerned with the board hike and
purchase of Waverly Place.
TDHlllinnlni !IQ| i|( inlnrilririlnninalflCHnri
3
3!
\
AFD Responds to Fire
call on D u t c h Q u a d Wednesday night.
Security sources say that the blaze was contained in a trash can on the
seventh floor of Stuyvesant T o w e r , and was put out by an unidentified
LeMoyne,
p r i s o n prior to the arrival of the Fire D e p a r t m e n t .
R e p o r t s ol heavy s m o k e p r o m p t e d the s u m m o n i n g ol the A F D . Residents
i,l the t o w n found refuge in the s u r r o u n d i n g low risers but many gathered
S.A. President Mike Lampert dealt with an explanation of the
Waverly Place purchase approval. He fielded questions regarding the
necessity of the move, the practicality of it, and future implications
of such action. Of primary concern to those on hand were the
expense to S.A., legal complications over an access road and whether
or not the purchase will be 111 the best interest of SUNYA students.
Lampert seemed to feel that, all things being considered, the move
would be a wise one. After discussion, Council voted in favor ol the
proposal 10 appropriate student funds for the purchase.
o u t s i d e to view proi eedings ol the firefighters.
The cause ol the blaze is believed to have hern a carelessly discarded
cigarette or emptied ashtray.
Dutih
in mid F e b r u a r y , when .1 Hash bin 111 Van Cortlandt
past
lew
months.
page IB
j
ranrtnninrfininoinnionihrtnnihrthiaaH^
Housing Recommendation Passed
The incident was similar to another fire on
flared
up.
Sri in 11 y sources see no c o n n e c t i o n b e t w e e n this and other c a m p u s fires ol
the
PLEASE RECYCLE THIS PAPER
Expenditure O.K.'d
Five pieces of a p p a r a t u s from the Albany Fire D e p a r t m e n t responded t o a
Rochester, R.P.I , and Platts
burgh- Like the Danes, they have
had an up and down season.
What of our Danes'' The final
stats show the obvious: Iiyron
Miller led the team, lie wound
up with a I (i.9 scoring norm
(shooting 17 1% from the field)
and 7.7 rebounds u (jame. He
had :i games over 25-26. U6, and
Football Goes Varsity
njanf3m[nniri^»a^«"MnniaaiaamnioaddiraninniDDiriatTg
3
The question of the role of the bookstore was also deall wilh.
( unenlly, FSA is trying lo unload 11 on an outside company. Zahm
explained that ISA would he better off if they sold the Bookstore
and collected a percentage from il. He conceded that the booksloie
operation is no money-maker: "I doubt il any book store is going to
come in here and make any money." He said, however, that a
company would come 111, willing lo perhaps take a loss "just to get a
foothold in the Stale University system."
Council also consideied a hill sponsored by the Political and Social
Position Committee m accordance with the recent opinion poll on
housing, calling loi ihe allowance of privately-owned refrigerators.
.mil ceitain cooking appliances in ilie dormitories, utilization ol
lounge furniture in rooms, possession of certain types ol pets.
meaningful siudeni involvement m Hie drawing up of die housing
conltael, and termination of room searches and inspections. 1 he
recommendation passed and will be presented 10 officials.
Copies of Ihe Budget Committee recommendations were disiiibuied lo Council Members for iheir consideration as well.
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Iijilill!
T h e Communists declared on Thursday night they are suspending
release of the last American p r i o n s e r s in V i e t n a m because the United
States went back o n a deal for withdrawal of all U.S. troops by the
weekend.
T h e North Vietnamese a n d Viet C o n g called the altered U.S.
position "illegal" and refused t o hand over the remaining POWs in
Vietnam pending "an appropriate answer from the U . S . side."
The 138 prisoners h a d b e e n s c h e d u l e d for release in two groups
Saturday and Sunday in Hanoi in e x c h a n g e for an accelerated U.S.
troop pullout that would have p u t A m e r i c a n forces o u t of Vietnam
by Sunday, three days ahead of t h e d e a d l i n e in the Paris cense fire
accord.
AP
WASHINGTON
President Nixon asked Congress T h u r s d a y t o abolish insanilj as a
defense to federal crimes and t o r e v a m p the criminal code
completely. The death penalty w o u l d b e b r o u g h t back and nbscenits
laws redefined.
The 680-page Criminal C o d e R e f o r m A c t of 1 9 7 3 , as submitted In
the President, would toughen d r u g laws, provide m a n d a t o r ) impn
sonment in some cases and grade offenses i n t o nine categories with
maximum sentences and fines.
The existing code dates back t o 1 7 9 0 a n d the President in a
message last week promising t h e new legislation—called modification
" n o t merely desirable, b u t a b s o l u t e l y i m p e r a t i v e . "
Al'
This spring a new system of
pre-registration will be instituted
at SUNYA-a seniority based
system.
According to this new system,
graduate students will register
first, followed by seniors,
juniors, sophomores, and fresh- .
men. The order of registration
within these levels will be decided by alpha rotation, which we
know as the previous preregistration system.
This spring, academic advisement will begin on March 5. The
actual preregistration will begin
Monday, April 9, and continue
through Friday, May 4, in the
Colonial Quad U-Lounge. This
may seem like an unusually long
time period for registration,
however, il is important to note
that there will be a spring recess
from April 14-22. Al this lime,
the alphabetical order within
class divisions for llus springs
pre-registration has not been decided.
WASHINGTON
T h e Supreme C o u r t ruled W e d n e s d a y t h e r e is n o eon stttul niial
right to education; and t h u s n o c o n s t i t u t i o n a l r e m e d y for dispi rrtwi
between rich and poor school districts.
The landmark 5 to 4 decision left i n t a c t the local pr< .perl lax
system that plays a large part in financing s c h o o l s y s t e m s i n all tares
except Hawaii.
The need for tax reform is a p p a r e n t said Justice Lewis F I' •well
Jr. for the majority, " b u t t h e i u l t i m a t e s o l u t i o n must <• orne from
lawmakers and from the d e m o c r a t i c pressures of those who elect
them."
mil)
Justice Thurgood Marshall, in dissent, said t h e decision
be seen as a retreat from our historic c o m m i t m e n t to > •t|U,,l t) of
educational o p p o r t u n i t y . "
AP
The 25lh anniversary of the
State University of New York
wtis celebrated last week bete in
Albany Willi speeches by
Governor Nelson Rockefeller
and University Chancellor truest
Buyer before a special session of
the slate legislature.
In his remarks at the ceremonies, Rockefeller called for a
new r e l a t i o n s h i p
between
SUNY, CUNY, and the stale's
private colleges so thai no student would be denied a higher
education because of a lack of
finances or a lack o\' college
facilities. 'Both ihese goals we're
close to achieving.' Ihe Governor
said.
His speech departed from the
prepared text, in which lie
backed the iceoittmeiidalions of
lire Keppel I ask Force, including lite controversial proposal lot tnsttmttnn of tuition at
the City Univeisuy. as well us
having the governor nominate
PAGE TWO
a,
•••'. '••••
•//.'&
the 3 0 0 and 4 0 0 level courses,
w h i c h required experienced staff
to
teach
thus
cost
more
In light of this, the discrimination against underclassmen during pre-registralion is justified,
especially since the underclassmen will benefit from the sys/
tern when they reach uppcrclass
status.
While the seniority based preregistration system will not solve
all the problems, such as closed
courses and insufficient number
of sections, it is hoped that it
may ease some of the aggravations of pre-registration.
the ineinlu'is of the Slate Boaid
of Regents. The Keppel Task
Force was a p p o i n t e d by
Governoi Rockefeller to investigate highei education in Ihe
stale.
The Governor consideis the
development of SUNY to be one
os his administration's greatest
accomplishments. This was
acknowledged by Ms. Maurice T.
Moore, chairperson of the University's board of Irusiees. She
said thai Rockefeller 'made us
what we are today and what
we're going to be.' Ms. Moore
acted as master of ceremonies
for the special legislative session.
Boyer's speech stressed ihe
impact of the university on the
average citizen of the slate.
According lo Ihe Chancelloi, the
University has had a major positive effect on such aicas as
health care and agricultural
produclivity. as well as enrolling
sludenls from families with incomes below the poverty line.
who would otherwise have no
chance of receiving a higher education.
Alter Boyer's speech, special
medallions for 'distinguished seivice' were awarded lo four recipients, three posthumously. They
included the late Governor
Thomas E. Dewey, Ihe late Irwin
Sleingut, father of Assemblyman
Stanley Sleingut. and ihe lale
Senator Benjamin l-einheig, and
former
governor Frank C.
Moore.
Commemoratory medallions
were also presented to every
legislator.
Governoi Dewey's medal was
accepted by his son, Thomas b.
Dewev Jr.
The Stale University of New
Yoik was created in 194X. The
bill was passed by lite Senate
March 10. by the Assembly
March M, and Gov. Thomas
Dewey signed it on Match 30.
I94K
/.NS
WASHINGTON
Former CIA director J o h n J. M c C o n e testified Weilnen
International Telephone & Telegraph C o r p . offered $1 m
back any U.S. plan t o prevent the election of Marxist '
Atlende as president of Chile.
McCone, u n ITT director and still a CIA c o n s u l t a n t , said be
the offer m S e p t e m b e r 1970 to H e n r y A Kissinger ,
security adviser to President N i x o n , and t o Richard I Mi
director of Uie Central Intelligence Agency
But McCone said in testimony before a special Senate
relations subcommittee that while I T T offered financial supi
corporation devised no plan to s t o p Aliunde " It was no
generated by I T T , " he said.
ONCE,A DRAGON CHALLENGED
A KNIGHT TO A GAME OF QUOITS,
I OR THE WAGER OF 3 CANS OF
SCHAEFERBEERE...
WHENCE THE KNIGHT F0RGETHE
QUICKLY INTO THE LEAD, AND
AGREED TO DOUBLE THE BET...
BUT ALAS,WHEN VICT0RIE WAS
ALMOST HIS, BAD LUCK FALLETH
UPON HIM, AND HE LOST ALL
HIS BEERE TO THE DRAGON...
SlhAL'ler UreweMt-t INutt Yurh I- '
FRIDAY, MARCH 23, 1973
PROVING THAT SOME GUYS
JUST DON'T KNOW HOW TO
QUOIT WHEN THEY'RE AHEAD.
u^mMwmcmswmtm
i
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
and
money.
Statistics also show that upperclassmen, per ratio of their number in upper division courses,
drop upper division courses less
often than do underclassmen.
Research results I have shown
that the drop rate for underclassmen enrolled in upper-divisiori
(300 and 400 level) courses
(approximately 34%) is considerably greater than the drop rate
for upperclassmen in upper level
courses (approximately 9%).
This means tha many upperclassmen get closed out of courses by
underclassmen who eventually
drop, anyway.
Fundamental in the adoption
of the seniority based system
was Sandy Lutfi, a junior at
SUNYA. A psychology major,
Sandy became aggravated at
being closed out of courses and
decided to do something about
it. She received independent study credit for her involved undertaking which included research,
organization and augmentation
of materials. After months of
hard work and battling the
bureaucracy, Sandy's efforts
were rewarded. In the fall of
1972, the Educational Policies
Council of the University Senate
and the University Administration accepted the system for the
fall of 1973 implementation.
WASHINGTON
A survey of college campuses has found that most slurli-i
don't give a damn about s t u d e n t g o v e r n m e n t .
The publication " O n C a m p u s R e p o r t " polled slinleti
college and university campuses, ranging in e n r o l l m e n t li
to 35,000 s t u d e n t s . They found t h a t the average campu
draws only 6.2 percent of the s t u d e n t b o d y to the polls '
of every IS students. Apathy was found to be so prevalent
positions on various ballots were left blank because in
bothered to file as a candidate.
USE YOUR MASTER CHARGE FOR ALL PURCHASES OVER $6.00
i:
new grading system, if a student
takes more than 6 S-U credits in
a field and later decides to major
or minor in that field, the additional S-U credits will not be
counted towards fulfilling the
requirements. So we see that
even underclassmen should give
careful consideration to choosign S-U courses.
The new system of pre-registration was adopted because of
discontent with the alpha rotation system. Under the alpha
rotation system, no consideration
was paid to the student's class
year. Juniors and Seniors sometimes found themselves closed
our of courses they needed to
graduate.
Many upperclassmen found
this situation unfair since underclassmen have more time left at
SUNY'A in which to lake the
needed courses. It was also taken
inlo consideration lhat upperclassmen pay $150 more tuition
per year, since it was believed
lhat upperclassmen took most of
SUNY Celebrates 25th Birthday
by Glenn von Nustitz
SAN FRANCISCO
The judge in Ruchell Magee's m u r d e r a n d kidnapping tri.il in Sun
Francisco has reversed himself and has p e r m i t t e d former rl niirne\
general Ramsey Clark to join the d e f e n s e t e a m .
Judge Morton Colvin handed d o w n his decision after the Ciilit'urritii
State Supreme Court first h a l t e d the trial, a n d then unanimous!),
voted to instruct Colvin t o reconsider his decision banning Clark
from the trial. On two occassions last m o n t h . Judge f'ulvin had
refused to permit Clark t o p a r t i c i p a t e in Magee's defense on tingrounds that the judge did n o t k n o w Clark personally
On Tuesday, Clark t o o k a seat n e x t t o Magee in the heavi!)
guarded courtroom--and the trial was r e s u m e d . T h e former Altorne)
General,who has c o n d u c t e d extensive interviews with Magee ;it San
Quentin Prison, is expected to p r e s e n t a p o r t i o n of lhe defense
arguments relating to Magee's " s t a t e of m i n d " during tin- courthouse
uprising in 1970.
ZNS
Because of the adoption of the
new grading policy, there will be
a new procedure instituted at
pre-registration. The new grading
system states that students during their four years at SUNYA
have the option of taking a maximum of 30 credits S-U, with no
more than 6 S-U credits in their
major and minor fields combined. These 30 S-U credits do
not include courses designated
S-U by their departments. Therefore, at pre-registration, the student must sign a card to obtain
S-U grading for an ordinarily
A-E course.
It is important to note that
even juniors and seniors who
may have been on S-U grading
for their first two years, have Ihe
option to lake an additional 30
S-U credits. This in only possible
because it is a transitional period.
A word of caulion should also
be given to those students who
are unsure of their major or
minor fields. According to this
FRIDAY, MARCH 23, 1973
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
It-Ut
PAGE THREE
Boyer Accepts Proposed
State-wide Student Gov't
Pen Pals Needed to Help Junior High Kids
• ' W l
1
by Ann E. Bunker
Growing up in South Bronx
can be as depressing as poverty
itself. The realities of life offer a
sharp contrast to the American
dream, the ethic that anyone can
go anywhere. The inconsistencies of poor housing, local
crime and value differences
combine with other such factors
to create a discouraging environment.
Among the ch(ef problems of
the South Bronx is its educational system. At a time when
schools even in relatively welloff neighborhoods are experiencing problems with educational effectiveness, schools in
the South Bronx are getting the
problems even more intensely.
The relevance of career-oriented
goals is all but lost under such
conditions.
Many of the kids in this
neighborhood have reading levels
far below satisfactory for their
age group. By the time they
reach junior high, the problem is
a serious one. There is a need to
strengthen the reading skills of
these kids if they are to continue
on into high school with any
success.
Concern for the problems
faced by educators in the
SSoulh Bronx (as well as other
areas) has led the Stale Education Department and related
agencies to iniiiale an innovative
ALBANY
465-1301
"
w
^ "
..
education program called Project
Redesign. The South Bronx
junior high is the New York City
Conponent of the pilot program.
Project Redesign is an attempt
to structure a model school,
u t i l i z i n g new educational
approaches and technuques.
Called 'an alternative junior
high,' the South Bronx component hopes to 'get kids turned
on to learning.'
An immediate goal of the
program is to improve the
reading skills of kids who are
dangerously behind in reading
development. Proponents of the
program hope to motivate these
kids, making education relevant
to them and their world. This
pilot program also serves to
demonstrate new educational
techniques and strategies that
may come to be employed on a
widespread scale throughout the
state educational system.
In line with the motivational
goal, coordinators of Project
Redesign are trying to initiate a
pen pal program between the
junior high kids and college
students. The purpose of such a
program is explained by one of
the educators involved:
Receiving letters from and
sending
letter
to
a college
student is so simple a concept
but so motivating and exciting
an experience for a student
who
has
320 River Street
813 Madison Ave.
had
little
or
contact
with
people
in
college o f outside his or her
immediate
environment.
Sharing one's concerns about
growing up w i t h an understanding young college student
is certainly a positive
outlet
for
a
Junior
high
school student. One's fears
about his future and concern
about his won education can
be
greatly
verbalizing
channelling
alleviated
by
them
and
them
through
this kind of experience.
Such
a
invaluable
program
would
be
as a learning force.
The writing practice would be of
considerable merit and could be
used to structure reading within
the oroaram.
Dr. Joseph Bosco of the Center
for Curriculum and Instruction
here at SUNY A is extending a
plea for interested students to be
pen pals with the South Bronx
kids. No p.reat deal of work is
involved; it just takes a little
concern and a lew minutes to
share what you can in a letter.
The pen pal program is looking
lor two types of persons. They
need aware individuals whose
planned profession is mapped
out and who are working toward
a definite career goal. Sucli persons can correspond with kids
wlni express interest in the same
field.
J list as much, however, the
...
„„„„„ Should
shouli a pen pal fail to
spans.
write, it would only contribute
to the already 'down' attitude
towards life that is so prevalent
in the neighborhood.
Participation in the pen pal
program would take little effort
but could be of immeasurable
value, providing the college student with an opportunity to be ;i
moving force in the life of a
program
c o o r d i n a t o r s are
looking for interested students
whose futures are uncertain students who can share with their
junior high kids the realities of
their •uncertainties' and hassles.
In both cases, the junior high
students can come to identify
with their pals. Through such
correspondence, the South
Bronx kids may recieve muchneeded educational motivation
while finding a friend.
Of primary inportance in this
program is honesty,There will be
no censorship involved, as
program c o o r d i n a t o r s are
pushing for the establishment of
frank and candid communication.
Another important consideration is the trust factor. These
kids have been disappointed too
many times in Iheir short life-
child .
The need for pen pal volunteers is immediate. It you can
spare some time here and there
to answer a kid's questions and
share your experiences, please
contact Dr. Joseph Bosco, ID
348 right away, or just send him
a note with your name, addict
interests and career goals lit
any). Help fight situational .in.i
educational depression. Ii lu
got to be a rewarding expei
lence.
/ i
Ji i JT> I
M IHERE t.H'Plfi,
I CiWM «Er
IM t*WMi' TARf you
N
(
The reported agreement climaxes a two year struggle by
various student leaders to obtain
an officially sanctioned statewide student government . State
University faculty already have a
"(. SEE THE UNIVERSITY'
' -
H
'
'• i
TROY
272-4004
STUDENT DISCOUNTS IS OUR POLICY
BOOKS ORDERED FOR CLASS AT DIST. PRICES
GOOD SERVICE
FINE VARIED SELECTION
•3LS5
Hi There1
"WHATEVER THE REASON FOR LIGHTING UP
UGHT UP WITH A NEW SANDCASTEO CANDLE"
JOIN US ON
FRIDAY MAR. 23 FOR AN
similar representative body.
The proposal calls for the creation of a 64 member Student
Senate that would be composed
of student government presidents and delegates elected proportionally from every school in
the State University system. One
delegate would be provided for
every 3500 "full time equivalency" students on each
SUNY campus. Community
colleges would also be guaranteed representation under the
proposed set-up.
The group would be officially
recognized by the Chancellor
and the Board of Trustees, the
governing body of State University. Approval of three-fourths
of the local student government
bodies would be required as
well. Funding would come out
of the Chancellor's discretionary
funds.
While the new student government would be "the final voice"
lor all SUNY students on statewide topics—like tuition and the
issue of student representation
on
the
Board
of
Trustees—individual campuses
would maintain their own autonomous local student governments that would deal with
issues of a less broad interest.
For Albany State, this means
the Student Association would
continue its usual operations of
dispensing money to campus
groups and legislating for students on this campus. But it
would be expected to defer
issues of statewide interest to
the new Student Senate.
The new government structure
would replace the current SASU
(Student Association of Stale
University), a confederation of
student governments that is not
officially recognized by the
Trustees. Albany State is not a
member of SASU.
Leaders of SASU strongly
endorse the new plan and played
a large role in its drafting. They
plan lo maintain the SASU
organization as an independent
student service group and hope
the
l e a d e r s h i p of
both
groups—as well as the delegate
members—will be identical.
Group Supports Wounded Knee
by Barry Davis
View From the Inside
On Wednesday, March 21 a
demonstration was held on the
corner of Stale and Pearl Sts. in
support of the Nalive Americans
al Wounded Knee. The demonstration was sponsored by the
Center for United Labor Action.
About 50 people came foi the
demonstration
and
many
passersby stopped to listen,
The demonstrators were ihere
for a reason, the same leason I
was ihere and here H is. Almosl
a month ago llie people ol
A.I.M. I American Indian Movenent) sci/cd Wounded Knee, a
location where a massacre ol
Indians happened in a past eculiny. They weie Inking what's
theirs. I'hcv are (he nalive Amen d ns.
federal forces moved in and
the smell of massacre was and is
in llie an . One of the icasons I'm
lire demonsltation was lo show
llie Indians have widespread supptnl. The sei/ure al Wounded
no
Troy, New York 12180
Albany, New York 12208
The thorny issue of student
governance in the State University system is about to be resolved.
Student government presidents
from throughout the State
University system met with
Chancellor lirnest L. Boyer
Tuesday afternoon and sources
close to the negotiations say the
Chancellor has "tentatively accepted" a proposal for an officially recognized, slate-wide
student government that would
represent all SUNY students on
mutual matters of interest. The
Chancellor's legal counsel is reportedly studying the plan, these
sources say, and the agreement
will he finalized at an April 15th
meeting to be held here in
Albany. Student government
presidents meanwhile, are discussing the proposal with their
executive governing bodies on
their individual campuses.
Knee had been preceded by the
"Trail of Broken Treaties."
Speeches made at the demo
brought oui many important
points. The Nalive Americans
aren't asking anything from the
U.S. government. They are demanding the US government to
live up lo ils treaty obligations.
The Native Americans resent
the right, and in so doing deny
the right, of the BIA lo choose
their tribal chiefs. The relationship of the Indians to other
oppressed groups in America was
successfully explained. The Chicane) larm worker movement in
its relationship lo the Native
American struggle was also
dealt with. Capitalism exploits
us all.
The memory of Attica was
very much on people's minds.
The threat of another massacre
ol people fighting for what's
theirs and ours was a spectre
hanging over the demonstrators.
We refuse lo be exploited. We
siand with our sisters and brothers of nalive American descent, Chieano descent, and any
descent. Capitalists fear the unity
of the people. The people will
sland uniled.
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Stuyvesant Plaza, Albany
L
PAGE FOUR
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
FRIDAY, MARCH 23, 1973
ttJStyUUAlfc.The Lively Night
Spot in Latham, announces that
they're expanding their new
popular price policy.
sacrificing the quality of their great
out-of-town entertainment.
7 nights a
V -iwtS\[rAffl\\|fc
will make it possible to hear Er
dance to exceptional road groups
„___^
p|olLnjlnuliX'*Ju]iMluiJa
OUTASIGHT
Michael Harrington, author of The Other America, a book that
inspired the War on Poverty, lectured Wednesday evening before a
crowd of 150 students. The former chairman of the socialist party,
who has for several years supported the contention that the
Democratic party was the basic vehicle for social improvement, told
the audience that "social change must be achieved through the
liberal wing of the democratic party." He noted that socialist
candidates in the pasl have not been successful in securing more than
6% in a national election, even in the midst of a capitalist depression.
Stressing party unity, Harrington claimed that unless the working
class under Ihe leadership of AFL-CIO president George Meany.and
the liberal left or McGovernites can come together, we will not have
a liberal democratic president in the forseeable future. "The two
Georges" (McGovern and Meany) must be brought together on
common areas of agreement. One such area he suggested was the
elimination of lax loopholes for lire rich and for the corporations.
He called for the creation of a nation-wide coalition made up of
working class Americans, poor and minority groups, the youth and
Ihe liberal working class. "The Democratic Party needs all three and
no one group can dominate the coalition."
Mr. Harrington ended with a slrong condemnation of President
Nixon's hindering federal programs created lo help the working
class, poor, and retired citizens.
is doing it without
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FRIDAY, MARCH 23, 1973
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
PAGE FIVE
Balfior Affair: WhaTrTappened
time Dr. Paul Pettit) if he would
return the following year. Balfior said yes.
When the vote to renew Bailor's lectureship contract came
before the Theater Department,
Balfior claims that the vote,as.
reported to him by then Chairman Pettit, and that it was unanimous in his favor. In fact,
Balfior was offered a two year
lectureship contract, which went
into effect.
by Mindy Altriian
The ntain point concerning Joe
Balfior's situation at SUNYA
seems to be that his is another
case of a faculty member who is
supported by students, communi t y and faculty colleagues, yet
will not be remaining at the
university. However, Balfior's
case does not involve tenure, as
so many recent cases have.
Raiher. it is because Joe Balfior
was not hired at all for a regular
teaching line position that he
will be leaving. Statements concerning the situation have been
made by Balfior's supporters and
administration.
Last spring Balfior was recommended for another one year
lectureship contract. After the
vote went through the Theater
Department, a majority of which
voted for Balfior the proposed
contract was turned down by
Ruth Schmidt, Associate Dean
of the Collge of Arts and Sciences.
The reason for this, according
to both Morten Hess, a SUNYA
alumni who heads a committee
working to keep Balfior here,
Balfior was invited to come
here three years ago on a one
year lectureship contract. Lectureships do not involve tenure.
After being here a number of
months, according to Balfior. lie
was asked by the chairman of
the Theater Department (at that
Thcij
do not
love
that do not show
their
Willi..in
and Dr. Jarka Burian, present
chairman of the Theater Department, is university policy on
lectureships. Lectureships were
designed for flexibility and to
rotate different people in and
out of the university. They are
therefore of a temporary nature.
According to Hess, Schmidt
stated that if the Theater Department wanted Balfior to remain, then he should be considered for a regular teaching line
job. Schmidt maintains that due
to the nature of the lectureship
positions in the Theater Depart
ment other people should be
offered lectureships also.
Balfior, himself, was under the
impression, due to what Pettit
had told him, that as far as
renewal went, if he went on the
leaching line he would he work:
ing for tenure, but that the
lectureship appointments could
go on indefinitely as lung as
people wanted him. Because Balfior was not overly concerned
with tenure policy, hut was concerned in knowing whether students and faculty thought he
was doing a good job and wauled him, (which was what evaluation on the lectureships would
show), he chose to remain, on
Ihelattcr. This was at the time
love.
that Ins Iwo year contract was
coming up lur a vote.
ShakfifKiin
This past hill ISallim was recommended lui a regular leaching postion llns was also after a
number ol measures were taken
the pluvious spring In keep him
here, such as petitions by sin
dents. Once again the majority
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HEGISIERIOLOI.MOND
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of the Theater Dept. voted in
favor of him. But Balfior was
turned down by Schmidt.
According to Hess the reason
for this was that fouro f the
seven tenured faculty lmembers
in the Theater Dept. voted
against Balfior, even though the
three that voted for him included the chairman and two other
faculty members whose fields
are the same as Balfior's, namely
acting and children's theater.
Hess also cited Balfior's lack of a
doctorate as another reason why
Balfior was denied appointment.
Hess feels that this is totally
unwarranted because Balfior,
who is 58 years old, has a
lifetime of experience in the
theater.
Hess and other alumni, particularly those involved with the
Theater Dept. are still working
for Balfior. Hess' committee,
which includes many local theater people, is angered because
neither Schmidt nor President
Benezet would meet with its
members.
Schmidt had something to say
about this. She stales that when
Hess wrote to Benezet on
Ichruary 10th of this year, he
received an answer from him on
February loth. Hess wrote to
Benezet again on February 1'Mi.
This letter was answered by
Schmidt
on March |2i1,
Schmidt claims that Hess Mated
in his letters that heand"therson
the committee would be available for a meeting, bin ,,, no
time did Hess ask for an appoint.
ment, and Schmidt did noi ex.
tend an invitation.
Furthermore, in commenting
on the issue ol whelhei ,n au\
Balfior was denied appointment
because of his lack of academic
credentials, Schmidt added that
though Balfior "has done valid
things" in the department during
his stay, a "university appointment of more than slum duration needs sometlims qunt
distinctive." She bcln-\ - th.it
there are other people .il. have
qualifications stipenm ; - Hal
fior's, people with jlisl a
experience and heltci i.. idenik
credentials. She says il
has seen some of these i
Therefore, allot icvrcvii
evidence and material in :i
Schmidt did not i t m i :•
renewal. "This is haul '
to people." she said v [
when they gel to like i
Balfior. hiniscll is i •
ed" dial so little all
continued mi /'iin
Twin Oaks Speaker Here
Cathexjfi and Undergraduate
Psychology Association w j | |
sponsor a program wilh Zoe
Wise, u memher of the Twin
Onk.s Community, on Tuesday,
April :i, 197H. Twin Oaks, located in Louisa, Virginia, is a
commune modeled after B.F.
Skinner's Wahlcn II. Il is the
topic of the hook. A Wahlcn II
hxprritnati, written by one of
lis founders, Kal Kinkude, and
has recently received national
attention as the feature article in
the January, I *>V:5 issue of
i'svrlif)lf>xy imluv maRazine.
Founded in IIMi7, Twin Oaks
is an nUeni lunjil rommumt y
whose purpose is " t o set up and
maintain a society aimed at and
operated for the henel'i! of its
citizens, to create a c u l t u r e
which produces h a p p y and use
ful people , who c o o p e r a t e wilh
one another for the general Hood
and who deal with problems in a
peaceful and rational w a y . "
Twin ();iks s u p p o r t s
itself
through a c o m b i n a t i o n ol auri
c u l u t r e , indusl rv, and
for wages for brief p'-i
side the c o m m u i n l \ Il
on a labor credit syshp u r p o s e is " t o give as it
choice of work ;i> pu
every m e m b e r and lo i
a m o u n t of labor e n n l n
the desirability ol tin- • •
c o m m u n i t y is g o v n m i
pla n n e r - m a n a g e r
vr
scribed in Wahlcn II
'/AW Wise, a gradih.i.
University of llhnoi
living at Twin (t.il
years. She is a m m n m .
ner, labor credit man.n
member
of
live run
c o m p a n y crew.
She will discuss iht
m l y Way ol Life
nul
s h o w slides of the i . unti
pin
in
|,("
is.
I'H'.<
l e c t u r e , .HI IIII.MIII.II I .
will be held from I i
the Third Kloo. -:•
R e f r e s h m e n t s W ill i„
Moth programs ,in- in .
>'d in all--nd
Chinese
.mnese Journalist Here
,
Chen Speaks on Revolutionary Ed
by Gary Ricciardi
Jack Chen, a Chinese journalist hired by the N.Y.S. Education Department's Center for
International Programs to prepare a China studies kit for the
state's public schools, told two
h u n d r e d fifty people here
Wednesday night that all of
China is 'a vast school,'
Chen was brought here by the
Chinese Club to speak on 'education in China.' Chen, a diminutive and dapperly dressed
man, delivered a low-key lectme
addressed-not tothespecialist, but
lo those with a,generalintetest in
China's educational and political
syslem.
Chen is currently under fire
from conservative legislators
hero in Albany, who fear a
curriculum in Chinese studies
which is helped formulated by a
Marxist
journalist, would
politically mislead unsophisticated New York State schoolchildren.
Chen, flanked by the New
York State, U.S., and Chinese
flags, did not touch on the controversary, but rather confined
himself to discussing Chinese
education and its development.
Although he spoke of the educational syslem as it existed in
China before the 1949 revolution, he concentrated on the
reforms which directly resulted
from the Great Proletarian Cultural Revolution pi' the latter
sixties, and which, he said, is still
going on.
between walls, and posters were
hung from them. When that was
no longer possible, temporary
backdrops were raised to provide
more poster space, and, after,
posters were stuck to trees, and
even sidewalks were written on.
Universities were 'forests' of
poster-opinions.
were later betrayed by Chiang
kai Shek, whom Mao Tse-tung
and the People's Liberation
Army ousted from the mainland
in 1949.
Chen said Mao Tse-tung's ideas
'went farther' than Sun Yat
Sen's, and that in the intervening
years since 1949, Chen estimated China's literacy rate has
risen to fifty per cent.
For a year, Chen said, no
academic work was done while
students took control and ran
the universities. Students found,
however
that among their
numbers there were not always
individuals with the necessary
skills to run large institutions.
Consequently, a rapprochement
began between students and
faculty, and the universities were
reestablished on the principle
that all its members work 'for
the people' and not toward personal goals. What this entailed,
said Chen, was that theoretical
knowledge learned In the schools
must be applied in practice
among the people.
Chen said the Cultural Revolution was a 'do-it-yourself revolution,' and that its greatest
accomplishment in the educational system was the integration
of theory and practice. Before the
Cultural Revolution, there was
the 'three-door Student': the
student who went straight from
his home to the university and
then to a professional post and
never once worked in the
factories or on the farms.
The Cultural Revolution was a
reaction lo such elite specialization, and it was a time of a
cacophony of opinions and of
student-run universities. The
climate of the Cultural Revolution encouraged the expression
of individual opinions, and
hand-made posters
expressing
slogans and brief ideas plastered
the universities
An illustration of integrated
theory and practice is the training of medical personnel. First
n
I liiul I'M ), lie said, only ten
pei cenl of China's people were
literate, flic educational system
was the piupeiiy ol the elite,
and the univeisity was the only
loimal means lo an ollicial
puMlon Willi tllv govi'iniueilt,
I lie gull between the educated
elite ,uul the illlteiale pcasauliy
uiih began in he limited In the
egalitanail ideas ol Sun Yat Sen
whom Chen said Chinese call lite
Talliei ol China.' These ideas
i
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T
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5SDflRt)
;
i APPLICANT
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MEET\MCr
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And at no extra charge we'll t h r o w i n Scotland a n d Wales.
If you w a n t to stay longer, you can b u y a o n e m o n t h BritRail
Youth Pass for $85.
For those of you w h o are over 22,
w h e t h e r you're a post g r a d u a t e or a professor,
we h a v e a BritRail Pass for you too.
Either BritRail Pass lets you ride
a n y o n e of o u r 1(S(X) daily trains. T h e y
can take you from London to as far
n o r t h as Aberdeen —and farther.
However, there is one
restriction. BritRail Passes are not
sold in Britain. You must buy t h e m
here in the U.S.A. before you leave.
T h e r e are also two other travel
bargains you m a y be interested in.
O n e is the O p e n to View Pass.
It entitles you to a d m i s s i o n to over -100
castles, gardens and m u s e u m s all over
Britain for only $5.5(1.
T h e other is the Britainshrinkers — four neat tours. You
eave London in the m o r n i n g
and go to either York, Chester,
C o v e n t r y or Bath. T h e tour
price includes all admissions
and l u n c h in a p u b . And at
night you'll be back in
London in time for
dinner and a night
on the town.
"I
funded bv student
I
ICE COLD BEER AND SODA
$2.00 General Admission
(11 am to 4 pm)
Co
Journalist Jack Chen
There is a strong emphasis on
maintaining close relations be-
Chen emphasized the goal of
the educational system is to encourage selfless motives in the
individual. Ask an average
Chinese student what' he is
studying, and he will say, for
example 'I am studying engineering, but 1 will study whatever is necessary for the people.'
SUBMARINES
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HOW TO PLAN YOUR KN<.A<;i:MI'M AND HI l)l)IN(,
Although
the educational
system is uniformly based on
integrating theory and practice,
no standard curricular textbooks
are in use in the schools. Since
the tumult of the Cultural Revolution, all textbooks are under
review, and each school chooses
its own.
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March 28, 29, 30, 31 - 8:30 pm
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S 71
tween the schools and the community in order to prevent the
growth of a new elite. Every
school is affiliated with a factory
or a farm, and students are
required to visit, learn and work
in them Before entering a university, all students must spend a
year on a farm, in a factory, in
service, or in the People's
Liberation Army.
If y o u ' r e b e t w e e n t h e a g e of 14 a n d 22, y o u c a n b u y
a B r i t R a i l Y o u t h Pass for 15 d a y s of u n l i m i t e d e c o n o m y r a i l t r a v e l
a l l o v e r E n g l a n d for j u s t $ 4 5 .
In an attempt to give a picture
of the time, Chen said that first
posters were hung on all available wall space. When wall space
was taken up, wires were strung
1
the student is trained in the
classroom and then he -.r she is
sent to work in the community
as para-medical help. After a
time, the student again returns
to the classroom, and later again
to the community. This alteration between theory and practice is, Chen said, basic to all
educational training in China
Buy all of England for *45.
And well throw in Scotland and Wales.
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ALBANY S T U D E N T P R E S S
F R I D A Y . MARCH 2 3 , 1 9 7 3
PAGE SEVEN
(
Help Coupon Drive
• i
t h e m , will be able t o read b o o k s .
by Carol Olson
This is a valuable service, since
T h e O n o n d a g a Biaillists Organ-
b o o k s in braille are expensive t o
ization. Inc.. (P.O.Box 34, Liverpool.
New Y o r k ) is collecting
Betty C r o c k e r C o u p o n s in order
p r o d u c e . F o r e x a m p l e , a title in
regular p r i n t t h a t costs between
$ 3 . 5 0 t o $4 w o u l d cost
about
duplicating machine. The Brailler (A
$18.
C o u p o n s can
Braille typewriter) costs 23,000 cou-
Carol Olson, c / o the ASP. They
p o n s ( a b o u t $115) and a Braille
will b e gratefully a c c e p t e d .
t o b u y a Brailler and a Braille
duplicating
machine
If a n y o n e is interested in be-
costs
c o m i n g a Braille transcriber (the
164.000 coupons.
The Onondaga County
ists Organization.
be sent to m e ,
Inc.,
Biaillheaded
Library of Congress will finance
lessons a n d will pay for
paper
by Mrs. Arlene Cook, is a volun-
and p o s t a g e ) or recording for the
teer
blind,
organization
which
tran-
they may write to T h e
scribes b o o k s and o t h e r reading
Department
material into Braille. T h u s blind
Visually H a n d i c a p p e d , Library
people, w h o would not ordinari-
of Congress, Washington, D.C.,
ly
20542.
have
material
available
to
Balfior
the
continued
paid i o live o p i n i o n o tin Sill
faculty mei ihei
d e n I s. oihei
a n d also the c n m i i u i n i n . I k
is trying in understand the VOlk
ing >!' such s i t u a t i o n s . .Hid In id
thai thv\ ' S e e m some vlia! poll
heal
1101
J o • BaH'loi's case h
iiUl.ll Some people
Ace HIIII
m l n is lejCLlcd
f l u muni' Dun.in Ihei e vie
in ll .Hill .Is llllle
of
| nlltl
uiiu
med
p. 1.
e ".i
CS 11
Blind
and
from page six
volvcd here as in any situation
Hul
the
poml
being made
hy
those s u p p o r t i n g Balfior is that
il is a l w a y s those l e a t h e r s w h o
people w o u l d like In see remain
who
uo
According
I"
Dcan
S c h m i d i . Iliough. n is the " j o b
ol a d m i u i s t i a l i o u lo i h m k of the
Inline
pecially
ol
a
department."
when
es-
il comes lo the
•liiilgincni quality,
which Is diffi-
c u l t . " Agreed.
IT'S COMING ON A SUNDAY
LOSE
20 POUNDS
IN
TWO WEEKS!
famous
I' S
Ski Team
WonU'il
Diet
During the non-snow nil scasiin
(he L" S Women's Alpine Ski Team
members go on the "Ski Team" diet
in lose 20 pounds in two ueeks
That's right
20 pounds in 14 days'
! he hasis of the diet is chemical food
action and was devised hy a famous
C olotado physician especially lor the
l1 S Ski Team Normal energy is
maintained Hers important1) while
rcduunn You keep "lull"
no
Ma r\ anon
beta use the did is dcHyied ihat way' It's .1 did thai it
:as\ !•' lollow whether um work
rMsel or -.las ai home
• uucsslul diet If ii weren't, the I S
Women's Ski Icon wouldn't he permuted id use it' Right'1 Si> give
yourself the same break ihe I S Ski
learn gch I osc weight the scientific
pro sen way Fsen il vuu'vc tried .ill
the nihcr diets you owe it I" soursell In u> ihe I S Women's Ski
I earn iJicl 1 hat is if you really do
Wiini 10 lose 20 pounds 111 two weeks
rdcr today le.o this nul .is a
rrimdci
Send only Mm (12 2i loi Hush
Servitef
cash is O K
to Information Sources ( o |» () Box M2,
Dept S I . (arpinlcna. Calif 93013
Don'! order unless you expect to lose
20 pounds in two weeks' Because
that's what the Ski [cam Diet will do!
CAGE EIGHT
+
Sign of
the good
neighbor.
T h e A m e r i c a n Red Cross
b y Steve Weissman
Should t h e United States cont i n u e t o provide e c o n o m i c aid t o
S o u t h Vietnam, Laos, and Cambodia? Should we help rebuild
North Vietnam?
President
Nixon,
Professor
Kissinger, and POW spokesman
Col. R o b i n s o n Risner think we
s h o u l d ; Congress remains unconvinced while anti-war radicals
just a r e n ' t sure. But almost no
one has yet tackled the tough,
overriding question: w h a t policy
objectives would Washington use
the aid to pursue?
T h e answer is far from clear.
Dr. Kissinger, for example, told
NBC t h a t the United States
would
not
object
if
the
Communists
unified
Vietnam
through "peaceful
and democratic m e a n s , " while some observers believe thai he expects
the CommunisLs to do just that
within a year or two at most. If
thai is true, then Washington
evidently agreed lo c o n t r i b u t e
' t o healing the wounds of war
and the postwar r e c o n s t r u c t i o n "
either as "reparations' 1 to obtain
a face-saving agreement from the
Communists, or lo keep open
future options with a Communist Vietnam.
This, however, would not explain why Washington rushed to
build up Saigon s Air Force and
Army in the days prior to the
('ease- V\ re, or wh y Preside nl
Nixon is so willing to risk his
political capital gettilng the unpopular $7.5 billion aid package
through an already-hostile Congress .
Nor
(I ii e s
ihe
" r e p a r a t i o n s " view understand
that the idea of aid came not
from Hanoi but from Washington, where il has been under
high-level study ever since I % t i .
On balance, then, il seems lhat
Washington, while prepared to
accept a possible Communist victory, still intends to use Ihe new
peacetime aid to pursue its old
wartime goals: a permanent division DI' Vietnam and a secure
and
1ndc pe nde nt
nonCommunist South Vie-!nam,
Washington also hopes to pur
sue these goals less overtly than
before, working with Japan and
the Europeans through either a
United Nations agency or some
specially-created
international
Motor Cycle Insurance
New Low Rates
Jim Riley
(T&fc.
1078 Western Avenue ^ ^
482-1645
CUNT EASTWOOD
Alternative F e a t u r e s Service
t h e criticisms of t h e m a n y ant.
mechanism. This multilateral apwar activists w h o n o w find
proach is what the aid pac kage's
t h e m s e l v e s a p p l a u d i n g aid to
loudest " c r i t i c s " favor. Senators
Hanoi.
Fulbright and Proxmire, for exT h e actual aid t o S o u t h Vietample, have blasted the idea of
n a m , Laos a n d Cambodia will
"American aid," while at t h e
likely follow familiar patterns.
same time offering to s u p p o r t
Back in 1 9 5 4 , for example,
multilateral aid, "My purpose in
C A R E , Catholic Relief Services
making it (the aid) multilateral
a n d the I n t e r n a t i o n a l Rescue
would be t o disengage the AmC o m m i t t e e c o o p e r a t e d with the
erican presence from Indochina
U.S. Central Intelligence Agency
and to allow t h e m to settle their
to build u p p r o - g o v e r n m e n t supdifferences among themselves,"
port
among
the
900*000
explained Senator Fulbright. " I
refugees. Now, t h o u g h possibly
do n o t think it's our responu n d e r c o n t r a c t t o some inter
sibility to c o n t i n u e to dictate
national agency, t h e same groups
how this part of the world
will p r o b a b l y give t h e new refshould be r u n . "
ugees t h e s a m e priority.
Whether Nixon is pulling the
Similarly, civilian contractors,
wool over Ful bright's e. is, or
like NHA, Inc. of Los Agneles,
Fulbright is pulling the wool
will provide m a i n t e n a n c e for
over the eyes of his anti-Saigon's h e l i c o p t e r s and fix
inlerventionisl supporters, is un-winged aircraft, while Food loi
clear. But when we r e m e m b e r
Peace aid c o n t i n u e s lo support
lhal
former
Pentagon
chief
the CIA's "secret a r m y " in Lin,
Robert McNamura now heads
F o r m e r A m b a s s a d o r to Ln,-.
the World Bank, and that former
William Sullivan, who controlled
Bank
of
America
president
the " s e c r e t a r m y " is now .\ v ,
Rudolph Peterson - w h o has
istant Secretary of Slate for
glowingly spoken of the profSou theast
Asia n A f fa i is ami
itable investment o p p o r t u n i t i e s
with Kissinger, the key aid neu-n
111 South East Asia • heads the
I in tor.
United
Nations
Development
O t h e r aspects ol ihe aid |HM
Programme, the uses of multgram - like the large influx ,,t
ilateral aid become clear.
" c i v i l i a n s " in the days before iln
Under such auspices, any aid
Cease-Fire
bring smiles in v-i
to North Vietnam would be a far
eran observers. "While man', ,i
cry from either " r e p a r a t i o n s " or
t h e e x p e r t s or technician* '••
the recent " n o - s t r i n g s " private
advisers) will be wearing ciwiun
contributions to rebuild
the
sp< shirts,
the suspicion leBach
Mai Hospital.
In his
st )ng t h a t u n d e r n e a t h t l u \ w,i
February 23 press conference,
hfctve doglags or at least H I . , .
Dr. Kissinger described aid to
i n e n t p a p e r s , " w r o t e (,.-.,.•••
Hanoi as "an a t t e m p t to enable
Me Arthur of the Los Angel,
the leaders of North Vietnam Lo
Times.
" A n d , the civilians .
work together with other counready h e r e , including main i '•
tries, and particularly with Wesl
tral Intelligence Agency t \ \i>
ern countries, in a more conwill simply change lilies .,.,,!
structive relationship, and to
c o n t i n u e what Ihey are il
provide in this manner an inand possibly do m o r e . "
centive toward a more peaceful
" A m o n g o t h e r things." tie
e v o l u t i o n . " That, of course, preJournal
explains, "all \,m >\ i
sumes
that
the
Communist
earned by investors who qiulii\
leadership, or at least an eleare e x e m p t from taxes for I'm
ment, thereof, shares Kissinger's
years or longer, export ami mi
vision.
p o r t taxes also arc waived. a- ,,n
More i m p o r t a n t , though, by
land and building levies
I \\>
supporting
aid
to
the
Vietnamese also advertise tlu
Communists in the North, Nixon
their labor is even ehea])ci il,,,ii
and
Kissinger
have
further
in Hong Kong, Singpore, I'aiw.n
strengthened their case for a
or Korea.
continuing c o m m i t m e n t to the
So far, investors remain w,n\
anti-Communists in the South.
But, " N o w that the war is utfi
No doubl
they could have
cially over, there is inereasin
forced throuuh some aid to
American interest in private <!•
Saigon in any event, but not at
v e l o p m e n t of Southeast AM.I.
anything like their proposed
n o t e s William .J. Bird ol Kmw
billion dollar levels. Nor could
Industries, And to prove In
they have so effectively silenced
point, he has organized a gron
of fit) high-ranking business .m
financial executives to lour th
entire region in late Man I
looking over some $1 billion i
potential c o n s t r u c t i o n pmieci
O t h e r businessmen with mi' •<<•••
in oil, food
processing
••
riculture, and labor inlemiv* embly plants should VM»H I
following suit.
clams
|Tower East... cine cum laudt
An Interview with the Speaker of the Assembly
b y Kim Steven J u h a s e
In
1974
there
will be a gubernatorial
who has been in office
he will
run
options
for his fifth
open."
Republican
If
unified.
Perry B. Duryea
One reason
from
might
he
term
but only
decides
not
That
be that
he is hard
fo
bis
but
to
run,
universal
positions
then he might
Rockefeller's
to pin
from
his
down
from
for Speaker,
the Democrats
voting
record.
budget
should
be cut 60-75 Million
When
The interview
took place in Duryea's
rostrum.
struck
me as a man
before
with nothing
He was friendly
who
quantity
office
and
Q: You were first elected to
the Assembly in 1961). and in 9
s h o r t years you rose t o the
S p e a k e r s h i p . What a c c o u n t s for
y o u r rapid rise?
A: I'll have to be very frank in
saying that there was a tremend o u s turn over in Ihe Assembly
in 196-1. President J o h n s o n carried every c o u n t y in the S t a t e
and this m e a n t that y o u n g e r
m e n in Ihe Assembly, like myself, were able to move ahead
m o r e rapidly t h a n they would
have been o t h e r w i s e . Kor this
reason, 1 was given an opport u n i t y relatively early in my
legislative career to move into a
leadership capacity.
to be on
conservation
might
have to be
announcement
dollars
that
making
him about
of no
located
very
has been interviewed
new to say.
questioned
for
Yet, when I questioned
me it was just a minute
he
impossible
talent of seeming
He makes a public
not
also,
on issues. As Speaker,
see times when the environment
the economy.
he told
Speaker's
the
Assembly
in cases of ties. This makes it
seem like a fiscal conservative.
amount
his
one
and still keep
admiration
but
on state issues, he has a strange
for
is only
of the N.Y.S.
sides of an issue. He states that he is strongly
sacrificed
that
to "keep
there
get the nomination
of his own party
have to vote except
both
that he wants
man is Speaker
the almost
doesn't
get
Rockefeller,
yet stated publicly
Jr.
for
members
personally
race. Governor
15 years, has not
who could possibly
Republicans
just
for
him
the
consequence.
just behind
cooperative
thousands
but
of
the
he
times
Q; You have been q u o t e d as
having said that a lifetime career
in the legislature "is n o t for
m e . " Why not?
A: I believe that in governm e n t a l • act i v i i y p e o p l e can i
stay in office t o o long. It is
i m p o r t a n t career wise for a person to change his efforts from
time to time and I also think
l h a t institutions such as the
legislature gam s o m e t h i n g from a
new personality, a new look,
from time to time. T h e q u o t e
you are referring to is m a d e t o
the fact that 1 think a person
should arrive on a scene at a
particular j o b , d o the best he can
for some specific period of time
and then go on to s o m e t h i n g
h e r e n t in o u r s y s t e m t h a t t h e r e
is a division b e t w e e n the executive, t h e legislative and judicial
and t h e G o v e r n o r r e s p e c t s t h e
i n d e p e n d e n c e of the legislature
and t h e legislature respects t h e
i n d e p e n d e n c e of the Executive.
Built i n t o o u r e x e c u t i v e b u d g e t
s y s t e m is t h e need of the Governor s u b m i t t i n g his b u d g e t t o t h e
legislature n o m a t t e r w h o the
people involved m a y be a n d it is
t h e legislative responsibility t o
review t h a t b u d g e t ; in some cases
t o m a k e c u t s a n d in some cases
to r e o r d e r priorities and I ' m sure
t h a t the G o v e r n o r recognizes
t h a t when the legislature " d o e s
it's t h i n g , " so to s p e a k , . . . t h a t t h e
legislature is acting responsibly
and is serving the people of t h e
state..,
Q: T h e r e has been some question as t o the e x t e n t of New
York S t a t e ' s budget surplus.
Why?
A: This is a Variable and it
relates to m a n y different things.
I'll give you an e x a m p l e . At this
time of year, a n d the state fiscal
year ends on March 3 1 , New
York S t a l e income tax payers in
m a n y instances are receiving
funds. Now if the refunds are
mailed o u t in March they are
charged against the c u r r e n t fiscal
year. This could cut into a
surplus. T h e c h e c k s could be
dalayed because of servicing in
the office or in administrative
p r o c e d u r e . In lhal case, t h e
checks might not be mailed until
A prvl. This
item
alone
of
I'll! ITT) million dollars would
alleci the surplus a! the end of
March -'! 1. It w o u l d mean we
could have a surplus of this
a m o u n t totally c o m m i t t e d to go
Q . Is t h e r e a possibility t h a t
w h e n you feel y o u r t i m e period
in the legislature is u p y o u might
decide t o run for G o v e r n o r ?
A: I h a v e n ' t given t h a t m u c h
t h o u g h t . New Y o r k S t a t e has an
i n c u m b e n t chief e x e c u t i v e w h o
indicates t h a t h e is considering
r u n n i n g again in 1974 so speculation a b o u t w h a t might h a p p e n
in the future in so far as t h a t
office is c o n c e r n e d is certainly
previous.
Q : Has G o v e r n o r Rockefeller
ever personally told you t h a t he
w o u l d run for a n o t h e r t e r m ?
A : He has n o t said to me t h a t
h e w o u l d r u n n i n g again in ' 7 4
in specific w o r d s b u t he has said
publicly t h a t h e is keeping his
o p t i o n s o p e n and he is certainly
considering r u n n i n g for a n o t h e r
term.
Q; Is there c o m p e t i t i o n between yourself a n d
Majority
L e a d e r of t h e Senate Warren
Anderson?
A: I think that t h e r e is a
friendly
competition
between
the t w o h o u s e s but I d o n ' t think
there is c o m p e t i t i o n b e t w e e n
leaders t h a t relates to o n e trying
to o u t d o the o t h e r or o u t press
release the o t h e r . I have been
e x t re mely
close
to
Warren
A n d e r s o n on a personal basis
and I suspect our leadership responsibilities will bring us even
closer.
Q: You have split with Governor Rockefeller on such m a t t e r s
as tax cuts and budget cuts. How
are y o u r relations with
the
Governor?
A. My relations with
the
Governor
have
always
been
warm, cordial, and we have enjoyed close c o o p e r a t i o n . It's in-
o u t in t h e form of refunds t o
t a x p a y e r s n e x t m o n t h . T h a t is
t h e reason why there is so m u c h
q u e s t i o n as t o the size of the
surplus. A n o t h e r reason is t h a t
we are doing business in New
York S t a t e at the rate of S8
billion is 80 million a n d t h a t ' s
n o t a big variation. Therefore, in
a business this size it's a l m o s t
impossible t o predict t o t h e dollar w h a t the surplus m a y be on
any given day.
Q: This week you suggested
that
the Governor's
budget
s h o u l d b e c u t by 60-75 million
dollars. Where should t h e cuts be
made?
A: A c u t of 60 million is only
vi of 1% of the total budget.
T h a t ' s n o t much m o n e y . A cut
this size could be an accumulation of a job or two here, a job
of t w o t h e r e ; a small program
here, a small program t h e r e .
Q: T h e r e has been m u c h controversy over the m a t t e r of tui
lion at the State Universities
A s s e m b l y m a n Henderson has int r o d u c e d a bill to eliminate tuition while there are t h o s e w h o
w a n t to m a k e tuition equal to
that of private schools. Where do
you stand?
A: I d o n ' t think in o u r complex sociely today we can hold
o u t the h o p e for people that
major functions—transportation,
higher e d u c a t i o n , health services- c a n all be free...I believe there
should be a c o n t r i b u t i o n by people for services...If we are going
to have a viable higher e d u c a t i o n
system involving 3 6 0 , 0 0 0 people, we need to get some pari ol
the cost defrayed. Likewise, if
we m a k e higher e d u c a t i o n totally free, we would p r o b a b l y deal
Attn: Class'74
Dec. '73 grads
May 7 4 grads
Your senior portraits for the 7 4 yearbook, and your parents,
Place of sitting: Campus Center 305
Hours:
will be taken during the week of March 26th.
Appointments for sittings must be made at the Campus Center
Information Desk...starting today! In order to get a time slot
convenient for you it is important that you sign up early.
Mon.
March 26th, 9AM-1PM
2PM-6PM
Tues.
March 27th, 1PM-5PM
6PM-10PM
Wed.
March 28th, 9AM-1PM
2PM-6PM
Thurs.
March 29th, 1PM-5PM
6PM-10PM
Fri.
March 30th, 9AM-1PM
2PM-6PM
Sitting Fee:
$2.50
Due to popular demand, your portraits will be done in natural
Friday and Saturday,
tfffeJr • -
note:
color.
a free sitting will be granted in the
You may come dressed formal or informal.
fall if you're dissatisfied with this
March 23 and 24
7:30 and 10:00
The scream
you near may
be your own!
$.50 with state quad card
"PLAY MISTY FOR ME"
...an Invitation to tenor...
JESSICA WALTER
DONNA MILLS
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
sitting.
Photography hy:
LC 7
Delma Studios, Park Ave., New York
If you have any questions please contact John Chow
$1 . 0 0 without
at the Torch Office.
SHORT FEATURE:
Campus Center 305, 457-2116.
You must have an appointment, sign up this weekend...now!
What Every Boy and Girl Should
A PORTRAIT IS FOREVER
Know About Sex
FRIDAY, MARCH 23. 197':
FRIDAY, MARCH 23, 1973
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
PAGE NINE
Interview with the Speaker
Pine Bush
by David Lerner
i V u r i m K i / from j * g c 9
a d e a t h b l o w t o p r i v a t e higher
education and this would be a
very serious p r o b l e m in o u r
s t a t e . A t o t a l l y free s t a t e university s y s t e m might h u r t t h e stud e n t s in the l o n g r u n because
certainly, if t h e s t a t e w e r e t o
assume total c o s t , it w o u l d m e a n
t h e g r o w t h of t h e S t a t e universities w o u l d be r e d u c e d a n d t h e
n u m b e r of seats available in t h e
future w o u l d be less t h a n otherwise.
get along o n a voluntary basis.
On t h e o t h e r hand, this is the
kind of decision I would like t o
see s t u d e n t government make. I
d o n ' t t h i n k we in the legislature
s h o u l d impose our will on campus in areas of this kind. O n e of
the great trends in higher education n a t i o n w i d e is the participation of s t u d e n t s in their own
governance and this is the kind
of decision I like to see students
make.
Q: Chancellor B o y e r h a s called
for almost a c o m p l e t e halt in t h e
e x p a n s i o n of S U N Y . D o e s this
mark the end of t h e great S U N Y
expansion?
A : One of the reasons t h e s t a t e
university s y s t e m has grown so
t r e m e n d o u s l y o v e r t h e past decade, was t h a t t h e funds were
available t h r o u g h the s t a t e university c o n s t r u c t i o n fund which.
incidentally, receives its m o n e y
from s o m e t u i t i o n collection a n d
o t h e r revenues from s t u d e n t s .
Without
that,
the
growth
w o u l d n ' t have been as great as it
was and looking to the future,
even though we may go t h r o u g h
a period now w h e r e e x p a n s i o n is
curtailed, we c e r t a i n l y w o u l d
not grow as fast, relatively
speaking, as we w o u l d if we do
have some i n c o m e t o offset
costs.
Q : You have long been an
advocate for e n v i r o n m e n t a l conservation a n d have o p p o s e d offshore drilling off Long Island.
But is there a possibility that the
e c o n o m i c benefits t o New York
from off-shore drilling might
outweigh the potential environmental hazard0
A : In 1 9 7 3 . I am o p p o s e d t o
off-shore drilling in New York
State waters...that's no* to say
that in the year 2 0 0 0 when we
have a very serious energy problem that that position should
not be reviewed. S o m e o n e will
be a r o u n d besides me to make
those decisions. I'm sure at that
point But 1 think that a decision
of this kind is a question of
balance Right now we don I
need energy that might be stored
u n d e r the water of Long Island
**ound
Q T h e r e has been m u c h debate as t o w h e t h e r t h e r e should
be a m a n d a t o r y s t u d e n t tax at
the state universities. Both Senator S c h e r m e r h o m and S e n a t o r
Marchi have i n t r o d u c e d bills t o
abolish the m a n d a t o r y tax. Do
you feel t h a t t h e organization
funded by this tax can get along
on a volutary basis' 1
y Last week, s e n a t e Majonl)
Leader Warren Anderson said
that he was in favor of modifying
Governor Rockefeller's drug program with it* m a n d a t o r y life
sentences and with no chance of
parole for drug pushers H o » do
you
feel a b o u t Rockefeller >
plan" 1
A I think Mere are portions o :
the G o v e r n o r ' s program which
certainly
stand
consideration
A: 1 think they could p r o b a b l y
North way Taxi
24 hr. Service
a n d favorable action. On the
o t h e r hand, there are some portions that concern me. I have
always d r a w n the line between
the e n t r e p r e n e u r pusher, which is
m y description of a person who
lives o n t h e sale of drugs and an
addict pusher or juvenile who
u n f o r t u n a t e l y may be h o o k e d
on drugs. I think there are different problems. In ray mind there
are no pentalities severe enough
for the person who is profiting
from the sale of drugs. But that
person is different from the addict
who
unfortunately
is
h o o k e d on drugs and is pushing
drugs in order to support his
addiction. For that reason.I feel
that they should be treated in
varying degrees..
Q: Would you then be in favor
of the death penalty for the
e n t r e p r e n e u r pusher''
A I think that may be rather
unrealistic. 1 think that mandatory sentences short of the death
penalty would meet the problem
Q Finally, Mr Speaker what
would you say were your major
accomplishments is Speaker" 1
A 1 think that we have improved the operation, of the
A s s e m b h immensely We nave
better staffing, better facilities
We have more time for commit
tee meetings, better planning
We work really on a year round
rja^ts. Sc> that I would say one of
the ma;or things that we nave
d o n e o'.er :ne pas: four years
-A as to move Lie New York State
legislature to the front ixid has
made us a leader .n tne nation
Compared to other stites '.r,-.
conduct u' our nouses ;n terrra
:' ;ne work load tne job ihev
c- • and their response to critical
LSst-e-s r. m> mind is far super.or to ir.Ytning iround us
A friar.* >ou .ery much. Mr
STUDENT-FACULTY PLAN
FAST DEPENDABLE SERVICE
LOWEST CAB RATES IN THE AREA:
I
FLY-DRIVE^.
EUROPEbfi)
SUNY Campus to Albany Airport-S3.50
SUNY Campus to Colonie Center-S2.00
Fcr Fret fo'Z*r write
C a r - T o u r s in Europe. Inc.
SUNY Campus to Northway Mall-S2.00
additional p«*sang*rs only S 25 extra each
Our o t h e r rates are equally l o w - Call for q u o t e s
:•: t i i
DIAI
4 5 6 - 8 2 94
L
!••••
T h e development of A l b a n y ' s
Pine
Bush wilderness
area,
moved o n e s t e p closer following
a public m e e t i n g o n March 7 at
City Hall.
After months of l e t t e r writing,
imploring, d e m a n d i n g and waiting, the long anticipated meeting', pitting T h e People for the
Pine Bush against t h e MidAtlantic Construction Corporation, produced little visible results. T h e Mid-Atlantic developers revealed some vague plans
for their 263 acre, 2,000 unit
housine project in the area,
along with plans for an extension to the Washington Avenue
Extension, perhaps o u t t o R o u t e
126.
T h e People for t h e Pine Bush
environmental coalition b r o u g h t
out their facts as well: t h e claims
of "environmental u n i q u e n e s s "
and the fact that 2.5 billion
gallons of pure water
from
which Schenectady, Guilderland,
Colonie and Albany all draw
some of their water supply, will
be in serious threat of pollution
if the Pine Bush is covered over.
Despite the insistance t h a t of
the first 32 acres of development. &b% will remain untouched. George Keleshian, President of PYE. said, " M u c h of
the ground cover will die when
disturbed during c o n s t r u c t i o n .
Because of the type of soil on
the Pine Bush, a very delicate
balance in the u n i q u e area m u s t
remain u n d i s t u r b e d . "
David Berley. of the develop,ng company also promised t o
cor.ate 30 acres a r o u n d the
r.^idwaters of the Kaikout Creek
:<j eitner the city or the State
Nature
Conservancy
Rudy
Peterson, head of 'tie Conser
-ancy expressed strong interest
.n managing this small preserve
Tne Albany League of Women
Voters protested against the proposed cost of the housing •
22.000 t o 5 3 0 . 0 0 0 per unit • as
contrary' to the needs of the
area, that being low and moderate income housing. T h e y also
expressed dismay over the rapid
.*> with which major decisions
.ire being reached By this they
obviously meant the unusually
snort span of time between the
.nitial public hearing on March
and tne zoning board meeting,
tne final step before approval for
:r.e development, this M o n d a y
T n*- .nesting Monday
has
-•pjrf.r-d ^ new round of charges
*nd c o u n t e r c h a r g e s between the
K IT. irunmenidlist-s
and
Mayor
I'j-nir.,;. wno finds himsulf jammed :' 'rri!> on the middle of the
pr-j'.t-rbi'il fence
A c c e d i n g to tn<- Tinu-s L'nion.
*edne>dd>
March '21. Mayor
Corning promised to inform the
P e o p l e for t h e Pine Bush of his
decision w h e t h e r or n o t to post
p o n e t h e s c h e d u l e d meeting until a soil s t u d y by Patrick
Mahoney,
of
Smith
!int l
M a h o n e y Engineers of Albany, is
s u b m i t t e d for inspection. Mr.
M a h o n e y ' s r e p o r t , detailing effects o n drainage, sewage, the
w a t e r t a b l e a n d t h e soil was
c o n s p i c u o u s l y absent from the
m e e t i n g d o w n at City Hall H<>
did, however, a d m i t that the
natural
filtration
of the sit-nd
d u n e w o u l d be impeded by construction.
Mr. Keleshian, w h o feds that
the M a h o n e y r e p o r t will | )( .
damaging t o the efforts of the
developers,
has asked Mayor
C o r n i n g for a delay in the Monday m e e t i n g , and a n o t h e r public
f o r u m t o reassess t h e situation
when t h e r e p o r t is turned in But
R i c h a r d Patrick, City Planner.
c o m m e n t e d , " I d o n ' t think .mother public hearing will practi
cally solve a n y t h i n g . "
Mr. Keleshian's precise request
was for a new public hcirma
u n d e r t h e rule of the mayor *<,r
t h e p u r p o s e of "acquainting ;>•••,
pie with t h e u n i q u e 'points ( | |
the a r e a , " t o which Corning ,••
p o r t e d l y said that it was pn^i
ble. A m o n g t h e " p o i n t s :»• re
ferred to were the King* Hi^h
way, dating back to the colon J
dav. archaeological findings nt
Indian cultures in this s-n-.i MMsand d u n e s resulting from ml K ,.,I
Lake A l b a n y , and the J r. bill nn
gallons of water.
M a y o r Corning recogni/.w! ..
validity of t h e e n v i r o n m e n t i -•.
claims, b u t s t a t e d m a t t e r o! ' •
ly, "1 am interested in cr< •.• :*>
housing in A l b a n y ' Wit! • •
a p p a r e n t l y in mind, the M , . .
called Keleshian informing ;, in
of his intent to let the rnwtiiui^'
on as s c h e d u l e d .
Keleshian reflect* back •" .
p r o m i s e M a y o r Corning ••'.. ••
last year in a meeting he*.
SUNYA
with
himselt
Mayor, Ted Mallin and II.,
G o r d o n , t w o RPI engine
s t u d e n t s At this meeting
M a y o r allegedly promi\c(i
no further
extension
Wash i n gt on A ven u e Kx t *
would be m a d e b \ o n d tnsent K a r n e r R o u d - R o u i e
C o r n i n g denies ever h.i
made such a s t a t e m e n t
T i m e sland» definitcls <••
side of the "Pinehur.vi n.>
c o m p l e x and the Mid .V
C o n s t r u e t ion
Own pan \
Keleshian and Ins Coaiiii"
main d e t e r m i n e d in •*,,•••
ever they c m of l he i i
diminishing area
Ai ;<>•
they plan a massive <!••.•
campaign in t h e Pun H •
April 7th which f u r
p r o m i s e d t o lend .ill tin
he can
•••—•••••••••••••••§•••
Campus Coalition presents:
composer to attend
String Quartet will p e r f o r m Siring
P.M. in
recital. Ihe
Dorian
Quartets
Woodwind
a Fantasy
and the Mxidumd
Ihe I'iann Sonata
PAGE TEN
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
Quintet,
JJ
a
and
lalci in the day at 8 : 3 0 also in Ihe Recital Hall.
alive ol New Y o i k C i t y . When he c n t e i c d l l a i v a i d lie majored ..
Lllo.lt Cailei is
English h t e i a l u i e . Il was ii"l mini his lasl yeai Ihere that he decided t o he a musician.
idiialc slitdcnl and studied with Wallci Piston
l i e slaved on
In l'i 12 ( ailei wool to P a n s , wheie foi three years he studied with Nadia lioulangei.
I rom this period d a l e s the Insl ol lus w o i k s lo he performed in public, incidental music
loi a pci I oi u lance ol i he lliihu
teles of S o p h o c l e s b y ihe l l a i v a i d Classical C l u b , l-'oi Ihe
l i n n lo the United Slales in ! l ) 3 S , the music lor
.line c r o u p he w t n l e . at lei his
iiuihei h o r n ibis s c o i e . the I'aranletk', w:i wlilely p e i l o i i r
PI.nuns' W.n/c/fa
U c e ( lub I .me
10 id. His ailiclcs
ell led in New Y o i k ( l i s
published it
dicals won linn
asa thoughtful
lepulali
I"
c
In
laciiln ol St J o h n ' s C
appointment lo il
.\lien' the philosophei Scott liiiehanan bad inaugurated a "gleat
oulil not hul he
( .ii l e i ' s l n o a d inlelleeiiial i n i e i e s l s . h
I') In In
Annapolis
nCpl.
M,,i\i.i
llll
I h e i k hi ,i
ence bin .ils
ili.ii u n d e i l a )
which music was laughl
mil only as
.Iheli
a h i a n d i ol physics and m a t h e m a t i c s . I h e idealist philosophy
the leaching ai Si
J o h n ' s was congenial lo bis o w n o u t l o o k , which he
dcsciibed as h e m e "in ihe direction ol Plaloiusin. as seen by W h i t e h e a d . " C a r t e l ' s
e x p e u e n e e al St. J o h n ' s gave hull a line insighl into trie role ol music in hbeial a i t s
education
11 is il lines a i Si. J o h n ' s inieil'eied w u h his c o m p o s i n g , b o w e v e i ; so Carter relinquished
his posi and weul lo Santa | e . New Mexico, w h e r e , in Ihe winlei of 1 0 4 2 . he c o m p l e t e d
Ins I usl S y m p h o n y . He seived dining the wai as a music con suit an I at the Office ol Win
liiloMiiaiion, ami taught al ihe P e a b o d y C o n s e r v a t o r y in Baltimore. Since t h e n . C a r t e l
has not w a n t e d loi r e c o g n i t i o n ; lot m addition to n u m e r o u s academic a p p o i n t e i n e n t s ,
c o m p o s i t i o n prizes and t w o Uiiggenheiiu Fellowships, he has received m a n y c o m p o s i n g
c o m i m s s i o n s - n o t a h l y from Ihe Koussevitsky Music F o u n d a t i o n , the Louisville Orchesu a . the I-11110111 F o u n d a t i o n , I he League ol C o i n p o s c i s and the l l a i v a i d ( d e c C l u b . In
I'll,I), his String
Quartet
Nn, J won the P u h l / e i P n / e loi Music.
I h e C o m p o s e r s S l i m e O u a i t e t was established in l ' l ( o and i s c i n i e n l l y in residence al
ihe New I'ligl.md C o i i s e i v a h n y ol Music m l i o s l o u . C o n c e i t s and Symposia on c a m p u s e s
.is well .is guest .ippeai.inecs on ehainbei music senes have won ihe (Juarlel a devoied
public ami high ciilical acclaim. In 10711 | h e C o m p o s e r s (Juailel and the New England
Couseivaloiy
whelming
eslahlished
the
"Composers
Ouailel Coinposnioii P n / e
llu
limited SLOICS augeis well loi ihe I n l i n e ol string
lesponse ol i
ipiai lei v\ i iling. In the
1071 the Q u a i t e l was in icsldenee ai
Darlinoiilh
College in S ™ llanipslii
,il ihe Ouailet aie Matthew Kaunondi, Au.ihiil A|,iini.iu. Jean Diipouy
lb
id Mn.li.iel K u d i a k o v . I aeli ineinbei is a highly esieeined p e i l o i m e i in his own n g b l .
Chailes Kuskiu lei iv K u k b i i d e . Jane
Ihe lion.in Woodwind (.(iiuili
Kail Ki
I i,l\clNll\
cipienls ol n u i n e i o u s
,1 I
Ill ( eniei I li< \ ,n.' ill.
I iiutl loi Music In
.Mil Hie U.lllh.l ll.ill.I K o . k e l ,
I \ , « \ oik C l H ' s lliooklyll College I a. nil y as Al lists-
I . .11
I,
,.l h a s p .
, \ .1-
eiloiiue.l at the St.lie
I the M.nih.ltl
Willi.
l l l l . e Ii
s. hool " i Mn i- ii Sew
i em,-i .ii Hun do
I
Ihe I . u i i l H " I the Si
l I and head ol lli,
V„k
m
hie
,1 Mi
Ins d u n e s al
Piol.
Ii
1 .Mt.-i I,-, ihe 1
IO |
.lie-I .Mill
id 1*1-11.
III.
In
in oigain/alion
h. I ..id
,1 Ihe 1 .
..i.l
, I nk.is I
led Ai
did In, iindeigi.idii.ili
I W i l l i I 111
I I. .il •! .lie I I
id II, l.i S.i
SUNYAIi
Nil .
|,, | 0 / | ||,
III,' II. I I oil,
,ik
7:30 & 9:30
the Si.
. It,
\ .;\,
I I-.I
ink
has app,
uhle
ilk al 1 ill' I idle
•llcli
Donald
in ihe I ,e.l .Hid Soullieasl with
lid is ,n,
palllsl
lleloie |o|illllg Ihe
I ,i, ,ill\ .,l in,' Soil, I
.IT \ ,d New N oik .11 Alh.lll) he lallglll al Alllto.h College III
siinnii'l l.e
it., i ,0 ihe lllllsi, I est iv. 11 a I I .ingle wood as ,, vocal coach.
Is ., I .1. idl\
I,, I h . '
ihe SI NY A I'At
1., Ihe Stllllld.iS
FRIDAY, MARCH 2 ' . I '
1
I and 2, S a t u r d a y a f t e r n o o n at 4 : 0 0
anil Ian Williams from S U N Y al Buffalo will p e r f o i m Carter's piece for
\.".l
H I I U H I I I M I H I I I I H I W I M
•'
linipani
I'll,.) Ill,.,
$1.50 w/o tax card
• M M
i
I h e Dorian Quiiilel will perforin these two pieces. Dennis llelmrich of S U N Y A will play
I ,-|,o-nlli[l.
1,1 SI \ s , \ . loel ( li.id.ihe
, Inn i, Ii ,l il,, si \ i \ I .,, ih
$1.00 w/tax card
Nos.
Q u i n t e t will w i t h Elliott C a r t e r c o n d u c t
w o r k s h o p c o n c e r n i n g t w o of C a r t e r ' s w o r k s loi w o o d w i n d e n s e m b l e : Right Eludes
Medical Aid for Indo China
Friday & Saturday
a
of three e v e n t s : on F r i d a y at 8 : 3 0 P.M. in the Main T h e a t r e of the PAC T h e C o m p o s e r s
Kesnle
All p r o c e e d s go to Attica Defense Fund a n d
March 23. 1973
A Festival of the Music of Elliott Carter will highlight this w e e k - e n d s March 2 3 - 2 4
sk\
directed by Gillo Pontecorvo (Battle of Algiers)
i
w
activities at t h e S t a l e University of New York at A l b a n y . T h e festival will be c o m p r i s e d
ihe I).
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I h e cllseinlile has p . u l l . Ipaleil in the Inlein.
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Stan Unlirartlty of New York at Albany
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Carter Festival Today
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LC 23
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ALBANY
STUDENT
PRESS
1%K0
Student
I...
IWi
tils will he llu
olhlis
hike
on sale
lt.,\ O i l t . e IIII tut oiiiv.il ion call -1's' si,110 I l u i o will he no admission
MuslColliiill eveul Innileil by
I his I e-.ll
ill
ist Jan Williams, and tile Dorian W o o d w i n d
I h e C o m p o s e r ' s String Q u a r t e t . Perci
Q u i n t e t will be performing al the 1-lliutl Carter festival this w e e k e n d
twt-muf
Society:
view/comment/preview/comment/
How Paradigms Change
bv Saul-Paul Sirag
AFS
We all k n o w t h a t s o m e t h i n g is
r o t t e n in America and t h e world,
a n d that it just has t o change.
But h o w ? O n e of . t h e m o r e
i n t e r e s t i n g proposals t o c o m e
a l o n g r e c e n t l y is Willis H a r m a n ' s
prediction that parapsycholygy,
b y its challenge t o the scientific
a n d social paradigms of o u r
c u l t u r e , will be a major force in
bringing a b o u t a new (and bett e r ) society.
Willis H a r m a n , w h o m a d e this
p r e d i c t i o n at a parapsychology
c o n f e r e n c e ar U.C. Berkeley
recently, is t h e Director of t h e
C e n t e r for t h e S t u d y of Social
Policy at t h e Stanford Research
I n s t i t u t e and is also Professor of
Engineering-Economic
Systems
at Stanford University. Now,
w h y w o u l d such an established
researcher go directly against the
E s t a b l i s h m e n t ? Answer: they are
desperate.
But it's m o r e c o m p l e x than
t h a t . T h e so-called 'paradigm
c h a n g e ' is already well begun.
( T h o m a s Kuhn in the T h e Struct u r e of Scientific Revolutions,
1962.
p o p u l a r i z e d the
word
' p a r a d i g m ' to mean 'a p a t t e r n of
perceiving, valuing, and acting,
associated with a particular view
of m a n in the universe,' so you
might as well get used t o it.)
T o get on with my point,
significant n u m b e r s of middle
class people
have had
'the
psychedelic e x p e r i e n c e : and have
had
their
own
paradigm*
changed.
Some
of
these
p s y c h e del jets Is have d r o p p e d out
of t h e d o m i n a n t culture and
have m a d e an uneasy alliance
with the political leftists, w h o
got their paradigms changed by
reading land further changed by
tear gas ans billy clubs), and the
blacks, most of w h o m grew u p
with
non-establishment
paradigms.
But t h e way to c o p e with
change is to u n d e r s t a n d it. So
the E s t a b l i s h m e n t says, 'Who
•>eems to be into altered s t a t e s of
consciousness a n d has n o t linked
u p with the Left? why, it's
psychic researchers!' Yet the
d i s t i n c t i o n s b e t w e e n Left and
Right are misleading. In fact,
these distinctions are part of a
paradigm t h a t is itself changing.
What if ESP a n d psychokinesis
( m i n d over m a t t e r ) a n d reincarnation are for real? T h e implications of parapsychology are radical. Just listen t o w h a t (at least
according to H a r m a n ) is at issue.
T h e scientific paradigm that
parapsychology
challenges
assumes:
1. All
knowledge
comes through
the
physical
senses. 2. Quality reduces t o
q u a n t i t y . 3. We can k n o w only
about the o b j e c t i v e not the
subjective. 4. F r e e d o m is an illus i o n ; determinism. 5. Consciousness is a passive side effect. 6.
M e m o r y is stored data. 7. Time
is unidirectional. 8. Mind c a n n o t
influence t h e world
without
physical linkages. 9. Evolution
takes place only through r a n d o m
m u t a t i o n s . 10. There is no survival of t h e personality at death.
This paradigm is s o m e t i m e s
called
'materialism,'
and
a l t h o u g h Americans tend ro give
lip serviec to religious transcendentalism, it is the success of the
materialist paradigmi t h a t has
given rise to the industrial state
with its own paradigm:
1. T h e d o m i n a n t (and adequate— value is acquisitive materialism.
2.
Efficiency
is
achieved through subdivision of
work into meaningless small
pieces, the machine m e t h o d . 3.
T h e e c o n o m y can and should
always grow — 'the bigger, the
b e t t e r . ' 4. Nature should be con
trolled and e x p l o i t e d . 5. The
search for knowledge is it) gain
m o r e control over Nature 6.
T h e individual is the determiner
of the g o o d , society is an aggregation of
individuals pursuing
their own interests, chere being
no overriding purpose | except
perhaps survival).
T h e r e are items dear to the
hearts of both Rightists and
Leftists in both of these lists.
Yet I think it's clear that the
psychedelic viewpoint challenges
every o n e of these points. So
Harmon
seees the
parapsychological patadigm as lined up
t o a large e x t e n t with the insights of the psychedelice exper
lence. He said the L.S.D. was an
important
part of his own
paradigm shift. And he cites
faggotajes
##B!
Pisces Apple Lady
By Ron Simmons
AJdous Huxley's The Perennial
Philosophy as a defining part of
the emerging paradigm
This is how Harman delineates
that paradigm:
1. Various states of consciousness
are legitimate, cosmic
unconsciousness is possible. There
is a reality behind the phenomenal.
2. We >uffer from cultural
hypnosis (literally) but a is
possible to emerge from this
state into enlightenment.
.3 The central motivation for
the individual will be the quest
for enlightenment
1 Human potentiality will be
seen to be limit less. Anything
imaginable can be actualized
5 .-Vs a aide-effect of enlightenment one will have an attitude
of
acceptance
and
nonattachment, and nnn-personal
love for everything
B A business organization for
an> other i will maintain its
legitimact only if it.» c o m m u n i t y
is served. The self-fulfillment of
the employee is more mportant
than profU'making
7 Everybody is entitled to a
meaningful social role
i Regulation is achieved only
through a sense of purpose.
Roadco Productions Presents:
FOR ONE SHOW ONLY
Beck
Bogert
A!•ppice
Jeff
Bach's B Minor Mass
The Capitol Hill Choral Society will celebrate its 2 0 t h anniversary
with a performance of Bach's "Mass in B M n o r " on F r i d a y , March
23, at 8 p.m., at the Cathedral of All Saints, S w a n a n d Elk Sts.. m
Albany.
Judson Rand, founder and director, a n n o u n c e d t h a t the perl'ur
mance also honors the 1 00th anniversary of the C a t h e d r a l .
The 175 voice choral group, with guest soloists, will be acconi
panied by a Baroque orchestra; t h e Cathedral organ p l a y e d by LI
Cast, Cathedral Music Director; and Harpsichord p l a y e d by j a
Hallenbeck, Choral Society a c c o m p a n i s t .
Tickets for the concert can be purchased from Choral Siicii-iv
members, at the Blue Note Recoed S h o p , or at Van Curler's MUMI
Stores in Albany and S c h e n e c t a d y . Tickets at $'i for adults am
SI .50 for students.
f'.uest soloists at the concert will b e :
Soprano, Grace DiBaltista of Elnora. This will be her Ins
appearance with the Choral Society. A g r a d u a t e of t h e Eastmai
School of Music, she is a music teacher in the S h e n e n d e h o w a scbuu
system. Her credits include opera and o r a t o r i o p e r f o r m a n c e s will
the Boris Cloldovsky Opera C o m p a n y in New York City, and win
the Boston S y m p h o n y at T a n g l e w o o d . She has a p p e a r e d in this are;
with the Schenectady Light Opera C o m p a n y , S c h e n e c t a d y Ova
Players, and at the Colonic S u m m e r T h e a t e r .
Alto. Barbara Crouch of New York City. This will be her firs
appearance with the Choral Society. S h e holds music degrees fron
the Oklahoma College of Liberal Arts a n d the Julliard School o
Music, and is a soloist at the Broadway United C h u r c h of Christ n
New York City. Her m a n y credits include p e r f o r m a n c e s with tin
New York Philharmonic Orchestra, the Atlanta S y m p h o n y , and thi
Wisconsin S u m p h o n y . Her television a p p e a r a n c e s include perform
ances as a soloist with the Robert Shaw Chorale and t h e Camerat.
Singers.
Tenor, David Harratt of New York City. A l t h o u g h this is Mi
J a r r a l t ' s first appearance with the Choral Society, his father
Howard Jarralt, was a guest tenor soloist in a p e r f o r m a n c e o
Handel's 'Messiah' when the Society was just beginning. His music,i
background includes degrees from St, Olaf College a n d Southern
Methodist University, and study at the T a n g l e w o o d O p e r a Work
shop. He is a soloist in the weekly Bach series at Holy T'rimU
Lutheran Cjurch in New York City. He has a p p e a r e d with tin
Octavo Singers, the Boston Opera C o m p a n y , the R o b e r t Shan
Chorale, and was a m e m b e r of the B r o a d w a y c o m p a n y of 'Cabare!
Bass, Robert, Kuehn of New York City. This will be his s w o r n
appearance with the Choral Society — he was bass soloisl in I hi
' '*' - performances of Rossini's and Dvorak's 'Stabal Mater
I "
nriiinnnnnnnnnnnrirriuuuuuLiuu
Movie Festival
Tim
2 Academy Award
Laurel & Hardy
Carmine
2 W.C. Fields
I Eddie Cantor
SUNDAY, APRIL 1 8:00 PM
j
AT THE PALACE THEATRE IN ALBANY
j also appearing W E T W I L L I E
•
Fri. & Sat. March 23 & 24
Ireih from their tour with the Allman Brothers
!
TICKETS ON SALE NOW AT
PALACE THEATRE BOX OFFICE
ARMADILLO
MIDLAND RECORD SHOP
CRYSTAL MANSION
COLONIE MALL
DEJAVU
ALBANY AND TROY
MOHAWK MALL
ALBANY AND NORTHWAY MALL
LC2
7:30 & 9:30 PA/1
95 c admission
Sponsored by GDX
FOR RESERVATIONS PHONE: 465-3333
M»"n«cwMonniiuMMUOBnouuuuooooouuuuuuuoooo»
PAGE 2A
Paul Harvey News
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
FRIDAY, MARCH 23, 1973
I'm really s o r r y a b o u t F r i d a y
before last, and I h a d i n t e n d e d
t o write t h e Friday before t h a t
b u t I d i d n ' t because t h a t Friday
was m y b i r t h d a y , and man it was
the best f u c k i n ' b i r t h d a y in the
world.
I really like m y b i r t h d a y s , n o t
because it m e a n s s o m e t h i n g big,
but because I get t o go through
this beautiful head trip, w h e r e I
get into myself and m y o w n
h e a d , and m a k e a lot of future
plans and e x a m i n e past m i s t a k e s .
A n d if I start, telling people my
b i r t h d a y is c o m i n g , it's n o t because I w a n t t h e m to give me
stuff b u t because it's on my
mind a lot and I look f o r w a r d
t o checking myself o u t .
So this year I decided to s t a r t
m y self-celebration the T h u r s d a y
night before my b i r t h d a y with a
b o t t l e of wine (Cold Bear), and
my last " J . " T h e n Billy called
me and begged m e to c o m e o u t
t o the bar t h a t night, because we
h a d n ' t seen each o t h e r in a long
time and he had forgot it was
m y b i r t h d a y . At first I said n o (I
really w a n t e d to be a l o n e ) b u t
t h e n I said O.K. for a little
while. So I got s t o n e d and started getting ready to go o u t , b u t I
d i d n ' t feel like getting " r e a l l y "
dressed so I w o r e m y smiling
faces t-shirt, - a n d put on my
wool cap instead of c o m b i n g my
hair. I l o o k e d p r e t t y lousy so I
decided t o go all the way and
put on my rhinestone choker
( t h a t I b o u g h t in Macy's " F i n e r
J e w e l r y " when I was m u c h
y o u n g e r and had courage) and
o n e of m y larger r h i n e s t o n e rings
on my index finger.
A n y w a y I w e n t t o the bar and
the usual T h u r s d a y night crowd
was t h e r e , b u t Billy h a d n ' t arrived and I got pissed off because it was 1 1 : 3 0 and he had
said 1 1 : 0 0 . So I danced and a
Grievance Committee
Air Your Cares
By Barry Davis
" W e l c o m e b a c k ! " If you have
c o m p l a i n t s a b o u t d o r m inspections or the price of meal contracts or a n y t h i n g else let Grievance C o m m i t t e e know.
My name is Barry Davis. I can
he
reached
by
phone
at
4 5 7 - 6 5 4 2 , and by written w o r d
either through the Grievance
Box, t h e S.A. office, or the
ASP,
If the Grievance Committee d o e s n ' t know y o u r p r o b l e m s
there is not m u c h we can d o for
you.
If y o u ' v e s u b m i t t e d a griev
anee and feel n o t h i n g is being
d o n e a b o u t it, please let me
know.
My c o m m i t t e e
needs
feedback. U you d o n ' t help us to
serve y o u , we end up serving
ourselveK. D o n ' t allow us t o become
b u r e a u c rats
pteasel
T h e c o m m i t t e e also wishes new
people to join us. There is no
one else to fight for our rights of
privacy in our d o r m s and o t h e r
such Lhings, Grievance Committee is alive and well and in order
to remain so we need you and
you and vou\ Join us!
T h e n e x t column will deal
with the students' posit)]on in the
P r o m o t i o n and C o n t i n u i n g Ap
pointment
Quagmire.
It will
grapple with the q u e s t i o n of
" W h y are all our best teachers
gutting dismissed."
FRIDAY, MARCH 23, 1973
•
,
;
,
'
-
,
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•
•
lew people wished me a h a p p y
b i r t h d a y and Keith gave m e
s o m e t h i n g for t h e h e a d . T h e n
Billy burst in and w i t h o u t saying
a w o r d , led me b y the h a n d to
the cloak r o o m and gave m e this
big p a p e r bag and yelled " H a p p y
B i r t h d a y " a n d kissed me ...It
was a c a k e ; a real live b i r t h d a y
c a k e ! It was a beautiful l e m o n
chiffon cake that he had m a d e
from an old recipe, I was speechless (believe it or n o t ) because I
swear I never e x p e c t e d it. I felt
g o o d ! So we danced until the
bar closed a n d he left before m e
and I left with Keith, who's
this really great hairdresser freak,
and really strange. First we got
some m o r e shit for the h e a d , and
then we went to my house to eat
the c a k e . This was at a b o u t 3:30
in the m o r n i n g and I had been
2 3 for 3 h o u r s already and I
wasn't really hungry, so we decided to work up a case of the
m u n c h i e s and play some records
first and Keith told me that he
had never heard of " O s i b i s a , "
which is my favorite g r o u p , so I
played some of my favorite
tracks and we were starting t o
get into t h e m w h e n Danny ( m y
r o o m m a t e ) and Pauline walked
in. So we all w o r k e d up a big
case of the m u n c h i e s a n d w e n t
to t h e kitchen t o e a t cake and
milk and I said it would be nice
if we h a d candles...And the next
thing I knew Danny had p u t 3
candles on the cake- and turned
out all the lights and t h e y all
started singing " H a p p y Birthday
T o Y o u . " I felt like a kid again
and w a n t e d t o cry and shit. I
mean I felt so fuckin' g o o d !
T h e cake was flawless and we
ate half and t h e n Keith a n d
P a u l i i e left a n d I w r o t e in my
diary and w e n t t o bed at a b o u t
5:00.
Friday at 9 a.m. the p l u m b e r s
came to fix the b a t h r o o m wall
and started tearing it d o w n . 1 got
up and went into the kitchen
and found
o u t that
Danny
h a d n ' t gone to work, which was
sort of a d o w n e r because I had
wanted to be alone. So I got
s t o n e d again and went out for a
b o t t l e of wine. T h e day was so
beautiful\
I felt like a spring
c o m m e r c i a l . Rita, Peter and
Chip were walking d o w n the
street and I invited t h e m to s t o p
up. Chip did so we drank and
got
higher.
Then
someone
k n o c k e d at the d o o r and Estelle
came in with a b i r t h d a y card and
ii b o t t l e of Cream White Concord, which freaked me o u t because the only time I have it is
when I'm h o m e in Brooklyn
smoking o n the park bench and
we chip in to b u y a taste. I love
the stuff. So we got even higher
and s o m e o n e else k n o c k e d at the
door and Keith walked in looking really cool in a dungaree
jacket and jeans and wide dark
sunglasses. He had some m o r e
stuff for the head and we started
l>ftting high all over again and I
gol smashed*. I o p e n e d all the
windows to let the sun and air
m, and played my theme song
hsces Apple Lady by Leon Kussel. T h e n I put on Eddie Kendricks and everyone screiimed
and j u m p e d up drunk and start
i'd dancing; all of us Danny,
Chip, Estelle, Keith and I were
just shuking' and curryin' on...The plumbers freaked o u t . 1
m-ver saw two m e n work so hard
and fast to repair a wall in my
life, But they c o u l d n ' t finish and
decided t o c o m e back the next
d a y . So we ate t h e rest of the
a
cake and talked a b o u t A r n o l d ' s
party the next night a n d what
we should wear and I realized I
d i d n ' t have a n y t h i n g a n d got
sort of d o w n . Then t h e y all left
and I cleaned u p the h o u s e and
played records and got t h e mail:
a card from Annie, and o n e from
my parents with a check for $ 2 0
which made me feel g o o d . T h e n
Danny cooked a great dinner
and later I invited B e n n y a n d
Carol over, and later m y m o t h e r
called and I s p o k e t o t h e whole
family and felt even b e t t e r . T h e n
a package came for m e a n d it
was a gift from J o n i e in Rochester, who is my favorite female
person and the only s t r a i g h t girl
I'm in love with. It was a b o o k
called Journey into Ixtlan by a
guy called Carlos C a s t a n e d a , and
it's all a b o u t this Indian n a m e d
Don J u a n . Later on I w e n t to
the bar and came back a n d w e n t
to bed. I was really e x h a u s t e d
but boy did I feel good.
When I w o k e up S a t u r d a y I
found Publio sleeping o n t h e
sofa and Keith sleeping with
Danny and p l u m b e r s freaking
out again and w o r k i n g faster
than they had the day b e f o r e .
We all washed up in t h e k i t c h e n
and Publio went to t h e s t o r e and
bought some stuff t o m a k e
French toast for breakfast. We
decided t o act like faggots and
ate in the dining r o o m a n d used
the good china, and n e w silver,
with the p e r c o l a t o r o n t h e table.
While we were eating a n d listening t o Ella Fitzgerald's
Greatest
Hits 1936-1939,
we s t a r t e d discussing Arnold's again a n d h o w
we didn't have any m o n e y to
buy s o m e t h i n g new. A n d just
when we were t h i n k i n g of h o w
to come up with a new c o m b i n a tion of our used c l o t h e s t h e mail
came in and Danny received his
tax return. We were r i c h ! D a n n y
and I said good-bye t o e v e r y o n e
and, running in the rain, hailed a
cab to Colonie Center only to
find nothing tres, tres chic
enough for our tastes, and returned t o A r m a d i l d o e . Danny
bought an entire o u t f i t from
shirt to shoes and jewels, b u t I
c o u l d n ' t afford a n y t h i n g big so I
decided to " g o s i m p l e " and
bought this " d a r l i n g " little pink
terry cloth " n o t h i n g " t o wear
over my bare s h o u l d e r s and
naked
chest; u n b u t t o n e d
of
course...The p a r t y was flawless
and so were we. Derrick decided
to wear white d o u b l e knit trimmed with red feather boa, and I
got high and t h o u g h t h e was the
"Ghost
of
Christmas
Never
Was." Eventually I got higher
and then h o t and s t a r t e d engaging in foreplay with different
guests on Arnold's b e d . Then I
brought one of t h e m h o m e and
finished where we left off.
The next m o r n i n g the guest
was gone and it was S u n d a y . I
gol up as always at 2 : 0 0 and
went for the paper. T h e n Frank
and Chip and J o h n a n d Michael
and t h e m came over a r o u n d
3:00 and we sat a r o u n d the
living room drinking tea, smoking it, and reading t h e New York
Tinu>B.
Finally that night I got a
chance to he a l o n e , and I
thought about the w e e k e n d and
how great it was and h o w great
the future's going t o b e o n c e I
leave Albany, and I c a u g h t my
reflection in the m i r r o r and I
looked ot myself und laughed
and felt good cause it's s o m u c h
fuckin 1 fun being an a d u l t .
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
Renter Exposed By Press
Who told o n K e r n e r ?
He r e m a i n e d a governor for
two terms a n d t h e n was a p p o i n t ed a federal judge t h r o u g h an
a s s o r t m e n t of a d m i n i s t r a t i o n s in
Washington.
Meanwhile, Democrats who
used to be able to cover for o n e
a n o t h e r r e m a i n e d in a b s o l u t e
c o n t r o l of p a r t y m a c h i n e r y in
Chicago.
If Kerner, p o p u l a r , r e s p e c t e d ,
e s t e e m e d , h a d all t h a t c l o u t a n d
all those friends—then w h o told
o n him?
Kerner's u n d o i n g began when
a snoopy newspaper reporter
from the Chicago A m e r i c a n discovered t h a t car dealers were
cheating the s t a t e on sales taxes.
T h e s t a t e revenue director--the
man w h o let it h a p p e n - was a
close friend, personal counsel
and c a m p a i g n manager for Kerner.
But because of K e r n e r ' s impeccable r e p u t a t i o n , he was able
t o shift t h e blame from his
friend by promising t o find and
p r o s e c u t e t h e g u i l t y - w h i c h he
never did.
But t h e w i n d o w was o p e n a
crack.
It was a Chicago n e w s p a p e r ,
Chicago T o d a y , which identified
the n u m b e r t w o man in t h e
Illinois S t a t e Revenue Departm e n t as a s y n d i c a t e payroller.
It was a Chicago n e w s p a p e r
which exposed a d u m m y company prospering on s t a t e business and run by K e r n e r ' s closest
friend.
It was Chicago n e w s p a p e r s
which
backtracked
on
that
friend, T e d Isaacs, t o discover h e
had a h a n d in or c o n t r o l of s t a t e
b o a r d s w h i c h regulated b a n k i n g ,
i n s u r a n c e , savings and loans,
liquor s a l e s - a n d racing.
By J u l y of 1 9 7 1 , h a n d s o m e ,
personable O t t o K e r n e r was before a federal grand j u r y investigating race t r a c k s t o c k deals a n d
a d m i t t i n g t o t h e o w n e r s h i p of
substantial race track s t o c k himself.
Yet it r e m a i n e d for Chicago
newspapers t o t h r o w o p e n t h e
w i n d o w . Kerner h a d b o u g h t t h a t
s t o c k at a bargain b a s e m e n t
price, sold it for w h a t it was
w o r t h and h a d r e p o r t e d t h e inc o m e as a " c a p i t a l g a i n , "
But, because he h a d ruled so
consistently in favor of t h e race
track people w h o had been so
generous w i t h him, t h e news
media, the p u b l i c a n d t h e federal
a u t h o r i t i e s w e r e alerted.
It's i n t e r e s t i n g - b r i b e m o n e y
which h e ' d claimed as a capital
gain a p p a r e n t l y s h o u l d always b e
identified
by
politicians
as
"regular i n c o m e , "
A n y w a y , t h e U.S. D e p a r t m e n t
of Justice was able t o readily
weave t h e rest of the w e b .
B u t w h a t I'm saying is t h a t
lawmen w e r e alerted t w o years
ago b y n e w s m e n w h o sniffed t h e
first of this stink eight years ago
w h e n t h e y persistently p u r s u e d
leads from clandestine sources
because t h e y were free t o . May
t h e y ever b e .
And w h o also dared t o question t h e p r o p r i e t y of a political
crown prince.
May t h e y ever dare.
ran hendren
Young View of Washington
Human Guinea Pigs
It wasn't m u c h , they told the
prisoner, just minor surgery on
his hrain designed t o m a k e him
less violent, and with the surgery
came the promise of freedom.
A scene o u t of 1 9 8 4 ? N o . T h e
time is t o d a y and the l o c a t i o n is
the California Medical Facility at
Vacaville, where o p e r a t i o n s like
the o n e described above were
recently
p e r f o r m e d on three
prisoners.
What t h e prisoners were n o t
told is that t h e psychosurgery
would render t h e m i n c a p a b l e of
feeling pleasure or sadness, and
would forever render decision
m a k i n g difficult for t h e m .
But the end goal was acheived p e r m a n e n t l y altering t h e subjects' behavior--and t h a t seems
t o be enough t o satisfy a growing n u m b e r of medical and gove r n m e n t authorities who s u p p o r t
psychosurgery.
Psychosurgery is just o n e of
t h e m a n y forms of e x p e r i m e n t ations which are being c o n d u c t ed on h u m a n s t o d a y , often witho u t their full u n d e r s t a n d i n g and
s o m e t i m e s w i t h o u t their knowledge.
Senator H u b e r t H. H u m p h r e y
(D-Minn.) late last m o n t h introduced legislation to set rigorous
guidelines governing medical exp e r i m e n t s involving p e o p l e .
He r e m i n d e d his colleagues of
a barbaric syphillis s t u d y involving 4 3 0 black m e n which was
c o n d u c t e d over a period of 40
years in Alabama. T h e m e n , all
afflicted
with syphillis, were
given $ 5 0 plus burial e x p e n s e s
to u n d e r g o t r e a t m e n t for their
disease. At least 28 and p e r h a p s
as m a n y as 107 died as a result.
H u m p h r e y said the fact t h a t
these m e n volunteered is clear
indication t h a t c o n s e n t of those
involved is a totally i n a d e q u a t e
standard. The most dangerous
e x p e r i m e n t s almost always find
the p o o r a n d u n e d u c a t e d as their
subjects, p e o p l e w h o m a y n o t be
able to u n d e r s t a n d or fully comp r e h e n d t h e danger t o which
they will be e x p o s e d .
In some cases, according Lo
H u m p h r e y , individuals may n o t
even be aware they are the subjects of a test. R e c e n t l y , according to associates of c o n s u m e r
a d v o c a t e Ralph Nader, the University of Michigan dispensed diethystilbestrol (DES) to coeds
w h o feared t h e y might be pregnant. D E S is a s y n t h e t i c estrogen
which has been linked t o cancer.
T h e d a u g h t e r s of some 8 4 0
w o m e n w h o were given DES in
the early 1 9 5 0 ' s are n o w found
t o e x p e r i e n c e a high r a t e of
malignancies,
according
to
Humphrey.
T o s t e m u n w a r r a n t e d and
overly d a n g e r o u s e x p e r i m e n t s o n
h u m a n s , H u m p h r e y has proposed t o establish a National
H u m a n E x p e r i m e n t a t i o n Standards Board, an i n d e p e n d e n t
agency a u t h o r i s e d t o d r a w up
rigorous guidelines governing human e x p e r i m e n t a t i o n in projects
financed by federal funds.
T h e b o a r d would have subpoena p o w e r and the right to
hold hearings; it c o u l d o b t a i n
injunctions to halt e x p e r i m e n t s
not in c o m p l i a n c e with its guidelines.
Meanwhile, the experiments
go o n , und t h e majority of physicians c o n d u c t i n g t h e m , says
Humphrey,
have never even
studied t h e e t h i c s of testing.
PAGE 3A
preview/leisure/preview/leisure/pre\iew/leisure/preview/leisure/preview
Crossword Contest Rules
Puzzle
solutions
must
S t u d e n t Press office
be submitted
t o t h e Albany
(CC 334) by Monday,
:
The Ham Stakes
by Steuen Alan Berch
12 noon
following t h e Friday t h a t t h e p u z z l e a p p e a r s .
Saturday, Mar. 24
Friday, Mar. 23
Coffee House: sponsored by CCGB at 9
p.m. in the CC Cafeteria.
Coffee House: sponsored by CCGB, 9
p.m. in the CC Cafeteria.
K E N N E W S E W E R E G I
E T S S A
R A V O Y A S C R A S E H C R A M P S
T E R E A K E E O I C O P E R R E B D
N a m e , address, p h o n e n u m b e r , a n d social security nur
ber must a p p e a r o n y o u r s o l u t i o n .
RAI
L K E N R R T A D N O F B U M N
A P N V O N D A O Y T T N I O U A Y A
WMUNI
F A D B M A N S A X C E E L
E C V B Z L F S A K Y A E A M K R N L
T C E R U P O W E L L R T U A L O A I
S K N A B R I
A F G O G R H M E O H M
A B O N C U T I
UMRRNAGOOCN
M A B D Q O E O Y O A A R D B I
NNA
U X H O N L D R N Y M V I
E O ) O A M
Puzzle s o l u t i o n s will b e d r a w n at r a n d o m until three
John Houseman Lecture: 8 p.m. in the
PAC Recital Hall.
correct s o l u t i o n s have b e e n c h o s e n .
All University Party: "Alabaster" and
free beer and soda, 9 p.m. in the CC
Ballroom. JSC members $.25 all otners
$.75.
Composers String Quartet: sponsored by
MusiCouncil, 8:30 p.m. in PAC Main
Theater. $3.00 general admission, $2.00
w/SUNYA ID and $1.00 w/tax card.
Colonial Quad Party: "Trek" and all the
beer you can drink, in the Flagroom at 9
p.m. Free w/Colonial Quad card, $.50
w/out.
Each of the three w i n n e r s will b e e n t i t l e d t o a SHI gilt
certificate t o t h e c a m p u s b o o k s t o r e ( n o t including tunnel
service). Certificates m u s t b e claimed w i t h i n t w o weeks of
notification.
Dorian Woodwind Quintet: with Eliott
Carter, 8:30 p.m. in PAC Recital Hall;
$3.00 general, $2.00 w/SUNYA ID,
$1.00 w/tax card.
E T T I
D L R E V F I
P E A S T S V W
LEAS
U A D Y F N E R M X H A N A E
H R R O B L C O D C Y E N G A C I
LN
B U G L O A H B I
DCWUNARBEC
A L S H R M A R X H E A N U U A O N A
R E I T I
O P Y E L L Y B O G A R T M
D R A W O H L E L W R N P Y S P A I O
Ml T C H N I
S C E O E M A C A X N C
LI
V R O O N E Y K E P O R T A M O S
No one w o r k i n g on or for t h e A l b a n y S t u d e n t Press is
eligible t o w i n .
Sorry, only o n e e n t r y per person will b e a c c e p t e d .
Sunday, Mar. 25
Free Music Store: "Black Earth" at 8:30
p.m. in the PAC Recital Hall. Free.
Chamber Music Series: 3 p.m. in the
Albany Institute of History and Art.
Free.
1
lit
Tower East
Off Campus
Gryffon Film Society
(462-9033)
"Play Misty for M e "
Fri. and Sat.: 7 : 3 0 , 1 0 : 0 0
Cinema 7 (785-1625)
Fri. and S a c : 7 : 0 0 . 9 : 0 0
Fri.: 7 : 0 0 , 1 0 : 3 0 in LC-25
" 2 0 0 Mot .:1s"
Delaware
(462-4714)
Hellman (459-5300)
Fri.: 7 : 2 5 . 9 : 4 0
56
"Save t h e T i g e r "
Sat.: 2 : 5 5 , 7 : 2 5 , 9 : 4 5
59
"Play it Again S a m "
Sat.: 7 : 3 0 , 1 0 : 0 0 in LC-18
Fri.: 7 : 1 5 , 9 : 4 5 in LC-18
Circle Twin (785-3388)
Colonie Center (459-2170)
" S o u n d of M u s i c "
"Cabaret"
Fri. and Sat.: 7 : 0 0 , 9 : 1 0
Fri a n d Sat: 6 : 0 0 a n d 9 : 0 0
"Lolly M a d o n n a "
Diversion
Fri. a n d Sat.: 7 : 0 0 , 9 : 0 0
" L i t t l e Big M a n "
Fri. a n d Sat.: 7 : 0 0 , 9 : 3 0
in LC-1
Sun.: 7 : 0 0 , 9 : 3 0 in LC-7
Tovvne (785- 1515)
"Poseidon Adventure"
Fri. a n d Sat.: 7 : 0 0 , 9 : 3 0
Cine 1234 (459-8300)
Peace Project
"The Family"
"Burn"
Fri. and Sat. 7 : 3 0 , 9 : 3 0
in LC-23
Madison (489-5431)
Fri. and Sat.: 7 : 1 5 , 9 : 1 5
" L a d y Sings the Blues"
"Man of La M a n c h a "
Fri. a n d Sat.: 7 : 0 0 , 9 : 3 0
Fri. and Sat.: 7 : 3 0 , 10:00
GDX
Movie Festival
Fox Colonie (459-1020)
Laurel & H a r d y , W.C. Fields
"Jeremiah J o h n s o n "
"The Getaway"
Fri. and Sat.: 7 : 0 0 , 9 : 3 0
a n d E d d i e C a n t o r films
Fri.: 7:30,9:30
" L a d y Sings the Blues"
Fri cV Sat: 7 : 3 0 , 9 : 3 0 in LC-2
Sat.: 2,4, 6, 8, 10
Fri. a n d Sat.: 6 : 4 5 , 9 : 3 0
PAGE 4A
•
I
•
13
29
30
31
3,
uo
|
• TT
19
57
52
55
I1
WSUA640
58
60
Jull us,
51
last names are prt'eceded hv initials, l-.xampie
= Lionel Harrvmorc and IHAKKYMOHl
John
Answers: Beery, L. Barrymore, G.»Dle, Lauyliln
Arbuckle, Astalre, Bogart, Ayre',, Stewart, G
Baxter, Howard, Chaplin, Hoiden, Buyer, Cayn
Kayo, MacMurray, Marvin, DouylaS, Eddy, I .m
Coogan, Huston, K a r l o l l , Keaton, LailrJ, Wayne.
Muni, Olivier, Pldgeon. Power, M i * . Rativbrn
Peltier, Wells, V a l e n t i n o , Young, G m . i d , H o '
Newman, Volght, Peck, Stekjer, ptfttj, Powell.
••
•
50
J
Directions: Hidden in this puzzle are the last mimes oj h 7 famous
actors. They appear in all directions horizontal'., vert tail, and
diagonal; they can he spelled backwards and lot-wards- a total W
eight directions. Letters may he used more than once
Note: Identical
LBARRYMQRE
Harry more.
1
I•
i
12
twm
1
_
1»B
11
22
26
,
It It
I;
25
|
39
g)Ed« a r d
Fri a n d Sat.: 6 : 5 0 , 9 : 5 5
"Smiles of a S u m m e r Night"
It?
"Lolly M a d o n n a "
I
112
II I
53
IFG
|
41
" T h e r e ' s a Girl in My S o u p "
"I Love Y o u , Alice B. T o k l a s "
]6
Iw
1
9
19
2U
27
35
Sat. Matinees: 1 :00, 5:00
8
7
21
32
"Sounder"
6
'
P" «
2<!
and Sat.: 7 : 3 0 , 9 : 3 0
SUNY Cinema
1r
1
3
20
"Mao's China"
Fri.
2
It
17
Movie Timetable
On Campus
ASP Crossword Puzzle
1
I5
EarWitness
«l
1973
Targ
«73- 2
ACROSS
DOWH
1. Shave Off
1. M e x i c a n Dollar
5.
B«ra
2. Enthualaetlo
10. PretenBe
3. Meeting
14. Type of Numbor
h, Paraoua Siamese Twin
15. Deeert Spot
5. Changing Sound Quality
16. Wife of Zeua
6. Hlrauta
17. Movie Hualcal (It wde.) 7* Anglo-Saxon Slave
20. Opposite of lit-Acroaa
8. Surnamedi P r .
21. To Laught P r .
Receptacles for Smokers
22.
Play
Dwindle
23. Black Magatlna
Pile
25. Kaavy 311k
Seed Covering
26. Prat. Initiation
Part of Horae
26. Metal R e a t r a l n e n
Coif Cluba
32. Patriae
Belonging to Sevareld
33. Kills
Weill P r .
311. Bear
Brother of it-Down
35. Pella U o
.
. Hayes
36. Kechewa
Lswls Carroll Character
37. Competent
Hurled
5ei Prench Coin
formed by Llpe and rloee
Filling With Wonder
30. Actress Veraho. Bent
31. Ovules
t i . Young Bird
Leg Part (pi.)
•O. Singe Like Croeby
V
Bikini
<*b. PPootball
o o " - - Team
"
»».
Bitter Drug
»5. Foreign
S a n Antonio Port
46. Playa Oultar
Optical Davloe
<t9. Soft Drlnka
Haa P a l t h I n
30. Biblical Lion
Kirk Douglae Peaturea
53. Movie Mualoal {it wde.)
Take O n [a praotloe)
56. Middle
Worry
57. Bungling
Siamese
56. Treaty Croup
Rspoas
59. Mental Paoulty
Oulf of
,
60. Canvas Sheltere
Nlsa Hayworth
61. Ardor
Religious I mags
5K. Looatlon of Maine
55. Prenoh Number
FRIDAY, MARCH 23, 1973
I'm not gonna try to build a
case here because I get 500 new
singles every month and can see
t r e n d s building, and you
wouldn't be able to find most of
the examples I could cite (but
take note of the Raspberries,
Rowan Bros,, Move, Mott the
Hoople, Slade...and of course
R&B, which has never amounted
to much outside of hit singles,
yet is becoming the biggest thing
in pop, totally dominating the
charts) but just take my word.
Bell to produce a full satisfying
Hollies harmony, and the rest of
the group backs up with instrumental and stylistic precision.
It's hard to believe this album
was made in Memphis. There's a
track called "Feel" that sounds
like a cross between Led Zeppelin and the Sweet. "In the
Street" sounds !Ske Badfinger
not imitating the Beatles. "Don't
Lie to Me" sounds like a combination Humble Pie and Yardbirds. "My Life is Right" sounds
like Badfinger when it's imitating the Beatles. The whole album, in fact, has that warm,
exhuberant freshness always
found in the best English pop.
That's about the highest
praise I can offer, other than to
say Big Star doesn't overwhelm
you with its Englishness, the
way almost every other American Angloid group from Christopher Milk back to the Knickerbockers has done. Their sound is
genuinely their own, and it's one
you'll grow t o love for the
uniquely crisp acoustic guitar
style as well as the more derivative vocal harmonies.
This is the kind of group that
ought to be producing Top Ten
singles like clockwork, and will
be if the direction of pop music
continues to change in the direction I've already indicated.
There are in fact four likely
candidates on this album. So if
you appreciate a good pop record the way I do, why not get
this album now and let the rest
of the world catch up at their
own speed? Being ahead of your
time has never been so easy.
And not only are singles
themselves coming back, but
they're coming from England
like never before (Who sez we
can't be invaded twice?) and
now by American groups trying
to sound English. Yeah, the
Raspberries, but I have in mind
an even more valid example.
A group called Big Star has
released their first album on
Ardent 2803, Ardent is a local
Memphis label with only one
other artist on its roster, and it
looks like becoming an important company on the basis of
this album. Big Star features
Alex Chilton, formerly vocalist
with the Box Tops, hut this
group sounds nothing like the
other. What it sounds like is all
those great English singles I was
talking about. That puts them a
quantum jump ahead of the
Rapsberries, although they lose a
few nostalgia points in the bar-
Poetry
a la bibliothccjue
t w o giggling c h e r u b s
disturb my peace;
in the next stall
This Week
Every week - Sundays at 7:00 pm
Seldom have I heard a song
cry out to be on the radio the
way "When My Baby's Beside
Me" does. As catchy as any great
light pop single could possibly
aspire to be, il stands with the
best of tl e Hollies or Badfinger.
Unlike the heavy lead vocal of
the Box Tops, Chilton blends his
voice with co-leader Christopher
Contest Winners
Sportsiine
their titular voices
finger my o p p o s i t e e n d e a v o r
to get t o t h e b o t t o m
or at least make s o m e sense of
Achean
funereal
rites
b o u n d b e t w e e n vellum.
Debbi Bellush
Sunday, 8 : 0 0 - 8:30
attention
This Sunday will
include Highlights from this year's ECAC Basketball
eye
/
scattered
creeps u n d e r partition
Carol Palczynski
Tournament
/
by i n c o m m e n s u r a t e tickles
Donna Burton
(no acoustical ramifications
the provocative j u x t a p o s i t i o n
Old Favorites
Last Snows
The Shadow
Sunday Nights at 11:00
The Lone Ranger
Saturday Night at 10:30
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
By Greg Shaw
A change is about to come
over pop music that is sure to
take many by surprise. It may
not happen overnight, but happen it will, and within a year.
What am I talking about? Well,
unless I turn out to be wrong for
the first time in my seven years
as a paid observer of the rock
scene, I do believe that singles
are about to regain the importance they held prior to 1967,
And not just any singles, but the
kind of exquisite, finely crafted
masterworks of pop rock that
poured out of England before
flower power hit.
News
Weeknightsat 11:00 pm
urn C
"Big Star" is Sparkling
of feet:
(Solution lo last week's puzzle)
u N 0 N 1
K A V A N
NT A t E
sA_AN AH 0R c0 TH SY HB e Af
R I
A T E s H L I
a a as a a a a a a a a
aaa
aaaau aaa
aaaaa aaa n j a a u
amaaauu a a a a a a u
aaa
aaa
auaaaua auaaaaa
aaaaa aaa aaaaa
a a a aauua a a a
aaa
aaaau aaa
a a a a u a a aauaaua
a a a u a a a uuaauuu
aaauauu uaauauu
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
have these discovered
s o m e startling new position?
Achilles,
pissed;
Homer,
snoring;
and 1 suppose I
should not be
overlistening •
PAGE 5A
•
Cathexis
the Twin
presents a speaker f r o m
Oakes Commune
featured
in the January 1973 issue of Psychology T o d a y Tuesday, A p r i l 3 at 8
PM in LC 18. A n i n f o r m a l
The Films of Ingmar Bergman
hour w i l l be held in the t h i r d floor
commune
Psychology Department w i l l speak o n
Determinants
While enjoyable as a romantic comedy the film is
also a good deal more. In his book on Bergman,
Robin Wood wrote, "With its own individual and
complex flavour, the astringency balanced and
modified by qualities of warmth, tenderness and
charm, Smiles of a Summer Night remains one of
Bergman's perfect films." The film is also the source
of the new Hal Prince - Steven Sondheim musical A
Little Night Music.
Smiles of a Summer Night will be joined by a
short film called The Dove by George Coe and
Anthony Lover. The film is an inspired burlesque of
Bergman films complete with simulated Swedish
dialogue and a death figure that challenges his
victims to a game of badminton.
Starting March 30th, IFG will present Bergman's
trilogy of films on faith and religion. On Friday,
March 30th, Through A Glass Darkly; On Saturday,
'March 31st, Winter Light; and on Sunday, April 1st,
The Silence. All films will be shown at 7:15 &9:45
in LC 18. Individually these films are masterpieces,
together they represent a major event in modern
cinema.
Through A Glass Darkly • certainly achieved, is
the story of a writer who learns his daughter is
suffering from schizophrenia. He is divided between
concern over his daughter's condition and a
fascination with her as a possible subject for his
work.
Winter Light - certainty unmasked, a film about a
priest who feels his faith abandoning him lo the
outer trappings of an ugly and useless church thai
he can not abandon. He lacks even the faith to seek
something else to believe in.
And then there is The Silence - God's silence, the
negative, impression. The film follows Ester, her
sister Anna and Anna's small son on a journey
through a world of "Naturalistic surrealism" thai
defies capsulizing.
Robin Wood wrote, "The Silence is one of the
mosi difficult films lo feel one's way lo the heart
of: To do so requires an acl of courage thai testifies
lo ihe extraordinary courage of the man who made
it."
When first released in this country in 1964
portions of The Silence were removed on the
grounds that they were "loo shocking." The Silence
is to be shown uncut offering you the rare opportunity to tee the film the way Bergman wanted it to
be seen.
PAGE6A
of Perceived Aggression
The
March
Coalilion
Public
Lecture
Changing
Soviet-
The
East European Relations by Prolessoi
other is a recent issue o n the Harris
Charles Gati U n i o n College/ C o l u m
burg Conspiracy Case 2 Ihe C a t h o l i c
biu University on Tuesday March 2 7 ,
Left. It also contains an analysis o l
12 4 6 , BA
Ihe trial w r i t t e n b y Phil Berngan in
Department of Political Science
119
Gurevitz
of ihe University
hibition
of German
and Scholars
Writers,
Socialists
15
Pholographs.
May 15 Main L o b b y of
the Universily L i b r a r y
73-74
writers.
needs a few more
Call Sondra
Becker-
man 7 5 0 0 3
School
See Ihe show f o r f r e e ' Ushers need-
An
Alternative High School needs teach
ed
eis.
Volunteer
t u t o r s , and interested
people
et
the P e r f o r m i n g
house
Arts
staff
Cenrer
See House
Come talk w i t h us Share your views
Manager M o l a i n G i l m o i e al Ihe box
Wheie? 8 t h f l o o i seminal r o o m of
office,
are invilinl lo a l l e n d
Mob.iwk
t h r o u g h Friday
Zionism
New Left
Ideology
in CC 315 at 4 P M , and The
Nation-
ality
in iho
Question
of the USSR
Farmworkers
meeting w i l l be M o n
day. March
2 6 at 7 3 0 PM in the
I PM Wednesday, M a r c h 28 W h o '
You ..nil I I ' , tnqnltim. talking, shin
Them w i l l he ,i ri'<)til.nlv '•' hedulecl
Meeting
Union are welcome
matron call
Farmworkers
Foi moro m i n i
4B9-WJV
Services
Delta-Sigma-Pi
and the School
.[>• "e
linen,,.,
!
C
M.n Avov
W-nks
,„„nol
wnli
Service
id I'M
Saturday's
begins
had
Service „ i
Join
Episcopal
10 30
in
Harold
plHese
Mandatory
Lumen
March
Mess
schedule
19 is .is follows
Monday 4 I'M in R o o m 3 7 0 , lui.-srl.n
I I HI end 12 10 R o o m
nesdey
Application
your
Placement
ill
Jen
I i k.inlt-H
lilt
'.I/;:
VJ 10 R o o m : ( 7 ' i
1 I 1(1 end 12 II) R o o m
Weil
I'lvutsilev
deadline
is
.'12 264 II 34
Financial
Summer
Mee
Cluh
Liberal
Arts Ma/ors
<t..
WdHtmi |jy lh<-
in
iltti
work-
;•!.> ,>Ky\
Registration
li'ie'li
• by Ruber
'v.',
.he
lliiivel'„ly
"|
Hieleinel Money
e/,i v
( J u l " el
I I.I
URGENT
to tench
iillu
t IS A p p h .
Community
,.M<1
Role
of
will,
the
Susan
JSC
uiHl.it
HILLEL
schools
Wednesday. M e n li 7M ,ii /
Mi".-.
•1 lo I T I W I ihe f l i M d l n w >••>" tWiVI! us
University
Hi„,in
by
l,i be .,,,,1,111
SlUll
N l"S I A
Students
C
«|e .vill be
through™ 1 ine
medical/
yitn b e l n i e March
piioinlineiil
w h o h.ive n o l IKIJISKJI
ConimitlfiG
-.],idem-,
l e i l i s t r . l l i i i n pel tod. ,11 ,eilei h limine
that y o u l .Idvis.e w i l l he .lljli I,, see
t (. A
to
iilveeiiil
I I l-t.-i
.vni. Hie P.uM«dical/Pre Dental
should d o so
student
you
28 to sign up I n .
II y o u eie ,1 i EOP
must
sen y o u
uK is, if l i e l o i e seeing y o l i i .it
LUP
llllMllll
.Idvism e, U l l l v e i s i l y (.ulleqe
thmtrqh Univ.'istly Collegfi U l R [ffi
/ 3d I'M
"
l"P"
1168
Lt. I 1
WESTERN
General
AVENUE
Meeting
Applicants
Events
,.•
Menial Illness Among
Adolescents
„I
,lllKlallr»lllltfn1Wfl%l»IH»%<'WllllMtl«tll»lenll»lli
o f f o s t
d e
|i
v e r y
ca
482-6300
«***
IHl%lrfllltllllllWIII«lllllll|llilllll|'WR*IIiil
albany state cinema
Saturday,
March 24
200
MOTELS
7:30 and
10:00
featuring
FRANK ZAPPA
*^^m+
r,
For I I Uial sue package of Kulax1
lampons (5 lampons), a prelly purse
container, and a vory explanatory
QOOK entitled Tell It Like 11 Is",
mail Ihis.otdoi lorm wild 25l in coin
tn covet mailing and handling lo
Kolex lampons
presents:
FRIDAY, MARCH 23, 1973
wasn't,
here's a
second
chance.
li:
Slice of Pizza $.30
REAL NEW YORK CITY PIZZA!
',|i,er,
and
THE MOTHERS
OF INVENTION
Because only Kotex
tampons have soft,
rounded ends
gentls
insertion guides
instead of two bulky
tubes, and more
protection than the
leading brand But
the only way to be
convinced is to let a
Kotex tampon be
your first one
WE DELIVER
CLOSED MONDAYS
f
T U E S - SAT: 11 am - 12 am
SUNDAY: 4 pm - 12 am
Board
III I'M
I lee
College
e,,l Ihe
Nurse
H'l
sludenl
when y<>"
if!i:ommeiid,ititin
M.i,, I, . " , e, l-1 3 1 ' , el !>
„•
I
„ , ' , e ,e,| !,
Special
Hii'il.i.
11 u-
h u m l o i t - f < Mint? of Scmli'in L f 1<-.
PIZZERIA^
V'A I inlay
School
M,ih' r.dirsle.
nil
• ;t A p r i l 1
Service
Apul
Class of '74 applicants
dentiit
loi
V<vu ' l u l n ' t Ip.ivc! y o u ! n.iniP We nPfid
• STORE HOURS •
Tim
Applications
,ee n o w .iv.nle.lhe in
nee ril
i|"
Your first
tampon
should
be a
Kotex
tampon.
1 101 Due dele is A p r i l 13
Me
II
,
Teacher
Aid
I V . I i " . ' , ' , , '.I Imei
.i, ', einl I
meeting is M o n
/ I ; M
A p i rl .1
I ( .!
| '.-. e I " ' t —r 1 " M e l
ii / '-in
Officials
Ihe I inani i.il A i d O f l i i c IRA 109 end
IJ<ML|IMII' is A p n l V2 CuiH.i.
il
r-,,.,,l . I I I . , , - , r . ,,|| In
nil
Mauling
PM M o n d a y
iipplyinei i n U of Rochester
Peace Corps in 58 countries
Corporations
, ' i , , ' II I !V1
I ,
II
\2 HI R o o m 3 7 0
Clubs & Meetings
to 4
School
chopped
Fellowship
Italian
,,.,,„„„,I I
Hnu
4898573
Newman
,,,,,
,., M e i
AM
the N
Chapel
I n July Hie Peace
Contacl
12
ActvtMviy
For f u r l l n ; i
11 A M
A l l l i i . u i j l i Uiiivei'ety
All
House
contact
Bdom,
beginning
.
Majors
is placing 2200 teachers in 43
Apnl
Responsibility,
Christian
Services
Chapel
Protestants w e l c o m e
formation
' 'l'"
Softball
day March 2 6 at 4 PM in CC 3 7 5 .
Official Notice
secondary
, , ) , , , , ines
,',1
Sunday
AM
Education
,1
. i l l , Men I, 2H .1!
I,, hnni,ini/e
A M e n in >n
us <il Chapel
JSC-HILLE L
Why '
Inter
Varsity
III
House (on Ihe tell b e y o n d the gym)
Sponsor
Piesidenl
He w i l l be ,0
II
A M w i t h ihe S h a c h a n t . and Kiisfiei
follows
ol
I It
,il 9 3(1 A M
ihe Preliminary
Lunch
II
"g
w i l l lie held on
following
,„i
Board for
•vim e l e e i Please we oeeil help
Corps
Business
Community
I riday el 7 3 0 (Creative! w i l l , Oneg
Sh.ibb.it
luesitiv
li
HA . ' ? ' ,ei W ' l l
Sabbath
PM
I' 1
Corning Get'.
Ecumenicals
8
I I ' ' , '.nil not I " " Kile h i
Mile il pi
j•Ii
Studenl Canler o l St Rose A l l sup
porters of the U n i t e d
When?
172 9807
March 27
of the
Towei Indian Quad
call Peqg ,il ' l ! i / 6 1 8 6 <» Marianne .11
Phoenix
Friends
Al!
For more m f n
Bulletin
Artists
M a n u s c i i p s . D o c u m e n t s and Books.
April
AMIA
d r i v e n m m Exile by the
Viewpoint
Community
at A l b a n y
speakers, workshops. and films
The n e x l Albany
FRIDAY, MARCH 23, 1973
ol New York
E X I LE 1933-1945. A n Ex-
Monday March 26. T h e y are
Assembly Hall at 7: 3 0 P M . Sponsor
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
presents
Matting
2 7 , League I I -
by the captains meeting
guages and Lileratures of Ihe State
University
Captain
no later than first game, preferably
of Rochester w i l l give I w o lectures o n
(id by Ihe F o r u m o l Politics
Friday, March 30, 1973, is the
next date for the series of
Country Dances currently being
sponsored by the Eighth Step
Coffee House. As with previous
dances this one will be held at
85 Chestnut St., Albany and
will:te»ture Fennig's All-Star
String Band, Andy Spence
calling the dances
consult
article
Albany
Softball
I I I - March
.location o f rooms. B o n d m o n e y d u e
Interested Folk
National
Majors & Minors
AMIA
League
M a r c h 2 8 , League l-March 2 9 . Please
A p r i l 6. 7, .mil 8 We w i l l be having,
and the American
Mar. 22 Movie Night • Peter
Lorre in the movie Classic, "M"
Mar. 22 & 23 - The Eighth
Step will be open for informal
talk, etc., Attend the Niskayuna
Folk Festival and visit our
refreshment stand
Mar. 26
" R a p " Nite
Informal conversation, bridge,
etc.
Mar. 27 - Paul Miller - Music
from the Renaissance to Present,
on Lute, Guitar and Piano
Mar. 28 - Mini Film Festival •
"Mask of the Red Death",
"Occurrence at Owl Creek
Bridge", "Metropolis", Horror
Films
Mar. 29 - Mini Film Festival
"The General", "Kind Heart*
and C o r o n e t s " "The Wolf
Specialist," "The Barber"
Mar. 30 - Country Dance at 85
Chestnut St., with Fcnnig's All
Star String Band
Mar. 31 - National Cleanser A
new folk rock group
Apr. 2 • " B a p " Night - Informal talk, bridge, ping pong,
etc.
Apr. 3 - David Gordon, vocal &
banjo - Old time string band
music
Apr. 4 - George Colavecchio Contemporary & Original folk
27 al 7 : 3 0 PM in CC 315.
Tri-Beta Meeting Tuesday March
27 al 7 3 0 PM in Bio 2 4 8 . V o t i n g on
new
membership
and
Induction
planning
Sponsored by llie
The Women's Liberation G r o u p w i l l
Baruch
Country dancing is a unique
tradition of dancing having its
roots in the music and life styles
of the lrlsVi and British people. It
is different from square dancing
in that different forms are
employed in each type of dance
with the particular piece of
music having been written or
developed for the particular
dance. Included in this category
are; Contra Dancing - based on
Irish fiddle tunes, hornpipes, and
jigs; English Country Dancing • a
specific tune and title for a
particular dance; Quadrilles •
reels and jigs; Kentucky Running
Sets - reels and jigs developed in
this country: Circle Mixers Polkas, Waltzes and other step
(lances.
The music can be played with
different types of instruments
which give a particular flavor to
each dance. Traditionally, the
unique feature of the ensembles
has been the inclusion of the
hammered dulcimer, which was
added in this country, but for
years has been lost. Recently,
with the revivial of this dancing
in t h e northeast and in
Kentucky, this instrument is
again being featured, and is
included in the instrumentation
of Fennig's Band. Dance time is
9:00 P.M. Charge: $2 NonMembers; $1.50 Members
Science
o n Tuesday,
tend. Sponsored by Cathexis
the Campus
be holding ,i Women's Weekend o n
tunes
Apr. 5 - Open Night - Use our
stage to do your bag.
Apr. 6 & 7 - Lou Killen •
Traditional British & Irish music,
Chanties
Apr. 9 - "Rap" Night Informal talk, bridge, etc.
Apr. 10 - Harry Danner, Tenor,
Affiliate Artist Program of the
Lake George Opera Festival
Apr. 11 - Jake Cimino • guitar
& vocals, contemporary folk
music
Apr. 12 • Mark Patton • Guitar
& Banjo - Traditional English &
American folk music
Apr. 13 & 14
Dennis
AndreopouloH - fi & 12 String
Guitar - Contemporary folk,
Original songs, country music &
piano Rags.
Apr. 16
"Rap" Night
Informal talk, bridge, etc.
Political
meet
Admission is lien- all invited to at-
at
eral Prison
Calendar o f Events
p h o t o is required for a p p l i c a t i o n .
The D e p a r t m e n t o f Germanic Lan-
available
May of 1972 w h i l e i n D a n b u r y Fed
Eighth Step Calendar
Undergrad
Association w i l l
Sports_Shorts _ _ ; _ _
ULB 36.
Deadline f o r a p p l i c a t i o n f o r M a y 5 is
F.
zine (Workshop in N o n Violence) are
files f r o m M e d i o . Pennsylvania
The Passion of Anna is the only film in the sel
featuring Liv Ullman. She is a singularly remarkable
B.
N e x l semester's courses w i l l be dis-
conlains reprints o f the stolen F B I
Bergman films are not simple to understand; they
do not serve their message on a plate. These films
invite you to a challenge; a challenge to seek the
heart of the film by entering the filmic universe of
that work. If you accept the invitation and take up
the challenge you will learn much...about yourself.
after
cussed. Everyone welcome
, a b l e in Campus Center. O n e issue
The final film in the series, presented on Friday,
April 6th at 7:15 &9:45 in
LC18, is one of
Bergman's most recent films, The Passion of Anna
made in 1970. On a small island we meet a number
of characters all in some way controlled by guilt
over their pasts. Anna feels responsible for the
motor accident that killed her husband and son and
those around her carry with them the ghosts of
failed marriages, lost dreams and unhappy love
affairs. Beyond these private guilts the community
has another weight: One of their number is a lunatic
who goes about the island torturing animals.
patterened
Monday March 2 6 al 8 PM in LC 2 0
Two special issues of WIN maga-
actress and a long time member of the "Bergman
Players" who include Max von Sydow, Gunnar
Bjornstrand, Bibi Andersson, Harriet Andersson and
lngrid Thulin. This brings us to the matter of acting
in the films of Ingmar Bergman.
Bergman's company of actors includes some of the
finest and most gifted talents in the world. Each one
offers an almost impossible consistency of perfection. They are another reason why these films are
so rewarding.
College
A p r i l 13. A recent 2 inch by 2 inch
Skinner's Walden II.
by Joseph Dougherty
Advance tickets for the Bergman Trilogy will be
on sale tonight at the door of LC 18 before the
screenings of Smiles of a Summer Night.
University
A l l i r v i t e d - free admission. This is the
Dr. James Tedeschi o l the S U N Y A
-Ingmar Bergman
There is a good possibility that Sweden's Ingmar
Bergman may well be the single most powerfulforce
in modern cinema. His films are unmatched in
complexity and honesty, and their perceptive investigations into the nature of man are without
peer. Like no one else, Bergman is a filmic poet.
During the next three weeks, the International
Film Group will present a regrettably brief look at
the Cinema of Ingmar Bergman.
The first film in the series, presented tonight (Fri.,
Mar. 23rd) at 7:15 & 9:45 in LC 18, is Smiles of a
Summer Night, a comedy about love, deception and
misdirected dignity. At the turn of the century, a
wealthy lawyer goes to his former mistress to see if
she can do anything to help make his young wife
more affectionate. The mistress, however, is of a
mind of her own.
from
Admission
ate now evailabte
Soical Science lounge f r o m 3-5 PM.
Peace & Politics
"People ask what are my intentions with my
films-my
aims. It is a difficult and dangerous
question, and I usually give an evasive answer: I try
to tell the truth about the human condition, the
truth as I see it. This answer seems to satisfy
everyone, but it is not quite correct. I prefer to
describe what I would like my aim to be."
coffee
MCA T (Medical College
Test) applications
Box 551 CN1
N e e n a h , W i s c o n s i n 54956
AiiuA 4 .voeku lt-i delivery
LC18
$.75 with tax card
$1.25 without
ALBANY STUDENT WIESS
PAGE 7A
WANTED
^f,,..,*.<JWf*
Wanted Desperately! Girl's
Pat, 434-6282 after 6 P M .
CliASSlPiP
Pontecorvo's Burn - A Rare f=lick
Business Opportunity: Earn money
In your spare time on campus or
during
summer vacation. 'Call
785-775S from 3-6pm Mon.-Frl. for
an appointment. No obllgatlon-no
Information over the telephone.
bicycle.
Wanted: Used Men's 10 speed. Proof
of ownership required. Call Helena,
436-7873.
W A N T E D D E A D OR A L I V E : Lionel
trains. Quick cash. Call 4 3 9 - 5 1 0 9 .
(and even w h y ) t o read the slave
by T i t o Francona
experience necessary. Call Phil at
457-4328 after 6 PM.
SERVICES
revolt. I n Dolores' camp, while
might qtuilily for some
the guerillas dance around the
kind lit' prize l o r being the least
fires w i t h their new guns, the
promoted, least distributed, and
two men sip whiskey, talk about
least seen major film o f the last
the f u t u r e , become friends.
Hum
the fact
On Walker's part, the friend-
that it features Marlon Brando,
ship is something less than sin-
who in l ° 7 0 (when Burn was
cere. While Dolores gathers his
released
forces in the mountains, Waler
decade.
This despite
i n this c o u n t r y ) was
already a very big b o x office star
engineers the final blow o f the
(as well as a fine actor), and
slave revolt, a coup d'etat by the
despite the fact that it is a very
plantation
powerful
young gallant chosen to assassi-
and superbly
artistic
owners
nate the colonial governor hesi-
tor. Gillo Pontecorvo.
tates. Walker obligingly pulls the
lack o f
trigger for h i m ) . When General
audience understandable is that
Dolores brings his troops into
Pontecorvo is a major (and very
the capital, the slaves have all
heavy) Marxist
director, whose
been emancipated and a British
was acclaimed
ship siis in the harbor to insure
makes
Bank'
in
this
o)'Algiers
Not only have the slaves been
picks
on very touchy subjects: colo-
freed, bill
nial war. race w a i . the Vietnam
opened to lice Hade (i.e., British
War. A l l this is rathei unpleasani
trade). This has all been done,
toi white American viewers.
says
palatable by
never quite seems Io believe i l
iiKie.isiiiii the Instoiical distance.
himself, thai is o f httle conse-
.1 little
itHiic
island m the Antilles; the coloni-
is ignorant o f constitutions and
alists
sugai
Poititgucse
Isiueh
ami Mulish
revolutions
British
.tie justified),
distance is not gieal enough: the
come
paid
lues in Bum are still painfully
rebel
army
close.
that, o f course, is o f enormous
workers, and
When ex-porlei Dolores carries
mi the forces they represent):
Walkei's hags to the boat he asks
William
"Wheie
VValkei
(Brando), an
agent o f the British
10 foment
Controlled
the
imported native I horn a slave o f
Indochina in the Antilles.
pital this Thursday and l i u l a y at
Brando's is the major role (peihaps I'm commercial
and
the more
British
agent.
7..id and '):.!() pin in l.C l.\.
reasons'.')
Hits flick
complex. As
Walkei
IV.
teaches
won't
be shown on
and the possibility
of a
Dolores i o kill Portuguese sol-
icvival is non-existent. So this
diers.
may be youi lasi chance.
supplies
Frank Zappa, k n o w n best as the chief Mother o f
Invention, has turned his talents to the silver screen
and come up with this richly eclectic cinema
fantasy. I t is evident that Zappa has n o t been
fiddling away, so t o sepak, all these years while
everyone else has had his eyes filled to one sort o f
screen or other. The musician has also been
watching, and making mental notes for his o w n
movie
While for the most part eschewing conventional
plot and character, Zappa draws liberally from those
aspects o f film and television that are useful to him
and fits I hem into a cohereni whole. T h e
groundwork o f 200 MOTELS is provided by the
rock'n'roll film pioneered by The Beatles and The
Dave Clark Kive But with The Mothers as the main
attraction, there has to be a difference, and there is
If The Beatles often appeared rather naive and
unselfconsciolis. The Mothers make their individual
and collective consciousnesses the central issue I n n - ,
visually suggesting the incompleteness of subjective
experience and the illusions inherent in sense
perception.
last trail o f the film we sec
.aising henefil lor Bach Mai Hos-
rebel against the British.
h i m wit Ii
weapons, and shows h i m bow
A
handicap
doesn't
have to
be a
hangup.
If you need rehabilitation —
or know someone
who does— write to
HURRAH. Box 1200,
Washington, D C 20013.
HURRAH
i-telplh Reach and Rehobiftult
/••<«:< "v. HonaVapped
The Stale-Federal Program o l Delia
billlalion Service* U S Department
ol Health. Education, and Welfare
The Advertiaing Council.
(.r-
PAGE 8A
-Sr^wTcTreij
IvfMUE ^ * i WISTtM AVIMUE
I Hownaot!
-T
JlJX»J.«JUJIJU.OJLlULIL»JUUIJJ-..t 1 1 « J U U J . i l » » » IL8J1AJLI1JU,
The Down Tube
Cycle Shop
1 0 speed b i k e s a n d service
c o m p l e t e l i n e o f accessories a n d c o m p l e t e repair f a c i l i t i e s
Reopening Specials:
Spring Tune up: $8
Fuji
Corso
Corsa
Zeus
ElvishJ
a v a i l a b l e at
last y e a r ' s p r i c e s
until March 3 1
Models tfom $95
19" frame sizes available
•fororrBT&TTfTmw^
New
.ile
cabinet.
condition. $3!)
b o d , desk, dresser, c a b i n e t I m
, 4 H : 1 • I 0-1.
Call M M
Safe; Low-Cost Confidential
Burn will he shown as a fund-
I be Portuguese and executed as a
Parenthood
:>?" BS.W I V . Wood
Using the flexible T V medium o f video tsipc.
Zappa incorporate;; into this fabric
versions of such materials as the Metro musical,
ballet, the T V giveaway show, the omiiipn\seiil
Faust theme, T V cartoons, and I he sell reflective
Jerry Lewis ending ('omedic antics and high I \
original visual techniques enclose every! lung in tinunnustakcahle Zappa mantle
Bookcase o p
,'M 452 i
a non-profit organisation
V'\\
Yt.ik-h.uikt/oil M<o
i u u i u l 11 i p .
SEIDENBERG
JEWELRY
Cici man
c
cigarettes 39 lpack
Afro earrings
264 Central Ave.
cor. No. Lake Ave.
Albany
flights.
Ove.se.iN
[our
t\>,
1' 0 Box 5 *5. tii.nilch.no. Voi
muni os 101
earrings 2 for $1
buy 4 pair get 1 free
\WCUN
Resoivf now I'm JuiU' .mil July
Ollrul i « l . . t « t e . l i t . bit) li.,m SOFA II
STEREO REPAIR—reasonable.
457-5255.
PASSPORT PHOTOS
Fast quality
service-Call John Chow at 457-7796
or David Shapiro at 457-8714.
Typing
Service
439-5765.
mmjjf^
f
\
I l\\\
-,, .
|M|
Typing done In m y home. 869-2474.
Need transportation for bicycle f r o m
and back to Queens. C a l l Susan,
7-4680.
PERSONALS
Oear Brucle Baby
Y o u ' l l get!!
H a p p y Birthday
Love, J & F
Bruce M.,
B u m m e r : Spending
at S U N Y A .
HOUSING
your
IMPROVE
YOOR
F R E N C H OR
SPANISH wlille y o u leach others t o
speak
English.
Peace Corps and
VIS I A need T E F L (Teaching English
•is a Foreign Language)
teachers.
T'EFl certification is not necessary.
For i n f o r m a t i o n and applications see
ynui placement director.
Wanted: One bedroom apartment In
Albany
for June thru
September,
Prefer sublet. 457-7854.
Help Wanted: Ondergtads w i t h car I N
w i n k part l i m e nights. $2 pci h u m
plus lips. Call John, 4 5 7 - 5 0 4 3 .
Use your skills in Latin A m e n t a , F i j i .
Jamaica, A h i c a m here in tlie U.5Gaiu valuable experience selling up
co-ops, corporations, credit unions.
Caoduct mat keting and labor sut
verys. Establish long range economic
goals .it all levels of government.
I each p r o d u c t i o n
marketing, etc.
Hie Peace Corps and V"1STA need
you.
Contact: Theresa M a r t i n , Oiv
islOM of M i n o r i t y Rcciuit merit, "JO
CtiNicli Sdeet. N Y C . 212 264-7124.
Roommate w.inlcMt (or F .ill ' IS I
handicapped d o i m student
I
and board in rc-lurn for service
aid
UNIVERSITY OF PARIS
Nfiw P.ilt/ Philosophy Yeji
Qualified und&rgiailuotes m Philosophy and such i elated majors
as Sociology, Psychology and I lench htei atuie, can oain from JO to
34 credits taking t ogular courses at the University of Pai is
(Soibonne) during l l J / J - / 4 . The SUNY 1'iogi.im Uirectut will help
students secuie suitable housing:, arrange programs and assist or
anange assistance lor them in then studies throughout Ihe yeai. A
three-week orientation and intensive language review will be held at
the start, September I :.i to June l b . Estimated living expenses,
transportation, tuition, and fees, $2800. Additional information
may be had by writing to Pi ice Chattson, Department of Philosophy. I 1 1000, Stale Univeisity College, New PalW, New York
12561. telephone: (914) 2b"/-2b(Jb.
2-Bedroom apartment needed tor fall
and summer. Call Nancy: 438-5426.
1'Ob
tfOtfDA^AP^LE.
P.M.
C.C. 3 7 5 ,
Send 25 cents t o :
Last Chance, 6 Mach Pherson Terrace, A l b a n y , N.Y. 12206.
M E N - W O M E N . W O R K O N A SHIP
N E X T S U M M E R ! N o experience req u i r e d . Excellent
pay. Worldv^de
travel. Perfect summer j o b or career.
Send $2 for I n f o r m a t i o n . S E A F A X ,
Box 2049-DJ, Poart Angeles, W A
98362,
Dick's ass Is gotten
One-room etliclency or one-bedroom
apartment needed f r o m June 25 t o
August 3.
891-0802
Wan led Io rent: Mouse In c o u n t r y
w l l h land. 4-6 bedrooms .Within J O
minutes f r o m campus. Call 4 8 ? i j 8 5 7 .
Wanted; 3-bedroorn apartment for
' / 3 " 74, close
t o busline.
Call
•lb/
Wanted: Young, affectionate, passionate, playful girls f o r f u n and
games. Call 7-8900, ask for Rudy.
Dear Pete,
H o w Uave y o u put u p w i t h me for
1' .• years?
Love,
The Bitch
JO?'J.
&215-2 Bedrooms, den, etc., pool and
porch, Latham..783-7239, 474-6118.
Will the person w h o sent valentines
to the girls of 6 0 2 Eastman please
i d e n t i f y h i m s e l f We love y o u , b u t
w e ' i e going n u t s ! !
Rooms in large, lovely c o u n t r y home,
fireplaces, 3 baths, land, creek and
wilurlalls nearby. A p p r o x i m a t e l y 25
minutes f r o m A l b a n y . 084 5813, or
call Mike al 449-1 /'J'J after 5 PM.
Smax.
Will more be a Senior Week?
•Concer ned Seniors
Fin. apt, only for summer. $1 10/rnu.
Stale St- Near park Modern, one BR,
suitable lor .1 students, Iree parking
lot. 462-0214,
fn
Run
l [
flat. N o , Allen St. Call
niallon, 4 8 9 0 7 2 5 .
grrinrrinrinnrinnr^^
A belated
Happy
Birthday
t o i infoi
to
f u r n i s h e d house for r e m , $240, ;
bedrooms, nose t o campus, air condl
tioned, 482-1 103, 4 82-4 54 8.
rjuall Struct, $ 1 / 0 a m o n t h , utllittc
included, A|MH to August. 457-4065
Couples wanted t o discuss coed hou?
IIUJ l o i tall CaM Dave, / 4004 u
Boh. 7-8705
Phil and Sheila
from
3
the ASP Staph
feuXUXIULLILUJIXSUULSJU
^INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION!
a
announces its big trip to
i
^WASHINGTON, D.C.|
i
i
I
birthday
Have a happy,
SEG
Cute, c o ^ y , clean apartmonl needed
In June (or t w o people. If you're
happy in your apartment but leaving
this year call, 472-8897 and ask (or
Andy.
5'. 00 r.jj. Ffi.bffiAttMflSO
I mis. & Wed 116
Thurs. & Fn. 118
Sat. 9 4
reasonable.
Married Couples-Earn extra money
babysitting p a r t / f u l l time, $117 per
week. Live-In situations available lor
this semester. Onlverslly Family Services Inc. Agency. Call 4 5 6 0 9 9 8 ,
vj0o ccx-^X vnake T\ne
I
B i c y c l i s t seeks companions for hostellng t r i p In June. B o b T u c h m a n ,
465-3006.
Papers t y p e d - reasonable rates. Call
Marcla, 459-7352.
3
tHUrHDOlUuJrMlfll.-rHjlfl.ghU
RIDE/RIDERS
WANTED
Typing done In m y home, 482-8432.
»
. . I.i
Rich,
Found In Women's Auxlillary Gym small gold ring with Initials. Call
7-4532.
Secretary
needed - $ 2 0 0 / w e e k .
T y p i n g 50 w p m . 4 8 2 - 9 7 8 1 .
FRtt: all the dope you'll
need for a Europe trip.
1**11 llir K I . I I I SOFA Llll •,!•: eliu 111 I 111
262 Central Avenue
Albany
434 1711
KS
Spring's C o m i n g : Get your
bike
ready n o w ! A l l kinds: reasonable.
Call Paul, 4 5 7 - 5 2 3 4 .
Earn u p t o $2000 a scnool year or
more hanging poseters o n Campus i n
spare time. Send name, phone, address, references t o : Coordinator of
Campus Representatives, 2 0 7 Michigan Theatre Bldg., A n n A r b o r , M l
4 8 1 0 8 . Call (313) 062-5575.
/ Band A M - F M - L W - S l u n twavo radio,
excellent c o n d i t i o n . $60. Call Barry.
457-4656.
Good wi.ikimi
457 /a54
Experienced babysitter w i l l w o r k in
her home or yours. 4 7 7 - 7 8 2 1 .
Waitress needed 1 1:30 A M till 2 PM
Iron Horse Pub, \b Colvln Ave. A p ply In person.
SONY
I C 6 3 0 tape
recorder.
bmnnths
o l d . Retail
14 50, price
$ J ? ' j . PertcU
Must
sell. J o n ,
457. / / 1 2
G.E.
Fuller Pure Boar Bristle Brushes. Save
$2.
Now-March
3 0 . Call
Jalk,
7-5234.
OVERSEAS
J O B S — 5 u m m e r or
permanent.
Australia,
Europe, S.
America, A f r i c a , etc. A l l professions,
$ 5 0 0 - $ l , 0 0 0 m o n t h l y , expenses a i d ,
sightseeing. Free Into, w r i t e : T W R
Co. Dept, E6, 2550 Telegraph Ave.,
Berkeley, Cal. 9 4 7 0 4 .
200 W. 72nd St.
N.Y.C. N.Y.
in
Dolores, a black native (albeit an
Orlver needed urgently t o help /1th
solicitations f o r State Fair j o u r n a l .
Call Linda Weinstock. 7-8972.
Fender T w i n Reverb A m p . Excellent
c o n d i t i o n . $200. Gibson Les Paul.
G o l d . Vi;ry good c until I ton, $1 75.
Eves: 4 3 4 - 6 6 4 0
Suite 55
will y o u go n o w . " T o
which oin agent replies "Have
Admiralty
revolt
1200. 28,000
tires.
Clean.
Part-time food store demonstrators.
Dependable. G o o d salary. Neod transp o r t a t i o n . Call or w r i t e : " J . E . Dem o n s t r a t i o n s , " 5 7 Idle Day Drive,
Centerport,
N. Y.
1 1 7 2 1 , or
{516)757-9195.
LOST & FOUND
Lost: Purple scarf In Patroon Lounge.
Sandl, 482-8695.
T y p i n g w i t h a personal touch •
reasonable rates, t o o . Please call
Sandy at 7-4712.
HELP WANTED
Gibson B 25 Guitar. 4 5 / 1 ) 0 8 6 .
the y o u ever heard o f a place called
Antilles and Satei sent t o pin Indochina?" l-lash! We never
see Walkei in Indochina, but in
down a revolution: and Jose
sent
Best
3-spced bike. New. Call 465-3206.
CALL
595-4220
t o the Umpire.
two men (and. by implication.
Chopper.
2 Snow Tires w i t h rims. Si/e H78-15.
almost new. $ 4 0 , 3 / 2 - 1 4 6 0 alter
b:JO PM.
the
is disbanded and
consequence
I he film turns on the lives of
Pontiac 6 5 . Mechanically good condi t i o n , 2 door, w h i t e , new tires.
60,000 miles. $ 2 0 0 . O n e driver. 6
Brevator, A p t . C, A l b a n y .
1970 T o y o t a Corolla
miles.
Stick.
Snow
489-7912.
Free Placement
N.Y.C. Free Preg Test
Medicaid Accepted
puces, that piogiess and
l i o i n the whites. The slaves he-
lint the
1966 V W Fastback. 10,000 mites on
rebuilt engine, excellent body. $500.
Call 3 9 9 - 8 7 3 7 .
ABORTION
civilization can only be learned
against the
1968 Cadillac, m a r o o n w i t h black
v i n y l t o p , power seats, windows,
antenna. 57,000 miles, Immaculate in
and o u t . $ 2 , 1 5 0 . 869-8503.
1968 Cadillac. 57,000 miles. F u l l
power
air-conditioning,
excellent
condition. $1950. 869-8503.
'68 P l y m o u t h , 4-door, 6-cyilnder,
automatic, snows. $250 or besl offer.
463-6054.
I he nine is the middle o f the quence [o the l . m p i i e . l l e hu.illy
convinces General Dolores, who
las' a ' i u u i \ . die colony a small
1968 P l y m o u t n
Roadrunnor, 3 8 3 ,
a u t o m a t i c , tape deck, Mat lory ign i t i o n , 4 8 , 0 0 0 miles. Very goad
c o n d i t i o n . 869-8503.
1965 Volkswagen V a n w i t h a 1971
engine. $ 2 5 0 . 869-8503.
1965 Volkswagen: W h i t e w i t h red
stripes, black Interior. Restored mechanically t o r u n like new, $550.
465-7748.
Walkei. in the name o f
T o y o t a Corona Deluxe. 1970, automatic transmission, A M - F M radio,
a l r - c o n d l t l o n i n g , excellent c o n d i t i o n .
$ 1 5 5 0 . Jay, 4 5 7 - 5 0 6 1 .
1959 6 5 0 T r i u m p h
offer. 456-0652,
the island has been
" c i v i l i / a l i o n . piogiess" and il he
Pnnlecoivo attempts to make
It
1968 G T O A / C , PS, r a d i o . Runs well
- body excellent - mag wheels. $ 1 2 5 0 .
Call K e n , 4 8 9 - 1 6 2 6 .
turn.
War A m e i i c a . A n d
Pontecorvo again in Burn
1963 Mercedes Benz-220 SE, 4 door
touring sedan, n e w A M / F M , power
steering, 4 speeds, leather-wood Interior, classic car. $ 9 0 0 . 8 6 9 - 0 4 5 0 .
that the Portuguese do not re-
Luiope but seldom seen in
Cold
Adorable 1963 Volkswagen. Many
extras. Sacrifice. $300. Call Mike,
457-3028.
(when the
film by a major European direcWhat
1965 Volvo, 54,000 miles. $600.
459-6935.
Apartment wanted. If you are rentlnfl
a four or five bedroom apartment,
please call us so we may look. Call
Paul, 457-4693.
| -
I
leaves Thursday March 29
g
at 11 pm from the Circle
|
and from Sayles Int'l House
jjj
returns April 1 . . .
1
$24
$24 covers
covers travel
travel and
ana lodging
loaginy
,,
Sign up NOW in CC 329
|
IllfOflMfl MuilurU l l m l I rnl.i 1 I.I
.SQflkj
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
FRIDAY, MARCH 23, 1973
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
FRIDAY, MARCH 23. 1973
PAGE ELEVEN
.
Advertisement
•'->>•
'-'•'.- • ';•••'
'
•
•••
Advertisement
litorials & letters /
Advertisement
AN OPEN LETTER TO PRESIDENT BENEZET
Or. Benezet:
What are thejsalreasons for Dean Schmidt's rejection of the Department
of Theatre's recommendation that Joe Balfior be rehired next year? Can it
be that such reasons are so lacking of objective merit that they could not
stand open scrutiny?
Why will neither you nor Dean Schmidt consent to a meeting with
concerned alumni having possession of expert personal knowledge in the
matter, to hear additional testimony on Mr. Balfior's ability and potential
value to the University, and to consider a rebuttal of the arbitrary and
fallacious reasoning in the official explanation of your Administration's
action? Can you possibly believe that the Dean's information was so
complete, and her judgment of such omniscient quality, as t o preclude the
remotest possibility of error on this decision?
Why do you refuse even to acknowledge your responsibility for reviewing
a questionable decision of the person to whom you have delegated some of
your duties? A competent administrator does not abdicate responsibility
when he delegates it.
When all appeals for a responsible discussion between reasonable people
are rejected out of hand, as has been the case in this situation, it seems
justified to publish the facts as we see them, with the onus of any
misconception falling upon the parties which rejected the opportunity t o
correct them.
The following statements represent, in our opinion, a probable explanation of your Administration's actions in this matter:
1. You find proven teaching ability of little consequence without support
of academic degrees; even a lifetime of professional experience is given no
weight.
2. The vote of four faculty members whose expertise is in other areas was
given greater credence than the vote of those best qualified in the field to
which the appointment is to be made, and contrary to an outstanding
recommendation by the Department chairman and the unanimous support
of student representatives. It appears reasonable to ascribe at least part of
the negative voting to intra-departmental politics irrelevant to Mr. Balfior's
qualifications, and the Dean's decision to a desire to give support to the
faction so voting.
3. You are quite glib with speeches to alumni about your desire that they
manifest continuing concern for their alma mater, but demonstrated by your
arrogant and close-minded refusal to see us, that your opinion of our
abilities, concern, and fair-mindedness is abysmally low, and that you really
see us as a source of potential revenue.
Please take note that our concern for our alma mater began long before
you probably even heard of the institution, and will continue long after the
completion of your association with SUNYA. A president who refuses to
appreciate that fact is not deserving of a long tenure in office.
Regretfully yours,
Morton B. Hess '57
William Frankonis '63
Pf\CE
TWELVE
Advertisemenl
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
American Tel. and Tel.
Oldies But Goodies
March 20, 1973
,VJ .I:JIIXIIKIII
"Long distance Is the next tmi
thing to being there."
Advertisement
FRIDAY, MARCH 23, 1973
Beginning M o n d a y evening a n d for several evenings t o follow over 100
S U N Y A a l u m n i a n d s t u d e n t s will s t a r t a massive " P h o n a t h o n " campaign in
s u p p o r t of t h e A l u m n i Annual F u n d Drive.
T h e " P h o n a t h o n " objective is t o gain e n o u g h s u p p o r t for t h e building of
the p r o p o s e d Alumni House-Conference C e n t e r c o m p l e x . S o m e $ 1 7 5 , 0 0 0 is
needed before c o n s t r u c t i o n can begin on the facility, which is t o b e located
near the c a m p u s lake.
T h e volunteers will meet in t h e lower lounge o f F u l t o n Hall, w h e r e some
3 0 t e l e p h o n e s have already been installed, a n d will t h e n call a b o u t 4 , 0 0 0
alumni t h r o u g h o u t t h e United S t a t e s .
T h e weal lor a conference facility on c a m p u s is o b v i o u s . It will serve as
the local point ol alumni activity on c a m p u s , a n d will provide m u c h needed
space lor conferences, meetings, a n d c o n t i n u i n g e d u c a t i o n p r o g r a m s . It will
reduce much of t h e heavy b u r d e n being placed o n t h e
vercrowded
C a m p u s Center.
T h e Alumni Association offices will also be located in the new building,
and future alumni events will b e held t h e r e .
It has been encouraging t o see t h e steady progress the Alumni Association
has made during the pasi less years, and the C o n f e r e n c e Center was an
excellent choice for a project
• , h the growing assocation can realistically
complete.
According to Alumni Director David Jcnks t h e assocation has d o u b l e d in
size over the past 111 years, and the services a n d p r o g r a m s offered by the
association have q u a d r u p l e d . With t h e association's increased s i / e has c o m e
considerably increased giving, giving winch is sorely needed it an otherwise
good university is going t o b y m a d e into an excellent o n e .
It is alumni support that allows a p u b l u institution to enrich its
e d u c a tio n a l program and to achieve greater flexibility. T h e public institutions which .inn toward excellence inusi look t o private sources tor the
h i n d s needed to d o tins, and the 'alumni a i e the first place llicv look.
A p p a r e n t l y . Albany State's Alumni Association has r e s p o n d e d enthusiastically.
We wish the association much luck in icae htng their ] une 1 Mh goal, f r o m
the building ol S.ivies and Hi nb.u hei I tails in t h e I 'Mil's, t o t h e installation
ol t h e carillon t h e new c a m p u s , and now in the building of a Conference
C e n t e r , thev have c o n t r i b u t e d iniine.isiii ably l o the university c o m m u n i t y .
Spring, Peppers and Smiles
fsws-'wsws
T h e y d e c i d e d t o t r y a new m o n t h on
us ..March for s o m e reason This w a y t h e
transition is not dramatic-. We go in
gloom, r e t u r n t o t h e same
O u r introd u c t i o n Lo a n o t h e r season ol' fiisbei-s a n d
fountain dips will he gradual. This semes
ter we missed t h e s u d d e n n e s s of an early
April r e t u r n .
But t h e t h e m e s are t h e same
They
start early. By Wednesday we catch, it
only s u b c o n s c i o u s l y , t h e trickle out of
lecture c e n t e r s . By T h u r s d a y we are sure
to have realised t h e reasons, s h o c k e d t o
our sensibilities
by a four-star PSA
special. O u t rolled t h e three week old
stuffed p e p p e r s (ever inspect a dining
r o o m freezer at its height of leftovers'.'I,
the h o n e d r y cleaned roasl beef lor
whatever p s e u d o n y m is chosen tonight I
and last a n d least t h e p u d d i n g s thai have
reverted t o their original stales of m i s
and water T h e restless and I he lucky
leave by m i d d a y Friday, Willi only .1
meager few 10 enjoy t h e s m o r g a s b o r d
lunch inevitably awaiting us Kvery 'lis
gusting.
dispensable
non perishable is
t h e r e lor t h e asking Whin |(>y'
I gel a h e a d of my.se-ll Since 11 u.iM o n d a y , or I'uesday .11 lie- lalesl on
Wednesday as always .is lale. utv a.iiliv
colleagues) when you craned v..111 neck
and s t o o p e d a n d . m u l l e d a n d u n c i n
read thai rule c-aril clow
ihe middle .a
the sln<-k u n d e r Ihe name Karmingdale
t y o u clou'l live in Karmingdalc. y o u d o n ' t
really even k n o w w h e r e il is, Inn t h a t ' s
o k a y , It's -II tin- light i l n e e l i o n I Willi.nil
taking t h e w h o l e h u n c h o i l Ihe hook
because it's s u c h a pain lo put them ti.uk
on a n d them (delight ! | it's jusl a n o l h e r
p o o r s o u l looking for a ride like yon lull
he had t o t a k e an orange card and cross
oul t h e R S in riders w a n t e d because Ihere
were n o yellow c a r d s left because- yoc:
huve a b o u t ft,000 o t h e r kids compel ing
/, v Miu-ltcl /.olvi
| Waverly Place: Bum Deal
Wlnlc we w h o l e h e a r t e d l y " ' " ^ •'"' Alumni Association's fund raising
efforts, there' arc' a tc-vs- aspects s u r r o u n d i n g their search for new
h e a d q u a r t e r s which arc nevertheless o p e n 10 serious q u e s t i o n i n g . We speak
ol the p r o p o s e d sale- ol Waverly Place, a split-level l u c k e d b e h i n d Chapel
H o u s e , and until n o w . a private- residence o w n e d b y the Faculty S t u d e n t
Associai ion. Aliiinni President William Floyd h a s p r o m i s e d S t u d e n t
Association President Mike Lamport that t h e A l j i n n i Association will
consider b u y i n g Waverly Place from Waverly Inc. a not-for-profit corporation comprised of S t u d e n t Association a n d the classes of ' 7 3 . ' 7 4 . and
'75 1 eforc u considers b u y i n g any oft c a m p u s building. According t o
1..unpen. Waverly Inc. wishes t o b u y Waverlv Place from FSA in order t o
hold it tor the A l u m n i Association, until t h e y have e n o u g h m o n e y t o b u y it
themselves.
••••'•••'••'•-•<••
Willi y o u . t h e bastards. Since
your
parents d o n ' t believe in hitching because
of the stories they heard and because; il
might be dangerous and why should their
s o n / d a u g h t e r have to a n d anyway it's
against Ihe Law, s o you are forced t o t h e
same perennial o p t i o n
Armed wilh just a light knapsack (not
like Ihe lime, as a d u m b freshman, y o u
lugged hall Ihe immediate world up and
hack with yecu, including books) y o u
Inidge along that vague, h u t familiar
path
The bus t o Draper is set A con
stanl Known territory f r o m there is a
nebulous conglomeration of larks and
lakes ,uid pearls and broadways with .!A
Belts and !) Whitehall Roads for the
unathlelic- spendthrifts.
So that s the stage tin- mall Is in There's
lh.il ecu.- park where llial guy they
named ihe physics building afler lived, 01
.cmelhing Hut it's nil I'amdiui sin..- v..11
were down here only ,c week .igu lor Till-:
I'UNl'KHl
You always I,, go Adinin
dark he.-alls,- it's cheaper, or (supposedly I
,.,1'er lor -,,. ihe stories ,.,n and anyway
lln- station is less lucky and between Ihe
1,11- ,11,1 iln- I'orl Authority, y o u ' i e r„,ing
1,, i;,-i .,11 ihe luckiness \ , , u r a n slomach,
,,, \,,.i might as well luiv yocu 11. kel .11
,nu/.d, modern arc-hile.-lcne
What 11 all 1 omi-s d o w n t o is t h i s : if the A l u m n i fund drive should succeed
111 reaching its $ 1 7 5 , 0 0 0 goal, then they will most certainly not want to
buy the Waverly Place p r o p e r t y , but will go ahead and build their o w n
conference center near the lake, meaning that Waverly Inc. will have a
$37.00(1.house on us h a n d s .
What b o t h e r s us about the deal is that vvc d o n ' t sec the necessity tor
m a k i n g it in i h e lirsi place. It involves .1 lot of hard w o r k , m o n e y , and even
a mortgage on [In- part ol Waverly Inc.
last
Student
night
alter
torniullv approved
h o p e tliat the
aciiiiisiti.nl ..I Waverly Place- will be a b o o n to tile s t u d e n t c o m m u n i t y .
/\8S 2IF*
/ L J&HHHS!P H
/ ,»»,/,-,/ HI
Editor-in-Chief
s,, , l u l l .,
ml as you fumble loi your
III 'kel, .111.1 il you tell some luggage o l d ,
villi c-i,in,- your neck all Ihe way clown
Ihe aisle lo he slue ll.e sllllcasi- gels pul
in, since y o u ' r e paranoid alioul having it
left behind Now you smile No classes,
in, \< s A . no early awakenings. That
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course, the governor, at the time o f bill
signing, asks opinion from various places.
On many bills dealing with the State
University, we get asked our opinion.
Stote of t h e University
legislative Mood Reviewed
Dr. Paul Bulger Is a Professor of Educational Administration here, but is on
leave t o serve as Special Assistant to
SUNY Chancellor Ernest L. Boyer for
Governmental Relations.
According to Chancellor Boyer, the
purpose of Bulger's job is to "give the
courtesy of attention to the legislators
and governor's office." While doing this,
Boyer often finds himself meeting w i t h
legislators at the Capitol, attending hearings at the new legislative office building,
and expressing the position of the University at the legislature.
•£•
He also keeps abreast of happenings in
the legislature, and reports to Chancellor
Boyer on the status of bills before the
Assembly and Senate which deal w i t h the
University.
Before teaching here at S U N Y A , Bulger
was President of the State College at
Buffalo, and also taught at Teacher's
College, Columbia University. He is a
1936 alumnus of Albany and received his
doctorate from Columbia.
Following are excepts from a recent
conversation w i t h Dr. Bulger.
Have you seen what may be termed an
"anti-intellectual" trend in the legislature
over the past couple of years, perhaps as
the result of the failure of many Great
Society type programs w i t h which intellectuals were closely involved? There have
recently been some surveys taken on
popular opinion toward doctors, p o l i t i cians, university professors, as well as
other professionals. Where some 60% of
the population used to hold Professors'
views in high esteem, I believe the figure
has plummeted to somewhere near 30%.
Would you comment on this?
I saw t h o s e figures b u t perhaps in m y
day to day existence I see only those w h o
have an i n h e r e n t interest a n d trust in the
power and virtue of e d u c a t i o n . So I d o n ' t
really see this, frankly.
On the o t h e r h a n d , t h e r e definitely is an
understanding or c o m p r e h e n s i o n t h a t perhaps everyone d o e s n ' t need a four year
education. Perhaps we'll see m o r e interest
in vocational e d u c a t i o n .
I do think t h a t m o r e colleges and m o r e
administrators are m o r e respectful of
vocational e d u c a t i o n , and it's n o t looked
at with disdain a n y m o r e . There are m a n y
ro'MPS to an e d u c a t i o n .
Glenn von N o s t i t z / A S P Interviewer
I'd like to get some of your general
views of the mood of the legislature in
regard to the funding of higher education.
Do you see any "loosening u p " on the
part of the legislature during the next few
years? We have all been aware of the
slackening growth the University has witnessed since 1970. Do you forsee, perhaps within the next five years, any
loosening of the purse strings, particularly
in light of potential state budget surpluses?
I think there is a very favorable climate
relative t o the m o n e y situation. As you
just said, there is a r o u n d i n g off in the
state university's fantastic g r o w t h . However, t h e r e is still a firm' c o m m i t m e n t to
c o m p l e t e the campuses t h a t are developmental, such as Old Westbury and Purchase.
As you k n o w , there's a s t u d e n t g r o w t h
t h r o u g h o u t the university of 7,400 students for this c o m i n g fall. I d o n ' t think
there's a n y question t h a t the budget that
has been s u b m i t t e d by the Governor will
be h o n o r e d . The Chancellor has tremend o u s s u p p o r l , b o t h personal a n d professional, and h e has respect from the
Governor a n d t h e legislature. I think t h e
m o n e y picture is optimistic.
T h e Chancellor is also realistic on t h e
a t t i t u d e of t h e legislators on accountability for these monies, a n d t h e public
trust was given to the S t a t e University to
d o an efficient and effective j o b .
/
What has been the reaction in the
legislature to State Senator Schermerhorn's bill to outlaw mandatory student
taxes? Where exactly is that in the legislature now? Is it still in committee?
It's in c o m m i t t e e , and it still h a s n ' t
c o m e o u t of c o m m i t t e e . F r a n k l y , I d o n ' t
think it's going to get passed. I think t h a t
too many people understand that the
s t u d e n t s are doing a great j o b of taxing
themselves which, as citizens, they have a
right to d o . T h e y ' r e r u n n i n g p r o g r a m s
t h a t are of t o p q u a l i t y .
I've been involved in the collegiate life
for 37 years n o w , a n d I have great faith in
the s t u d e n t s - t r e m e n d o u s faith. We've had
p o o r j u d g e m e n t s on spealers a n d buses,
and so forth, b u t if you take it
university-wide, I d o n ' t see h o w we c o u l d
live and be e d u c a t e d as well as we are if
we d i d n ' t have this right t o tax ourselves
as s t u d e n t s .
We have s u b m i t t e d a m e m o from S U N Y
Central offices on this. T h e Chancellor
directed me t o do thaL. We think it
should be carefully t h o u g h t of. F u r t h e r more, the trustees have made great progress in giving guidelines to the various
campuses.
Does the university ever take strong
positions on bills before either house, or
do they try to remain neutral and out of
legislative politics?
Yes. We're asked by various commillm>s
to file m e m o s of position. T h e n , of
Another Look at Budget Cutting i G o o d b y e To W h i t e W a l l s
Bills, Bills, Bills
There is presently a bill before the
Assembly that would Increase the power
and authority of local college councils.
How would this be Implemented? What
could college councils do that they d o n ' t
presently do, in order t o increase their
authority?
I k n o w t h a t bill. What t h e y ' r e p r o p o s i n g
in general is t h a t u n i t s of t h e S t a t e
University b e c o m e m o r e a u t o n o m o u s ,
each with its o w n Board of Trustees. B u t
o n c e y o u have that, y o u d o n ' t really h a v e
a university system. Our position over t h e
years has been t o have j u s t o n e Board o f
Trustees, and several local college c o u n cils. What t h e bill proposes is t h a t we give
the budget a n d a p p o i n t m e n t p o w e r s over
t o these councils. It's m o r e t h e c o n c e p t
of s e t t i n g u p separate colleges. So far t h e
o p i n i o n has been t h a t this isn't t h e w a y
the S t a t e University w o u l d like t o go.
This q u e s t i o n was u p years ago w h e n t h e
university was founded. I d o n ' t see t h e
p r e s e n t practice being changed.
Following Is a summation of important
bills presently before the State Legislature dealing with higher education and
the State University.
The President at long last has embarked upon a p r o g r a m of c o s t c u t t i n g in
the federal b u r e a u c r a c y a n d , t o hear t h e
baying and howling of t h e politicians,
editorialists and c o l u m n i s t s , y o u w o u l d
think the R e p u b l i c was traveling a
suicidal course destined t o bring p o v e r t y ,
famine, and disease across t h e l a n d ,
making the military-industrial establishment laugh in delight, while t h e p o o r a n d
"underprivileged" wallow in t h e m u d a n d
gutter, begging for meager handouts from
fat and prosperous R e p u b l i c a n passersby.
•»•
5.871 iSchermerhorn) and A.753 (Ingrassla)
Prohibits the State University B o a r d of
Trustees f r o m a u t h o r i z i n g the I m p o s i t i o n
of m a n d a t o r y student a c t i v i t y feus. This
bill has received the highest a t t e n t i o n
f r o m s t u d e n t leaders In the S U N Y system. If It were passed, the result w o u l d be
that a large a m o u n t of the support for
student activities w o u l d t h e n be paid o n a
voluntary
basis. The main
sponsor,
Senator Schermerhorn, says the b i l l Is
aimed al ending the publishing of " a n i l A m e r i c a n " and " o b s c e n e " literature and
the I n v i t i n g of such speakers as W i l l i a m
Kunstler to appear o n SUNY campuses.
The President, of c o u r s e , b y c u t t i n g
out "social w e l f a r e " p r o g r a m s , is assumed
to be the arch-enemy of t h e p o o r and
downtrodden, the c o w b o y in t h e black
hat riding the black horse, while t h e pork
barrel politicians and t h e welfare statist
congressmen, w h o so e n j o y spending
other peoples' m o n e y , are t h e good guys
in white hats out to save t h e last faltering
remnants of the Great S o c i e t y . T h a t is all
balderdash.
A . 2 4 3 5 (Cluhane)
Requires State University Board ot
Trustees t o report any t u i t i o n increase
annually t o the Legislature on nr before
March 1, and unless such proposal be
disapproved try the concurrent legislative
r e s o l u t i o n , the Increase shall become
e f f o c t l v e o n July 1 o l that year.
What are some of the more important
proposals coming up in the legislature in
the field of financial aid? Are any moves
being made to increase scholar incentives?
T h e Board of Regents has c o m e u p with
a b o u t four very i m p o r t a n t bills, all in t h e
sense of increasing scholarship incentive,
i n c l u d i n g t h e bill t o t a k e care of transfer
s t u d e n t s , the so-called " B u n d y m o n e y "
for private e d u c a t i o n , a n d bills a i m e d a t
e n c o u r a g i n g s t u d e n t s w h o needed remedial h e l p when e n t e r i n g college t o go o n t o
a fifth year. These bills are n o w being
discussed, a n d hearings a r e being held o n
them.
S.1417 ( G i u f f r e d a , G o o d m a n , Carcia)
Extends scholar incentive e l i g i b i l i t y to
five academic years (ot students enrolled
in approved o p p o r t u n i t y programs; appropriates $ 1 6 0 , 0 0 0 . The purpose o l this
bill appears t o be to encourage EOP
students t o sDend five years In college it
they teel It Is necessary, w i t h o u t having
l o w o r r y about losing scholar incentive
payments in their f i f t h year. The Board
of Regents has backed this b i l l .
An inspection of t h e premises taken by
the critics is in order. Implicit in the
criticism leveled at t h e b u d g e t cuts is the
assumption that a program designed to
aid a certain segment of society a u t o
matieally fulfills its goal. T h e Model
Cities program, for e x a m p l e , is emasculated by budget cuts and, therefore, our
cities will further d e t e r i o r a t e due to Hie
Brother's neglect, or so the thinking goes.
Because a program is backed by h u m a n i
larian convictions it is assumed the loss of
the program is i n h u m a n e . Because m o n e y
is poured into some project w h i c h has an
appealing altruistic title it is taken for
grunted t h a t the w i t h o l d i n g of such
money produces unappealing results. And
because an army of b u r e a u c r a t s is
assigned the task of fighting a war on
poverty, it is assumed t h a t a r e t r e a t from
llnal war relinquishes the battlefield to
the forces of poverty. T h e s e a s s u m p t i o n s
inust be questioned.
S . 2 0 1 3 (Bellamy) and A . 2 3 4 6 ( M . Miller)
Doubles the number ot Regents Scholarships awarded annually. Presently this
bill Is In the Senate and Assembly Education Committees.
Just one other question, Dr. Bulger.
What do you think w i l l happen in the
future relationship between public and
private schools in the state? Do you
forsee an increased readiness on the part
of the legislature to bail out private
institutions w i t h public monies? Do you
see more money being diverted to the
private sector?
I t h i n k t h e a t t i t u d e is t h a t the S t a t e of
N e w Y o r k c a n n o t allow t h e good private
colleges and universities t o go b a n k r u p t .
T h e r e has been a great tradition in this
s t a t e for private higher e d u c a t i o n . I think
it's
one
indication
of
workingtogetherness that SUNY Chancellor Boyer is President of t h e Association of
Colleges and Universities in the s t a t e , the
first public i n s t i t u t i o n president in t h e
history of that organization. I think it's a
h e a l t h y a t t i t u d e p e o p l e are bringing t o
this p r o b l e m of private higher e d u c a t i o n .
I've been a great believer in b o t h secotrs,
and have taught at b o t h the State University a n d at a private college, and I'm o n
the Board of Trustees of a private College.
S.1357 (Ferraro)
A u t h o r i s e s recipient o l Regents Scholarship t o use such a scholarship at any
college or university In the United States,
instead of o n l y in the state.
A . 5 2 {Henderson)
Prohibits student advisor f r o m disclosing c o m m u n i c a t i o n s made t o , or Inf o r m a t i o n acquired by h i m In his professional capacity relating t o .i student's
possession, sale, or use of a dangerous
drug. This bill Is presently in the Assembly Codes C o m m i t t e e . S.1581 ( B l o o m )
Provides that student at any I n s t i t u t i o n
of learning may designate his residence
for v o t i n g purposes by filing a verified
declaration o l Intent. Tnls bill Is designed
to allow students to vote In their college
towns. Presently, the B l o o m b i l l Is In the
Senate Elections C o m m u t e .
"What? T h e government is dismantling
the Office of E c o n o m i c O p p o r t u n i t y - '
What will become of t h e deprived ' ll.r.\
will the poor find j o b s ? " A n d the hand
wringing c o n t i n u e s ad infinileni, while
the past government failures in sui'li
social programs are lightly skipped over
or altogether ignored, a n d while | h e
important
principle of
whelhei
tin
government colossus s h o u l d ever a t t e m p t
or even has a light to a t t e m p t , to cull. -. I
taxes from its citizens t o lie used I,
social welfare e x p e r i m e n t s
lilts ij -• • -- •
is not even a p p r o a c h e d .
5.872 (Schermerhorn) and A . 7 5 4 ( I n grassia)
A u t h o r i z e s the State University Board
o l Trustees to provide armed security
patrols to police campus grounds for at
least the Hours 9 j . m . t o m i d night.
Whether or not this bill is actually necessary is uncertain, since the Board o l
Trustees .ilready has the a n t n m l t y to
provide lor armed service patrols.
EARTH, WIND, FIRE and
EDDIE KENDRICKS
Tickets: $4.00
Registration Cards: $4.00
Total: $8.00
SUNYA
STUYVESANT PLAZA
Monday, Wednesday and Friday:
6:00 P.M.
6:15 P.M.
(and every half hour)
(and every half hour)
8:30 P.M.
Registration: March 2 1 to April 6
Campus Center Lobby
Monday thru Friday: 2:00 to 4:30 pm
Saturday 1:00 to 4:00
FOR INFORMATION CALL 457-4803
MORNINGS • 10:00 to 12:00
AFTERNOONS- 2:30 to 4:30
PAGE FOURTEEN'
funded by student i.i
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
8:45 P.M *
' *This last bus to SUNYA leaves at 9:05 P.M.
Saturday:
11:30 A.M.
11:45 A.M.
(and every half hour)
(and every half hour)
5:30 P.M.
5:45 P.M.*
"This last bus to SUNYA leaves at 6:05 P.M.
:$
U p o n being "released" from this institu-
WESTERN AVENUE COR. FULLER ROAD
about y e t another professor
•jj lhat for sixteen consecutive years I have
tenure, or not being able t o discriminate
:J: ( a m o n g o t h e r things) b e e n occupied as a
between WSUA and its 60-cycle h u m .
•g s t u d e n t .
This
*: continuing
j§ m o r e
with
along
•* P e r h a p s , b u t
of
gratification?
S o o n e r or later (if y o u play the game g
right) y o u m a y find y o u r s e l f a senior, and •:•:
Independent?
Well,
will p r o b a b l y feel a bit sick a n d yet a bit :•:•
nostalgic
jx we all arc d e p e n d e n t o n s o m e o n e . Only
:|j w h o that s o m e o n e is c h a n g e s from t i m e
$
for
this path for several
:g 'overqualifications.'
about
Whereas y o u
the
whole
knew
many
situation. $
people
as a •:•:
f r e s h m a n , y o u m a y find yourself staring |i|:
l o lime l o l i m e .
at y o u n g e r , u n k n o w n faces years later. :|i|
Perhaps you
•J
Graduation?
mean
I won't
be
'punky
hanging a r o u n d S U N Y A n e x t y e a r ? Hard
m a y even get t o b e called a •:$
senior' as it was m y h o n o r re- :•:•
cently. You
could
tell s o m e o n e a b o u t :;:
h o w it was living those pioneer days on |:|i
& business building, o t r u n n i n g d o w n n i n e -
Indian Q u a d - b u t w h o cares? Or h o w •:•
;i|: teen
We have grown t o o d e p e n d e n t on t h e
forces of government to solve problems
which arc better left o u t of the hands of
federal agencies. Is it not ludicrous t h a t
the government sees fit to issue regulations t o protect us from b a b y cribs a n d
tricycles, which it is now doing? Is it n o t
silly that a g r o u p of parents can m a k e t h e
TV news programs by smashing to bits
various children's toys and, u p o n c o m i n g
t o the remarkable conclusion that broken
plastic s o m e t i m e s leaves sharp edges, then
d e m a n d that the government step in and
do something a b o u t i f
You
S: to believe. N o m o r e b o m b scares in t h e
i-i-
flights al 2 in Ihe m o r n i n g for a
fire-alarm,
D u t c h Q u a d o n c e had custard m a c h i n e s • iS
or slushing t h r o u g h t h e m u d
y o u ' v e got t o be k i d d i n g . Or what il was ;.:.
S
and snow b e t w e e n Ihe p o d i u m and S t a t e
like w h e n the s t u d e n t slrike closed d o w n :•:'
|
Quad.
the
university
- it
seems
like ancient £
history n o w .
|
TUB
PODIUM!
Nol
being
from Ihe
B
cal p o d i u m a n d Ihe s w e l t e r i n g t u n n e l s
•:•: What
of
v.
outside world by t h e s y m m e l r i Ihe
teeming
-ft
;"-'
sheltered
%
masses o n
the
iij:
b o o k l i n e , a n d the n i g h t l y m o b - s c e n e al
£
dinner? Well. 1 guess they'll have l o get
>•: along w i t h o u t m e .
You may w o n d e r what tins place will :j|:
look like ten years from n o w , but will S
you cvei c o m e back lo look? Will they 5}
finally
e x t e n d the wcsl p o d i u m and crush :•:;
lulward Durcll S t o n e ' s d r e a m s of perfect •:•:
symmetry?
Or
will
the
roof near
Ihe g
c o m p u t e r center finally give up and stir- if
The government, whose role was
originally relegate to thai of a peacekeeper and a kind of umpire, has swollen
ill the last II) years to llle extent that ll is
now assigned the task of curing all ills and
treating all maladies. Up until 19:10,
except in limes of war. no m o r e than 15
per cent ot t h e national income was
consumed by the expenses of govern
nienl Now it s t a n d s al about 111 per cent.
And Ibis spending is mainly for civilian
purposes Military spending lias, in fact,
declined from I li per cent of the national
income in I '.His lo H per cent today.
Ii, ,
I • ;• lbo.se
, ,-,
SIMII. in
p,,|„ .
Willi,
tonus
moving
. . . , l . , , r , - l i m i t , . V.,,1
-i
(''ill "I' H"- '•""
i,1.1
loilllc
are
lion t h e average QPAI?
liuncd
on
so
the
chance
I
think
I'm
going
to
miss
il.
lo
No, g o v e r n m e n t c a n n o t solve social ills.
In fact, government i n t e r v e n t i o n has geen
the cause ot m u c h of these ills. M i n i m u m
wage biws, fin instance . e n h a n c e p o v e r t y
by increasing u n e m p l o y m e n t .
Federal
housing projects have to d a l e put m o r e
1 pie out of homes than inside of t h e m ,
creating subsidized slums in the process.
The Piuilt Igoe bousing project ill Si
Louts, lor instance, would s t a n d as t h e
ultimate model of the i m p o t e n c e a n d
futility of government i n t e r v e n t i o n in
housing. I say " w o u l d " s t a n d because this
federally subsidized project turned inlo a
so
In
high rise slum reeking of such crime, filth,
a n d vandalism that Ihis e m b a r a s s m e n t
had t o be bulldozed to the ground.
Kxample after e x a m p l e could be given
of similar federal debacles where taxpayers m o n e y has been t h r o w n d o w n Ihe
drain. T h e point is lhat g o v e r n m e n t cannot act as the omniscient and o m n i p o t e n t
benefactor, ll has nol succeeded in what
it has tried and in trying to succeed it
m a y have e x a c e r b a t e d Lhose very problems it has sought lo alleviate, ll is time
to s t o p believing ill t h e federal Santa
Cluus,
ALL UNIVERSITY
The U n i v e r s i t y o f A i x en P r o v e n c e , Fraiuie
H,e R o y a l U n i v e r s i t y o t M a l t a
The U n i v e r s i t y o f B a r c e l o n a , S p a i n
'
The G i o r g i o C i n i F o u n d a t i o n , V e n i c e , Italy
I h e University of Palermo, Sicily
PARTY
N'DOI
MAY
l')7 I
with
FREE
ALABASTER
BEER & SODAI
Sat., March 24 at 9 pm CC Ballroom
SOCIAL SCIENCE T R A C K
Social Science Majors in then Jumo, Ye,„ spend
the first semester in Malta and the second semestei
divided between Morocco and Venice (Sopho
mores with special qualifications will be consi
dared.I
GENERAL
Lanyuaye ol Instiuclion in English If fioamance
Languages Major
French, Spanish or Italian
depending on location Independent study oppor
mimics, field in|is in North Africa, in Italy, et"
. •
t".
Housing in a p a r t m e n t s , hotels,
and1 pension!. (32
ROMANCE LANGUAGE TRACK
lotal credits I
Romance Language Majors spend ihe fits! semestei
in Malta w i l h the Social Science M,i|ois ami the
second semester either 111 Aix 1111 Proveni c 11 ,1
celona, or Palermo, depending on then in.,|,,i
language. (Sophomores w i t h special qualificationwill be considered!
COS!
JSC $.25 non- JSC- $75
JSC-IIII I I I
GENERAL MEETING
Sunday, March 25
$?:ib()
li,|i
laic, or
baskets to O u t baskets a n d m a y b e someo n e will be impressed. A n d m a y b e n o t .
M o h a m m e d V U n i v e r s i t y , Rabat, M o r o c c o
P r o g r a m D a t e s : I A l I SI I'l 1 M i l l K I''7 M i l l
%
describe h o w lo gel s o m e w h e r e on cam-
doing
In,in
tois are m i l . or In c o m p l a i n each night
Ihe fountains are Untied o\~\~ so early and
> P ' e c e s i,l
lie ", ariimi,I
lender to the rainwater? Ot will l u i l i o n -x
and b o a r d ever s l o p using (nol to men- ;£
ahull! the lousy food, o i w o n d e r i n g why
tin government .nul getting less and less
nil iheii doll.,i- And people an- l.-d up
Willi il ill Agencies .mil bureaus of llle
goverllinciil by 111' ii very mil m e are
wasteful
nid n u l l i c u t
I'll'- prot'll
nn.l..i e. aliseiil .mil 111, l.ixpavers money
keep., ,,-, , omiiig, so why not spend it?
,' .
Ilul lo give u p the c h a n c e of climbing
endless llighls of s t a l l s w h e n the eleva-
'
plus
SUNY
lianspoitalion
tuition
from
Cost
New
includes
York,
room
round
and
!,„,,,,| ,it all program sues, cost of held trips,
health and accident insurance Personal spending
money extra
ELIGIHIl I f Y
Good academic standing, minimum age 18. w i i i t e n
S t a t e U m v e r s i . y o f N e w Y o r k at B i n u l . a m t o n
B i i u j i i a m t o n , New York
DA I I : AI'KII
CC 315 ai 5:30 pm
THEATER PARTY
"Man of La Mancha"
Sunday, March 25
permission of iiareni 01 guardian
FRIDAY, MARCH 23, 197'',
possibility
Long-term
13901
.
FRIDAY, MARCH 23, 1973
the
fighting
m a y b e n o t in this era o f
years.
'
iil.AIMINI
d o w s . ' Or t o read in the ASP each week
•:i tion it is somewhat frightening t o realize
g
A P P L Y T O : O f f i c e of International Studies
STUYVESANT PLAZA
pus t o a visitor as "That black building
with the white c o l u m n s and narrow win-
HOST I N S T I T U T I O N S :
STUYVESANT PLAZA
FREE BUS SCHEDULE:
Main Concert:
Whatever one's position on t h e war in
I n d o c h i n a - h a w k , dove, or owl - it is
generally c o n c e d e d t h a t at best the conflict was h a n d l e d in a clumsy, inefficient
m a n n e r , wasteful of b o t h lives and
material and distinguished b y a lack of
c a n d o r and h o n e s t y on the part of gove r n m e n t officials - a n d an a p p a r e n t ignorance of the true n a t u r e of t h e forces
involved which s h a p e d t h e progress of t h e
war. Why s h o u l d the bungling bureaucratic apparatus b y assigned t h e equally
formidable task of curing all m a n n e r of
social ills here at h o m e ? Why, after it has
been d e m o n s t r a t e d time after time after
time that the government is i m p o t e n t in
such m a t t e r s , why do people still insist on
assigning such m a t t e r s to the inepts and
incapable in Washington?
MEDITERRANEAN STUDIES PROGRAM
BLACK WEEKEND '73
April 6 - 8
by Phil Chansky
by Doug LeComte
Meet at the Circle at 6:30 pm
$2.50 - JSC
$2.75-non JSC
sponsor: JSC Hillel of SUNYA
16. I ' m
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
PAGE FIFTEEN
S
Since we were not informed of any ot
Letters to the Editor
Sidelines
Hi, Mike!
r—fftlfflON-
Dying For an Ambulance
c^V
Anyone who has had some first hand
•:• experience with the ambulance service on
Following is a letter I recently received:
^*a 11 sr
:•:• this campus, or more specifically, the lack
:•!• of it, may find Dr. Janet Hood's stand on
$, the new student ambulance service a bit
Mr. Michael McGuire
Wrong On!
To the editor:
We feel that the drama of ego hang-ups
should be confined to the medical shows
like Marcus Welby and Medical Center.
take a discriminatory stance on the ques-
Dr. Hood, director of the infirmary, has
gone on record as being opposed to the
Dear Michael:
venture. Her chief argument is that there
Your director has indicated that you are
is nothing wrong with the existing service.
responsible for the cost of removal of 1
Probably
the most celebrated case to
square table that was in your room or
refute
suite.
Mr. Boggs was a member of the Albany
Your
portion
of
the charge
for
her claim concerns Bernie Boggs.
removal is $2.00, If you wish to discuss
State football team and sustained injuries
this matter, please do so with the director
during a game one cold Saturday
of your hall.
Please make your check or money order
for
this
amount
Account" and
payable
send
Housing Office,
or
to
bring
"Damage
it
to
Failre to make restitution by the above
date will result in a hold being placed on
all
of
your
Housing
university
Office
records and the
refusing
to honor
197 3-74
appreciate
academic
your
year.
prompt
I
would
cooperation
in
this matter.
My
share
$2.00',
principle
of
you
the
say.
with
enough,
Dr. Hood
was a
:• spectator at the game and took care of
> him in the interim. One wonders how she
the
accounts
of
the
deplorable
is
\ ambulance situation do not end here.
]
policy
of
think you should bill all of Waterbury for
of
crossword
puzzle
evaluation.
Each month the Community Relations:
Office
sends out a publication
entitled:
parking is available evenings in the lots:
the
Academic
Podium
as you •
: on the subject. In addition, this reporter
: people
some incredible stories
who
had
to
rely
on
from
the
tardy
; ambulances.
All the reports make it seem like a few
! drunken
Potter
Club
brothers
with
a
it's paying the movers (or should I say
: shopping cart would
removers). So, I figured out how long it
; vice.
provide better ser-
Being somewhat confused, I wrote
took me to move the table from my room
:
the following response:
to
! race against the clock between a car and
Perhaps instead of a dance marathon, a
bureaucracy that presides over it.
Chief
the
Council
meeting
described
in
after
the
echelon members of the administration. I
To the Editor:
This
letter
expresses my disgust with
find
their
reaction
to
be
surprisingly
student funds that would put the Student
this situation.
sequential
United States. Week after
Association $4,000 in the red, Mike told
solutions
dismal week,
are
printed
and
only correct solutions are rewarded.
us that he was "not going to lose any
sleep over it," Nice to, know that Mike
This need not be the case. Many of us
sleeps well.
on
the situation here in the Albany area. It is
also a battle cry
As the principal organizer of the Benefit
Program
that was held on March
raise funds
for
4, to
the Pan-Africanist
Con-
gress of Azania, I was prepared to face a
Now about the accusation that 3,000
people
this
campus don't
support
ambivalent,
though most generally sup-
matter,
except
that
I
was
pleased with some of the complementary
statements
made
by
tenure
evaluators
about my scholarship and teaching. I did
recognize
that, in part,
the favorable eval-
dis-
uation was due to the fact that I was not
appointments in announcing this event to
rocking anyone's boat, but 1 also feel that
lot
of
hard
work
and
a
few
to a
Bach
members
the Albany community. Apathy, red tape
the statements were partly genuine and
who
obviously see it in their own interest to
and unintentional errors I expected. But I
could be taken as encouragement for me
respect the so-called 'incorrect' solution
deny that people on this campus have any
was
to continue in my efforts to seek excel-
find, and use, the boundless opportunities
social and political consciousness. We feel
diabolical hypocrisy I encountered. When
to free our imaginations offered
that the fact that 1300 students on meal
you
plan voluntarily signed-up to skip dinner
the same ways, you know it ain't coinci-
one night with the money going to Bach
dence. I call it racism, pure and simple.
being forced
to
single
grid
fixed
restrict
of
ourselves
letters,
we
by the
infinite possibilities of man's verbal range.
Mai.
Some
Council
Mai and that individuals and the Newman
puzzlist's mind along a constricted, pre-
Club donated
designatod path. What is to be udded to
past few weeks, is a far better indication
over $300 dollars in the
duplicate
a
pattern
satisfactorily
that
has
proposed?
the development
been
Would
of alternatives
be
more fruitful?
One finds
tacit approval of Council's actions.
Despite
crats
remnants here of
medieval
the wishes of student bureau-
obviously
accountable
annoyed
for
what
at
being
held
they do with our
(The favorite time is said to be between :
8:00 and 8:30.) Also, one of the popular •
must strive
violations checked on the tickets is "un- :
path
It is puzzling that a situation which is
air
col-
policies practiced in South Africa and the
only correct
money, despite the ravings of SUNYA's
connected with the University.)
several
port the present system. I was tenured
anti-humanism the the idea that each man
registered vehicle." (Which would be true :
publicly
and views. I
last year. I considered it to be an incon-
not
since the people involved would not be
to
with
to the Black Brothers
already
Security is regularly ticketing in the areas.
these
and Sisters to keep up the struggle despite
our money. When asked
nue."
that:
me
observations
about a possible error in the tabulating of
argument that going to a concert meant
reported
my
worries about
of where people are at than the specious
been
discussed
tions is no less elitist than the apartheid
to
has
have
practice of catering only to correct solu-
indicates how much he personnally
enter the campus from Washington Ave- ;
it
stimulates
of
leagues in the social sciences and lower
bureaucrat Mike Lampert,
this world's experience if we set out only
However,
After the the Shaft
March 6), on the tenure system at
some
ASP,
Nothing is to be gained from forcing the
The sheets conclude by stating "Free:
SUNYA
Though she may not be aware of it, her
find greater liberties for self-expression in
The ASP has received numerous letters
: has heard
!
tion
to
deriving 'incorrect' solutions. Instead of
nearest
\ can overlook this experience.
in
Garry L. Petre
my little table. After all, they didn.t all
_ Associate Director of
know. Also, $2.00 sounded a little high,
Residences - Management even at the $4.00 an hour Housing said
lately-one leg tripping up the other.
The ASP preview editor continues
The New University Conference's article
(ASP,
the loss of money from a boycott would
all belong to the students and not to the
attend them.
Interestingly
I agree
each according to his needs", I still don't
Sincerely,
\
removal
Housing
octopus
soming events and invites the public to:
of
"from each according to his abilities, to
uncoordinated
"Calendar" to the people of nearby com-;
Although
the
cost
an
munities. The pamphlet lists all the up-;
But
any
requests you may have for housing for
the
in my "room or suite". Although the
downtown rooms are indeed spacious, I
still don't see how you might mistake my
room for a suite.
like
•: noon. Bernie lay huddled under blankets
I
the
tain branches Of the University have been
•j on the sidelines for what seemed like ages
\ before an ambulance arrived.
Suite 106, Fulton Hall,
State Quad no later than April 12, 1973.
after-
In their relations with each other, ceracting
To the Editor:
Two Dutch Quad Residents
the hospital and legal fund. In addition,
have further deleted funds that do after
Dr. Hood is too fine a woman to snub
the organization.
Incompetant Component
this imposition was a great encroachment
on our privacy.
$* hard to believe.
Room 215
Waterbury Hall
as room and board paying residents that
wouldn't have gotten back the $3500 for
by Mike Igoe
by Mike McGuire
the details or asked our approval, we feel
totally
unprepared
get shafted
for
the sneaky,
lence.
time and time again in
I am opposed to tenure. It is unjust. I
am certain that professionally competent
To tell it like it is:
people are being turned down for non-
1.
academic reasons. These reasons are well
Flyers and
posters were systemati-
cally removed and systematically replaced
known
by announcements of Women's Lib meet-
establishment view of the matter. People
ings, speakers or films. Some of my signs
are
had
liked personally
been
removed
by
Others were removed
selfish
students.
by a very choosy
maintenence
staff
who
certain
from
doors or pillars and
signs
clear
off
only
to anyone who will take a non-
turned
down because they
are not
by their colleagues, be-
cause they are controversial in their approach
to a discipline, because of their
sex, their moral standards, because they
then only when the urge hits them. I was
are good at their craft, and
token fascist and Bill Buckley sycophant
told at the Performing Arts Center that I
older
a failure,
Milch Frost who celebrates the death of
could
post a sign on the black bulletin
cause their work gives a direction to their
always of the consequences of
the student movement and the return of
board in front of the building. The next
department which goes against the tradi-
straying from the truth. And just what is
apathy,
day
this Truth that we are subjected to each
administrators who think they can enter
week? We reach the inescapable conclu-
any
or
to follow his predetermined
acknowledge
mindful
himself
despite
student's
the
hopes
dormitory
room
without
2.
tional
interests of other faculty and ad-
ministrators,
I had made an agreement
with Mr
etc.
My
point
simple.
A professor
profession-teaches
of
view
is
who is qualified in
sion that Ms. Davis believes not onl> that
meeting
Frank Vetosky early in February to have
his/her
an absolute
wishes of administrators and their depart
the
fulfills counseling and committee obliga-
mately 1 7 seconds. At $4.00 an hour, this
: tants would compete to determine which
dents continues to go on.
Truth
Mr. Garry L. Petre
Fulton Hall
comes out to a total labor cost of
; car
it
I am writing this letterto thank you for
removing the
"square
table"
from
my
room ana restoring it to its rightful place
in the section lounge. It would have been
easier, though, if you had waited until the
day
before
our
recent
vacation
began,
when I was planning to return it myself.
All I can do is laud your efficiency, which
is so superior to my own.
I received your letter of March 1 2, and I
am happy to see that you went to the
trouble of writing me a personal
just to tell me you
when I knew
to
letter
the table out
that anyway. But despite
this, there are a few
obliged
took
answer.
points in it I feel
Actually,
I
wasn't
me
1-8/9
can
make
the
most
trips
between
I discover that
: State and Albany Medical Center Hospital
you meant to bill me for $.02, but you
: before an ambulance arrives on campus,
cents. Rounding this off,
Dear Mr. Petre:
Walking at a
took
got your decimal point misplaced. The 2
:
cents is enclosed. If there should be some
> ience
Winners would be given a private aud-
cost which I'm ignoring, such as the cost
'. Benezet.
with
University
President
Louis
ing the recent efforts
Albany State has
the table, please contact me about paying
>
All
aside,
though,
Good
luck
in
your
future
> consulted
during
nothing
from
consideration
silently let the campus cops bust people
Yours truly,
substantial savings.
Mike McGuire
of
has
their car to the man who wears the star.
suggest that,
Davis
consider
J
SIDELINE
It should be noted that Dr. Hood holds
SHOTS. The rendition
U—mr u u u u t i
u.v n
j the record for writing letters to the ASP.
do"
j; In her letters she consistently calls upon
honors
j; students to show a concern for each other
campus. Ms. Wurtz is the chairwoman of
•: or to assume responsibility.
Concert
Wurtz
at
as
Telethon
the
latest
Board,
the
'73 takes
It seems
that
the
student
: give it a chance to prove itself
bit
of
Kroup
irony
that
on
spent
ambulance
'' • •
if il
Depending
upon
whom
one talks to.
Central
Council is anywhere from com- ;
pletely
broke
to
$4,000
in
the
red. I
Meanwhile Council pays $400 a year to :
i jut.
maintain a comptroller, Joel Lustig.
in the
the
future,
possibility
of
that they still haven't succeeded in in lei
lectually
and
spiritually
enough of us to gel away with this shit
plus: George Coe's short- THE DOVE
FRIDAY, MARCH 23
LC 18
7:15 & 9:45
* Preparation t o r tests required tor
admission t o graduate and professional schools
* Six and twelve session courses
* Small groups
' V o l u m i n o u s m a t e r i a l f o r home study
prepared by experts in each field
about
it
now"
I asked
about
the ommission. Why?
3. 1 sent letters to WTRY and WABY to
announce the program when other community
events were announced.
Neither
station claims to have received my letters.
So
I gave
phone
and
them
the
the
it
its
came.
assurance
over
that
never
received
message
would be mentioned in its turn. Well
turn
I was
especially
dis
several
and
letters
the
in
the
general
money
outrageous sum
of
Brothers,
$36,000
(212133e-630G
-fV
(116) 538-4S66
BATfi l i / I N i N i j S Wf.OU.NOS
Bronches in M a | o i C i t i e s in U.S.A.
Tfti frtluTM* .SifcuU mlh Ifcf Nalumwtd* Htputmltom
FRIDAY, MARCH 23, 1973
their positions and tenure before
quality became a priority on this campus.
competency
by
by
while
for
silent
unite
against
update their departments and the institution
as
a
whole.
Worse,
rather
than
old
and
new
faculty,
tenure
is an
negative
between
atmosphere.
special
Rather
interests.
The
as the
applicant's
numbered
and
publications
measured
for
size,
ing is evaluated in a similar quantitative
flu-
way.
There
is
a noticeable
absence
of
attempts to look into the quality of the
long range research and teaching interests
of applicants, and the personal nature of
publicly m the
and
they
almost never read by anyone, and leach-
or Central Council mem
anonymous
tenure,
in-
the securi'.. given them
younger, more dynamic faculty trying to
are
a single ('oncer I
their
relationships
with classes and stu-
dents goes undetermined,
uni il the
storm blows over.
The
In the ASP's cover story Friday. March
Council,"
we
gel
Cuuncilperson
allegedly
l»>n
the
are
are
quote
Itmn
Gottlieb
who
State
3,000
Allman
there
juicj
Vjcki
represents
iold "Then'
think
a
Quail
Brother
We m<
and
on
Gottlich
and
lions
silent
Central
To impl)
Allman
lion
old
the
majorit>
Council •
that
the
callousness
Approval
is
a
rill*')
| 0
mainpiil •
at
was an
of
nidii.i
self serving
lie
M iu\
people at the concert, including I
Coalition,
were
exorbitant
formers,
charged
form Bach Mai
The
quite
amount
Campus
for
angr\
paid
with
to
tickets
I he
'•'
the
per
and taken
and Attica IJCIVIIMCoalition
never
urged a
boycott of the concert We never opposed
the actual
event because
we know thai
introduce
creative
should
a more
ol
[acuity,
our team
. . p p o i n L i il in ' B r o t h - i
No Tulips on Dutch
tin
the Coum il
qualitative
leadership
eliminate
[enure
flexible,
res iew
positive
and
lacuhy
cross stimulation
We
but
then support
and en
courage ihein alter they become part of
Central
attendance
Bothers Conceit
of
we
progr am
myth of the apathetic student I remember
good
research,
new
some otlu-i
on
should In enormousl} careful m selecting
Coundil members u.se the Time Mi^UZItit
liislit'y
important
.idin i n isi i.ilion
tins
campus who support Bach Mai
Ms.
we are incapable of
decisions
Therefore,
and
I dm '
people
is that
yes-no
matters as complicated as good leaching,
people who Mip
.'1,000
truth
making
- . entitled "Allman Controversy Kinim.ik
members, and supporters ol the < amp".-.
!/—m
ceived
These people are lulled into further
process,
over
Special Compact Courses during
i m (Ml lift SUM) frMklyn M 1
who are not competent, but re-
administration tries lo bureaucratize the
to make up (he
not
It protects pro-
fessors
than a review of a professor's work, it is a
ASF, an
disgust
the
Intersesions
given as its justification
basically
Like all good bureaucrats th<-> will
remain
Tenure militates against developing qua-
contest
their spending of Bach Mai Hospital and
Attica Defense
be dis-
all-or-none procedure carried out within a
attempt at playing rock n' roll promoter
After
"field"-cannot
lity education, even though this is often
of
were obviously caught off guard h> the
editorial,
knows the
missed on any justifiable grounds.
pulling effort into improving the quality
* Lesson schedule can be tailored l o
meet individual needs Lessons
can be spread over a period of
several months to a year, or lor
out ol town students, .1 period
of one week
• O p p o r t u n i t y lor review ol past
lessons vie tape at the center
STANLEY H . K A P L A N
EDUCATIONAL CENTER LTD.
sale tonight)
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
MCAT-DATGRE
LSAT-ATGSB
OCAT
NAT'L BDS.
Summer Sessions
(advance tlckets on
do
when
Some members of the Central Council
in answer the accusation
Weekends -
™ e B e r 8™" ™°<»
can
To the editor:
ASP.
state university of new
if U • york at albany
lobotommng
we
the secretary
tions,
competently,
1 received a
her who supported the rip-off has seen IM
'
u yj
SMILES OF A
SUMMER NIGHT
PAGE SIXTEEN
their dreams that the
the week it
revulsion on this campus of their lavish
\ needs criticism, let the good doctor .-.,<eak
next week;
and
CC Fights Back
top
$36,000 on the Allman Brothers.
The Cinema of Ingmar Bergman
admission: $.50 w/student tax
t i nn w/mit
»100 w/out
for grass, despite
it,
of
"Hey Big Spender" by Marguerite "Hon-
5e^r^r^QbloQlaaldaldaliririlDalOQldCigQlQGlQPJaQBB£
funded by student tax
FG
she
lo set up
owned
Campus Coalition
Board member
uunu
that
desire
treating all solutions on an equal footing.
Allman
u •• u r u u u u u u
fact
real
Mel Cox
You also mentioned that the table was
mpcBEHbapa
the
no
as if they
Tower
Everything else was printed
my announcement.
this campus
Community-
She also seems to feel that the task will
>; be too big for students to handle.
except
the
sweet, "Sorry for the oversight but there's
solution is, in fact, inferior to another. In
as
[l the student ambulance service.
ij.
research grants pour in, and
Ms.
I We hope that Dr. Janet Hood wiM -it least
and myself did this ourselves, resulting in
unenviable,
encouraged to think twice before trusting
the planning stages of
Salvation Army Thrift Shop.
for the cost of installing it. My roommate
the
their
'70's will be the 'Mi's; despite the fondest
table from
the
her
watch
hopes of all these bureaucrats, we know
furniture-
buys at
to
and
respectfully
•
great
defense dept
delegates
professors
artificial ideals or to stifle originality, we
> service is trying to meet these requests.
some
this
watch their McCarthyite purge
activist
We hope the problem is corrected soon.
of
there's
ASP Preview Editor, we do not feel that
alternative.
If it isn't, Metroland residents might be
hunting. Incidentally, if you can't find all
it,
was to occur
every
is
f. affair. Dr. Hood is upset that she was not
Incidentally, you told me to make my
check payable to "Damage Account". We
didn't hurt the table. Honest! There's a
little hole in the middle, but that's only
because that's where the cord went many
years ago when you people used it as a
lamp table, and I really can't blame you
for recycling the table when the lamp
didn't work.
Tribune Campus Clipboard
of
to
with
things
in
passively
superior
made to foster good community relations
such
announced
men I henchmen that we will sit back and
is
whole
there
disturbing aspect of the
program
their corporate and military recruiters u.se
University Day.
kidding
this
While we recognize Ms. Davis's position as
probably
f. another
the Transcript Ransom Fee of $1.98.
exists, but that
god-like role of declaring flatly that one
of an hour spent sanding and refinishing
responsible for the cost of removing the
my room; I was responsible
It becomes even more so when consider
Truth
the
the others that were
bad, be-
creating much bad feeling with area resi-
pace,
despite
my sign (and
there) were gone. Why?
thus make
look
: an ambulance should be held. The contes-
slow
opposition,
campus
colleagues
approxi-
the lounge next door.
fairly
any
of
tenured
| o |ht! editor
y\,
,,, , * . , | ) „ l . h
i : ,dign.ifU
I,.,,,,
u»..d" — l . n l s
"•'
-Mid l i ' n u i h a l . -1 b> i l " u i » ' >'«'"
ht.mlteil
- l i a n g ' i-s
I'"
I 1 ' " " "•'
W e e k e n d oil o u r q u i d
it halls ant
N o l iml> d i d ih«*> a b u
, ,,. nilered and de
"I 1 .
loungei.,
|<1(.rlj Inn toii-cd us to leave nui uUad
lafetena foi meal
[
u'r homes which .,t this .uuvers.ty
"
r " I"."'
lonns
we do nol concede oui
"ml"ou- cimforl
unsown'weekend
lor the use ol
v.s.tors WJlhuiil our
PeeWee Harris I
i strned l o ins . f u m lo. i
t
hours after I
• ailed him i lo linil on! wh\
he had nol
Older faculty should be subject
to the same review and stimulation, and
reaciiviatcd
would
as
needed
eliminate
much
This
of
the
announced
il Hie previous weekend like
now oceuring, by defusing and
m\
asked i
ing the overly
letter
announced
Wbs'
UtlUMl bothered
and
it
was still
un
I wonder il the '/T/Hes
to
piiul
focused,
largely
approach
injustice
fragment
negative
tenure procedure now in operation
the ad I sen:
Robert M Car mack
them? I woildei
Associate Professor
To all of the above incompetents, 1 say
your flforU
failed
The show was a great
lenally and spiritually thankb
success, m..
lo the solidarity ol the Brothers and
Sisters
liberal
from
and
other
hypocrisy
friends
won't
All
of
your
slop the people
doing what has to be done in the
name of freedom!
the rip-off occurred inn the secrecy of an
YvoillW BenfiM
t o l u t u i vhou d L>«J typo
( u
Hi ,HllJO:V.lMi
wnltu
J
1 d i n o . i I .JIJI; 1 • (ltli> ASP.
S U N Y A (.rtiiiiJUi Cti Her i2l>.
Albany N.Y. 12222
Jill Oil
lie u .in* UKlenu n i i n j eircumall Ittllert m u i l be ii'jnuci.
"emergency" Council meeting. A boycott
would have been a waste of our time, and
FRIDAY, MARCH 23, 1973
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
PAGE SEVENTEEN
Danes End Frustrating Season;
Cogers Say Good-bye to Five Seniors
still evident but were more con-
by Kenneth Arduino
trolled as Rossi led t h e outside
shooting
The ECAC Basketball Tourna-
zone.
ment marked the closing o f the
Albany
Great
Dane
attacks
against t h e
His outstanding
Capital
District Tournament was a high
basketball
light o f his career along with last
season and for five Dane cagers,
Dave
uniform.
Welchons,
Dave Welchons is Mr. Defense
Quat-
for t h e Danes and this season
trochi, B o b Curtiss and Werner
was
Kolln will all be sorely missed.
usually draws the other teams
n o exception.
Dave w h o
t o p scoring guard did an outstanding job o n defense. Dave
For B o b Rossi it was his best
all
around
season.
three years. A team leader in
chance and h e did n o t give it up.
assists and steals, John s e t the
An agressive rebounder Curtiss
t e m p o for the club. This year h e
was able t o hold his o w n against
concentrated less o n scoring, y e t
also was a valuable ball handler
Always
which helped break the press.
known for his outside shooting
Welchon's
and sometimes criticized for his
problem
was his
bombing, Bob never had much
lack o f offense, though h e had a
of a reputation for defense or
high
shooting
percentage. He
ball handling. But this year, im-
proved
that
provement in both these depart-
tribute
without
a m a n c a n conscoring
Quattrocchi
best
shooting
percentages
and was a threat from the out-
But statistics don't show his
value.
Offensively Curtiss had o n e of
the
made the
Capital District all tournament
tough
rebounder
w h o knows
what t o d o with the ball. Werner
gave the team extra m o v e m e n t .
Though
not a
good
outside
an
outside
All five seniors were team ballfitted
in by D o c Sauers
that
must
be
filled,
but Doc
Sauers
has h a d that
problem
injuries. Werner did n o t reach
before
a n d h a s been
able t o
opening
ECAC's.
Truly
round
U n i o n a n d w o n by t h e Great
end
Danes in o v e r t i m e 57-52. There
- that c o m i n g
when t h e
fans
as parts
handle it.
per-
and
Fredonia.
As e x p e c t e d , it
was a boring defensive game won
ing round t h e Danes played a
by
magnificent first half against a
A l b a n y proved t o be very embar-
so-so St. Lawrence five, taking a
rassing for Fredonia, as they also
41-19 spread
lost t h e consolation game t o St.
into
room. Albany
the locker-
eased
Union
T h e second game Friday saw
t o the ECAC
the
Danes
rip apart
St. Law-
Championship p l a q u e . T h e r e was
rence. J o h n Quattrocchi scored
to be o n e big o b s t a c l e t h o u g h ,
Albany's first 9 points, as they
Union.
raced t o a 9-2 lead, o n e thai
Dutchmen
Bob Curtiss lost his starting j o b
Of
T w o year captain, J o h n Quat-
The "Bob Rossi bombs" were
ed with 1 6 , Harry and Byron
had 12, a n d Rossi a d d e d 10 in
throwing
the impressive Albany win.
penetrating, and getting deeper
h e s t a r t e d every game. An injury
IF YOU HAVE AN UNUSUAL TALENT
YOU HAVE WHAT IT TAKES TO BE A
BUDWEISER WORLD CHAMPION!
half.
Albany
the ball
kept
away, n o t
and deeper in trouble. The situa-
Troch s t a r t e d the Championship
tion g o t worse when B o b Curtiss
G a m e h o t again, scoring 7 points
and Byron Miller both received
early
their
t o lead t h e Danes t o a
4 t h personal.
At 1 2 : 0 0 ,
13-10 edge. After a sloppy be-
Union led 4 9 - 3 7 and the Union
ginning b y b o t h t e a m s , t h e game
fans were eating it u p .
into
a pattern:
Union
Byron was left in with
four
fouls. It was n o w do-or-die - t h e
defense, a n d o n offense, a pa-
Danes
tient,
someone
disciplined,
penetrating
needed
someone. The
was B o b Rossi. As
game - Albany was hitting t h e
erratic during the year as t h e
offensive boards a n d also playing
team, Rossi chose n o w t o put it
good
all together. The senior guard hit
defense,
b u t they
were
and committing
too
t w o free throws, a jumper, made
a steal a n d t w o m o r e foul s h o t s
As t h e half progressed, Union
to spark t h e Danes. T h e d o r m a n t
ever so slowly pulled away. Pa-
Albany fans roared t o life w h e n
ced by forward Mike Doyle, t h e
Byron
scored
tourney
Rossi
clicked
MVP, t h e Dutchmen
a 36-31 edge
at
inter-
and
o n a drive a n d
another
so d i d B y r o n .
ed o n a give and go lay u p t o u p
the margin t o six. Kolln's Jumper
pu.t it back t o four b u t that was
it.
Union
scored
five
straight
points, used a four corner stall,
and w o n t h e Championship.
The
dazed
Great
Danes sat
motionless o n t h e bench, as t h e
All-Tourney team was announ-
using a very tough man-to-man
built
this year during pre-season. Yet,
more playing time.
c u t it t o 6 0 - 5 6 . B u t D o y l e scor-
the second
fouling
son came off the bench to score
in t h e
Kolln made a three point play t o
off five straight points t o o p e n
many turnovers.
would only widen. Harry John-
h a d certain
thinp going for them
following, t h e Dutchmen reeled
Rossi blew it o p e n . Troch finish-
settled
4 6 - 3 8 . T h e trip t o
Lawrence 67-36.
over the
Larries 6 9 - 5 5 , and Great D a n e
The
former a n d t e a m leader.
T h e o p e n i n g game was Union
of the
8, as he, Byron Miller, and B o b
But tomorrow was a new day.
University
regular season. For in t h e open-
rooters p o i n t e d
o f the
a clutch
Frustrating all t h e w a y t o t h e
Albany
s h o o t i n g t e a m needs.
early by m o n o and then by leg
the
played at
ment was just as mysterious t o
penetration
ner
top form till t h e end. He's a
in December
the
winning
Scoring t h e first nine points in
team.
b r e a k free for. He gave t h e t e a m
mance this year. Making the t w o
Williams in t h e closing seconds.
basketball
Gym.
players
w h o was bothered
Game
Dane
Championship
fans, in t h e half-full
ing a twenty-five point perfor-
Kolln,
Great
District
Danes in the ECAC Champion-
for t h e benefit of t h e club. Their
against
Capitol
ship Game 6 9 - 6 4 . T h e tourna-
a b s e n c e n e x t year leaves holes
shots
frustrating season for the Albany
there
of t h e
the m a n y lay-ups h e was able t o
team t w o years in a row, includ-
foul
t h e vivid m e m o r y
also was a l o u d group of Union
setting picks, freeing the outside
It was a rough season for Wer-
was
l o n g a n d very
Union Dutchmen outplayed t h e
shooter, he made up for it with
side. He also did a fine job in
shooters.
t o u r n e y . T o begin with,
It was a very
many
points.
ments was evident and Bob got
taller men.
he greatly contributed. He was
ing for the last t w o years.
B o b Rossi,
John
t o tyerner Kolln gave Curtiss the
nationally ranked in foul shoot-
year's last second heroics.
it was their last game in an
Albany
trochi, was a super ballplayer all
by Bill Heller
Lose in ECAC Finals
jumper,
At 7 : 2 5 ,
mission. T h e stats showed t h e
Miller scored o n a b r e a k a w a y as
Danes s h o o t i n g as well as Union
the Danes d r e w t o within 5 4 - 5 1 .
ced. It consisted o f Byron Miller,
Jim Baasett of St. Lawrence, and
3 D u t c h m e n : MVP Doyle, Geoff
Walker, and J o h n Dennio. Union
had
played
a great
defensive
game, a n d were also impressive
with their style o f offense. They
were well coached and showed
great desire.
The final stats were similar t o
t h e first half: both teams s h o t
48%
- Albany
Union
out-rebounded
33-29,
"turnovered"
Danes were
and out-
them 22-11. T h e
8-9 from t h e foul
line, Union 19-28. E n o u g h stats you
t h e reader a l o n g with m e
rebounding
Union called t i m e o u t t o re-
14), and still
group. It was here t h a t Albany
basketball.
losing. T h e difference was turn-
had
u p a n d d o w n frustrating year for
overs
(15-32
to
13-27),
better
(21 t o
severe
defensive
lapses.
t h e writer, a r e a little w e a r y of
A l t h o u g h it was an
Charlie Gugliotta scored a n u n -
t h e 1 7 - 8 Danes, t h e m a n y high
Danes had 6 m o r e mistakes than
contested
points
the
bany
and
free
opposition,
throws. T h e
while
at t h e
fouls
lay u p , a n d t w o Alled t o four
more
Now
charity stripe, Albany was only
Union p o i n t s . B o b Rossi's t w o
thanks
1-2. Union was 10-14.
steals resparked t h e Danes. B o b
Werner
To t h e delight of their noisy
made
it very
i t ' s over.
to Troch,
exciting.
G o o d b y e and
Rossi,
Dave,
a n d B o b . We will miss
Curtiss h i t a lay u p a n d Werner
7SMIA
AMIA Softball Captains Meetings
Judo Clinic
TERRIFIC PATCH,
7"X6", COLORFUL,
WASHABLE, WITH
SPACE FOR WRITING
IN YOUR SPECIALTY.
Breathe easy, Earthlings.
B u d w e i s e r is
doing something a b o u t the current short
a g e of w o r l d c h a m p i o n s in t h e w o r l d ,
B u d w e i s e r is s a n c t i o n i n g five
Taka School in Springfield, Mass., i.s a fifth degree black belt. He will
Dance to the music of
!
beer
weiser World C h a m p i o n s h i p " display!
D o o n e , b e a t t h e r e c o r d , tell us about
it on
a n d get your m a r k e r p e n ready
for i n s c r i b i n g y o u r p a r t i c u l a r s p e c i a l t y b e
n e a t h w h e r e it s a y s " W o r l d
Softball officials m e e t i n g is Moll. Mar. 211 :il I Oil in CI-:17
foolish
store where you see t h e gaudy " B u d -
a fXistcard
Champion."
(Maybe you've detected that
this is not an official, rigid-rules
" c o n t e s t . " But it is a lot of fun,
even if you can't break the
records. You can, though,
—--^_
can't you*3)
TREK
j!
and drink all the BUR
•
•
TO GET YOUR BUDWfJSER
WORLD CHAMPION PATCH
(EVEN IF YOU DON'T SET A
RECORD), JUST WRITE YOUR
NAME, ADDRESS AND WHAT
YOU DID O N A POSTCARD.
•!
HO noof of fuioiAii iMtfrUD aim VOID WHIM notuuw •<
A lull range ol
summer undergraduate
anil graduate courses.
•.poci.il institutes
and workshops
Residence halls available
i
;
Fri. March 23
9 PM - 1 AM
tuuH vim: rOi di i
Otttt ixriilt Diet Mill 11
50 c without
2 sessions June IB-July 20 and
July 23 August 24 (day and evening)
Call or write lor Iho Summer Bulletin
Summer Session Ollice, C W Post Center.
Long Island University. Greunvalu, L I , NY 11548
C. W. POST CENTER
SUMMER SESSIONS
luniJiHl l»y -,i u d o n l t.i«
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
FRIDAY, MARCH 23, 1973
LASAGNA • CLAMS • BEER
BURGERS • SPIEDIES- ETC,ETC
mJ PIZZA-PIZZA too/
(516)299-2431
FRIDAY, MARCH 23, 1973
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
Our own Abruzzc style sauce. All the salmi
you can eat! Tangy Dressings. Oven fresh
breads'.
Creamy
Butler!
A good faculty is a collection ol good
teachers in all their variety.
•!
;
CheflUlii /*...
SPAGHETTI
SPAGHETTI
A GOOD TEACHER
you can drink!1.
Free with Quad card
A n y o n e interested in going o u t
for the Albany Slate Lacrosse
team is urged to contact Coach
Ford. The club will play a ten
gam** schedule. T h e team will
[jive anyone an o p p o r t u n i t y to
learn a -sport as no experience is
i (led.
Art Professor Arthur Leipzig:
Colonial Quad Flaqroom
PAGE EIGHTEEN
I.C 10
LC 20
«• .17 rt
Rosters a n d b o n d m o n e y are to be handed in at these meetings.
Salomon at 4 8 2 - 5 3 7 8 before Sunday
others.
favorite
•1 .00
•1:00
1:00
Lacrosse
to watch. All o t h e r s , w h o a r e interested, are asked t o contact Doug
to t h e t h r i l l i n g B U D
details at your
Mar. 27
Mar. 2H
Mar. 2 9
m e m b e r s of t h e Albany S t a t e J u d o Club S p e c t a t o r s arc also invited
patch.
Get
Tues.
Wod.
Thurs.
be in tin; wrestling r o o m beginning at 2 p m . T h e clinic is open t o all
can w i n prestige plus a h a n d s o m e
C A N T O T E , t h e r e a r e four
Lg. II
Lg. I
clinic with guest instructor Mr. N. K u d o . Mr. K u d o , who heads the
e v e n t s in w h i c h w o r l d - r e c o r d s e t t e r s
In addition
i* I"
On S u n d a y , March 2 5 , t h e Albany S t a t e J u d o Club is sponsoring it
Thii fine young man i i
doing the BUDWEISER
CAN TOTE. So should
you. Just tote a record
number of empty Bud
cans, balanced atop one
another, without mishap,
for a distance of 25 feet
and earn a dandy
Budweiser World
Champion patch,
Record to beat
it 4. (You laugh?)
EARN THIS
Western Ave. at Fuller Rei.
PAGE NINETEEN
^teiV Vprnti
ALBANY
STUDEIV"'
PRESS
San UnMnlty at Ntw York «r Albmy
Frldty, Uirch 23. 1973
Long Basketball Season
Comes to a Close
pages 18 & J9
The LX'AC Baskeibnll tournament represented the
last same lire Great Danes will play this season.
Shown above, to the left ami to the light are sonic
o f lite reasons why Doc Sailers (below, I c l i ) came
through
with
his eighteenth
stiaighl
non-losing
season. F r o m left to right, at top, the learn members
aie Harry Johnson, Hob Rossi, Weinei Kolln, Dave
Welchoas, Reggie Smith. The remaining playei above
is Mike Doyle from Union College, who was voted
the Most Valuable I'layer of the tournament.
To the middle, left and right, arc pictured two ol
the l o p contenders I'm Most Valuable I'layei o f the
Team honure, John Quattrocchi,, and H y m n Miller.
On litis, the last basketball back page, we couldn't
forget to include those great Albany fans who weie
there when they were needed and directly below,
you see one of the main reasons the Danes had such
a great season, their jumping ability.
Well, this is your loving basketball phologiaphei
saying "see ya next season."
photos by niagnien and slawsky
PLEASE RECYCLE PAPER
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