by Glenn von Nostitz

advertisement
by Glenn von Nostitz
Thii it the city: Albany, New
York. The state capital js here.
So to a port, a lot of banks, a few
small industries, and about
130,000 Albanians. ,
Some people don't like Albany. They're mostly dissatisfied
students and downstate legislators who spend only part of each
year here. They complain incessantly about the cultural wasteland, "hick town" atmosphere,
and the general lack of excitement in the capital city.
Then there are those who really don't find the city so objectionable at all. Albany certainly
has its share of faults, but on the
whole they see it as little worse
than any other American city its
size. "Look at Alburquerque „
New Mexico or Urbana, Illinios"
they tell us. "What do these
cities have that's so exceptional?"
They want to know why Albany is always singled out for
extra criticism.
Case in point: A story appeared recently in the Sunday
New York Times Travel Section
headlined, "Is Albany a Capital
Offense?" The question was rhetorical as the story which followed was essentially a rehash of
the oft-cited terrors of living and
working in the state capital. The
lead set the tone for the entire
story: "You're in Albany either
on business or by mistake."
Urban Ills
But is Albany really so much
worse than other American cities
of comparable size? Albany
backers point out that it merely
shares with most every other
city the usual plethora of urban
ills. It's not unusual, they claim,
that all of the major downtown
department stores have closed
down or moved to the suburbs.
Or that the major downtown
hotels have gone out of business
or become severely dilapidated in
the face of stiff competition
from suburban Holiday Inns.
As in so many American cities,
Albany's tomblike railroad station stands empty and splotched
with pigeon droppings, a stark
testament to days of heavy rail
traffic.
The city backers point to the
main business thoroughfare. Albany's State Street is nothing
but one long row of banking
houses, a situation which is common in almost every American
city. It's beginning to look a lot
like Fifth Avenue. Even the
names of the banks are the
same: Chase Manhattan, Bank*of
New York, Banker's Trust,
Chemical Bank. A few small
stores hang on, thanks mostly to
the lunchtime crowds of office
workers.
As in numerous American
cities, the riverfront area has
been destroyed by the building
of massive arterial highway
systems which whisk workers
into the city a little faster after
work. Which means they don't
have to see much of the city
either way. Nice for the commuters. Not so nice for the
downtown merchants.
And Albany has its share of
deteriorating brownstones, ugly
high rise low-income housing
projects and urban crime.
AH of these afflictions are not
unique to Albany.
Things Get Done
Indeed, Albany may actually
be better off than a lot of other
towns. Yes, there are some differences. Unlike many other
cities, the police do answer calls.
The fire department responds to
alarms, and neither is seriously
undermanned.
Garbage is collected from
every neighborhood. The streeU
are cleaned; the snow somehow
gets plowed. In short, the city
functions, which in this day and
age is something to brug about.
The city government may be
"corrupt and rotten", but the
PAGE TWELVE
average citizen here really
'doesn't care. As long as his street
is plowed and his taxes don't go
up, hell be satisfied. The Albany
machine knows how to please.
Atomy not so bad
Mediocre but Secure
Photos by dmrld Shapiro
Scenes like the one above are more and more common in Albany commercial areas as
stores move to the lucrative suburbs,but the city is by no means stagnating. Many new
construction projects are either in progress or planned throughout the capital city.
State Street is the heart of Albany's central business district. The street is increasingly
being dominated by banking offices as retail stores go out of business or flee to the
suburbs. Consequently, streets are empty after 5:00 PM, when office workers are safely at
home in the suburbs
Albany is a slow city. The pace
is langorous. It is a middleAmerican haven. The people
don't have to face crowds, subways, junkies, or high crime.
True, they are somewhat isolated from a lot of mainstream
America, and most of them appear happy. Happy, perhaps in a
provincial sense, but happy
nonetheless.
Living in Albany is a lot like
turning the clock back 20 years.
Albany in 1972 is a lot like the
average American city in 1952.
The government is somewhat
archaic, but things do get done.
The city is not falling apart.
Hopeful Construction
This is not to say that Albany
is completely stagnant. There are
even optimists who see a "bright
and prosperous" future for the
city. They base their hopes not
on the massive South Mall project, but on several other recent
developments which could go far
toward revitalizing the city core.
Most important of these is the
Ten Eyck Project. Construction
will soon begin on the site of the
old Ten Eyck Hotel of a high
rise office building, hotel complex, shopping mall, and other
public spaces. It should pump
some blood into the weak heart
of downtown Albany.
This Spring construction
should start on the new federal
building next to the Palace Theatre. Several other building pro
jects are also in the works.
Physical improvements are being made in harbor facilities
United Fruit Company recently
decided to bypass New York for
Albany, using the latter city as a
distribution point fur the north
east. And although we shouldn't
hold our breath waiting for large
corporations to move their headquarters to Albany, the United
Fruit move is indicative of a
desire to capitalize on Albany's
central position in the northeast.
There is the decision by the
State University to utilize the
delapidated Delaware and Hudson building for its central headquarters. SUNY will completely
lenovate the building inside and
out.
Whether Albanians are hanging
onto the South Mall as theh
"last hope," as the Nfw Yurll
Times story staled is questionable. Musi city leaders realize
that the final opening of the
mall won't really mean a very
large increase in the number of
workers in the city. The thous
ands of construction workers
will merely be replaced by a few
thousand more officcworkers
transplanted from other areas of
the city and consolidated at the
mall site.
The arterial highways will
whisk workers into the cavern
oils maw of an underground
parking lot anil whisk them
away when day is done Whether
they will bother to actually slop
in Albany to and from work, or
during noontime to do some
shopping is doubtful It's a long
trek from the mall offices to the
downtown stores.
Mediocre Yet Secure
Albany certainly wouldn't win
a Model Citins Award. It is.
admittedly, a mediocre place
The "well bred" anil "soplns
tacted" would undoubtedly he
bored here Mm the average Al
Iranian is content right where he
Is.
Albany's riverfront area has been seriously affected by the building of massive arterial
systems effectively preventing access to the river for cith residents. The expressways are
beneficial, however, to commuters who can whisk to and from downtown offices without
stopping in the city itself. Nice for the commuters. Not so nice for the merchants.
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
Winters may he harsh, the ar
chitoeture may he atrocious, the
cultural attractions few and fur
between, hut Hie average Albanian isn't complaining. His gov
ernment looks after him closely
His job with the statu is secure
His n e i g h b o r h o o d is unthreatened, lie is happy.
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 28,
1972
Vol. LIX No. 49
Most tipslale New Yorkers
beaded home from work Thursday evening in a major snow
slotni-lhc second in sixteen
days for eastern counties-while
flurries were repotted in the
Buffalo area and tain and sleet
fell on New York City and Long
Island.
The National Wcatltct Service
in Albany said the snowfall
would amount to over twelve
inches, as it fell at the rale
over an inch an hour throughout
the night.
The storm which hit Albany
about .1 p.m. in a lighl mist hut
quickly changed to heavy visibility-reducing Hakes, foiled
many rush-hour m o t o r i s t s and
liavcllers on the eve of the
Jewish holiday of llatuikkah.
Police in Schenectady reported
an injury lice 25-car pile-up near
one Tluuwav exit.
Colder air was forecast lo push
Into the stale in the precipitt
lion's wake, dropping temperatures into the teens Friday night
and the i(Js Saturday. The snow
was expected to taper off to
Hurries throughout the slate Friday.
Slate Police throughout the
state reported hazardous driving
conditions in their areas, with
toads wel, slippery and icy in
many places. Maintenance crews
SttltUnlnriltyofNtwYorkttAlbiny
were dispatched along the entire
length of the Thruway from
New York City lo the northwestern Pennsylvania border.
The weather service said (he
storm derived from a low-pressure system that intensified
tapidly off the Virginia coast
and moved northeasterly into
the region. "Nor'easlers" traditionally bring the heaviest snowfalls to the eastern sections of
lite slate.
December 1,1972
Another storm, possibly bringing snow into the western New
York si, >w bells, is expected
Saturday, forecasters said.
A storm that began Nov. 14
and lasted for the better part of
24 hours dumped up to 18
inches of heavy, wel snow on
eastern parts of New York.The
snow blanket stayed in most
countries with near-or belowfreezing temperatures in the
fall's wake.
Teevan Discusses Tenure With Students
by Glenn von Noslitz
The tenure controversies con
linue. About twenty concerned
students met Psychology Depart
munt Chairman Richard Teevan
Tuesday night to talk about
issues related to tenure and
teaching effectiveness.
Much of the discussion centered around the importance
placed on student evaluations in
tenure cases. Teevan said that
when student evaluations are
strongly unfavorable to a purti
culur professor, he will most
probably he fired. However, if
the evaluations favor the professor, his or her case will Ire
discussed further by the depart
merit
Other considerations
would then he taken into
account. These would include
research, university service, and
continuing growth.
Teevan told the students that
beginning this coming semester
nil Psychology professors will be
required to undergo student
evaluations, Students asked him
what would happen to professors who still refused to undergo
evaluation, and he responded
that, in essence, ho would Ire
"unable" to force thum to be
evaluated, particularly if they
are tenured. It is his own personal belief that every instructor
should be evaluated, but he is
not likely to force anyone to do
so.
Also discussed in this connection was the availability of evaluation information. Such information, Teevan told the students, is restricted only to the
professor involved and is not
supposed to be made public.
This policy was voted on an
approved by the department,
and Teevan says he is in no
position to circumvent it, although bis personal philosophy
is that all such information
should be public,
Teevan recommended that if
students so desired, they could
conduct their own evaluations
and make the information public. However, he feels thot If a
professor was against this, ho
would not be obligated to sacrifice class time for it to be dono.
Students would have to contact
their classmates outside of class
to gather evaluations. There
would not, ho emphasized, bo
any restriction on releasing any
information gathered in this
manner.
Graduate Teachers Defended
111 other discussion, Teevan
talked about teaching effectiveness in regaril to the issue of
g r a d u a t e students leaching
undergraduate courses. Students
questioned the use of graduate
students in teaching introductory courses, as well as several
upper level courses. In at least
one c o u r s e ,
"Personality,"
graduate students are teaching
two out of the three sections
offered. The undergraduate students feel they are being deprived of the teaching effective
noas of full professors, since
muny of them allegedly spend
their time doing research.
Teevan says that rather than
being harmful, the use of graduate students is actually beneficial. Graduate students can give
more personal help than full
professors and are often more
enthusiastic about their leaching, ho says. Also, he points out
that they are less specialized and
are thereby belter al teaching
Introductory courses.
Ho feels that research directly
benefits undergraduates since It
makes the department more
visible and gives it prestige This
benefit* undergraduates who
later apply to graduate schools.
Research is so important, in fact,
that professors are often hired or
promoted according to how
likely it seems they may make a
"research breakthrough," Teevan adds. Such "breakthroughs"
also add to departmental prestige.
Student Vole Denied
Also discussed during the
meeting was the issue of whether
students should vote at faculty
meetings. Teevan feels that this
issue is not of paramount importance. Ho udds that he
doesn't wont to create faculty
morale problems, which student
vutes could possibly create.
There was at least one urea in
which both Teevan and the students found themselves
in
agreement. Both feel that the
curriculum should be expanded
and that now courses should he
offered, In addition to "the
basics." However there is the
usual problem of money and
budget restrictions, which pre-
vent any new courses from being
established. Teevan did point
out thut one new seminar course
will, however, he offered next
fall. Where the money for this
course come from is uncleur.
One problem being encountered by the Psychology department is the faculty-student ratio.
Tire department reportedly has
one of the highest ratios in the
entire University. This is partly
the result of lurgo class sizes, and
the muny nursing and speech
pathology students who ure required to tuke psychology
courses. Neither of those departments contributes professors or
money to the Psychology deportment.
Teevun fools thot upper level
courses should have no more
than I fi to 20 studeliio, und he
claims that he will not teach
courses with large numbers of
enrollees.
Teevun says thut when he came
to this University, lie understood
that his main tusk was to develop a large gruduute program,
und thut this was the reason he
loft Bueknoll. That college apparently hus no graduate psychology program.
HOT FLASHES
"Sensibility" Thurs.
Brubachcr Hall ( a b o v e ) , h o m e of the J a m e s E. Allen collegiate
c e n t e r where an o p e n h o u s e will be held tomorrow at 9 : 3 0 AM for
interested high school j u n i o r s .
" T h e J a p a n e s e Poetic Sensib i l i t y " is the subject of a talk by
Earl Miner of Princeton University, T h u r s d a y , D e c e m b e r 7 at
8 : 1 5 p.m. in t h e C a m p u s Center
Assembly Hall. This exploration
of an endurinfi Japanese influence on t h e arts of the West is
s p o n s o r e d by the d e p a r t m e n t of
English.
Professor
Miner,
a
noted
scholar in both Japanese and
English literature is co-editor of
the University of California edition of t h e works of J o h n
Dryilen, a u t h o r of The Japanese
Tradition
in English anil American Literature.
He has compiled
and published a selection of
J a p a n e s e p o e t i c diaries, and is
c o a u t h o r of An Introduction
to
Japanese Court
Poetry.
An interpreter with the U.S.
Army from I M ' I to 19«I6, he
has served
as corresponding
e d i t o r of Orient/West
a n d advisory e d i t o r of East « West. He
has Ihe unusual distinction of
holding Fulbright
lectureships
both at O x f o r d University and in
Japan.
J a p a n e s e poetic forms have
b e e n of absorbing interest t o
American
and British
poets
d u r i n g t h e past seventy years.
Professor Miner's lecture will
S
with the attitudes towards
n a t u r e , a r t , and life t h a t underlie
the literary forms. His talk is
i n t e n d e d for a general a u d i e n c e ,
and does n o t require familiarity
with Japanese p o e t r y .
On Friday morning, December
H Professor Miner will talk informally with s t u d e n t s in the
Humanities Lounge b e t w e e n 10
a.m. and noon.
Open House Tomorrow
T h e J a m e s E. Allen, J r . . Colic
aiate C e n t e r of S t a t e University
of New York a t Albany will host
open h o u s e for i n t e r e s u , !
an
,
, . •
, , [,„,.
hieh
school juniors and their
h
, .
i
n.„. o
parents on tS a t u r d a y , Dec. I,
i-rom 9 : 3 0 a.m. until n o o n in t h e
lower lounge of Brubacher Hall
,
, ,'s ,di o, „wi mnit,o. ,w, ,nn
on the
university
campus.
„ ,. .
,u ,.,.,.„r.,m t o
Participating in Ihe program t o
acquaint guests with Ihe Allen
Center program wil be Setb
,,
i
„n M*.lvin
Spellman,
dean,
a n d Melvin
' „,
,
,• . 1 , , , ...i
Urofsky, chairman ol the ad. .
,,
A I . , . ,,,,.
missions c o m m i t t e e
Also pre
... . . .
i.
„ i ,,,,i,.,,i L .
and show
e center's
sent
will het hfaculty
a n d facilities.
students
.,, ,.
,.is e x,,p e c•t.e, d
, i „lim
who'hewill
open
discuss
ho
the
. C curriculum
Api-l , , - u , , ,
ttraet
reside
...
lienssel
•, S c h e n e c t a d y , 1 Sara
toga. Warren, Cheene, Schoharie.
Montgomery, pulton, Columbia.
;ni<] Washington c o u n t i e s .
The Allen Center is a new linil
of SUNYA and o n e of the few
programs in the c o u n t r y with a
specific mandate t o innovate in
Ihe field "!' higher e d u c a t i o n ,
one to explore new a p p
in introducing s t u d e n t s to ,i lit*
c&e£Xtelte
WEI COMES YOU TO AN UNUSUAL. INFORMAL. INEXPENSIVE. AND SLIGHTLY
SENSATIONAL. NEW ITALIAN RESTAURANT SERVING
0
PARMIGIAN
* LASAGNA • BURGERS
CLAMS • SANDWICHES
R.A. Job: Like So Many Pots and Pans?
m a n a n d his institutions. A the
c e n t e r grows, o t h e r ml. "(lis
ciplinary curricula will b e ; , ,
by Aralynn Abare
R e s i d e n t Assistants here were
o n c e paid r o o m , b o a r d , a n d tuition. N o w , t h e y get only r o o m .
Despite this fact, a t least five
senior R.A.'s w o u l d m a k e t h e
s a m e choice if t h e y h a d it t o d o
over again. T h e i r reason is n o t
the p a y - i t averages o u t t o a b o u t
$ 2 0 . 0 0 a w e e k - n o r t h e prestige
of t h e j o b , which can b e , as o n e
R.A. explains, " l i k e washing so
many p o t s and p a n s . " Why
then?
B«»«ll«.««* I—
Enrollment Increase
Dean Paul Wheeler am
today
Ihe
M l ,.„, „
figures for the Collepe i,l t,.
al S t u d i e s . S l a t e Univei .
New York al Albany I
r o l l m e n ' for Ihe I.ill
wtU be 9 2 1 .student* I
sents n s u b s t a n t i a l i n , , . ,_,.
indicates a t r c m i i v l
„<
in c o n t i n u i n g erlui ,n ,,... ,
Albany area.
" Y o u d o get p u t o n t h e s p o t
sometimes, and there's nobody
to hide b e h i n d , " h e a d m i t s . L i k e
the time h e was a m i d s t 3 0 guys
and a b o u t t h e o n l y o n e w h o
d i d n ' t want t o fight. " I ' m just
thankful I g o t o u t of it alive..."
He's found t h e best a p p r o a c h t o
be
an
easy
going
"I-liveh e r e - t o o , " as, with t h e section
constantly reminding him that
R.A.'s " a i n ' t m u c h , " any o t h e r
attitude
would
b e relatively
stupid.
T2T
EBBie THE E£P
The office oi u„ c„
General S t u d i e s b,is m m , , '
Ci
£ • a<**«°™
""""
"'
"»"•
J » Western A ,
m o v e U. t h e c e n n
„
a t y wdl enable s u d e n K ,„
ter m o r e easl y Inn o : , . ,
sent time n o classes .,,->•
^
™ ."" d o w n t o w n c m :
Seventy-f.ve
evenmg
, „..,
were offered l o r t h e !., .,n
ter. Over 1 2n evening COUIM, r
.
p a n n e d for t h e sprine si im' . , , , ,
, - ,,
which s t a r t s J a n u a r y I :,. bve„
s t u d e n t s registration will ,
t m u e mill J a n u a r y t Kv, i
s t u d e n t s wi
be a lowed i., ,.
ter at special recistral ion ,1.,,
i
*
D e c9:00
e m b e r a.m.
I :m<
J noon
i, ..u -I
12:1111
further
form
p . m . anci nSa
u rar la iiv ,ni on
l i n n,,!-.ment
and interview I ] M „
m e n l s call 172 K III:: 111. i al.
of General S t u d i e s .
Hamilton Appointed
binge, and they don't know how
lo handle i t , " he continues,
" T i l e firs I t w o weeks are spenl
by every hotly showing every
body else how cool they are."
Although they both w o r k e d ,
(Dave's still at it) primarily with
freshmen, their jobs differ in
light o f the other factors pre
sent.
U process of learning
['be center is c o m m i t t e d
shortening t h r Lime spent in high
school .mil college In 11)71 111.'
Carnegie
Commission
recoin
m e n d e d thai, because so many
high school s t u d e n t s are better
prepared lo la,-,- Ihe challenges
,11,-g
- education .,1 an
•
-, age I hey should be give ,
I
pp.
nil', l o ,lo " I l i ' AII, n C-nl,-, -.nil aceepl quail
il< in
-ml of Hi,-i,
elevenlll grade in high -., I
I
Urn-- providing plum l o
selected
WELCOMES YOU TO AN ITALIAN
Alls
Is,
l»'
like lownie guy w i n drop the
pants in girls'
, and tl
creeps w h o oil
girls ri
t o w n " O n c e < eryhod; knew
who and whirl I
watch ul tor,
she
eonlmues,
yth.ng
c a l m e d d o w n pre! I \ i
Besides freshmen, I
apped
s t u d e n t s live in Davi
rm, he
considers them HitWell
adjusted
of any ho
"They
know themselves and aren'l ;i
fraid t o lay a problem on t h e
l i n e . " T h e relationship within
the d o r m ? "1 was afraid t h e r e ' d
Will,
FAMILY FESTIVAL
! MANDATORY
I
I
A dolicious new Italian food sensation.
Marinated chunks ol meat charbroiled
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Sunday,
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PACK TWO
1:00 -11:00 PM
call Jeanne 457-4760
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
FRIDAY, DECEMBER 1, 1972
He friendly...you're t h e
who's going to have t o take
initiative. Realize, t h o u g h ,
continued
on page
one
the
that
Id
WE'RE
LOOKING
FOR F U N MR'S A N D MS'S SIN-
GLES OR GROUPS, WHO P L A Y G U I T A R , B A N J O ,
PIANO
(HONKY-TONK)
PORARY,OLD-TIME
DO S O M E T H I N G
LIKE
TO HEAR
SING
(FOLK.CONTEM-
FAVORITES).
ELSE T H A T S
IF Y O U C A N
FUN WE W O U L D
A B O U T THIS TOO. YOU D O N ' T
H A V E TO BE G O O D - J U S T F U N . GOOD D O L L A R S .
SHORT HOURS.
CALL 785-3236
noted Film Historian, Presents:
Sun. Dec. 3
LC 18
Sponsored by Art Council
Free Admission
itiiuioti by nstudent
u u v i i i t.i
ia>
noaoaaarjnl
mapapanegBBttage^^
KIUAY, DKCKMl'.l'l'' I
Administration seems a hassle.
Chuck
doesn't
think
R.A.'s
should sit duty al t h e l o w e r desk
or have master keys. " T h e o n l y
things I d o when I'm at t h e desk
is to answer calls for p e o p l e ' s
phone numbers," he complains,
"and it's a pain in t h e ass t o let
kids i n . " Another R.A., d e s p i t e
her closeness t o t h e staff, resents
their
i rresponsi bl i ty
t o wa rds
things like getting t o d u t y on
time, opening or closing t h e
laundry late, and not s h o w i n g u p
t o meetings. " P e o p l e have been
fired for this who were fabulous
in their s e c t i o n s , " s h e e x p l a i n s ,
"but t h e administrative stuff is
part of t h e j o b t o o . " Dave warns
any R.A l o he prepared for
these "little bullshit t h i n g s . " Besides this, these R.A.'s have a
lew oilier pearls of wisdom for
any perspective a p p l i c a n t s :
Ran A Great Films
from Hie 20$ & 30s
if you can't be there:
WESTERN AVENUE at FULLER ROAD
T h e drug policy seems t o be
the m o s t baffling. " W h a t ' s logical a b o u t a policy t h a t gets m e
i n t o a situation t h a t calls for
yelling at a guy with a j o i n t in
his hand t o return t h e chair h e ' s
sitting o n t o t h e l o u n g e ? " asks
C h u c k . " Y o u c a n ' t be arrested
on t h e c a m p u s for plain a n d
simple soft drug u s e , " says J a c k ,
" y e t we're s u p p o s e d t o ' e d u c a t e '
people by explaining t h e penalties. T h a t ' s r i d i c u l o u s . " T h e
entire battle seems a losing o n e .
Statements like: "There are exactly
four straight guys in my whole sect i o n " and "I was s h o c k e d o u t of
my mind t o discover I h a d
straight kids in my s e c t i o n "
seem t h e trend.
*)ijlijij|iitilualcjiUijt.iioGidd]ai;iliiiaQaIaa
William K. Everson,
December 3
Now open every day 11:30 A.M.-1 A . M . ^ LUNCH • DINNER •
go o n e way . o n this campus,
from t h e top down.... Maybe the
worst part of the job, then is
Chuck Fisher." F o r Dave, it's
policy "never made clear t o us
t h a t we are expected t o know,
interpret a n d carry o u t . "
FUN FAYS
JIjli itiludloolutBBlOi * JUII luImiluLriiiluiautiEidcfflQ
WITH SOME EXCITING NEW IDEAS
BEER
Koremeosl is frustration. F o r
Jack Ihe pinnacle was w h e n " a
kid stole $:iOO.(H) worth of his
suilemale'ssiuff He'd been kick
<•(! out of here a few sears hack
lor doing Ihe same thing, and we
were pretty sure thai this was a
repeal p e r f o r m a n c e , lie was unh a p p y in tile seel ion a n y w a y ,
hut I c o u l d n ' t even gel him
m o v e d ! " " Y o u can't move any
thing or a n y b o d y , " he con*
linues. " Y o u are a n o t h i n g , a n d
you find out it's the same with
directors:
they're
just
paper
j o c k e y s . " Her lack of effectiveness bugs G i n n y . " T h i n g s only
nh
Us
ol
be a split, b u t there isn't; and let
m e tell y o u what a great feeling
it is t o see this c o m e o u t in
things like a kid in a wheelchair
d a n c i n g at a s e c t i o n p a r t y . "
Differences exist w i t h i n these
five, b u t so d o similarities. F o r
instance, all feel a c o m r a d i e for
the rest of t h e residence staff.
J a c k considers o n e of t h e best
p a r t s of t h e j o b is t h e ' i n ' t o
m e e t t h e o t h e r 2 5 residence
people o n t h e q u a d . " T h e y ' r e a
m i x e d bag. O n e is m a r r i e d ; there
are artist-types,
independents,
greeks. I e x p e c t e d a lot of 'social
b u t t e r f l y ' types, but got t o meet
2 5 new a n d different p e o p l e ; it's
n i c e . " G i n n y considers t h e staff
t h e best p a r t of t h e j o b , a n d
Dave a t t r i b u t e s t h e m with "really m a k i n g y o u look at yourself
like y o u never l o o k e d al yourself
b e f o r e . " Also, all like having
their o w n r o o m . Ginny ranks it
second as to what she like best
about t h e j o b . Jack warns, however, lo forgel it "if y o u ' r e just
doing it for t h e m o n e y or for t h e
room."
He p o i n t s out that
" Y o u ' l l find it's not worth i t especiiilly w h e n s o m e guy is yelling o u t s i d e y o u r window at I
a.m t o let h i m in because he
can't find his lock box k e y . "
And this is not Ihe least of Ihe
p r o b l e m s these live lace.
The d o w n t o w n dorms are al
I'eded by the neighborhood.
Cathy explains, "We have had
Willi lie- .ml ,,l ., g,.iin from
the <
rI---,III,I.
i Ihe
center heg
s first classes in
Augnsl
App
lu-n- now .iiil„-,„g .,,-,-,-|,l,-d l,„ Ihe se, olid
class I ' l l " " coinpleholi ol then
course work
It.iclu-lo,
"Ease into the administrative
stuff."
T h e only s o u n d s in G i n n y
R o t h ' s s e c t i o n are a soft m u r m u r
of female voices and t h e nond e s c r i p t classical record playing
o n h e r s t e r e o . G i n n y , n o w in a
low-rise s o r o r i t y section, is a t w o
y e a r veteran. " W h e n y o u ' r e a
2 4 - h o u r babysitter, it's difficult
to find time for private m o m e n t s . " Ginny considers herself
a " p r i v a t e p e r s o n . " " I ' m n o t an
instigator, a n d it's hard for m e
to play a let\s-get-to-know-eucho t h e r r o l e , " s h e admits. S h e sees
an i m p o r t a n c e in k n o w i n g h e r
•section, b u t a d d s t h a t " i n m a n y
cases it's i m p o s s i b l e , " a n d t h a t
an R . A . should respect a person's right n o t t o have a n y t h i n g
to d o with y o u . "
In his freshman d o r m , Dave
F r e n c h sees himself a r b i t r a t o r ,
.sociaJixer, a n d general instigator.
" T h i n g s like water fights a n d
i m p r o m p t u traying in t h e s n o w
help m a k e a section very c l o s e , "
he explains. C a t h y Blumberg, a
d o w n t o w n R.A. last year, feels
much t h e s a m e way. "I was
m o r e than just a h o l d e r of keys• wh i eh I l i k e . . . Fresh men d o n ' t
k n o w a b o u t a n y t h i n g or anyb o d y . . . Y o u ' r e really
needed,"
she p o i n t s o u t . She holds thai
upperdiLssmen are usually " s e t , "
b u t t h a t freshmen, though s o m e
will go off on their o w n , are
anything but "set.
Phey'll accept
differences;
they
know
t h e y ' v e got t o it they are t o
survive." " Y o u ' r e l o o k e d u p t o
in a freshman
section,"Dave
claims, " a n d you'll soon rind o u t
what ego-tripping i s . " "Kresh
men are on an i n d e p e n d e n c e
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
PAGE THREE
U.S.-Hanoi Clash Over Details
between Henry A. Kissinger and Le Due Tho, Porter
said, "In this present phase then, we should respect
each other's problems and concerns, and we should
have faith that the serious purpose demonstrated
and the major progress achieved will lead at an early
date to a mutually satisfactory final result."
But Nguyen Binh Vy of North Vietnam told the
meeting the United States, "at variance with its
statements, . . . has breached faith and refused to
sign exactly on Oct. 31 the agreement which has
been reached. Furthermore it has demanded modifications in the text of the agreement."
Vy declared, "We reject all allegation that 'North
Vietnam has made an aggression against South
Vietnam' and all demands of 'mutual withdrawal.'
We reaffirm that the only aggressor in Vietnam is
the United States. Therefore the United States must
stop its aggression: U.S. troops and other foreign
troops in the U.S. camp must be completely
withdrawn from Vietnam."
by Morris W. Rosenberg
Associated Press Writer
PARIS AP — The United States pledged today
that President Nixon will not permit any avoidable
delay in ending the Vietnam war.
But Hanoi again rejected Saigon's demands for a
pullout of all North Vietnamese troops and charged
that the United States had broken faith by not
signing the draft peace agreement.
U.S, Ambassador William J. Porter told the 168th
weekly session of the Paris peace talks; "We had
hoped, as you know, to reach an agreement earlier.
We worked hard to bring this about, but the issues
in this long conflict are complex, as all recognize,
and can neither be dismissed nor distorted.
"We reiterate to you our president's firm intention
lo permit no avoidable delay in ending this war and
entering a period of peace and reconstuction."
In an apparent* reference to the secret talks
Power To The Left
WKSTPORT,
Peter
B
Among
Net-matt is a l e f t i s t , b u t
tlic
sells i t e m s l o r left - h a n d e d
people
H to
id
percent
population--who
o f the
he claims
face
the
Life aboard your big
sailing yacht is informal
Relaxed. Romantic.
There's good food.
And 'grog! And a lev.
pleasant comforts...
but any resemblance
to a plush pretentious
resort hotel is
accidental.
those are the
ones \ u u \ e heard of. Before
the cruise ends, you'll
Spend 10 daws
exploring paradise.
Spend ten nights watching the moon rise and
getting to know interesting people. It could be
the most meaningful experience of your lite
..and it's easily the best \acation \ o u \ e had.
tool
shed,
even
mood of each...and its
own beauty and charm.
hull IT
melt IT.
can
in
phone
his h o m e ,
N t ' i f n a n , his
mail onlcr
b u s i n e s s , o f f e r i n g (Vf>
wailing
to
be
lapped
by
•'We
try
everyday
man,
lo
sell
According
to
himself
a
example,
because
(hey
screw-cover
lually.
a
unscrew
said
lefty
lo
Mei
"Many
housewives,
think
jar
they
lor
are w e a k
cannot
or
i •> Mane
It's ytiui h n t h d a y i Celubr.ite wi
" h u t buttered n i m " i N . . ' Wc
How
.ihniil .i I K I I ' . I I H I iiamii
MA I I H I'...' "
' »I»V'
Y » . . . '....
Northwestern
Life,
suffer
I •- It h a n d e d
minor
nuisances
/ founds
III'.IM-U
Nit
•IK'I U 111, I
n o t e b o o k rings, w i n d i n g watches
upside d o w n , and w o r k i n g right-
solutions
problems,"
lelthanded
INSlMIC 1/1 til
•v, i s:>.> i
businessmen,
Neiman claims
Nal lonai
I <
ID:
Joyce
(Alias Dunda. B u n ,
I<M klehead, m H U f i )
Happy POtli Birltiday. Well, y o u
'rnally made it.
I rOKI I tic Sisleihutjd and F- nends.
',!,,.(.-
Lefties represent n s e l l e r s ' m a r
ket
Dear B u n c h .
Happy HJiriiiday Ms. P r o p r i e t y !
1 live, BB H J M , A l l y , Muley, H a r r y ,
Slepliie, l laivey, etc.
nakirvg my bll tliday
*e ynu an.
a left h a n d e d m u s t a c h e m u g
s u c h as h i t t i n g r i n g s i n l o o s e l e a f
A r i s t e r a is t h e
PERSONALS
scissors w i t h r e v e r s e d b l a d e s a n d
sign
lera O r g a n i z a t i o n
Deai S.5.,
Happy B i r t h d a y !
HOUSING
opener,
people
greek w o r d l o r " l e f t , "
1-2 female roommates w a n t e d . Near
busline. $5Q/mo. Call 4 6 3 - 3 8 4 ] .
•> day is one nl m i r t h
on
lel'l h a n d e d o r a m b i d e x t r o u s deHe calls i l i e c o m p a n y A r i s -
Z obeli may be Dan's b i r t h d a y , but It's
yout
anniversary,
so keep it
COMING!
knife,
the spoul
a
Wanted: 1 ot 2 female apartment
males tor Spring Semester. On busline. 4GS-2J37.
continued from page 8
proper side," a left-handed
enterprising
open
bottle
lefthander,
a
Ac-
trying
handed
adding
m a c h i n e s , cash
registers a n d v o t i n g m a c h i n e s
Even
lefty
m
in
holding
his
the
phone
booth, a
u y have a d i f f i c u l t
time
ilc sfu-Hi iiiei pin be
the receiver, d e p o s i t i n g
dime
and
dialing
from the ASP
a
number.
Student Art Sale
Coming
lo
a right threaded cover,
is u s i n g l he w e a k e s t c o n i b i
of her arm, wrist ami hand mils
A TOWER EAST
CINEMA MOVIE
SCARE:
[ le says a n l i f * -1*1 f l i s c r i t n i n a
run* f r o m
Art Gallery
ihe f r i v i l o u s , such
chewing gum wrappers, lo
i h i n g as p o t e n t i a l l y d a n g e r o u s
Dec. 13th & 16th
a p o w e r .saw
A cruise is forming
now. Your share from
$245. Write Cap'n Mike
for your free
adventure bookie!
in full color.
know the names of mam
more. You'll know intimiteh
the enchanting different
he .•••Ms: a
grapefruit
"with
m your car. A l l my l . D . & keys are in
it! Please call me at 4 5 7 - 7 9 6 7 ! Very
i m p o r t a n t ! Linda Campbell.
Love, J.B.
MORE CLASSIFIEDS
r.ullj.ill
di.scrimmal i o n in the k i t c h e n , in
w i f e a n d c h i l d r e n have begun a
like Martinique, Grenada.
items
peeler-pairer,
tics
From
Mission: A leisurely cruise to
remote islands with names
the
s o u p ladel
booths
Uniform of the day: Shorts
and tee shirts. Or your bikini
if you want. And bare feet.
Antigua
AP
lu- has n o i l i i n g t o d o w i t h p o l l
ill-
A sleek graceful sailing vessel glides across the sometimes green,
sometimes blue Caribbean. The cargo: you. And an intimate group
of lively. fun-lming shipmates.
Conn
$ 2 8 5 , Park near Main, C o m p l e t e l y
furnished w i t h washer/dryer. A v a i l .
Dec. 13. Call 4 6 2 - 9 9 3 2 & mornings
4 3 8 - 3 4 8 2 . Girls preferred.
vooooooGcoosoooooaocoocoooooooooooooooooooaooooodl
Applications for
Central Council Representative
Come on and live.
from:
Colonial Quad (one seat)
Dutch Quad (one seat)
Indian Quad (one seat)
Windjammer Cruises.
They must be returned by 5 PM
Friday, December 1 , 1972.
P.O.Bo, 120. Dep,. c 16 Mum,, D . . c h . Flonda 33139
idud
by
M.Mii-ni
la
FRIDAY, DECEMBER 1, 1972
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
The
FRIDAY, DECEMBER l.' 9 7 2
R
Mephisto
Waltz
mi
Are available in the SA office, CC 346.
PAGE FOUR
rWFNTIE l n C I NTURY FOX He w a i l s
/• i Jl I N N MAHI IN l-M)l >l» I ION
S O U N D oi
II-.KKOM
ALAN ALDA
JACQUELINE BISSET
BARBARA PARKINS
Dec. 1 & 2
LC 7
7:30 & 9:30
S.FjU w / statu quad card
$1 vv/o
+ ROAD RUNNER
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
PAGE FIVE
II
the now street people
by norman rocheville
which way do we turn
in a world set to burn?
'- h
Undermining the Press
The Rule of Unreason
"I d o n ' t w a n t to go to jail, b u t it's t i m e s o m e b o d y took ,i
stand. I cannot betray my own principles."
Peter Bridge said t h a t on his way to prison several weeks
ago. Bridge is a newsman and his c r i m e w a s doing his job.
Last
summer,
in
a case
involving N e w
York
Finns
reporter Earl Caldwell, the S u p r e m e C o u r t ruled thai tin
First
Amendment
does
not
protect
newsmen
vcaling confidential sources a n d confidential
from n
information
when they are s u m m o n e d to testify b e f o r e a grand j u n
II
they refuse to answer any q u e s t i o n s , they can be puled
The threat this poses is extensive. If n e w s m a n cannot k.> •
sources and i n f o r m a t i o n
in c o n f i d e n c e , ovbiously
thus.
sources and that i n f o r m a t i o n will dry u p . R e p o r t i n g will h,
seriously h a m p e r e d , and the public's right t o know u
suffer.
Bridge was the first to be hauled off t o jail. Will T. I ,
a reporter for the Los Angeles T i m e s , was the s o mi,I II
crime was a refusal to reveal a source tor a stor\
alleged
plans
by
Charles
Manson
to
kill
,il» .<
Hollvv,
'
celebrities. Bridge has been released b u t F a n ' s term is
;
to the discretion of the c o u r t . He can stay behind b.u I
as long as the grand jury remains ill session.
^BUr 7HAT& 7VE PROBLEM, EYEKV TIME I TAKt=
A WHACK AT IT. . . TREEPOM R/NG$!'
Both cases reveal an underlying irrational leai on th. j • . - •
of government officials that national security will ,"i
how be u n d e r m i n e d if the public is given lull a< c ess i..
"find the collective source & build"
workings
of
government.
Both
men
were
In,
.,|
we're millions V millions
of protest civilians
an' our number grows
with the G . I . J o e s . . .
we're daughters 'n' sons
society shuns. . .
we refuse mental chains
an' ghetto-bred p a i n s . . .
we seek lasting peace,
not crumbs on lend lease . .
we drag in the slime
of political crime,
of babbitts 'n' racists
an' self-proclaimed facists,
of bureaucrats' stealing
an' wheeling 'n' dealing,
of the U.N. jingoes,
an' double-talk lingoes,
of the Judas goals
buying sheep with votes,
of the taxes we pay
for guns to My Lai,
of the kill-craze defense
this country invents,
of the yanks ill tanks
vs unarmed ranks,
of the CIA
an' ol' Ldgar J.
with his miles 'n' miles
of snooped-up files,
of the new luna tides
toward new genocides,
of our so-called leaders
who are tax-dollar bleeders,
i)l the cryptic hawks
at the Paris talks,
of a war to save lace
by deslioying a race,
of encounters an' shakedowns
an' door-bustin' breakdowns,
of the search V seizure
at the PD's leisure,
of the sneak camera spies
an' their deft photo lies,
of sharpshootin' narcs
in free city parks,
of head-bustin' deals
in state fuzzmobiles,
of mace an' of clubs
an' the shootin' o' doves,
of death students meet
at (he storm troopers' feet,
of (lie instant hells
in the precinct cells,
of bail bonds an' lines
the DA designs,
,
criminal records. Their only crime was that ol l o l l o p "
Breaking Down All Those Walls
by Steve Nover
Though the university has a so
called peace studies, a student
council, and many organizations;
it certainly seems that so much
more can be done here in Albany to create feelings of mutual
understanding and co-operation.
Though the path is very narrow,
the yellow brick road is very
wide and we are all on it, whether we realize it or not. There
are many people who have gotten together and thus we are
able to say that we do have a
Refer, a 5300, a day care center,
draft counseling; and the needs
and problems of many different
people in varying spheres are
being cared for. Certainly we
need more people to give their
time and energy which is semiprecious because of school and
personal relationships. But how
can an atmoaphere of good will
and concern be brought to Albany, with everyone taking part
and committing themselves to
making their community an expression of their beliefs, ideas
and hopes? Or rather, the feelings are here already in many of
us and some kind of sensitive
stimulation that touches all of us
is needed to produce this new
community, to create this Creation.
Christmas is coming up, and
wherever we'll be spending it,
there's a kind of excitement and
closeness, but bow far into the
new year will it last? Does the
spirit just come and go can it
actually be integrated in some
part of our being with a lusting
effect? Exactly now we devote
our energy and what course of
action we take depends upon
finding our cenUr and then
working from there. 80 we have
P A G E SIX
;.._;•;. ; : , r ~„;:::,.:.:-;iv.
to find our individual center and
then perhaps find our collective
source and build. Rather than
get more abstract, I wish to call
attention to some points where
change is needed and hopefully
it will set off a cataclysm of
events as we become more conscious of our Self and sensitive
to the environment.
How we use colour, in the way
we dress, in the environment,
hov? they affect us, is a kind of
psychology. Just as how we relate to one another will decide
whether we help open each
other up and expand, or whether
we do the opposite backing
away, shriveling, contracting
closing ourselves up so it is with
col ours they can relax us,
soothe us, be arousing or they
can put us to sleep. Being on the
campus and seeing the architecture has an effect upon us, besides whether we see boring lifeless faces or smiling enthusiasticpeople.
The SUNY buses which parade
around the city one hundred
timeB a day could use a change
td
'"-;>""•':
*•*•
., ',
'
• " " " '
of face, perhaps a psychedelic
blue or a coal of many colors-if
it isn't a traffic distraction.
Though 1 wouldn't think of asking people to dress up, how
about a day of dress colorfully,
or corny, or backwards; not to
put the spotlight on external
changes hut it's needed everywhere in all of us. Albany lias a
lot of while houses for some
unknown reason; a house down
the block from me was just
painted bright yellow and another blue it really makes a
difference (though winter's not
the best time to paint a house).
I'd like to take pari in some
sensitivity groups but I don't
believe there have been any lo
take pari it Brothers and Sisters
we all can be and yet il seems so
far away sometimes.
As individuals we're infinite
with different possibilities and
yet we are all trying to be more
open to the forces of the uni
verse as we journey inward and
outward in quest of the holy
grail, our Self.
„„,,,...„, J B L mppum
>.!,.
JCASmBmW
Kd|(*Ml4l P M „
I,,,,,,,
*„.*,...< An. ).<iu.„
Mil...
C.i.Mm Ktl
,„.*,». M .i.„
ArU M l l ' - i
>
'
then
*»
»'"'
M
resisling
orders
lh.it
I h.
We join
lite
n u m e r o u s o t h e r college and
piol<
Farr
in then
light
confidentiality.
his dissent:
to guarantee n e w s m e n
For, as Justice P u t i n
"The
court
thus
Stew,HI
invites
•
the i't'1' 1
state
w.m
and
!••!
authorities to underiuitu' the historn iiuh'pendi tin
I
|)ress by a t t e m p t i n g to a n n e x the journalism piot.s-.i i .,
an investigative arm "I governineiit ...when a gt.iiiil '
may exercise an unbridled subpena
p o w e r , and
'
involved in sensitive m a t t e r s b e c o m e Ic.irlul id dis. I
information, the newsman will not only tease in "e.
gale
and
publish
information
about
issues
.1 pi.I
import."
Ihe.se two
fulfilled
newsmen
arc i riinin.ils only bci.ni.i
'
their journalistic obligations ol informing <•
citizens. This is clearly u n r e a s o n a b l e . If the Supteiin <
fails to recognize the danget posed by Us decision
the
public
remains silent
in the
face
..ml
ol sin li ill"i''
injustice, t h e n , as the Long Island paper \<i<;tl.i\
••!' "
this week: "reasonable laws have b e c o m e the nistiu
'
of unreason and all 220,IKK),1)00 of us are m danget
Aid Press Defense
I he legal costs involved in the defense of
I'd , I'm.i.
Bill Farr have been extensive. Both have . ,!..! i
financial help in meeting those costs. Sigma Dell.
professional journalistic society, has u n d e r t a k e n .)
"•••;;:::"::""
>-<...«-. ta
> '
campaign to raise funds
1 b w h « l Ail M . H . H , ,
- " " ' '*"* "
and
newspapers across the c o u n t r y in s u p p o r t i n g lii.. 11"-
and
A l l . . H i . i n * Pn.du.li.„.
i cnisi lem is
violated then pnilesslon.il .mil Knistiliiiiini.il lights.
"•"
'-'i'""*
'
1-
M«.i„#,
include any
K.,(..,. M r h.1,1,,,
n „ AlOff
Sludmm •"<«< .. IHll ..I...1 twit* HMtlv t<, l!w laludani
Anotm.u.i " ' <>•• ••'•" Um.ai III « 1 N . - Yuri ,< A | | „ „ , || „ li, I K |«l t i .
nix known-MSlutfffH ! • • Ou> nflioti
. - . 'it >!<>•>»> u n ill '!•« C H I * * > c * • I . - -p-i ..... phonal • • • 4 b ; *>•»! n u i
4'jf JltM t iliino.i imt't t PI 1!"
•.1 u, ir>. kdiluiiX Hourf
in then n a m e s to help
defense costs. Recently, that campaign was est
• J l l . , IJ.I..BI,
newsmen w h o found
deil
themselves i
circumstances.
' l u l l - l i l i ||l»ky
C o n t r i b u t i o n s can be sent t o Sigma U e h a Chi. Nail'
iidv.ll tUn-.t'T
Headquarters,
—*
ALBANY S T U D E N T PRESS
.15
East
Wacker
Drive,
Chicago
III)
00601.
F R I D A Y , D E C E M B E R I, '9V2
"I the press thai conceals
what the G.I. reveals,
• if sheet machinations
lu cup olhei nations,
ol die spun hteakeis
an' the widow makers,
ol the deniogogues
in street peoples' logs,
ol wins that deprive
(he oppressed (o survive,
of a nixonic mouth
thai spews only doubt,
nl hale that betrays
our earth-loving ways,
of deadly pollution
thai has no solution,
ol having lo leel
as Achilles' heel,
ol sweating V stunning
for houi-wuge gaming,
ol stcntoiian screamers
an' do-nothing dieanlc'is,
of the causisls' cues
an' (lieu moial lies,
ol the poot m (hen giaves
who lefuscd lo he slaves,
ol being misused
an' haiassed an' abused.
FRIDAY, DECEMBER 1, 1972
of ding-a-ling jurists
an' judicial purists,
of the merciless tales
out o' prisons 'n' jails,
of the jailhouse shimks
an' (lieu Freudian stinks,
of die pain thai was lead
m (he All lea dead,
of Nixon 'n' Agnew iV
Mitchell 'n' Thieu . . .
ours is the Age of Aquarius,
of the hedonist,
Dionysus,
Bacchus,
of the cap 'n' the lab
an' the clandestine lab,
of the pill-poppin' days
an' the heavy spike craze,
of dingbat illusions
an' id-fed delusions,
of boosting to cop
at a street corner stop,
of a life in the chock
of acid V rock,
the age of rebellions
an' college pro hellions,
of protests V fights
for due civil lights
of the evolution
of a new [evolution,
of (he nights V days
of the D.C. loiays,
ol masses that dance
in patched denim pants,
of pistols V blades
an' lipping off laids,
ol sit-ins 'n' diop-ouls
an' love-ins 'n' cop-ouls,
uf movements 'n' youlhquakes
an' lagalong truth lakes,
ol hang-ups 'if downers
ol lost out-u'-towners,
ol backpacking paces
lo faraway places,
of delectable drifting
dial's soul-to-soul lifting,
of hands mil lot bread
loi poetry lead,
of taking in stride
a hitchhiking lide,
ol hoi pants V knee hoots
an' bell-hot loin hip suits,
of the mini flirts
in their mini skirls,
uf record-lape choices
of love-in-bloom voices,
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
of double fix droppers
an' methadone stoppers,
of drug-rape V psyche-outs,
an' mainlincrs' freak-outs,
of underground papers
an' radicals' capers,
of lively nude flicks
for sexy-sex kicks,
of concerts V riots
an' soul-music diets,
of cross-country sallies
toward Pentagon Calleys,
of light install! hikes
on foldaway bikes,
of sweel Jesus vibes
an' heavenly bribes,
of stickers 'n' posters
for llo Chi Mini) boasters,
of the polyglot plot
lo legalize pol,
of low income spenders
on Ilea market benders,
of free choice abortions
an' legal contortions,
of long-bearded straights
no ledneck equates,
ol the slreelers' intention
(o pui down convention,
ol bra-burning voices
foi mate-spurning choices,
of marxian speeches
directed at teachers,
of dime rip-off bags
an' DO A lags,
of luck thai conceals
the pot-growing fields,
of plush pads for (lingers
an' love-levin' swingers,
of walerbed changes
the swing club arranges,
of nudist camp wooers
an* skinny-dip doers,
of hash pipes V roach chips
an' strobe lights V speed trips,
ecological foods
an' peyote moods,
of communes V pads
for the share-alike fads,
of odd funky clothes
an' peek panty hose,
of "Let's all get bleary
with LSD Leary,"
of a one-hand applause
for Nixon's great cause,
of the Libido Ub
to warm Adam's rib,
of wanting to host
a lonely ol' ghost,
of headshops, boutiques
an' ol' crafts antiques,
of the "right on" scene
with a left hook lean,
of the boom-boom sticks
with their tick-tick-ticks,
of painters V writers
an' symbolic fighters,
of that far-out itch
to visit-a witch,
of doing that thing
that makes the world sing,
of nomads on wheels
an' their friend-to-friend deals,
of peace-march parades
an' onlookers' charades,
of leenie-bop boppers
an' (winkle-toed hoppers,
of street peoples' eyes
thai Hash no disguise,
of Armageddon day
when goodness will stay,
of the partyin' mods
an' wall-to-wall broads,
OH
of wlnos V stumblers
an' panhandlin' mumblers,
of karma V beach strolls
an' ozone 'n' bedrolls,
ol hand-in-hand walks
an' sweet-worded talks,
of the bare-footed (brill
of climbing a hill,
of blacklights V incense
an' body-close bi-scents,
of (he (rips thai weie had
without leaving the pad,
of a trend that aiinoinls
euphoria's joints,
of The Voice V The h'reep
an' (lien cues from (he deep,,
of a land of (he free
in a Third World-to-be,
ol candles V wine
an' verses like mine . . .
which way do we turn
In a world set to burn?
gol a match?
PAGE SEVEN
' Barrecrafter roof ski rack w/locks
$25—never used. Call 434-2077.
f
4 0 lb. 56 In. glass Bear Grizzly Bow;
3 matching fiber glass hunting arrows] b o w and sling quiver used. $30.
Call Sue 472-8883.
CLASSIFIED
For Sale; Henke Ski boots—excellent
condition—ladles
size 9—$13. Call
438-1529.
Head 606 Skis—210 cm Spademan
Bindings—only used 11 times. $65.
7-3232.
FOR SALE
Two
15 I n . studded
snows—good
c o n d i t i o n —$30— call
Barry.
3 7 1 - 3 6 3 8 , evenings.
1967 American Rebel
convertible,
runs perfectly, body great, 4-speed.
A s k i n g $ 9 0 0 . Call Sue 4 5 7 - 7 7 2 9 .
1965 Mustang, stick, 4 new tires, best
offer,
456-3325;
weekends
1-966-8042. Ask for A r n l e .
SEIDENBERG
JEWELRY
earrings 2 for $1
patches 25e
cigarettes 39c/pack
Afro earrings
MOMFn
Sen
lo
1964 Sunbeam—needs engine
B o d y b e a u t i f u l . 2-8616.
work.
1968
Volkswagen.
Powder
Excellent
Condition.
New
A M - F M Radio. Call: 237-5135
5:00 p.m.),
Blue.
Tires/
(after
2 Sears Dynaglass Belted Snow Tiros.
8.25-14. One season o l d . $ 2 5 . Steve
H. 4 8 2 - 3 1 6 7 .
B r o w n Leather Wintercoat with lining. Originally $135. Asking $79.
Size 38. Call Paul 7-5356.
Poodle Puppies, A K C , Black
tures. Adorable—457-4840.
DIAMOND
ENGAGEMENT
&
W E D D I N G RINGS 3,000 ring styles
at 50% discount to students, staff, &
teachers. Buy direct from leading
manufacturer and S A V E ! >/? carat
$ 1 7 9 , 3/4 carat only $299. For catalog sond $.50 lor postage & Handling
t o : Box 12, Fanwood, N.J. 07023
(SUN Y A ) .
Stereo's, T.V.'s, Radio's & accessories. A l l major brands of stereo
components—SONY & P A N A S O N I C
T.V.'s & Radios. Savings of 10-25%.
Call 2 7 3 - 1 3 0 7 .
Pair A R - 4 X Speaker s, like new, 5 7 5 .
Call 732-7660.
stereo,
Help
wanted -Associate
Legislative
Director for Student Association of
the Slate University will include legislative research, m o n i t o r i n g commit
tees, w n l i n g weekly newsletter, contact Mr/legislators, and some traveling,
Realistic Quad Stereo System 4 M c
1000 spks., quad tape deck & tapes,
quad 60 w amp, 4 rno. o l d , askiitg
t?4'J.
457-4721
Albany
W a n t e d : m a n d o l i n lesson
Marlaterosa 457-303S.
Staff Unlvertity of New York at Albany
•isecai
Lucas Foss & the Creative Associates
STEREO
REPAIR
Rich 4 5 7 - 5 2 5 5 .
Women Required for rapidly expanding sales organization. N o car needed.
Will train In evenings. Part-time or
full time. 30% commission.
Call
434-4893.
The
LOST & FOUND
p h o t o by parmfln
Wagner's
by Andy Palley
Once in a while a latent floats
from
call Aralynn at 7716
continued on page 5
the sludge which consti-
Isolde.
GOING TO MONTREAL/
Koom .uul b,,,ird! 2 mc,ili |„.. r day;
Ladies or couple.., preferred. Group* „f m a | r ,,
students with references will be accepted.
to ( o i to laugh at). Whatever,
lasting prestige
Helmrich ale it up. Livery trem-
ovei the years Often il bubbles
olo wrenched Ihe proper amount
to the (op in Hurry of headlines
of e m o t i o n , and no one could
.uul
complain
trumped-up
expectations.
'IX-12 Hlv. I.evescjuc
M o n t r e a l . Can.ida
jfjiainDHEMTMciBaiarflowim)*
Hoiaamaai iiucur/nioHOLJii naraaoannEfijnaiiDiE
ui a u y Li d
composers living today.
Among
his
more
inglii. is one o f
lie akvav
I lie
had a
Dennis
Heimlich
known in Ihr nghl , n , Irs a i Ihe
Ills
wll.lk'V'i
his
/L/m/hti:
hn-it-r
null
Ihoiigh . his fame will grow in Us
well
due lime
K\IM!I!
A pleasanl change ol
insi
dung
one notices
llehinich's playing is thai
technupie
Notwitlr
ihe few wrong
notes
chose
ihe
Ihimnicrcluvu-r
pClSOl
.mini
lo,
Hi,
;il
n
in
\\h\
l,i',
su
SIVU*
mam
Ihe
n|
ilif
lion
Humphrey Bogart at his best in:
of
Um,
Hie ASP
Staph
e*******
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
F R I D A Y , DECEMBER I, 1972
ilst'll
' 'Humnterckivk'r
I l \ nickname,
"
implies
,i
and con-
ductor. He has held many posi-
ihe
tions ,,, cities of America and
PAC.
A
Minor
mliinale
w i t h i t , hence its un-
Icgaloetl c a p which people lake
Heimlich
When Pierre Koralink produced and directed Oscar
interpretation. His pauses in the
first movement were just light,
sound)
l u l l , in a strictly de,manic way,
and
t lie
winch
sudden
n i t in
acceleiandns
all m e i
wrie
dia
ma tic in the he si Heel hove nun
[he ouiei moveinciils had c a c k -
sense They weie profound, and
le
there is no heiiei a compliment
a .cackle
much
losl
lechniquc
which was as
from
as
performance
embellishments
weie lo Ihe music of J.S Bach
French
drama
"Salome,"
an influential
In Ins introduction to the speclacuiai International IVi lurnuuiee
Dccemhei
production, i n he seen Sunday.
> .it 1 till p in., hosl Kohcil Meriil says
-Wilde had .< In\e h»i ihe uikonvei
nwn sake
I n Wilde. utiU
al loi its
Ihe e \ l lanidinai y was
\ \ n ! t h \ u! siuviv.d. \ihelliei il he emisuleied got id oi
Tieiie
Kniahuk's
pioduetion
ill
inllueiued h> Oscai Wilde, Ihe man. as well as h\
ihe suinl itself."
than thai
When
is a strangeness
and nchness
in the
$2.00
of
w/SUNYA
$1.00
I.D.,
and $.!.00 for the public. Tickets
are available at the PAC Box
Office; 457-8606.
Both o f these events are sponsored by MusiCouncil. Funded
by Student Tax.
ciedo for Herod's court, as recreated in Koralnik's
production.
Audrey
Beaidsley's oiigrnal illustrations for
Wilde's pla\ set ihe tone. Realism is not a goal, and
anachioiiiMits are id ini concern, Modern plastics
eieate curious and l o i m e n l e d shapes l o i cosluines,
scenei \ . props
Ihe
nuns td .1 ea.lle neal Haieekma piovide a
h.inupie
setting Im ihe "cavem-pahice ol l l e m d
opening onto u n k s which siiegest ihe end id the
01 its heginning
Ami ihe costumes aie as remote ( m m the normal
will
Dennis
as the selling
An enormous peail-studded
surreal quality
cost limes and sellings " Men ill continues. This is an
understatement
Opulence
and extravagance are
canted to a h i / a n e extreme that would please not
One critic commented thai this production "finds
its riglu propnition in 11s excess." Together, scene
and
costumes
reinforce
a note o f
"underlying
d e l i r i u m " in ihe drama.
His hiogiaphei l i . i n k Hants called him "a pagan
b o r n , " and Wilde's choice ol this Biblical story ot
ultimate
dtcadence
appaienlly
light
ami sell indulgence
yeais away
from
while
the Victorian
pailors td " T h e Importance of Being Earnest"
is
perhaps not surprising.
Heimlich
Clearly,
Salome
all ol
this excess was leading Herod,
and the j est down a primrose path to
destruction. Clearly, the faithful followers of John
the Baptist must have the last word.
And
they d o , in a segment at Ihe end that is
play again'' Only lie "knows the
The playwright's own exlravagance was legendary
111 Ins lifetime. "Indulgence may hurt ihe b o d y , " he
ment is very brief The drama belongs to Herod and
to Salome.
answei, and, knowing Dennis, lie
probably hasn't given it a second
said, but " it is self-denial and abstinence that maun
Heimlich
thought
and deform the soul." This might have been the
scnplioii of the Liebestod from
w/lax,
Friday's and
concert
king, and his consort's costume has an even mare
"Iheie
As an inleresting contrast to
Iran-
be an admission
'Salome' was
the oilier works on Ihe piogram.
chose Ihe Lisvl
Salurday's
woild
evil
a masterful
loi g,allied as a propel lendilion
ol
will
for both
Oscar Wilde's Salome
only King Herod, hut also Oscai W i l d e *
played
ol Schubert
silearn
Saturday
enllai, topes ol ]ewels and colossal rings adorn the
SunuM was not the llowery, over-
was an e n d l e s s
series.
Laboratory Theatre o f the
Theie
Beethoven wouldn't
larniliauly
II Unwed where n
Slore
the keys
people even have a chance l o g e l
Schubert's
PAC. 11 will he pail of the Free
woild
Mis interprets-
nol
In
cet la MI amount oi pounding on
have had H any mhei w a y ' Il is.
ciispriess
had in How (ihe i h u d movement
It's Debbie's j
and Lloyd's
birthdays!
flit' wuik
lies III l l l f M.llUli- til
also, not thai often played. Few
a
Rudolph Soikin
Inn slaeciln
plays
y o u are, Helmrich
will)
night's concert will be
held in ihe Recital Hall o f Ihe
Hit'
im-il
unlike
good
the greatest
evening's performance will be in
pianist
be listening I " ihis stuff!
inc.il inasle, llial he ,s He does
all Ihe maihles
to be one of
a recognized
soundtracks, people would slill
lanlasiii lepuialloi], and is well
loi
and
did in the
lluinmcrcluvicr.
Beethoven
gial)
America
Music
ty o f Wilde himself.
nseis
of
He is considered by
Friday
and
VARIATIONS.
Ihe younger generation o f
addition l o his composing, he ,s
know, il il weien'l lo, old movie
about
BOGART NIGHT
E C H O I,
factor in his approach was the flamboyant personali-
which will appeal no mallei how
$.25 w/student tax
$.75 w/out
most
profession.
a lack of Romantic feeling. You
standing
Midnight - LC 18
placed h i m at the top o f Ins
uish, and ate leaders lo slay
Ihe
Friday, December 1st is
THE AFRICAN QUEEN
Europe,
progidies who hursi forth w i t h J
flawless
7 :15 & 9:45 • LC 25
for his compositions which have
Wilde's
,„.,
I uncled by student tax
THE BIG SLEEP
composers
which closed Ihe program) about
i,,l
"lUJUJT
(as they
petipic . m a u l i n g Ihoughi n was
inr tnhnr
whinei o f a long list of honors
He e l h o ven
genlle
St. V i n c e n t de P a u l , L a v a l
(,|
itions have had deep influence
A n d . very rarely, there a,e Ihe
Monday
PI,,,,,
and
went from great music to nonsense music, but it's fun lo listen
Ins first recital in a long nine on
l.ilas
opera to a piano transcription ii
society. Some-
Dennis H e i m l i c h , who played
PACE EIGHT
und
times 11 rises gently to the sur-
tutes our great
lace, acquiring
Reservations: M a n o i r d e s
Tristan
Varese,
on
charge
Wlien ,1 went from the original
Edgar
Arnold Shoenberg. His compos-
December 7 and H will he
devoled l o ihe music of John
Cage. On Friday night Ihe SFM
Group will perform his pieces
for small instrumental combinations. Saturday night's concert
will be the American Premiere of
B I R D C A G E , apiece for live performance with tapes. John Cage-
Helmrich Gives Recital
Couple needed to •
r o o m apt. on bush
Fireside Lounge
Monday, Dec. 4 at 7 p.m.
stale u n i v e r s i t y
y o r k at a l b a n y
Cowell,
Europe.
The Creative Associates, to appear Saturday night, are (left to right): Jan Williams,
Jesse Levine, James Fulkerson, and Edward Yadzinsky.
come to the
tile iiiternationa
III i n g r o
John Cage was born in Los
Angeles. He studied w i t h Henry
Institute of Philadelphia; he has
BAROQUE
HOUSING
-an ad manager
celebrating his sixtieth
also studied in Europe, Foss is a
CYC I F .
Ride Wanted West to Clu
Doc. 2 1 . Steve 434-J44H
world
birthday.
perform
famous compositions are 'JIMJ-
interested?
•iru u tru-o-
festival
Associates
Lukas Foss was born in l 1 ) ^ .
RIDE/RIDERS
WANTED
BIRDhere in
p r e m i e r e in Germany during a-
He is a graduate from ihe Curtis
L O S T : b r o w n suede si
Lost night o f Nov. 2011
my I.D. and keys 1 v<Please call 4 5 7 - 7 9 0 /
boll.
--an editor-in-chief
- a staff
%
The Creative
Lukas Foss will
was composed
Studio. I l received its
small instrumental ensemble.
$20 R E W A R D for re-tun
mineral sample in melai 1,1
vicinity of E a r t h Science i
Needed
for research. < (
Bernard Vonnegut
4 W <n,
be the performer.
Albany at the Electronic Music
M A P , an evening-long piece for
R o o m m a t e w a n t e d . ()•••
busline. $ 5 0 / n m n i h . <
\
will
o f Lukas Foss and John Cage.
PAC,
L O S T : Incabloc wrlstwatcn with stoi
watch
attachments
CJII n*
457-8740.
needs
Friday, December 1
in
CAGE
with
or
%.
t w o weekends
in the Laboratory Theatre o f the
1973
GUY & DAVE
first
December will feature the music
This Friday and Saluiday night
Married Couples - port-time job
-care for other people's children
or homes while on vacation.
Free foom and board. Work as
much as you want. Must have
car. One child okay. $100 a
week. Call 456-0998 9-4 or
355-8395 eues.
Friday, December I, 1973
'•' 84 l j
Come Ski S o l d o n , A n
A l b a n y State Ski c u
"• 1? ddyi
January 4 , 1973-Jamji
'V lb, 19,j
Price:
$312-transporu
"lead
accommodations,
taxes
iraluilin.
sklbag, p a r t y . Contact: Hone,,
>»
man-518.465-3706.
P r j n,
,,
DD-SUNYA.
" ,
«•
£>
T y p i n g done in m y I
Part Time Sales Positions Available.
Hours to suit your schedule. Must be
neat appearing and have a serviceable
car. Average students are currently
earning over $10 per hour. 4 6 2 - 1 9 6 0
L. F E Y to arrange a personal Interview.
HELP WANTED
264 Central Ave.
cor. N o . Lake A v e .
TERM
PAPERS
TvpEn
KIND-ANY
LENGTH
„FA
ABLE RATES. 4 5 9 - 7 3 ^
Want
devoted young
male
companionship? Good home needed for
Joshua—a 10 month o l d rhodeslan
rldgeback (that's a dogl) for a few
months. Interested? Please can j a n ,
438-4041.
White male k i t t e n lor
Christmas.
Please contact Debbie 45 /-8956.
$30 call
na leisure
SERVICES
viewpoint
WANTED
FOR S A L E - Z e n i t h T V . Double Bed,
2 Dressers, and kitchen tabic and
chairs—must sell call 472-93 74.
Magna vox portable
Peggy. 457-5186,
Minia-
Excellent pleasure horse and saddle,
cheap board near campus,
$325.
457-8929.
Exakta V X ( 2 ) . 35 m m S L R , LensesWestanar
1.28. 50 m m automatic,
Zeiss Tessar 2.8 50 m m , Culmlnar
1.45 135 m m , N o . 85 filter and
holder. Sell as a pair o n l y . $95 for
pair. 4 5 7 - 8 2 7 5 .
Stereo F M Tuner: Brand new. Save
m u c h . $60. 489-6661 a n y t i m e .
9
10 6
wr
SACRIFICE!
New Nordlca
Plastic
Buckle Boots Size 8'/i $39. Ron
Samuel 7-8741.
Cannot be t o o long removed f r o m
college environment. A n n u a l salary,
$5000.
Starts
Immediately.
Send
resume & letter explaining w h y y o u
want this j o b to SASU, 109 State St.,
Albany 12207.
inn we all want him to
play again
soon.
siaitlingJy effective in Us simphcriy
And lo Oscar Wilde.
But Ihe seg-
view/comment/preview/comment/p
Guarneri Quartet Plays to Full House in PAC
ran hendren
Young View of Washington
Another Vietnam
It gets to the point where the Guarneri Quartet is just too good to
be true. They.played a concert here Tuesday night which demon-
An e n t i r e generation of Americans has g r o w n up during an era
when this c o u n t r y was participating in a war viewed as unfort u n a t e at best and wrong at
worst. While the iong-term affects of t h a t war on t h e future
of the n a t i o n remain t o be seen,
o n e s o b e r i n g conclusion can be
d r a w n : It could easily h a p p e n
again unless Comrress moves to
assert its Constitutional responsibility t o prevent t h e waging of
war w i t h o u t Congressional approval.
T h e n i g h t m a r e of V i e t n a m has
been u n i q u e in our h i s t o r y . It is
t h e longest war in which we have
p a r t i c i p a t e d . It was waged far
from o u r shores and, for the
greatest part, in spite of o u r
national conscience. For most
Americans it was a TV war, a
ma m m o l h ,
surrealistic
army
maneuver waged nightly on the
seven o'clock news. E x c e p t for
' those w h o fought, and their
families and friends, it was business as usual fur the nation
And business, as usual, was
Rood.
strated their musical capacities, as well as their intestinal fortitude.
Arnold Steinhardt, the first violinist, was suffering from a multitude
o f colds, flus, and whatever else one can contract, yet he played an
acceptable concert. It was not perfect (some people hud the nerve to
grumble about the two scratched notes he playcd-probably the same
people w h o think the Albany S y m p h o n y is the world's best), but it
was still incredibly musical.
The Guarneri can play any tiling well. The Mozart Quartet is a nice
piece, one that challenges the intellect if not the pure physical skill.
It is a different piece to animate; the music must not only be played
accurately, but it must be played with an abundance of feeling. The
Guarneri seems to reflect over the music while it is playing it. The
pauses in the first movement
were
lmpeecable»if
s o m e o n e was
working t h e m by strings from above the stage it c o u l d n ' t have been
cleaner.
It was in the Bartok Q u a r t e t N o . 6 w h e r e the G u a r n e r i showed
their t o p form. It is a work of a different language than the Mozart.
It does not convey its message in 8-bar phrases and I o n i c - d o m i n a n t
relationships. It is a piece u n t o itself, and w i t h its five sister w o r k s it
c o n s t i t u t e s one of the most i m p o r t a n t bodies of c h a m b e r music ever
written ( m o r e critics and musicologists are j u m p i n g on the Bartok
b a n d w a g o n every d a y ) .
The r h y t h m s are the i m p o r t a n t thing, especially in the wonderful
third m o v e m e n t , where the d o t t e d r h y t h m s are t h r o w n about with
Eighth Step News
delightful results. T h e adorable violin t h e m e (using h a r m o n i c s - n o t
unlike the falsetto voice in a p p l i c a t i o n ) a d d e d a new d i m e n s i o n , o n e
of folksy h u m o r and c o m p a s s i o n .
S m e t a n a w r o t e e x a c t l y one q u a r t e t of any w o r t h . He
T h e weekend of December 1 &
called it " F r o m My Life," and threw into it musical portraits of his
2, 1972, The Eighth S t e p Coffee
Bcdrich
first wife, his court a p p r e n t i c e s h i p s , and his eventual deafness. It is
House will be the scene of a
truly, and the w a r m tones of the Guarneri are well-suited to it. David
special
S o y e r ' s cello is o n e of the m o n u m e n t s of c h a m b e r playing, and
For
J o h n Dalley's violin sound is mellow and w a r m . And last, but not at
all least, is Michael T r e e . What a violist!
T h e Guarneri Quartet
is
p r o b a b l y the best in the world at this
time. It was our fortune to have heard t h e m at this, the start of what
might be the greatest q u a r t e t of all time.
two-night
those
two
County
gala.
nights the per-
THINK FUR TOR XMASI
98
Central
Avenue
Albany
MUFFS
Call
436-7982
Cash
earliest
influences,
$1.50
blues w i t h a ragtime flavor
Hume.
McHugh
Pete
and
and
Dolly
will be retained.
will
also
donation
of
the
be
Mance
Refresh-
at
the
door.
performance
and
songs. Peter
Jack
on
perforin
contemporary
traditional
music. T h e
blues
the blues. Count .
barrelhouse
comprise
an
imporlan
Coffee
guitar, h a r m o n i c a and piano.
14
Willett
St..
and
ragtime
Mike Allen. Piesenlly operating
Spoors
mil of Boston, Mike Allen has
at
talents
coffee
house
of
rootage
colleges from easl coast to west
coast, including The Sword
d u o of Kurt Anderson and Jeff
the S l o n e
Morgan will present a repertoiie
Boston to the Coffee Gallery in
OH, WHAT A LOVELY
WAR!!
.il An
lien
,n
\IIII
Aib.i.
hill . r|< I.Ml .1 re clearly m
.-Wlh'hi <
I'he I n o r r s i t v H e a l t h
o| l h ,
9 : 0 0 p . m . A SI 50 donation
SeivH-i
asked lo help defray
I,,.in
expert
On S u n d a y night. December ;
the
Slar
Hand
in
Hyatl
and T u r k ' s Head in
_
Council urges thai lickels be
appealed lo ihe Parknu- Appeals
t 'ommit i
ll s e n . ,
ildenls
do
hill,. I,Ml
id S o I
i,i.s
Usual)
id Morn
upendous
I'he D a i l y runs . , u ulet-page
Hirili
Control
ill.
and
Nashville s o u n d . T h e remaining
M o s t council m e m b e r s feel
t h a t a n o t h e r strike certainly is
w a r r a n t e d , since t h e administration has gone ahead with enf o r c e m e n t of the controversial
rules recently passed by the University T r u s t e e s — the rules t h a t
precipitated t h e initial strike
action. Even since N o v e m b e r
13th c a m p u s security has been
towing and ticketing vigorously.
Parking in the main lots is still
segregated a c c o r d i n g to facultys t u d e n t s t a t u s . Parking is still
p r o h i b i t e d on the q u a d s . No
parking is allowed a r o u n d the
p o d i u m except for vehicles with
medical permits. And people are
still being charged for towing.
But a n o t h e r strike is clearly an
impossibility Strike leaders are
the first to c o n c e d e thai there
simply is not e n o u g h m a n p o w e r
available for a n o t h e r try
So
rather than do n o t h i n g lit op
pose t he new regulations, I bey
have asked s t u d e n t s lo "passive
ly resist," meaning thai I hey
w o u l d park wherever they de
sire However, (Ynlral Council is
q u i r k (o lei ll be k n o w n thai il
Will not lake any sort ol a c h o n
lo prevent lowing or I ieketing
M.ehi
I radii
P r o g r a m time on b o t h inglii-
Albany, will present the c o u n t r y
by Glenn von Nostitz
" W h e r e d o we go from h e r e ? "
T h a t ' s t h e q u e s t i o n a lot of
people involved in s t u d e n t gove r n m e n t here at S U N Y A are
asking in the a f t e r m a t h of the
recent parking strike.
Abortion Defeat
pi.in
panics himself on guitar, sink
House,
Although there will likely be
little public pressure to do so,
new limitations s h o u l d be placed
u p o n the Executive's power lo
wage war in the absence of
Congressional approval. If not,
the m i s t a k e of Vietnam can be
repealed. When Ihe new Con
gress convenes in J a n u a r y , the
Foreign Relations I \ m u n i t t e e s
of the House of Representatives
and the Senate ought .seriously
lit consider legislative means of
once again asserting their Con
slitnl ional responsibility
Now What Do We Do?
r
bei 8 & 9 , 1972, the Eighth S t e p
and
will
Spangled
be
House,
rail.id,
Washbo.m
playing
They
in
.n i
will
<
:§
Dec. I and 2
7:30 and 10 pm
LC23
i
$.50 with tax $1 w/of
j>™^^Ri^^Wtw^Wx ' / H K s^^&is^Hf'i J^Kf* P^Wv 3OTC JwOvUMDC XBEKT^
H u l l . d o .,,1(1 New
York
City
there will he no cover i"li.n>." '
siila
b o o t . H o w about t h a t '
md Ihe faces thai tell ihe story
only loo Well wail lor ihe bus lo
Metro W p o t i The a t t i t u d e o|
some worn.-,, here ,,l ihe univer
,il\
w.is succinctly aired by
Flu.ahelh Suns, a graduate slu
tleiu in Russian Studies, when
shr r o m n i e n l e d "Nhil 1 don'I
want any man lelling me whal lo
do with my body !"
a*
M
II
f o r a b o r t i o n r e l ' e r r n l services
Ouisule i l " - Michigan Ci
i as
the Novemtii-i
wind
brushes
down lYnin the Upper Pennin
p r'
I'rom0.,f() o n . il will he lice
an award-winning jjuisical-comedy-satire ° *
on world war I.
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
in
and
tunes
appeared
sponsored by peace project
Jimtm
part of his r e p e r t o i r e . He accoin
blues
contemporary
and
Decern-
will include material having its
(he
Lipscomb,
llopkin
Moreover, j us 1 as it is mi
possible to find a convincing
cause for Vietnam, il is tlilTieul!
to pinpoint a b e g i n n i n g of the
war and il will be equally difficult to pinpoint an end
We
eased into the q u a g m i r e in much
the fashion thai we are getting
oul under a blanket of mispei
c e p t i o n when few were aware
and during .i p r e o c c u p a t i o n with
Still
fewer
p i 'Sperily
win
ii Pearl liar
his favorite, although ihe Urn
b o t h nights will be at ( ):0() p.m.
will
Hume
Lightniif
Reed, he b e c a m e hopeless!) en
available,
Friday and S a t u r d a y ,
to Western
in
hearing
and close audience rap-
Kuri Anderson and
.
PAGE 2A
atlei
Time
Peter
infor-
hm
nighls are
performers,
the
ami
among In
which will be appearing on b o t h
The
but
were
tangled
8
i
Johnny
Admission will be gained by a
music
FUR
than is usual for the Eighth Step
House,
eounli\
Williams
ments
Albany.
McHugh
RUGS
Such
Hank
in
on the agenda, new and old: Hill
PUR
as
ner of Stale and Willetl Streets
held
All kinds of c o u n t r y music is
GLOVES,
heritage.
singers
form
Presbyterian C h u r c h at the cor-
SLIGHTLY USED FUR COATS
VESTS,
concert
port
Jeff Morgan.
LARGEST SELECTION OF S H E E P SKINS IN CAPITAL DISTRICT- $8 & up
d o n e in a more
Texas
will be
mality
S p o o r , and
HATS,
program
Coffee
BARB SKIH FURS
20 • 30% Off With This Ad
This special
in the
will be
WINTER CLEARANCE
FUR
Mike Allen's music reflects In
Western-cowboy t r a d i t i o n .
upstairs a u d i t o r i u m of the First
formances
Jack
MANY NEW FUR COATS
San F r a n c i s c o .
of music originating out of the
bor, no D-Day, a n d t h e r e will be
no famous memorials, like Iwo
J i m a , or t h e A l a m o , or battles h i p m u s e u m s t o remind
us
for m o s t of all,
we want to
forget. U n f o r t u n a t e l y , forgetting
s h o u l d be relatively easy-indeed,
far t o o easy.
When t h e generation of peace
we have been promised finally
c o m e s , t h e r e will be little change
here at h o m e t o distinguish it
from the d e c a d e of war we will
have e n d e d . T h e p r o b l e m with
t h a t is t h a t lessons are seldom
learned from mistakes which are
n o t a c c o m p a n i e d by sacrifice.
And if V i e t n a m was a mistake of
the m a g n i t u d e m o s t Americans
seem t o believe, it was nonetheless
not
a mistake
which
wrought great personal sacrifice
upon the majority (if our citiZens, "What
we obtain Loo
c h e a p , " T h o m a s Paine wrote,
" w e esteem t o o lightly; it is
dearness only that gives everything its v a l u e . "
Central Council Powders Parking Strike:
MCAT-DAT-GRf
LSAT-ATGSB
OCAT
NAN.. BDS.
• Small groups
•Voluminous material for home si
prepared by experts in each field
' Lesson schedule can be tailored to
meet individual needs Lessons
can be spread over a period of
several months to a year, or lor
out of town students, a period
of one week
• Opportunity 'or review of past
lessons via tape at the center
Special Compact Course* during
Weekends - Intersessions
Summer Sessions
S T A N L E Y H. K A P L A N
E D U C A T I O N A L CENTER LTD.
1212) 336-5300
(6161 638-4666
•*—
^
OAV!, EVENINGS WtCKENDS
_
B r a n c h . , in Mojor C,lio> in U.S.A.
n . r.i«»j S.«M( WM i»- «.!".'•«•*' " r " " "
FRIDAY, DECEMBER 1
1972
Willi I h e
suitcases
Inbi ul
Sun
lie side issue Ilia! eventually
,11 appear as [he real issue
is.egj.rdmg the belief in or
gainst a b o r t i o n , does a woman
live the right lo m a k e up her
WH mind on the issue, or does
verument have thai re
ll
sponsibiiily?
Morality
.,ml
Legality have always in p r m i i c e
overlapped, with varying results
Al'tei all. " k i l l i n g " a fetus is
really the same us killing with
narcotics t o b a c c o or warfare
SIM IM ly
negatively
sanctions
killing Willi .i gun without ;<
u n i f o r m , yel whim a policeman
oi .i Marine or an armed robber
m u r d e r s s o m e o n e , ihe said some
one is equally dead regardless o l
the m u r d e r e r or the justification
After careful thought isn't aboi
i urn like chain smoking,'
Such is the scene in Ann A)
bor, Michigan, where abortion
has mel defeat
• Preparation tor lasts required to.
admission to graduate and profoi
sional schools
• Six and tworva session courses
I N I (an lilh !.•«• B#™*l¥» N t
i h e girls
FRIDAY, DECEMBER 1, 1972
•
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
Helplessness
There are a lot of observers
who don't see the picture as all
t h a t bleak. T h e y claim the strike
was a success because security
was effectively prevented from
towing any cars. The c a m p u s
cops a p p a r e n t l y did n o t w a n t a
c o n f r o n t a t i o n with s t u d e n t s , so
they kept their shiny new t o w
truck hidden safely in the garage.
Nonetheless, there s e e m s to be
a deep-seated
feeling a m o n g
s o m e s t u d e n t s t h a t they are truly helpless in the face of administrative tactics. T h e strike illustrated how easily the administration can c i r c u m v e n t even the
m o s t c o n c e r n e d efforts of stud e n t activists.
Often cited by Central Council
leaders is at least o n e solid acc o m p l i s h m e n t of the strike effort. This was Ihe series of meetings which have been held between s t u d e n t s and administrat o r s , and which were aimed at
closing
the
"communications
g a p " and t o h a m m e r out changes
in the university
governance
system so that is would include
"meaningful s t u d e n t i n p u t . " T h e
major efforl in this regard was
the m e e t i n g several weeks ago
between s o m e t wenty council
m e m b e r s and a group of (op
university
officials,
including
President Beni'zet, himself, a | u n g
with
several
of
bis
Vice
President
bit tie of c o n c r e t e
substance was decided at the
meeting, bul il was agreed thai
inalt groups of s t u d e n t s s h o u l d
meet informally with administrators lor lunch periodically
New Proposals
\i b-ast there is o p e n discus
sum, which is o n e c o m m o d i t y
which was in short supply before
I be strike However, many conn
cil m e m b e r s are looking for
m o r e than jusl talk They waul
action. T h e y want l o see meaningful sludent participation in
important decision making And
they want to avoid repeals of
decisions like the o n e which
sealed
the
Tower,
which i n s t i t u t e d
future
regulations
in
opposition
from
ol
spile
Mohawk
ol
parking
severe
students,
which settle tenure cases with
minimal student input.
So they have begun developing
proposals which should increase
the amount of actual student
influence in the decision-making
process. The m o s t promising of
these calls for the creation of an
Executive Committee of
the
University which would a c t as a
" c l e a r i n g h o u s e , " b u t "not a rubber s t a m p " for all University
decisions directly affecting students. It w o u l d , n o t a b l y , c o n t a i n
a larger p r o p o r t i o n of s t u d e n t s
than the University S e n a t e , and
would be subject only t o the
veto of the University President.
Bad Faith
In spite of the informal atmosphere of t h e lunch time chitchats, there are still a n u m b e r of
council m e m b e r s w h o still wonder w h e t h e r the a d m i n i s t r a t i o n
is talking in good faith. They
were displeased with the performance of Vice-President for
Management and Planning J o h n
Hartley w h e n he appeared before Council several weeks ago
to answer questions a b o u t the
parking issue He allegedly tried
to " d o d g e q u e s t i o n s " and offered, in the words of one councilman, "glib g e n e r a l i z a t i o n s , "
And then there was the towing
of cars after the strike had ended
and before Ihe new regulations
took effect, a move which Connc il
C h a irman
Ken
Stokem
labeled an
"act of bad faith."
Everyone seems to agree thai
the efforl put into the strike was
worth it Parking may not be the
most i m p o r t a n t issue on c a m p u s ,
but s l u d e n t leaders see it as
"indicative of Ihe way s t u d e n t s
often gel s h a f l e d . " Their ultim a t e goal was to open c o m m u n i cations and to s t i m u l a t e real
change in the way decisions are
made at this University. It seems
thai they have been largely successful in doing this.
There was also a m o r e immediate goal
which was to s t o p
discriminatory parking and t o
overturn rules prohibiting park
mg on the quads and around the
podium
This remains to be
and
jack anderson
Washington Merry-Go-Round
Project Lost
One of the Nixon Administra
ion's pel projects for senior
citizens, "Project Kind," is now
a p p a r e n t l y Project Lost
The Lnidable program
was
initiated last August lo locale
older Americans w h o were not
taking advantage of federal food
programs It was a cooperative
efforl on the pari ol five govern
incut
agencies and Ihe
\itnt
( 'lOSS
Brochures were sent out in
Social Security envelopes, public
si-rv ice announcement*)
were
provided to radio and television
stations, and 7,IKK) newspapers
and magazines received press
lots
As result, t h o u s a n d s of
letters p o u r e d in
from old
people a r o u n d the c o u n t r y
Hul m a n y of the senior citizens
who inquired about the program
have so far received only a form
letter stating thai a Ited Cross
volunteer " s h o u l d " visit t h e m
soon
As for Project Find itself, its
appeals
to
older
Americana
a b r u p t l y s l o p p e d November In,
just a week following President
Nixon's landslide victory.
Project Find, obviously, was
motivated m o r e by pre udentin!
politics than by concern about
federal food programs The project, we have learned, was only
part of the President 's massive
campaign blitz funded in part by
the federal g o v e r n m e n t to woo
the rial ion's 20 million senior
voters.
In addition, the Nixon Administration sent notes to 2H million
Social Security recipients i in
plying the President was respnn
sihle for their bigger checks. The
truth, of course, is that Congress
passed the Social Security in
crease
over
the
President's
opposition.
Also to court Ihe older voters,
six government agencies prepared reports of what President
Nixon bad d o n e for the aged
The reports were then printed in
the form of p a m p h l e t s and distributed at a cost to the pubix
of over $ 2 5 0 , 0 0 0
PAGE 3A
.
preview/leisure/'preview/leisure/'previefr/leisure/'preview/leisure/'preview/leis
WSUA 640
Calendar
Creative Associates: a concert of contem-
Bazaar:
porary music, Lukas Foss's " N a p " w i l l be
from
performed at 8 : 3 0 pm in the PAC Labor-
Ontario
atory Tneatre. Admission: $1.00 w / t a x ;
Daycare Center.
bargains,
10 a m - 4
St.
old
and new
things,
Proceeds go t o Pierce Hall
O p e n p h o n e line t o t h e s t u d e n t g o v e r n m e n t
with :
$ 3 . 0 0 w / o u t . Sponsored by Music Council.
Lukas
Foss: w i l l
direct
Mike Lampert — President of S.A.
a spontaneous
Eric Joss — Vice President o f S.A.
music event called "Premiere" at 8 : 3 0 pm
CCGB Coffee House: featuring Rich
by Pam & Michael Rosenthal
Alternative
Features
Service
Kalidescope:
pm in Pierce Hall, 221
&
Ken Stokem — Chairman o f the Central Council
in the PAC Main Tneatre. No admission
Eddie and Bonnie Brauth, f r o m 9—12 p m
charge.
in the CC Assembly Hall. Enjoy the music
Phone in y o u r q u e s t i o n s this S u n d a y , 8 p m at 7 - 4 7 6 5 .
and free coffee!
Holiday
Dinner-Dance:
sponsored
by
Live Band: " G u y & Dave" f r o m 9 p m - 1
Italian Studies group, beginning at 8 pm
am
in the CC Ballroom. Tickets are $10.00.
in
the
CC
Rathskeller.
No
cover
Intercourse:
A live s h o w this W e d n e s d a y at 8 : 3 0 pm
charge.
CCGB
Coffee House:
featuring Randye
A l u m n i Quad F i l m : " K i n g K o n g " at 7:30
Kaye, f r o m 9 - 1 2 pm in the CC Assembly
pm,
Hall. Enjoy the music and free coffee!
shown backwards at 9 : 3 0 pm in the
Willi
Laura Silverman & the I n n e r Peace M o v e m e n t
discussing a practical a p p r o a c h t o P y s c h i c A w a r e n e s s
main lounge of Waterbury Hall (corner of
Western & Partridge). Free! Sponsored by
Sayles
International
House and Walden
Quad Board.
A l u m n i Quad F i l m : " K i n g K u n g " at 7:30
and Man's U n d e r s t a n d i n g of the Universe. Listeners
pm
calls w c c o m e at 7 - 6 4 4 3 .
in the main lounge of Sayles (Part-
ridge
between
Western
&
Washington).
Free! Sponsored by Sayles International
Colonial Quad Party: live band "Alabas-
Sunday
House and Walden Quad Board.
Nites:
D u t c h Quad Disco: Latin & Soul, albums
"The Shadow"
free w / Colonial tax; $.50 w / o u t .
and
at 1 1 : 0 0 p m
wine
given as doorprizes,
from
9
p m - 1 am in Dutch Quad flagroom. A d Dutch Quad Disco: hard rock and beer,
mission:
albums & wine given away as doorprizes,
S U N Y A I D ; $1.00 general admission.
from
9
pm-1
am
in the Dutch
$.50
w/
Dutch
tax; $.75
Tuesday
"The Gangbusters"
at 8:30 p m
flagroom. Admission: $.50 w / Dutcn tax;
Henway's:
&.75 w / S U N Y A I D ; $1.00 general admis
extras in the Indian Quad U-lounge. S.50
sion.
dance
with
"Reddy,"
beer,
Thursday
son,
Party:
featuring John Simp-
Hector and Fred, f r o m
30's
7:30-12:30
presented
noted f i l m
by
William
historian, f r o m
K. Everson,
1-11
pm in
pm in the Colonial Quad flagroom. Re-
LC 18. Free admission. Sponsored by A r t
freshments
Council.
and
Admission:
$.25
punch
JSC
will
be served.
members;
by Grug Shaw
Alternative
Feature
at 8:30 p m
Sunday, Dec. 3
Sunday Concert Hall:
with A n d r e w Palley
$.75
This week.
non-members.
Star
Spangled
Washboard
Band:
good
Mahler's 8th
t i m e music at the Thruway Hyatt House,
one snow at 9:30 p m . Free admission, no
minimum.
Rare 8i Great Films: from the 20's and
Movie Timetable
On Campus
IFG
Tower East
Towne
"Mephisto Waltz"
" T h e Big S l e e p "
"A Separate
FriAS.it: 7 : 3 0 , 9:.s() in LC 7
Fri: 7 : 1 5 , 9 : 4 5 in LC
(783 5539)
25
Sun:
Fri: m i d n i g h t in LC 1 8
7:30,
10:00
| 1 :()() j„
in
" T h e (Jieat Dictaioi "
Fri&Sat: 8 : 0 0
Fri&Sat: 7 : 3 0 , 9:4u
" C a r r y On D o c t o r "
"Godfather"
F r i & S a t : 7 : 2 0 . 9: 10
Fri&Sat: 8 : 0 0
Fri&Sat: 7 : 3 0 , 9 : 1 5
Hellman (459-5300)
" F i d d l e r on t h e R o o l "
"Clarence Cross-Lycd Lioi
Double Feature
LC-18
Fri&Sat; 8 : 0 0
Sat. M a i : 1 :00, 5:00
" B u t t e r f l i e s Are F r e e "
Bijou
" D r . Zliivago"
Cinema 7 (785 1625)
"Carry On D o c t o r "
Off Campus
"Carnal K n o w l e d g e "
1459 8 m i
Sat. M a t : I : 0 0
LC-7
SUNYA Cinema
Fri&Sat:
7:0(1, 9:0(1,
Cine 1 2 3 4
Peace"
Fri&Sat: 7 : 1 5 , 9 : 3 0
" E r o t i c Film F e s t i v a l "
" T h e African Q u e e n "
Circle Twin (785 3388)
(402 4 7 1 4 ;
Fri&Sat: 6:10, 10:00
Doiiblo Feature
" M y Little C h i c k a d e e "
(no s c h e d u l e available)
"Foreign Legion"
"Sometimes
" R i d e 'Ern C o w b o y "
tion"
F r i & S a t : 7 : 3 0 , 9 : 3 0 in LC-2
Fri&Sat: 8:10
a
Great
Madison (489 54311
Fox Colonie (459 1020)
Peace Project
Colonie Center (459-2170)
"Oil,
" L a d y Sings t h e B l u e s "
"Rage"
Fri&Sat: 7 : 0 0 , 9:30
Fri&Sat: 7 : 3 0 , 9 : 3 0
What a Lovely W a r ! "
Fri&Sat:
7:30,
10:00
in
^^^mmmmmm»f^>ai»^'^^-~-
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
(Jang
Thai
< otihlii i
Shoot Straight"
Fri&Sat: 7 : 2 5
"Valachi P a p e r s "
Fri:
LC 2 3
PAGE 4A
"The
No
9:30
7 : 1 0 , 9 : 1 5 ; Sat: 7 : 1 0 ,
There is n o w h e r e near t o p r o
portional r e p r e s e n t a t i o n of black
film critics, w h o are sorely needed t o sort o u t t h e whole business
from an inside perspective; s o we
think t h a t t h e first thing we
should remark a b o u t Lady Smf>s
the Illues
is that the largely
black a u d i e n c e in a t t e n d a n c e
when we saw it loved every
m i n u t e of it, cheering and hissing a n d talking hack
to the
characters o n screen t h e way
audiences used t o in t h e legend
ary age of silent cinema.
Records:
Nites:
" T h e Lone Ranger"
cover charge.
Hanukkah
Nites:
w/
Quad
You m a y n o t be a w a r e of it
( t h e w o r d gets a r o u n d slowly)
but blacks n o w c o m p r i s e 4 0
percent of t h e A m e r i c a n film-going a u d i e n c e .
Undoubtedly,
t h e ramifications of this have only begun t o
be felt, a n d already t h e effect
has been staggering. Superfly has
outgrossed
(financially)
every
o t h e r film for nearly a m o n t h ,
and n o t o n e single p r o d u c t i o n in
the r e c e n t black wave, from
Shaft on down to Blaeula, has
failed t o yield a tidy profit.
Lady is based on Biilie Monday's a u t o b i o g r a p h y , a n d for t h e
first fifteen m i n u t e s or so stays
fairly faithful
t o its source,
tracing (in a marvelously tough,
gritty s t y l e ) Biliie's
progress
from a 10-year-old cleaning girl
in a w h o r e h o u s e t o ;i I 5-year-old
h o o k e r . As s o o n ; she reaches
t e r , " beer and bash, f r o m 9 p m - 1 am in
the Colonial Quad flagroom. Admission:
" T h e y Only Kill Theii Ma
ters"
Fri&Sat:
9:15
Crossword Contest Rules
"Lady Sings the Blues"
This Week:
Saturday, Dec. 2
Friday, Dec. 1
Movies:
Nitty
Service
T h e N.tty (Jritty Out Band is
one of t h o s e groups that's been
a r o u n d t h e fringes for years
without
ever building up a
strong image in t h e public moid.
They were o n e of countless
c o u n t r y / f o l k rock bands around
L A . in 196H, a n d t h o u g h they
included J a c k s o n Browne at the
time, p u t o u t a basically fine
a l b u m , a n d even had a fair sized
hit single called " B u y For Me
the R a i n , " n o t h i n g h a p p e n e d .
T h e y ' v e h a d t h r e e a l b u m s since
then a n d built up a following ol
sorts, b u t never really broken
through. Until n o w Then 1 new
album, a 3-record sel called Wih
the Circle be Unlink en tUA
9 8 0 1 ) is, as usual, unlike any
thing t h e y ' v e d o n e before MV
also a smash h i t , having sold
2 5 , 0 0 0 in t h e first m o n t h ol
release, which is like 7ft 0 0 0 lo.
a single a l b u m
It's a c o n c e p t a l b u m , and one
t h a t fulfills their lifelong ambi
tion t o play real c o u n t r y music
What they did is r o u n d u p all the
legendary Nashville c o u n t r y slar>
who would eonsenl t o heme
involved, take t h e m into tin
studio, a n d have t h e m recul
their classic records with the
Dirt Band playing along, a n d the
whole thing d o n e on acoustic
i n s t r u m e n t s l o help create the
a t m o s p h e r e of a friendly back
porch j a m .
Among t h e living legends w h o
agreed t o appear on t h e allium
were Ear Scruggs, Hoy Acuff,
Mother Maybelle d a r t e r , l)o<
Watson,
Merle Travis, and
J i m m y Martin. They were joined
by d o b r o player N o r m a n Blake,
who has w o r k e d in t h e Nashvilh
studio b a n d s of B o b Dylan and
J o n nny
('ash,
and
Beechei
(Bashful Brother O s w a l d ) Kirby,
o n e of t h e m o s t famous m e m
burs of A c u f f a S m o k e y Moun
FRIDAY, DECEMBER 1, 1 9 7 2
maturity,
though,
t h e film
a b r u p t l y switches gears.
One d a y , deciding t h a t she has
h a d enough of t h e trade, Biilie
leaves a c u s t o m e r in his longjohns, packs a suitcase, a n d saunters across t h e street t o a nightclub that is advertising for a
dancer. Although she makes a
fool of herself as a dancer, a
broLherly piano player a t the
audition encourages her to sing,
and she opens that evening. T o o
ladylike t o participate in t h e
gross stageshow—singers are supposed t o pick u p tips in their
crotches—she is almost booed
off t h e stage, when—silence an
elegant Mr. Louis McKay presses
a twenty-dollar bill into her
hand. I m m e d i a t e l y , t h e audience
clamors, a p p l a u d s , a n d vies In
give her the largest lip. McKay
hangs a r o u n d after t h e show
with a gardenia a n d a dinner
invitation, and after a hit of
guarded flirting, Biilie is whisked
ID a fancy d o w n t o w n nightclub,
and then In McKay's tied, where
she coyly inquiws b o w he likes
his eggs.
In her b o o k , Killie described
her meeting with Lou is McKay
rather differently It sei-ms that
o n e night she noticed this hand
some y o u n g man asleep ;it ;i bar,
and a whore picking his pocket
Biilie told t h e w h o r e t o leave her
old m a n alone " l i e was n o such
thing, of course, b u t what did
she k n o w ' ' " gave McKay back
his wallet, and later brought him
Gritty
Dirt
Band
Boys,
well as a sensa
la
tional
young
fiddle
playei
named Vassal' Clements, who
does a s t o u n d i n g things with tin
old .standard, " O r a n g e Blossom
Special."
Despite initial fears, there wa;no friction b e t w e e n these has
tions of S o u t h e r n conservatism
and the long-haired Dirt Band,
once the basic affinity of then
approach t o music b e c a m e clear
T h e songs on Lhe a l b u m , like
" Y o u Are My F l o w e r , " "1 Saw
the L i g h t , " "Wabash C a n n o n
ball," " H o n k y T o n g Blues," and
"Wild wood F l o w e r " and I In
title n u m b e r , are all well known
c o u n t r y traditional
standards
While the original classic record
mg.s are in tittle danger of beinp
t o p p e d , 11 has been generally
conceded thai Ibis group die
about as well as any h u m a n
geing had a chance of doing
While perhaps not as i m p o r t a n t
to musicologists as the old Car
ter Family 7Hs s o m e of these
songs once appeared on, this set
has already achieved historic im
p o r t a n c e for bringing together
these legendary figures, many of
w h o m had never m e t or played
together before. The
Nashville
Tenessean 's prestigious
music
section hailed the alburn as " o n e
of the most i m p o r t a n t record
ings in t h e 1 !> years of the
Nashville music business
Puzzle
h o m e when h e t o o k sick.
What's lost is n o t s o m u c h a
result of t h e telescoping of time,
as a real whitewash of e m o t i o n a l
quality. T h e role-reversal in this
scene c o n f o r m s t o t h e m o s t conventional of H o l l y w o o d ' s sexual
biases, while a t the s a m e t i m e
sacrificing t h e strength, self-possession a n d rugged integrity t h a t
are present t h r o u g h o u t Biliie's
book.
On screen, Biilie is a flultery,
helpless, totally " f e m i n i n e " creature, who succumbs to junk
whenever her m a n isn't a r o u n d
to p r o t e c t her a n d k e e p her
h a p p y . G o n e are t h e succession
of bastards w h o messed with this
lough, intelligent w o m a n ; they
are all replaced by the s u p e r c o o l
and s y m p a t h e t i c Mr. McKay,
who is a c c o r d e d a seeming universal deference by black and
white alike, taking care of business for his w o m a n . He is even
c r e d i t e d with Billies t r a d e m a r k ,
the gardenia in her hair. T h e film
im plies n o t only
thai she
c o u l d n ' t take care of herself, but
t h a t she c o u l d n ' t even try
T h e chief surprise of t h e film is
Diana Boss's performance as
Biilie, which is always capable
and s o m e t i m e s just short of
s t u n n i n g , especially in t h e difficult scenes where she is nod
ding out on junk
Apparently,
Ms. Ross has been a r o u n d a good
deal m o r e than she has ever let
on T h e only limes her energy
Hags, in fact, is when she is
singing She tries very, very hard
lo imitate Billies inflections on
every n u m b e r , and all t h a t hard
work is a little t o o evident , her
singing
is t o o strained and
studied t o generate real power
On the other hand, the a u d i e n c e in
the t h e a t r e n o t only a p p l a u d e d
after every n u m b e r , but cheered
her on during t h e m ("1 hear you
talking t o me sister!"), a n d their
judgement on this m a t t e r should
carry at least as much weight as
ours
Lady Sin^s the lilue.s is n o t
simply a c a r b o n i m i t a t i o n of the
tissue-thin backstage films of
yesteryear It is o n e of the best
L-kstage films we
tissue-thin
n. It isn't Biilie
have ever
H o b d a y , a n d dial's a pity, bul
t h e r e are a whole l o t of worse
ways they could have gone
about it
As S a t u r d a y night
e n t e r t a i ntn e n l it can't
be
beat.
Student
Press
must
office
(CC
334)
by
to
the
Albany
Monday,
12
noon
N a m e , a d d r e s s , p h o n e n u m b e r , a n d social security n u m ber must appear on your solution.
Puzzle
solutions
will b e d r a w n
at
random
until
three
c o r r e c t s o l u t i o n s have b e e n c h o s e n .
Each o f t h e t h r e e w i n n e r s will b e e n t i t l e d t o a free d i n n e r
for t w o at t h e P a t r o o n R o o m in t h e C a m p u s C e n t e r ( n o t
including
liquor
and
tips).
Dinners
must
be
claimed
w i t h i n t w o w e e k s of n o t i f i c a t i o n .
N o o n e w o r k i n g on or for t h e A l b a n y
S t u d e n t Press is
eligible t o w i n .
S o r r y , o n l y o n e e n t r y per p e r s o n will be a c c e p t e d .
ASP Crossword Puzzle
1
2
3
'•
1 H 5
9
J4
1
123
26
32
35
2
•
13
22
2''
HHI
J ' •P3"
Nr
36
J
Jr
- Hf"
JP" -flflH•
'
38
Ul
t2
1"
1"
IB
1?
20
u
IB
W
111
25
e
7
2H
29
30
31
51
52
•JIlO
•J'.2
•J'lU
T?
ItB
53
W
i»9
w
w
•
59
WM5°
55
w
U"
60
By EDWAKD
ACROSS
1. Platform
5. Sober
10, Stupefied
14, Tolstoy Char-actor
15, Hear
16, Mislay
Sue Bushel
Mvliv.S.1 ( '.HIM
,1 0 i N T K i)M:; T R t A K s
u N u U 0 T 0 11 A 1 R N B i
a EJI 5 W ill A R 11 I T « R
H 1 »A
T Hi I IC
s finms
!'•
uuau
uuu
Nu
t L L j l s uuuuu C L|A
E|C H A R
aaaa aaaa
17, C h a p l i n ' s Underutudy
19. New York C o l l e g e
20. T r o j a n Hero
21". G l o a a i l y Covered
P r o t e n d i n g Shynena
Chinese I s l a n d
Musical
Work
25.
P r o t e g e of C a e s a r
27.
Roman
P
r
ovince
20.
Prevent
32.
Snakelike Fish
P r e t e n t i o u s Shows
Provides Opportunity
35. Mom and Dad
37. Stayed the D u r a t i o n
38. bunarui Co nun
Espy
1 1 1 . Revise
<|2. P e r t a i n i n g to P l i g h t
<n. Army Post
4U. Antenna
4 6 . Vase
4?. Prench Region
50. S a t i s f y
II:
Roclicllc Sthc-il)
c^•ll
submitted
JULIUS
Winners
N o v e m b e r 1 7 , 197 2
a P p g
be
f o l l o w i n g t h e Friday t h a t t h e p u z z l e a p p e a r s .
N o . 11
Contest
(Solution (o last week's pu/v.U')
hut
lartg
Pretty s t n
notified,
1 think
Whal the
album doe.s is solidify the bridge
between c o u n t r y music and the
young | o r " r o c k " I audience,
that
blinds like
Commander
Cody and Asleep at l h e Wheel
have already begun building
which, like any new source of
vitality, can only s t r e n g t h e n a n d
improve t h e music Whether or
not the fusion noes any further,
this is art i m p o r t a n t album by
any standard a m i absolutely
essential l o any fan of tntcii
tional c o u n t r y music
solutions
at
uuuuu urju uuuuu
UB3
aauwu man
uuuu U U U H U U B B U
auuauuu uuuu uu
ririacicKJH unutikjuu
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ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
M:
IV.
Tennis Uruut
Carnival Rides
M. Charles
Lamb
56.
57.
58.
59*
60.
61.
One Who Defies
Qo Away I
Mountain Range
Preview
Bouy Part (Fr.}
1
2
i
h
5
6
?.
8,
9.
10.
II.
12.
n.
18,
22.
24.
25.
26.
27.
A Pinch of
Poker Torm
Not Precise
Brazilian Stjaport
Skin Mark
Creek Letter
Overdue Debts
Peaceful
Thomas
Estrange
Sheep's Hair
British 31ave
Duceased
Actress t»lyrna
IndonusIan I Bland
Dutch Painter
Very rat
A i r l i n e Company
Encounter
Harmony
21. Bury
30. Balance S h e e t I t e m
31. hecaped from
hi
II:
yt.
Sources of Wealth
Knitting Term
36. Muelcal Division
Armed Forces Rank
Most Liberated
Interprets
German City
ParaBltic Insect
Soothe
On One* s Toeo
become Lively
Photocopy
Tliiai Sp.
body of water
P A G E 5A
C Davis: The Birth of the Cool
by Ariene Scheurer
Now that Miles Davis has
achieved an amount of popularity beyond that which is
usually accorded jazz musicians,
it is more interesting than ever
to look at the various stages
through which he has passed in
order to get where he has. His
recently reissued album The
Complete Birth of the Cool
(Capitol Ml 1026) allows one to
do exactly that. This album was
recorded about 22 years ago,
and it shows how much Davis
has changed. When this album
was first released it began what
has been called "cool jazz."
Therefore this is a very important collection of recordings.
The arrangements by Gil livans
are like cumulus clouds, large
yet soft and billowy. Davis'
playing is relaxed (sometimes
too much so) and natural. His
range is limited and his soles are
short. Sales by Lee Koimx and
John Lewis add value lo this
recording.
An older musician, Slcphan
Grapelli, lias made a new album,
Afternoon in I'aris (MI'S 20H7o).
Grapelli is a highly respected
ja/v violiiusl who first came to
lame in some exciting perloiniances Willi ihc greal guitarist,
Diango Khemhait. Giapelli has
giown consideiubly SIIILL' then as
lins recording makes evident. He
his a considerable amount ol
technique and Ins melodic lines
.ne extieinely complicated.
I hose aie all lliings thai can gel
in the way ol an utipiovi/ei hut
in the hands ol Grapelli ihev
become the means ol some vei)
good music. Hie rhythm seclum
behind him is capable ol
pioviding the sitppon necessaiv .
although lliey aie weak in sole
ability. Uui Giapelli moie than
compensates for that, making lliis
an album woilli its maoney.
In a uewei vein is Stanley
Turiinlin's Clurrv 1(11 (i()l7|. I
did not really expei i much liom
lliis lecordmg. because much ol
uh.it lie has done in ihe pasl lias
been we.nils coinnieici.il liui
this mixture of four swinging
tunes and two gentle ballads
comes off beautifully. Vibraphonist Milt Jackson is buoyant
on the uptempo numbers and
amazingly delicate on the ballads
ind very inventive on everything. Turrentine has a pleasingly warm and gruff tone on
tenor and although there is
nothing very deep in what he
plays, his hearty swinging performance is a joy to listen to.
Pianist Bob James, bassist Ron
C a r t e r , a n d drummer Bill
Cobham combine to make a
crack rhythm section. The sum
total of the various components
in this album is a big plus.
Groove Holmes' Night (Hider
(Groove Merchant GM5I2) tries
10
cash jn
tunes, and in doing so sacrifices
all artistic qualities. Holmes can
play with a lot of drive if. he
wishes, as is evident on "One
Mint Julep" and "Pure Sugar
Cane". But too much room is
given to such dead wood as "Go
Away Little Girl" and "It's
Going To Take Some Time"
while Holmes is almost crowded
out by the heavy handed rhythm
team. On the other hand, not
enough space is given to trombonist Garnett Brown and
Tenorist Selden Powell, both of
whom could have added quite a
bit to this album. Even so, this is
one of Holme's best albums in
the past few years and when he
is allowed to let loose his organ
playing is as good as nearly
anyone's in jazz.
"Life It theirs
In flight and scurry
The earth is theirs to
How
Mr.
Bradish,
who
leaches
drama courses in the English
depart me tit, is responsible for
bringing Gelber and Kopit here,
he knew them both when he
directed the I'laywtighUs Unit of
the Actors Studio in New York
(then headed by Klin Kazan and
Lee
Strasberj*),
in
MMilMiii.
Bradish recalls Arthur Kopit also
from the days when he taught at
Harvard and "Bin Arthur began
writing plays in my
Dunster
Drama Workshop." Kopit wrole
six plays before he left Harvard
with honors, and relaxed the
summer after lie graduated by
writing
an
international
hit
s h o w Oh
Dad,
Poor
Dad,
Mamma's
Uuna
you
in
Ihe
Closet ami I'm I'vi-Un Sad. It
was subsequently made into ,t
film with Kosabng Russell and
Barbara Harris
Indians,
aeroniing
to
Mi
Bradish. grew out of an under
graduate efleri of Kopil's called
Don Juan in leuix
Jack (Jelbei
who direct.. ..• well ,,N writes h.i*
knows
warmth
the clouds
dispel
The mountains
fade
The buds in spring do swell.
They live by me, they fly by me
They scurry and they die by me
And
never ask they why of me."
How am I come?
The tree-she knows
"The
flower sweetly
smells
The honeybee brings her to me
Then bear to me doth
come.
Then bear to cubs new life will give
Yet she herself will die
And
Flower
How
Jack
Richardson
whom Mr.
Bradish had hoped could make it
to
the
Stlldio
Theale.
lliis
Monday, is working on a number
of articles, (Ic.dli •s prevent In-,
coming. Mr. Rid
ilson I author
of
Call,,,, s
Ih.tnn) v
announced m Tuesday's . I.S'/'
tentatively M l i . - r ( u | . , | | , , . , , , | ) t
dwell"
The rivers run
nourished
by her
where she lay, will come in May
blood."
Not
"I" nor "me" can live
"we"
You do not live life
well
in
The earth is ours to
unity
dwuli."
All-Day Rare Film Fest
the world's
leading
personable man, Mr. Kverson is.
au I l i o n ly
on
film
classics.
Professor Kversun, who leaches
al NYU, has written .1 number ol
I
lis: 77i<- Urslrrn
t'he 11ml
C'll.y.v, '/Vie Films of Laurel unit
llunty,
the Films , . / ' Hal Roach.
and others, in Ihc- renter of film
nrlivily in N.Y. Born in F.nglund,
be came In the USA III Ihe eaily
1 HSU's and be-all ihe Theodore
Hull' Memorial Society in New
Yurk wind) speejah/es in rare
films of Ihe pa.sl. Mr Kverson
has (he world's lar^esl private
film collection and i.s an archive
popular
liuure
on
his
owl
campus, and is always willing l<
share lime with students Me wil
talk briefly ah.iul each ol III.
films he will he showing S'unitas
.mil there will be a wine recep
lion in room 12ti 111 the Fill.
Arts buildmu where lilm hull
can talk with him.
I oil
.-Ire
Fun-ills
I',-,,pi
(lOUti) Director
Malcolm
SI
Clair.
With Belly liroiis.,1
Florence
Victor,
Ailloph
Meiijoii. A youne Kirl, upse
after
her
mistaken
dismiss;
Iii these days ol
instant experts, Mr. Kversun is a
rarity
111 thai
he lives and
breathes hltn and knows more
about
11
than
anyone
in
Amen.-a
lie
has
helped
.,
number ..I film scholars, mill
parents
HWIl\ fl
her 1 • i e
c o i n , dy
eudl
•J. 1
II.-il •ri
Itroi SOI
(Jim Wl
1 l o l l ol
(,'hilclre
hlish •ll
club
s
In
\
Ride 'Em Cowboy
w i t h colonial quad tax card
...
e/i
7:30 and 9:301
$-50 w i t h o u t t a x c a r d
f
funded by student tax %
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
F R I D A Y , DECEMBER 1, 1 9 7 2
THE PLACE IS F R E E
One-nil questions will ;ilso he answered.
(GROUP DISCOUNTS) IS LOW
\
Dec. 4 at 8 PM in the Assembly Hall
<
SpunsiHi'd by (icngryphy Club
\
THE PLACE IS S H f l K E Y ^ S
CALL 785-3236 FOR RESERVATIONS
• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • a
• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
CARNAL
KNOWLEDGE
Friday and Saturday, December 1 and 2
7:30 and 10 pm
$.75 with tax card and ID
LC 18
$1.25 without
funded by student tax
F R I D A Y , D E C E M B E R 1,1972
PAGE 6A
TO GROUPS FROM 10-200
Atmospheric Science, Geography and
SUNYA CINEMA presents:
,.,
It,
/ t i l l •heart s F.ltl lilh
1 piodiii
l l u eeled
i HI; M
. i l l , l i s ell, w Hh ( i u
l.v K i l Si
r... 1 " r, r i . n i let t i - C o l l i e
Ii. H o n . l l , D a v i d N i v .
Kit v.
I'l.ir I.I II 1' i i u b o ii. A l f i . i : l i i i
l . u l i Is. ll .'. i i i i e i K 111 w n r h l l a
C o , p e r plays a x r i n n i i u i y , ' o
mill
seve i
d i ctinle 1
will
e ll 1 . r p r i s thi
111 O 11 1l l
in
l Jut l i e le 1 oll.erl l i o n les n o t .
hue ill) III. rely n i m b e e l i f h t .
Job Opportunities
with t h e Federal G o v e r n m e n t with special emphasis on
• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • '
:.
V
free
2u.vuaan>
SBIXETS "FRAT" PARTY
personnel director o f tire U. S. Civil
Service Com mission, will discuss
Geology.
:.
Abbott and Costello
LC 2
>
I III , . 1,
ll
Bell
Ce 1 . .
.,,I.,|.l
II.
al
csl
1 i 1)
i ll
(1 ' ' W O Ureal f i l m s
SOI1I l l .-no 1
I 1 '.1 1 I
< oil 1 ilila
7 : l l llm
I ' l o . h ceil
1
.•ml
D i n . 1 'll
• Mill..
II i w k
apol
i i o w an
leehl
Hen
r e i n i ki- I I I I h e
C h i n ll's M. , - A i l h 1, p i y / • ' . „
Pali' , W i l l i 'arv l b a n t , H o s a l u
Itlls: e l . It.i pi. I t . l l a t u y A m a
cap l e w s p a lei r. l l i e d y l l n s h i
tells I I I ' s i . i,y o l a I j o l r e p o r t .
I.s h o . ceil 1 • •in l l e l l l l i l l l i
win
1 ,, N •w Y . ill p a p .
• hi
run
oil
and
ll i'l'ii'l
IISIO.,,1
A l l . . 11V l o . n a n
My Little Chickadee
1 and 2
™
divorce, decides lo ru
• mi h o m i . S h e eoes 1
dry d o e l i r . i n d t h i s l.i'l
cm elude w i l h
1,
t'tfi
Wi
III i i . i n
unci
. K llesl
i-i.-.-n
I'he
•k.
H i • Sn . l a m e
ll
1 s lalll... \
Itel \ 111.
All .
-Aers.
1
mils
• nils 1 W., I I
W-C. Fields-
December
Donald Smith,
< LIBERATES
there is not a film book of mem
published in Ihe last lwent>
years
thai
doesn't
have
ar
acknowledgement In him in tin
preface.
An intense, enthusiastic am
I In Sunday, Dee .', al I p.m.,
An
Ciuii.il
begins it second
annua!
All Day Film Festival.
Six very rare films will he introduced and shown by Wm. K.
COLONIAL QUAD PRESENTS:
Foreign Legion
tion. It presents a marvelous
opportunity to see German
theater at its best.
For any further info: call
Ulrich R. Froehlick, phone j t o .
273-9502.
Mail 10
National Organization lor lliu Rolorel ol
Marijuana Laws,1237 22 Slreet Northwest
Washington.D C 20037
Vivian Lichtimstem
01 himself.
tour is also sponsored by the
Goethe Institute in Munich. The
performance in Albany is sponsored by the German Dept. of
SUNYA in conjunction with the
International Student Associa-
sheets ol stamps is? a sheon
Name
Address
Cily_
Slate
Zip
Life is ours
Kverson,
"Die Brucke", with a cast of
well-known actors comes for the
fourth time to New York but"
has never performed in Albany.
It comes fresh from its success in
Asia, Australia and New
Zealand. As before the present
Marijuana offering.
loday.lrte best wo can oiler you a"; stamps
and bumper slickers We want the legal./.n.'
issue public and conspicuous Thoii wo r a n
have a leal ottering
for now, send me
bumper stickers (Iwo lot SI) and
know
"The secret will we tell
but
translated in many languages,
made into movies and an opera.
The play consists of twenty-six
scenes', most of them rather
short.
am I come?
The earth-they
Playwrights to Speak
SUNYA will get a chance to
fire questions about the contemporary scene in American drama
at two eminent playwrights of
the
New
York
statfe,
when
Arthur Kopit who wrote Oh
Dad, Pour Dad, and .lack Gelber
of The Connection come to the
.Studio
Theatre
this Monday
{December
-1) at 8:00
p.m.
(Jaynor Bradish will direct the
informal panel, which is sponsored by the Knulish department.
The German Ensemble, DIE
BRUCKE, presents Woyzeck in
the Performing Arts Center at
Albany S t a t e
University,
Albany, N.Y., Main Theatre on
Monday, December 11, 1972, at
3:00 PJVt. (matinee) Students
$1.50, Adults $2.50. All groups
from Colleges and High-Schools
are welcome.
Tickets are available at the
Theatre Box-Office Phone no.
457-8606/7/8, beginning Nov. 5,
'72, or at the German Dept. of
SUNYA.
"WOYZECK" is a play written
by Georg Buchner. It is one of
the great dramas of the l"th
c e n t u r y , foreshadowing the
expressionism, which has been
am I come?
The sun-he
"My
on some popular
directed a London production of
Kopit's Indians.
.lack Gelber is best known for
The
Connection,
which
was
produced by the Living Theater
under the direction of .Julian
Beck and Judith Malina; the play
is regarded as a significant event
in the theater of the 19li0*s. He
has
also
written
The
Apple
Sq uarr.
The
Cuban
Thing,
Square
m the ICye, and most
recently (last spring) Sleep, produced at the American Place
Theater. Robert C'oover's plav,
The
Kid,
which
Mr.
Belber
directed, is now at the American
Place theater.
(Jaynor Bradish has been at
SUNYA since 1970. Before thai
lie taught at NYU lor seven
years, where lie established a
department of Dramatic Literatu r e ,
Theater
History,
and
Cinema,
at
I lie
Washington
Square College, While in NYU he
chaired the Playwrights Unit at
Actors Studio and was drama
adviser
to
Hill
and
Wang,
publishers
of
Dram..hook-,
Before that, from I'.IM UN,I, he
was on Ihe Harvard faculty. Mi
Bradish has written an introduction to a collection ol" plays by
Arthur Kopil
"Woyzeck" To Be Presented On Monday
Life ii mine
Lei no one say
I did not live It well.
ALBANY S T U D E N T P R E S S
PAGE7A
m
m\
»^i^
i
i
>-ri if •
LMTi %r —
There is coed volleyball every* Wednesday evening at 7 : 0 0 p.m. in G y m
C. Bring.a friend.
Immigration
The Covenant Players a traveling
drama group will present the Sunday
Morning service on Dec. 3 at the
McKownville
Methodist
Church.
Time 10:30 on Western Avenue just
west of the Thruwav.
STEREO
OFFICIAL NOTICE
Notice
to all students, faculty, staff
and organizations who have university rented post office
boxes.
I f back
rent f r o m the fall semester 1972 or
any
prior
semester
is not paid by
Dec. 3 0 , 1972 the box w i l l be auto
matically closed and mail returned. If
y o u have any questions regarding this
matter or if y o u wish to rent a post
s e e us • here's w h y # • •
the S U N Y A post office staff.
Students are reminded that
Friday,
15. is the last day t o d r o p
courses for undergraduate
Degree
Applicants
students.
Students >••
pectmg to graduate in May must file
a degree application
Friday,
February
9,
no later
1973
the
Geography Club travels to D i p p i k i f t ,
Dec
} 3. The trip is open to all
students
and faculty
interested.
Please come !u J meeting on Nov, 27
!
in SS 134 at 1 30 u> i i i Hal 7 3 0 6 0
t)- N o r m / 7956 by N m 28
Donald !
U.S.
than
Registrar's o f f i c e , degree i luar
nih
Civil
I ederal
M-f-iC
emj,has'S
.><>
The Placement
film
Office
w i l l show a
ol a sample job interview
M o n d a y , Decempei
hi-* every
with
Nov
dtmospl
on
1 1 , at 3 10 p.m.
nite
except
Candles w i l l
Friday
from
30 riiurs. through W e d . rule.
III.
Dr.
Dei 4 at Hpi
Paul
Manor
pf
the
Hebrew
University of Jerusalem w i l l speak im
The Military
Students calling other students
ire patients in the infirmary
Establishment
in
Brazil
on Friday, December 8 t h dl 2 p.m. in
',h
I D 33b
ise 4 0 9 - 9 7 2 5 .
Armenian
Student
I here w i l l be a J I M us:
pei :od l o l l o w i r u i Ins p u d e n t a l ion
Medical
M e d . Techs, or
Nurses
wishing
at the Bloodmobile
to
William K. Everson, noted film historian, presents great films from the
20's & 30's Sun. Dec. 3 , 1:00-11:00
p.m. LC 18.
James Leonard's Tuesday scene
study class will be presenting a number of shot scenes on Saturday Dec.
2 at 10 a.m. in the studio at the P A C .
Freell
The Crafts Fair
is here! Friday of
this week come to the back of the
Campus Center lobby.
F r o m 9 a.m.
on Wed.
to 4 p.m. for the Student Crafts Fair
Dec. 6, call Karen at 4 5 7 - 5 2 8 9 to
Exhibition. Tables will be set up at
the back of the first floor lobby.
Record Co-Op
Slate*
Quad
records!!
Ushers f o r Holiday
Meeting in Fireside
Dec. 5 at 7 p.m.
every Thurs. 6-9 in
Flagroom,
cheap
Freshman—Cm MI-
to
the
WHAT
Doc. 6. 1 1 1 2 n o o n . Meet the candidates
for
class office
Discussion next
behind Campus
Wanna edit Viewpoint
1973' H o w
abuul being ad manager? H o w about
being pari of the staff .it lame'' I! any
of
these SH it H h o m e , come to the
I .reside I n u n n e o n Monday Dec, 4 at
/
|).m
Ar.ilv
If
you can't
TO DO?
and f i n d out
hnw y o u i .m become involved.
What is a Fidler?
I huisda> evening
CertUM ,.1 1 HI
Sing needed.
Lounge. Tues.
Coffee
Hour rn t h e C C Palroon Lounge Wed.
1st floor CC Lounge by cafeteria.
same o f f i c e .
Emergency
junior
P. V.E.
GM»-Generat
MeetingReorganization to be discussed M o n .
Dec. 4 7:30 p.m. F A 126.
'
arrange scheduling.
nace, adrn. bldg. B-3. Completed applications should be retur
qualified
work
Lighting uf Channukah
opportunities
e,ovi>rnniem
Any
Technicians
junior
Come hear Janet Traver, research
biochemist for Sterling Winthrop Research Institute, speak on The Bible;
Fact of Fiction? on Friday. Dec. 1 at
7 p.m. in the Physics building lounge
1129).
Mr.
Shabbat
services are field every
week at Chapel House. Come for
Friday 7 3 0 p.m. Kiddush, Saturday
10 a.m. Torah reading. Kosher lunch
is served Saturday.
Applications are now being accepted for AM/A student assistant, A p p l i cations may be picked up in CC356.
Any questions call D. Elkin 7-6978
oi L. Fishman 7-3016.
in the Fducational C o m m u n i c a t i o n s
Center. R i m m S B 33
trtvis
Service C o n u n i :
discuss job
Apphca
tions and forms may lie obtained at
make
it.
i all
i! i / / 1 6 .
Holiday Sing December 10 at 7
p.m. in the gym. Reception immediately ( a l l o w i n g in the CC B a l l r o o m .
Sayles International
House and the
Walden Quad Board present the original King Kong this weekend. Y o u can
see tt ut 7 3 0 Friday night in the
mam Juunoe u l Waterbuiy Hall (Western Avenue and Partridge St.) or
/ -id Saturday night in the main
lounge ol Sayles IPan-idge Street
hi'twuen Western ,mi\ Washington),
till I l l d l l K )
•'.',/ 4(11,1)
F.1AJ0RS & MINOR\o
Winding
i.ills
3. We have the right price - see us with
any price quote - we may have a lower price!
and
up its series ol popm..'
Zpace Science
..I
May A
Kaftan Kav.«m .-,,
i "Planetary Nebulae
';
I
.il
l I H I ,-i in
Center 2lJ .Hid I >'
•-1
I,,I-
I)
'
25
STARTER"
ami p M ( m e
'••••"
it,
Mm >>•) ,i syiiatms
I " .c* (|ui«,li"ns
tnrl
.- .:•)».
,o
N
|,
Cathexis
p.m
d
lable
.-,
. .... , , I ,,
•
•, ..
•
rj
,,
• )[,'!
VI
The Japanese
I ' >• t ,.
'
Assoc.
I d d m anil Bonnie B i a u t h . U n Saturday,
Dec. 2 oui Coffee House w i l l
Randye
Kaye
An are wel
i miie to i*i<p>v the listening pleasure
,md h e n coffee. CC Assembly
Hall.
;
Thursday evening 8-12
he,
Beer, Liquor, Wine
• >''
t no P.
A t t e n t i o n .ill I'syi h. siwdt" '•
Psych.
Bfil
Coffee
' i0 \N OUR P ^
. |.
ne.ir Kit; ei i l l , UK e | u jh<' M M , I I ,
Undergrad
A husi
1 CCGB
tie shared by Rich and
,,,,
FOLK
the ( .impos C o n , . , < ,i!e(eo , ,i • ,1 „••
tejSpjSm-^^.,,
will
Sp.umh
Mr.nd.i-, . .•'
luesd.iys .H
this I i i d a y . Dm
House
ie„tnie
Ah mo-..' V\.IM!HH| ft, referee
intramural
volleyball
cunta. I Whale ,il
held ,.t / ' , ( l p in
ovei .i i iifi i;l (.ot1ee .H it e SpmiSh
Conversation
I
M *IH.I
ih. .,• M...
INTERESTED
Sensibility
,. .
,,\
Assembly
Food! Help us si'l it up and serve
hit ttii> Holiday Sing Reception
Call
Sue / 7812(1, lohn / /'MSB by I h u r ,
Dei i
' " ' I " •• • "> •->•• - / ' .
C o m m u n i t y ,ere wel< <
Come
M<< , ,,o.
, j><, ,, f d i„-ui
I .,,.•
'
A l l membe-s ol it,,
•:<,,.•.
I '•• -on
h --,,.,,. •.'
v
« " ' <"' ' '"
Peace Studies
f'oopli
A t; , ,• ol
,n D i d Age" o n I ntbiy
hei
I ><-u., \»KJI-U,..I l ' t f,
n • -,.,,.,.,
D
' l i n e s Mani
I the Si I N Y A
Psychology Depi
Diagnosis of Mental
Illness as Drama
Criticism
I .,.- I
I I.
AM1
Department
present ItlR f o l l o w i n g t w o te< ' i i . - ,
Di
Business Students:
'.nil ihve. I l
,
this semester, the Astronomy
D e a t h " on Mood.e, I >• i-ot« • ; . !
1 1 1(1 ,1 in also '', | ,. :.,. I . • '. -
"THE
Attention
a l l English
students
There is an important meeting uf
English Students Committee Monday, December 4, 1972 at 7 : 0 0 in the
Fireside Lounge. Please attend.
o f f i c e box call 4 5 7 - 4 3 7 8 or contact
December
1. We have more brands of stereo equipment
and more models to hear, than anybody!
2. We can clear up confusion, and
advise you honestly!
Community
Service
Students:
Papers must he in by Dec. 1 at the
Contact o f f i c e . LCB 30, 4 5 7 - 4 8 0 1 .
Remember that y o u are responsible
for having your agency send y o u r
grade to Mrs. M c K i n l e y by Dec. 1.
Information:
Francis M u r p h y , officer in charge of
the Albany Immigration and Naturalization Service, will be on campus
Tuesday, December 5, at 3 p.m. in
the Campus Center Assembly Hail to
discuss current immigration regulations.
1 lie
(mltmi
jnd
Aithui
Knpu
VILLAGE DRUMMER
Newsletter
2514 Western Ave.
2 mi west Route 155
*
Elections for
Central Council Representative
from
1 - Sherwood S7050 AM/FM receiver
$159.
M
54.95
1 - B5R 310X stereo turntable
2 - Lafayette Criterion 50 - 2 way 2 speaker systems 31.
50
ea.
63.
00
List Price $277.*°
only $218.5 0
Visit Any Or All Of Our Six Stores - Located To Serve Youl
COLONIE
ALBANY
NorttnMyM.il
7» Cwwiil A M .
^jg^
PAGE 8A
«W,
SCHENECTADY
141 ErI* K M .
M^U
GLENS FALLS
PITT8FIELD
» « UjgwW»n MrMI
43 S u w j j i r * M «
lOm
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
«»,«10
AMHERST
MASS.
, . ^ , « ,
FRIDAY, DECEMBER 1, 197?
Colonial Quad (one seat)
Dutch Quad (one seat)
Indian Quad (one seat)
Voting will be Tues. - Wed. - Thurs. Dec. 5,6,7,
on the respective Quad dinner lines
between 4:30 PM & 6:30 PM
FRIDAY, DECEMBER I, 1972
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
UETUSK
UUH€€LS.
FRIDAY
ESCAPE SERVICE'
Lv. A L B A N Y
4:00pm
Ar. N Y .
7 00 pm
SUNDAY RETURN
SERVICE*
Lv. N.Y.
4:00 pm
Ar. A L B A N Y
7:00 pm
Buses leave direct f r o m :
Administration Circle
Student Association
CC346
457-6543
GO GREYHOUND |
_^^^K£-^
and laava tin ilnvmy I I
PAGE NINE
News Briefs
GO HOME
L EWISTON, Maine AP
Americans deny the inevitably
of death and consider it to be
similar to going to sleep in a
comfortable bed, a sociologist
says.
It is something to be ignored,
sent packing off to a nursing
home to slip away and die offstage, says Richard C. Dumont
of Bates College, who recently
coauthored a book. The American View of Death: Acceptance
or Denial.
AFTER FINALS
FOR 25
SODOM, Israel AP —Centuries
before pornography and nude
movie scenes turned sinning into
ho-hum family entertainment,
this part of Israel waa the. swingingest wicked city in the Worm.
e
That's all it costs you to run our special
"after finals going home" ad
use it to get a ride or t o get riders
ADVERTISE NOW!
NEW YORK AP - The Daily
Express of London said Monday
that Martin Bormann, Adolf
Hitler's deputy in World War II,
is hiding on a vast Krupp estate
in Argentina, where he was
traced by the South American
country's secret service.
The article, by spy expert
Ladislas Farago and former Express foreign editor Steward
Steven, was distributed under
copyright in the United States
by the Chicago Tribune-New
York Daily News Syndicate and
appeared here in the Daily News.
The newspaper showed pictures of a thick-set, balding man,
said to be Borman traveling
under the name Ricardo Bauer,
being interviewed by an Argentine immigration inspector. It
.siad Bormann was photographed
at checkpoint Mendo/.a in northern Argentina when he crossed
over from Chile on Oct. 5.
" T h e American apparently
does not die," he said.
Madison Avenue image makers
and businessmen seeking profit
have combined to project the
American corpse as alive as
possible, and going to sleep in a
casket which is often explicitly
advertised as a comfortable bed.
Dumont said he still personally
denies death "at the gut level.
Although I am more conscious
now of the ambivalence surrounding death, it's no more comprehensible than it ever was."
He added that he personally
hasn't "solved any better the
notion thai I'll die,
"It's good for the individual Lo
know that ambivalence of confusing feelings about death are
natural," Dumont said. "It's
helpful in view of individual
adaptation."
Dumont said his observations
indicate that Americans, diverted by an affluent culture,
deny the inevitability of their
death.
And he credited the American
tendency to "run, hide and seek
refuge in group norms and
actuarial statistics...Lhat blur the
individual face of death" with a
kind of national delusion of in
vulnerability to it.
Farago and Steven said Bormann had been traced in the last
few weeks to the
Rancho
Grande, a huge estate owned by
Arndt von Bohlen-I lalhach c>r
llie West German Krupp family,
in the province of Sal la.
They
quoted
immigration
special agent Jose Juan Veiasco
as saying: "We have al this
moment
incontrovertible
evidence that Bormann himself is
there."
Nowadays Sodom is dullsville.
Prom the dedicated sinner, the
closed thing to an illicit thrill is
picking up a lump of salt littering the empty landscape, bleaker
than Death Valley.
Sodom in 1972 is a nature
preserve, although just what the
Israeli government is trying to
preserve is difficult to imagine.
There's nothing here except
salt crystals, lying around like
snow, but a sign proclaims them
"protected natural assets" and
swiping them qualifies as a sin,
or a least a crime.
In Old Testament days, Sodom
must have made Las Vegas seem
like a kindergarten. Along with
Gomorrah, which has vanished
from the face of the earth,
Sodom got top billing in the
Bible for unsavory repute. God
destroyed them both.
The scriptures don't make
clear exactly what was going on,
but Genesis says: "The men of
Sodom were wicked, great
sinners...The Lord rained on
Sodom and Gomorrah brimstone
and fire...and He overthrew
those cities...and lo, the tmoke
of thy land went up like the
smoke of a furnace."
That's pretty much the way it
is even now, much to the disappointment of tourists looking
for a little iniquity in the Holy
Land.
*****
NEW YORK AP - The stars of
"Peepalive," where for 25 cents
you can watch nearly nude
women on a revolving stage, take
their final bows today, according
to a spokesman for the real
estate man and attorney Edward
Finch.
Finch, uncle of f resident
N i x o n ' s son-in-law Edward
Finch Cox, was one of a number
of real estate holders identified
recently as landlords of buildings
housing sex shows and shops in
the Times square area.
The spokesman said Monday
that all such tenants will be
evicted from Finch properties by
next spring, either through lease
expirations or legal action.
The first casualty is "Peepalive." Other supposedly salacious businesses operating out of
Finch buildings included several
bookstores and a male sex
cinema.
, A statement from Finch (aid
Ihia eorporation had not leased
the property to the tenants in
question and asserted it had
spent more than one year trying
to flush them out.
In another development in the
city's campaign to rid midtown
of pornography, a deputy commissioner in the Department of
Consumer Affairs said his agency
would soon start making weekly
reports of action taken against
alleged offenders.
DIJON, France AP - The first
electric-powered automobiles to
look like real cars instead of
beach buggies or props for circus
bears will go unglamorously into
service next year in Dijon.
Only the standard engine and
transmission have been replaced
in a series of 80 workaday
Renault R4s that Electricite de
France, the stale-owned utility
monopoly, is modifying to serve
as repair and customer relations
cars.
It wants to push the idea that
autos that don't make smoke or
noise have grown out of the
futureland sections of amusement parks and into something
solid enough that its repairmen
can start driving in June.
Farago and Steven, quoting
secret service iliicumen ts,
claimed Bormann had been
living in various Latin-American
countries under several names
since 1948.
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PAGE TEN
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
FRIDAY, DECEMBER 1, 1972
FRIDAY, DECEMBER 1, 1972
_.
-
I
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
PAGE ELEVEN
Pups Meet Tough
GIGANTIC t
HOLIDAY I
^
SAVEUPT01/2 0 N M A N Y |
GIFT ITEMS
SHORT SLEEVE SHIRTS
nmirc
nc fiFCirN
OR LETTERS
uniivC ur
utoiun wii
BODY SUITS
REGULAR
$2.25-$2.5df
SALE $1.75-$2.W
REGULAR $5-$7-$9
MANY COLORS, STYLES
SALE 1/3 OFF
ALBANY STATE JACKETS
WERE $5-$20
SALE 1/2 OFF
•
'<;' ,
• '*•',
•'
•
ALL BOXED STATIONERY
y
Foe in Opener
by Richard Yanku
A young, inexperienced junior
varsity basketball team at Alb a n y will be playing their first
game of the season at H u d s o n
Valley on S a t u r d a y , Dec. 2 at 2
p.m. Coach Lewis h a s tried to
smooth out the young Danes'
p r o b l e m s in t h e final
three
w e e k s of the practice season, b u t
t h r e e w o r d s m i g h t s u m u p the
o u t c o m e of the first g a m e : rebounding,
inexperience
and
Vikingp.
T h e G r e a t D a n e " P u p s " are
n o t big in size. T o compensate for
their size, Coach Lewis has tried
t o teach t h e m h o w to b o x o u t
the bigger m a n , p r o p e r l y . In a
scrimmage
against
one
foe,
Fulton-Montgomery
the Danes
" h e l d their o w n " according to
Coach Lewis, versus the big man.
While t h e biggest m a n on the
Albany J V ' s is a b o u t 6 ' 2 " , the
tallest on F u l t o n was 6 ' 7 " . T h e
results of the game t u r n e d o u t to
be pleasing to t h e team and
C o a c h Lewis as t h e y gut their
share of the r e b o u n d s , offensively and defensively.
A l t h o u g h m o s t of the players
on the Albany ..quad have had
high school e x p e r i e n c e in basketball, only o n e or t w o of the
players have had college basketball e x p e r i e n c e . R o n T e r r y , from
C o l o n i e , is t h e only J V not
having played varsity basketball
in high school. J i m Eisenman is
o n e of possibly t w o players with
college basketball e x p e r i e n c e .
In the past years, HVCC has
been big in size, t h e y like to play
m a n t o m a n defense, and they
like t o utilize the press. Last
WERE 98'-$4.50
SALE 1 / 4 OFF
MUGS, CUPS, ASH TRAYS, WERE l79*$4.79
avE15%
BAR WARE
ACADEMIC DIARIES
WERE m i IO
AND DAY BOOKS
SALE W
MINERVA PRINTS,
WERE $8.49
MOUNTED FOR FRAMING SALEJMS
^ ALL POSTERS WERE $ioo$3.oo SALE in OFF
Hoopsters Open Saturday, Kglfo Hurt
|^^^WE5Tl!!N,7viNUE^"
Salad
ALLVOU car* m*KE • WITH
ALL DINNERS— CHOICE OF
PRESSING INCL. BLUE CHEESE j
ii
i
•
tmmmmmm^r
by Bill Heller
year, H u d s o n Valley played . 5 0 0
ball, b u t m o s t of t h e losses c a m e
against teams m u c h t o u g h e r and
o u t of their class. H o w e v e r , only
in t w o or three of t h o s e losses
did H V C C lose by 15 or 20
points.
T h e " P u p s " , h o w e v e r , can
c o u n t e r a c t their lack of experience and r e b o u n d i n g with quickness and t h e ability t o s h o o t well
from the o u t s i d e . J i m Eisenman
possesses b o t h of t h e s e talents.
He will, h o p e f u l l y , be l o o k e d t o
as q u a r t e r b a c k or p l a y - m a k e r for
the J V ' s . " C a n d y " L y o n s , alt h o u g h just o u t of high school,
also possesses q u i c k n e s s and the
ability t o take the o u t s i d e shot.
He c o u l d give the fans of the
Albany J V ' s s o m e t h i n g to look
forward t o as the season moves
on. Jeff Boyer, from L o c k p o r t ,
seems to have impressed Coach
Lewis o n his r e b o u n d i n g ability
and Bill Warner's b o o d outside
s h o o t i n g c o u l d present Lewih
s o m e p r o b l e m s when he decides
to pick t h e starting five. R o y c e
Russell baffles this r e p o r t e r and
Coach Lewis and his starling in
the game versus HVCC is questionable. R o y c e definitely has
the potential to be starting 1'or
ward, but h e has the t e n d e n c y to
usi- his t a l e n t s as a nuard, and he
d o e s n ' t fit at the guard position
in Coach Lewis' offense. Becuase
he ( R o y c e ) does this switching
from guard to forward and back
so often in practices, he may be
passed up by Lewis as a starting
live player.
cohesive u n i t of seven players
back from last y e a r . T h e y are
e x p e r i e n c e d , q u i c k , and all k n o w
h o w t o p u t t h e p o i n t s on t h e
h o a r d . T h e question
is can t h e y
s t o p S t o n y B r o o k , no easy t a s k ?
Pacing t h e o p p o s i t i o n is 6 ' 3 "
forward Art King and his playm a t e s on t h e front line: 6 ' 6 "
c e n t e r Chris R y b a and 6'4'* Bill
G r a h m s , b o t h good r e b o u n d e r s .
King has credentials all his o w n
i n c l u d i lg a
nineteen
point
average last y e a r and t h e M V P of
t h e Schaefer T o u r n a m e n t . Their
•"••ds are big, b u t n o t particu-
Na res
Kumquats
Habbits
EEP
r>-0
Simba's Ktiirs
STB-B
Krimmels
HNIM.at.-r,.
II"! U r n ; ,
Magic
Dec. A c t i o n
J J Johnson
The Dead
GM Boys
No. 4
Bells
Friends of Animals
The T h e
Birk loose
Faculty
KOK
l.eaitu
-: I K A
Is, I I I I M ,
\l.<
I.A I..,I..
Slush
II ,rdtu,
WSI A
h
i Hi,
Middle Earth
Bennie's Boys
Odd Srjuad
( 'ulassus
Desperados
Zoo C o m m u t e r s
All in all, the JV team has to
do alot of straightening o u t , and
if t h e y d o n ' t d o it by t o m o r r o w
•-2 p.m. -Hudson
Valley will
easily h a n d l e the " P u p s . " However, C o a c h Lewis has had the
-small team blues as a basketball
coach before and has had his
share of winners in small teams.
HVCC is really o u t of the Al
batty J V ' s playing caliber. T h e
y o u n g Danes return h o m e on
M o n d a y , Dec. 1, when M o h a w k
Valley of Utiea invades Hie
D a n e s ' den. The prediction of
outcome
for S a t u r d a y
after
n o o n ' s contest with HVCC is
HVCC SH
Albany (i.'l
Grid Picks f
Our Final Party of the Semester |
I Live Band -
Be sure to check our wide selections and low low prices
on gift and personal items
NEW HOURS FOR YOUR SHOPPING CONVENIENCE
FrL9-5i
S&4H
Mon.-Thurs...9-7:30
Beer & Bash
In the Blonde Bombshell
J E T S vs S A I N T S ,J,.|, fans :,.,
so ,I,,pressed lull Kami . u ,11 In
hurting severely when he.it, n
( H A N T S vs BKW1A1.S
Ii
ridiculous
that
Paul
Hi.juris
leant is going to lie denied a
victory by a hungry t i i a u i s team
('HAHOERK
vs
KAIDKHS
Heavy y a r d a g e by lladel will
make the Haiders feel e m h a r
rassed It's let d o w n turn loi
Oakland.
DETROIT
is
PACKERS
Hunter's arm is ijuesl tollable and
Landry's legs are not l.em Ii,,
lley will a w a k e n I roll! h e II, ,d i,<
lead Lions to victory.
KTEELKRS vs BROWNS
I
can't believe Cleveland won the
last
game
these
two
teams
played, but Krallco Harris is an
a m
slopatale
' Larry Kelly can
not c o u n t e r h i m .
j
EEP
Los T a m o s
SH 5
Dirt BaBs
Gophers
Bolsheviks
Straight 8
Avengers
Clarkstown
Xners
Irving
League III I)
III II
CI ,nk.s
\|,. ,..,„••
League II B
larly fast.
Doc
Sauers
sums
up
his
feelings a b o u t t h e g a m e , " I f m y
t e a m p e r f o r m s as well as t h e y
can, we'll win. T h e y ' r e bigger-w e ' r e q u i c k e r . If w e e x e c u t e , we
w i n . " T h e Danes have lost their
o p e n e r t h e last t w o years in a
row, b u t this o n e s h o u l d b e
different. Last y e a r A l b a n y beat
S t o n y Brook at h o m e by seven.
T o m o r r o w , d e s p i t e t h e absence
of KoHn, t h e G r e a t Danes s h o u l d
kick off a great season w i t h a
win in t h e n e i g h b o r h o o d of
77-66.
Danes Home Monday
League III <!
League III A
League II A
| y4Lr\BKST|R J
Coplas
IVwars
KB
ApLs
Maniac,.
Pugged
Allien Dukes
Lit lie Murder,
It;,1M
Men (I Pause
>
i
Dutch Quad Board
is on the move again with a " D I S C O "
j Saturday rtite: Latin & Soul
*
j
Friday nite: Hard Rock !
j
Featuring: BEER Friday & WINE Saturday
\
|
AND ALBUMS & WINE AS DOORPRIZES
j
{
time: 9-1 admission: 50c with Dutch Quad Card,
|
j
75'with SUNYA I.D. $1 without
j
I
Come to the Dutch Quad Flagroom Friday & Sat. nite
f
-ramrac™
Friday Dec. 1st
9:00-1:00
•x
8 x
:•:•
D
•:•
in the flagroom
|
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
Frogs T X O
TXO
Uglies
Independents!
Bui's
Skapis
Unity
Old T i m e r s
Gridders
Nads
APA
Dutchmen
EEP
Jean Vlajeans
MANY OTHER
UNADVERTISED SPECIALS!
PAGE TWELVE
year. Bob h a s a soft t o u c h , b u t
lacks Kolln's aggressiveness. Behind h i m is Harry J o h n s o n , w h o
c o n t i n u e s to i m p r o v e from last
year, and Mike Hill.
Sauers will go with B o b Rossi
and T r o c h in t h e b a c k c o u r t , and
Miller and co-captain
Reggie
Smith at t h e forwards.
6'2"
Dave Welchons can e x p e c t t o see
action at b o t h p o s i t i o n s , but
primarily at his m o r e familiar
guard s p o t . With e i t h e r Curtiss
or J o h n s o n in the p i v o t , the
Danes, at m i n i m u m , still have a
AMIA Basketball Standinqs
League I
Colonial Quad Board Presents
|
poisoning
incurred
by
coc a p t a i n J o h n Q u a t t r o c c h i and
Mike Hill. Both the latter t w o ,
and
hopefully
Curtiss
also,
should be 100% at g a m e t i m e .
If n o t h i n g else, Kolln's absence
will a c c e n t u a t e the key to a
successful d e b u t , and in w h o l e , a
successful year: c o n t r o l of the
boards. Besides losing his versatility, the Danes will also miss
Werner's fine brand of defense
and
those
all-important
reb o u n d s . Taking his s p o t will be
Curtiss, a seasoned vet from last
Injury a n d disease s t r u c k the
Great D a n e Basketball t e a m this
past w e e k as t h e y readied for a
tough
Stony
Brook
opener
t o m o r r o w night. Definitely o u t
of a c t i o n
are
center-forward
Werner Kolln ( m o n o n u c l e o s i s )
and r o o k i e Rich K a p n e r ( b o n e
chip). O t h e r assorted worries for
Doc Sauers are c e n t e r Bob Curtiss's a n k l e ( h u r t in the M o n t clair s c r i m m a g e ) , Byron Miller's
sprained finger ( s h o u l d n ' t affect
him),
a n d a b o u t with food
ONCE A KNIGHT ENUSTEP IN
THE KING'S PRAGOONS,
50c; Free with Colonial Quad Tax Card
FRIDAY, DECEMBER 1, 1972
ANP FOR THE PRICE OF A 6-fttCK
OF SCHAEFER BEERE, HE WAS
PR0MI6EP A SPECIAL TEST...
WHEREIN HIS TRUE TALENTS
WOULP BE REVEALEP...
Scluelm t)rwww, Nov. York dial Albany. N V., Balmnuit, Md , ur.ijh Valley, Pi.
FRIDAY, DECEMBER 1, 1972
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
PAGE THIRTEEN
If the fighting had taken place here...
Matmen Optimistic , Season Opens Here Saturday
by Kenneth Arduino
Wrestling returns to the Albany State gym this Saturday
when the grappiers from A l b a n y
take on three other schools in
the annual quadrangle meet at 1
p.m.
Albany which was 5-5-1 last
year finished second a year ago.
Defending champion Union and
third place finisher Dartmouth
College return along with newcomer RPI.
This opens the season for the
Albany matmen. Last year the
team started out strong but lost
five men around mid-season and
ended up a dismal seventh in the
SUNY
Championship. This
year's team has already set an
improvement on that finish a
goal for this year.
This year's team has already
received a blow. Top wrestler
Phil Mims was expected back
but he dropped out of school.
Cliff Wess, a returning letterman,
is under doctor's care and is not
expected to see much action.
High school standout, Ed Bellas
was expected to go out and
didn't.
But Coach Garcia still feels
that this team should he able to
better last year's record. He sites
the tremendous attitude and
fierce determination
of
the
team. This y e a r , the matmen
may be in their best shape ever,
as Garcia has had four scrimmages
with other schools. He was
forced to schedule these scrimmages as the team is short
handed and could not scrimmage
itself.
This is a perenial problem at
Albany even though the talent is
present. It is a mystery to Garcia
and the atheletic department,
why every year there are not
enough wrestlers to give the
starters some competition. There
are still openings on the team to
those who are interested.
Leading this year's team is
returnee Larry Mims. Last year
he had the best record in dual
meets on the team. Also returning is three year captain Jeff
Albrecht who came off a broken
leg to have a seven and two
record.
Last year's most improved
wrestler, Doug Bauer, also returns. After a year of experience
Doug should be one of the team
leaders.
The heavy weight division has
been usually a weak one for the
Great Danes, b ut th is year i ts
different. Albany has two top
contender-,
Rudy Vido and
Frank Villanova. Rudy was injured last year and will have a
fight on his hands for the top
job.
Dick Moody at 12(i and Tom
Horn at 168 are the other returning lettermen.
New men who will be stepping
into the top positions are Will
Katz at I 18, Ethan Grossman at
134, Jim Dickson at 177 and
Bob Nerlinger at 190.
How far the Albany team can
go will depend on how well
these men perform and how
many injuries the team suffers.
If
they avoid injuries they
should better last year's mark
but a few injuries could spell
disaster for the learn.
1
HAPPY
HANUKKAH
f
j
Swimmer's Goal: Winning Year
by Hob Rice
The Albany State swimming
team opens their fourth varsity
season tomorrow afternoon at
Pittsburgh.
The CJ rea I Da ties have eigh I
lettermen on hand and coach
Brian Kelly anticipates considerable improvement- "We have our
besl chalice yet for a winning
season," states the only swimming coach in the sport's sixyear history at (he university.
" F o r the first time, I think we
have at least a fighting chance in
every meet."
Albany's
l o p performer is
junior Len Van Ryn who holds
six school records in the free
.style and individual medley
events. The former Bethlehem
Central swimmer led the Danes
in points last year (111) and
scored the most points of any
A11) a n y
c o n teslant
in the
SUNY AC meet.
Staples, and butterfiyer and freestyler Mitcli Steinberg.
Other returning record-holders
are senior freestyler Marc Eson,
senior butterfiyer Pete Oerstenhaber, senior backs troker Bill
Marl, and junior breasts troker
Lew Puretz. Hart will graduate in
•January. .Junior freestyler Ed
Daniel, senior butterfiyer .faik
Schubert, and sophomore freestyler Ken Weber also are returning lettermen.
Rounding o u t the squad are
junior diver Bob Canter who
won the Nassau County one
meter diving championship and
placed sixth in the New York
State Inter-seelionals as a high
school senior; sophomore breaststoker Rob (Jeier; junior freestyler Sam Mandelbaum, and
sophomore
backs! roker
Rick
Masom.
Contributing to Kelly's optimism is what he calls " t h e best
group of incoming freshmen
we've had " He expects them to
provide important poinls anil
depth that has been lacking in
previous years. Hookies on the
squad are breasts! roker Bob
(lolian, breaslslroker and freestyler Dave Phillips, but lerflyer
.Jeff
Rosen, freestyler T i
The Schedule:
December 2 at Platlsburgh, Hi
at Buffalo; January 17 at Union;
20 at Stony Brook; 21 at H I T ;
February 'A al Potsdam; 7 at
Binghamlon, 10 at I'Vedonia and
Bndgewaler; 17 at Kings, 21 al
New PalU; 2 1 at Oswego, March
I A at the S U N Y A C Champion
ps a I (J
'
rrom
JEWISH STUDENTS' COALITION
j
j
Would you share malt liquor with a friend?
S u r e . N o w t h e r e ' s n o q u e s t i o n a b o u t it. B e c a u s e n o w m a l t l i q u o r h a s a (food
n a m e . B U D W K I S F i R . B U D W E I S F . R Malt L i q u o r is 100%-malt, malt l i q u o r (ni
o t h e r g r a i n s a r e a J d e t l ) . T h i s m a k e s B U D W E I S E R t h e first malt l i q u o r
Dec
3, Sunday- H a n u k k a h Party
I
Colonial Quad F l a g r o o m , /-.30 to 1 2 : 3 0
Refreshments and p u n c h w i l l be seived (fiee)
N o n - M e m b e r s - $ . 7b
I
Dec. 10- We have a group " n t r y in Holiday I
Sing. If you still want to join us, call Ellen or I
Andrea at 157 1019.
j
H a n n u k k a h Candle Lighting
the
NOW
*
OPEN
I
I
I
the umy, we also have intramural
banket
ball and howling teams active.
For Swinging
Singles
&
Ski Clubbers
\
I
I
I
JEWISH STUDENTS COALITION
j
Box369BBSUNYA
I
I
$5 m e m b e r s h i p fee- m e m b e r s receive discounts
Free food
Live band
Sounds of the 50's
^ e n o u g h to be w
called BUDWEISER £
764 CLINTON AVE.
FRIDAY, DECEMBER I, I " / . '
PAGE FOURTEEN
"Toial civilian ami mihtan,
casualties f,,r smith Vicinam
• 'I
' an> ili'.l.lmt) killed anil
I. ->-'«., HUH wounded, Ihe I S.
ci|inv,ileitis mi' li,l:l'_MKlll ih.nl,
I I .'.I.- ,,OI)ll wounded
Th.'.s,.
Inures ' . i , liascd on I l S u,,...,ii
tin-ill
l.i
' l'"url\ Ih, ,11., 11111 civilians wen
• seciHi-,l without trial mulct Hit
Phoenu program I an online. I,
Ihe Mi,,,,!,., ol h.l,„,,,.,I,,„i 11
Saiuonl
The I S equivalent
I ''.'OHO
01
,.,|||.,|s
III,.
„,|,,,|
,
Alaska
'live,
., mill
IH | , e ,
c m ol soulhe,n \ 1, I,,,,,,,
h.ive I,ecu sprayeil with del,
lint; chemicals I'll,- I S ,.,,utv„
lent I I 1,11011 ,,,,,, miles
The map ,1,,,..
rel'le, I
1
,1,1 !„
nil
,1
,|e
1
»
.1 .,,,.,,,,.
I'„p,
d e l . ,1,1'
Wind
I
s.uup.
would blow ,1, loli.inl . m l , , , „ •
'I. .'It,
'
s
UMU'JVf
Rocmmciwiii
CINE 1-2-3-4
—
A y r w m M E N S ) 0 M
IN CINEMA
LUX
UHY|
NORTHWAY MALL • RT. 5 i 1-87 - COLONIE
ACHIS Of l l l l t fAHKINC
tlCIIING
CONIIMPOR/tKI otcos
TEAR ROUND
tin COHOIIIOHIIIG
,,,,1 l,,,,|, ,1, '' '
ACTION Opportunity
epresentatives from the Peace Corps and
VISTA will answer your questions and pro-
i
T h r o u g h T h u r s d a y , December I, I p m in
the Campus Center First F l o o i L o u n g e .
By
Statistics (Hi war have a way ol
soundinit like just so many mini
hers The map above was ties
lulled In help Americans under
stand the magnitude of the Indo
rhina War by showine whal
would have happened had an
amount ol" damage equivalent to
thai done in the south ol Viel
nam been inflicted OH the I'n
lied .Stales.
Tile II
,1 the south Viel
ii.iinese population III thai " I I III'
r S is aboui I .11.a, so for every
.miLh Vietnamese killed, wound
ed or left homeless, I I .1 Anie,
leans would have nu-i cones
pundini; Tales if Hie I' S poind
ation had been as extensively
affected. The rcsultine. I'iuures
were then compared to Hie pop
illations of states in I he I' S
I
Ihose .slides with r o m p
hh
populations were so marked on
Ihe map
Since Ihe land ,
., ,s I .,.,.
the fifty five .ere-. ,,l deloll.il etl
hind are projected I'm Ihe II S
In eve,;,- .„•,-,. ,|,.| nl la I ell ,,, Hie
south o t Viel,nun The resit 1
,
ll'Oporllonal I lepiesent,
.howint! Ihe nupacl ol Hi, w,,,
"ii Ihe smallei ,01111m
llsell
The dala used
t h a t really is . . . malt l i q u o r .
featuring J o h n S i m s o n , H e c t o r and Fred
JSC M e m b e r s - $ . 2 b
by Jane Yell Kiely, John li.
Casterline & Judith Wifcun/AFS
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
vide applicationsCC Lobby, Mon - Wed. 10- 3
CC Ballroom, Tuesday- 8 pm special films
By appointment at the placement officeMon - Wed.
sponsored by the CLASS OF 1973
Al.UANY S'l UUKNT I'KEKS
FRIDAY, DECEMBER 1, 1972
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m
PAGE FIFTEEN
Number of Empty Beds Increases Here
by Diana M. Cyganovich
As o f September 3 0 , 1 9 7 2 , the
State University o f N e w York at
Albany houses 4 8 9 empty beds.
This total given by Mr, Garry
Petre, Associate Director of Residence, does not include Mohawk Tower. Why t h e number
of vacant beds? Where are they
situated?
At this time, these questions
are a little difficult to answer. A
survey is being t a k e n ; hopefully,
in a few weeks t h e precise answers will be k n o w n . But educated estimates can be given at the
present time.
All t h e quads are struck with
this p r o b l e m , each of t h e m has a
n u m b e r of e m p t y r o o m s . This
does n o t include t h e part of
Fulton Hall given u p to offices;
only residence r o o m s w h i c h are
standing idle are included.
A n u m b e r of reasons are given.
As in any o t h e r year, a n u m b e r
of freshmen decided n o t t o
come. According to Mr. Petre
this total is a p p r o x i m a t e l y 150
students. Since m o s t freshmen
live on c a m p u s this n u m b e r
makes u p for a b o u t one-third of
the resident s t u d e n t s for w h o m
rooms were planned.
As lor transfer s t u d e n t s , there
were less t h a t chose to live; on
campus 'his yenr as c o m p a r e d to
hist About HO0 transfers were
accepted both this year and last,
this year only 6 0 0 asked to be
housed on c a m p u s as c o m p a r e d
to 7 l,r> last year. T h i s decrease
has c o n t r i b u t e d t o the n u m b e r
of e m p t y beds.
A n o t h e r factor is the n u m b e r
of withdrawals and dismissals.
Twenty-six s t u d e n t s have been
dismissed; on top of this, fortyfive have w i t h d r a w n from the
University. A n o t h e r nineteen did
n o t show at t h e residence halls.
These last few are still enrolled
in the University, but have
decided t o live elsewhere.
The actual rate of c o m m u t e r s
is n o t k n o w n t o the housing
office; n e i t h e r is the exact
a m o u n t of off-campus residents.
It is s p e c u l a t e d t h a t m o r e stud e n t s m a y be married. Since
t h e r e are n o facilities for married
s t u d e n t s on c a m p u s , they must
live elsewhere. Because of econ o m i c p r o b l e m s , s t u d e n t s may
be transferring t o schools near
h o m e a n d are c o m m u t i n g . This
can explain p a r t of t h e reason
for vacant r o o m s . S o m e of the
funding for s t u d e n t s came in late
this year which may have kept
people from going to Albany.
Also on the e c o n o m i c side of
the picture is t h e fact that some
a p a r t m e n t s a r e c h e a p e r than
c a m p u s living. But this d e p e n d s
u p o n the quality of a p a r t m e n t .
T h e residence office feels t h a t in
o r d e r to find an a p a r t m e n t
which offers as good facilities as
the University offers, s t u d e n t s
have to pay m o r e than it would
cost t o live in t h e d o r m s
bring in a number of students,
but others will be leaving also,
have a tremendous effect o n the
amount of empty rooms.
This problem of vacant beds is
not o n e of Albany alone; a
Therefore, this will probably not
number of the State s c h o o l s are
having similar problems. A t the
present time, there is much research going on in this area.
Until the results are analyzed, no
more dorms will be constructed
by the State University s y s t e m .
The Residence Office here is
no different. It is trying to fine,
out w h y students do not like the
residence halls. If any particular
trends develop as the results are
returned, the University will do
its best t o correct the situation.
by Ellyn Stcrnberger
l l i i l i l
5
s* *—••-
Besides t h e p r o b l e m of freshmen n o t showing, there is also a
p r o b l e m of total decreased enrollment
Last fall the actual
h e a d c o u n t was 13,905. T h e projected c o u n t for fall of \91'2 was
14,450. Actually only 1.1,571
s t u d e n t s are enrolled at this time
a decline of 'A'.i'\ s t u d e n t s from
last fall.
U p until the past t w o years,
Albany has been a t increased
o c c u p a n c y . T h e r e are additional
reasons cited for this. O n e is the
opening of I n d i a n Q u a d . Also
the projected
increases have
been
lowered.
J a n u a r y may
Vice President Philip Sirotkir
There are 489 of these located around the University
R.A. Job: A Mixed Bag
-Never e x p e c t a n y t h i n g w o r t h while t o be said at a residence
meeting.
-Be ready t o instigate little
things t h a t will bring p e o p l e
together.
Learn h o w t o get
psyched for a d o r m p a r t y , s o
you can psyche o t h e r s .
- I f you have great e x p e c t a tions, a lot w o n ' t be (fulfilled....
it'll leave you lacking. It's nicer
to he surprised by success.
- E x p e c t lire alarms...false,
Try t o get s o m e sleep.
These five R.A.'s are babysitters, counsellors, d o o r - u n l o c k e r s ,
instigators,
nothings,
private
people, sociaiizers and " a i n ' t
m u c h . " It d e p e n d s on w h o
y o u ' r e talking t o . T h e j o b is
rewarding,
easy,
frustrating,
challenging,
like washing s o
m a n y p o t s and pans. It d e p e n d s
o n w h o y o u ' r e talking t o . T h e y
like t h e j o b because of the responsibility, because of t h e kids,
just because. It d e p e n d s on w h o
y o u ' r e talking t o . T h e bag is,
indeed, m i x e d .
name
get involved in a club that believes in
VO
\tt»*'
&
•
*
.Rio**^<o
Action!
U
WELLS & COVERLY'S NEW SHOP
AT STUYVESANT PLAZA
General Reorganizational
meeting
Monday, Dec. 4
7:30 pm
funded by student tax
continued on page three
Departmental Status by End of Next Semester;
Too Few Puerto Rican Professionals Employed Here
by
John
I.111I1.1II
Born in the aftermath of a tumultuous confrontation between Puerto Rican students
and administrators, the Puerto Rican studies program is expanding towards departmental
status. This event, expected about April by the interim director of the program, Antonio
Perez, will not likely attract the attention and hostility that the early cries for a program
met with in 1971.
Perez told this reporter that Moyer Hunsberger, dean of the College of Arts and
Sciences, authorized him to form a committee to develop the program into a department.
Perez is also working in a committee searching for a full-time director for the program.
What follows is a summary of the answers given by Perez to questions about the
program and his role in it.
**** *
P.Y.E. CLUB
•**£&
Sirotkin proceeded to review the tenure procedure. Each individual case is evaluated on
the criteria of teaching effectiveness, scholarly ability, University-Community service,
professional growth and development, and research. The case goes through several steps in
the department before it goes to a student-faculty committee in the college.
From there it goes to the University Council on Promotions. The Council makes its
recommendation to the President of the University. Sirotkin emphasized the point that
each decision along the way is simply an advisory recommendation. The President makes
the final decision, but usually the University Council's decision is accepted.
The decision goes from the President's office to the Chancellor and the Board of
Trustees who confer the actual tenure. Sirotkin said that the criteria of teaching
effectiveness is determined in part by student evaluation. One of the weaknesses of this is
no uniform method of evaluation. Each department has its own system. An effort was
made to standardize this across departments, but it didn't succeed.
Concerning student input on tenure, Sirotkin was careful to express the view that
"Teaching effectiveness is not synonymous with popularity." When specific cases of
popular instructors not being granted tenure were cited and questioned, he said that for
each popular individual for whom students signed petitions there were also students who
didn't like the individual. He also claimed that there are as many cases of popular
individuals getting tenure as there are popular individuals not getting tenure.
Puerto Rican Studies Director Says:
Editor's note The facts in this article are all true but the
have been changed to protect the
innocent.
\p*
Vice-President Philip Sirotkin was the invited guest at last week's Central Council
meeting. The topic was tenure.
Sirotkin informed the Council members that SUNYA presently has about 60% of its
instructional faculty tenured. The norm for Universities and four year colleges is in the
50%-60% range. It was his feeling that no more than 50%-60% should be tenured. He
explained that with a "no growth" budget you can't add new faculty and programs
without hurting existing programs.
----i~.~k
can't from page J
s o m e p e o p l e a r e n ' t going t o
w a n t you a r o u n d , r e m e m b e r i n g
t h a t s o m e people are.
--Expect an initial period of
loneliness and frustration; it's
c o m m o n . T h e length and denth
of it will vary t h e status of your
love life, a n d your familiarity
with t h e staff, t h e q u a d , and
y o u r section. E x p e c t as well a
s h o r t recurrence in J a n u a r y and
F e b r u a r y when e v e r y b o d y is
usually in a s t a t e of pre-spring
blabs.
Gox
Sirotkin Talks Tenure With Council
FA 126
Why do Puerto Rican students need a Puerto Rican studies program (department)9
Perez highlighted the needs of students who want a department formed soon so that
they may complete a major, not presently offered. He estimates that about 30 students
are prepared and waiting for the opportunity to pursue a major.
Perez also spoke of Puerto Rican students seeking something they can relate to in the
university. Puerto Rican students "realized there was nothing in the university they could
claim as then own " They want "to find out more about themselves in a university setting
. . . In any setting they need something they can indentify with." Perez noted that the
growth of the Afro-American studies department encouraged Puerto Rican students.
How ran a department be justified tor so few students''
Perez replied that the "number of (Puerto Rican) students is constantly growing."
About 300 Puerto Rican students attend SUNYA now, and according to a formula used
by the Educational Opportunity Program, about one third of the freshman students
accepted through the EOP must be Spanish surnamed, guaranteeing continuing admission
of some Puerto Ricans into SUNYA.
He emphasized that the program is for "the whole community." Despite the fact that
the Puerto Rican studies program has not publicized itself well, increasing numbers of
non-Puerto Ricans are taking courses in it. "I don't expect only Puerto Rican students
will minor and major in Puerto Rican studies," Perez said
The importance of Puerto Ricans as a growing minority in New York State was also
cited. Puerto Ricans comprise one-sixteenth of the total state population, Perez stated.
continued on page jive
Antonio Perez, Interim Director of the Puerto Rican
Studies Program maintains "great faith that the program
will be a department by the end of the semester."
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