Theater Hellman at the

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Guerrilla Theater
at the
City Cracks Down On Student Apartments
Hellman
Zoning Violations Cited
b y Stave Aminoff
T h e c o m b i n e d efforts of t h e S U N Y A Peace
Project and the " Schenectady Clergy and L a y m e n
Concerned," staged a small b u t persistent d e m o n stration against t h e use of a benefit screening o f t h e
film version of Kurt Vonnegut's "SlaughterhouseFive" at the Hellman Theater last Thursday night.
T h e group sponsoring the benefit w a s the Albany
and Colonie League of Republican Women Voters.
The demonstration took the form o f members o f
the S U N Y A Peace Project setting up still dramas
depicting the horrors of massive aerial warfare, as
people from the SCLC handed o u t leaflets. As o n e
participating person in the Guerrilla Theater put it,
"We wish t o illustrate the lunacy of sponsoring a
pacifist film whose purpose is t o point out the
horrors of devastation of civilian populations ( t h e
infamous Dresden fire-bombings) by a group w h o
would re-elect this decade's bomber himself."
b y Ed Deady
City Hall Correspondent
If y o u are living in an apartment off-campus and
•baring it with other students or friends, y o u r
landlord could b e forced b y the city of Albany t o
evict y o u .
Under the zoning ordinances of the city of
Albany, many sections of the city are zoned against
multi-family housing and consequently, d o not
allow t w o or more unrelated people to live under
the s a m e roof. A t Mayor C o m i n g ' s w e e k l y press
conference held y e s t e r d a y , t h e m a y o r explained t o
the ASP t h a t t h e city is cracking d o w n o n s t u d e n t s
w h o s h a r e a p a r t m e n t s in one a n d t w o family
residential areas because of n u m e r o u s c o m p l a i n t s b y
n e i g h b o r h o o d groups.
T h e r e have been r e p o r t s t h a t as m a n y as eight t o
twelve s t u d e n t s are sharing a single a p a r t m e n t in
s o m e s e c t i o n s of t h e city.
Look Elsewhere
A c c o r d i n g to t h e m a y o r , city officials are focusing
a t t e n t i o n o n t h e area a r o u n d M y r t l e , Morris, Park
and Main A v e n u e , from which t h e greatest n u m b e r
of c o m p l a i n t s originate. He advised s t u d e n t s w h o
a r e r e n t i n g in areas z o n e d against multi-family
residences t o look elsewhere for housing.
A c c o r d i n g to C o r n i n g , t h e university was n o t i f i e d '
last spring t h a t t h e city would be enforcing t h e
z o n i n g o r d i n a n c e s on a strict basis starting in the
s u m m e r m o n t h s , a n d t h a t s t u d e n t s should be
advised of this policy before they began selecting
a p a r t m e n t sites for t h e new school year.
S o m e s t u d e n t s have already been c o n f r o n t e d with
eviction n o t i c e s by landlords faced w i t h t h e possibility of high fines for n o t c o m p l y i n g with t h e city
Billy Pilgrim in the S n o w . A still from "Slaughter-House F i v e , " shown at
the
Hellman
for the edification
of Albany
and Colonie
League o f
Republican Women Voters.
Kurt Vonnegut was contacted in his Manhattan
h o m e and asked if he knew about h o w the film was
being used. When he said that he did n o t , and was
told, the phone allegedly went silent for a few
seconds. His c o m m e n t was: "Well, I'm flabbergasted. In a way, though, I think it's hilarious that
they would use that film. But I wouldn't be t o o
concerned about' it, this is just more Martha
Mitchell—3000 young republican rooting section—
kidstuff."
T w o of the area's pacifist groups were very
concerned about h o w the film was being used, in
w h a t promised to be driving ruin, a small group of
people brought the required props for stage theater
depicted on this page. Ed Hayes, a member of the
S U N Y A contingent and teacher of the Peace Studies
courses here this semester noted that, "We feel it's
basic not to let people coming to the theater have a
nice evening tonight because millions of Indochinese
aren't having a nice evening. They're being murdered by an air war."
Continued Hayes: "We feel that people should b e
confronted with the fact that Nixon isn't the peace
candidate he pretends to be, but instead is the man
the ki|ling wounding or making homeless of six
million Indochinese since he has taken office,"
Albany's Mayor Erastus Corning
F.S.A. Operating Cash Shrinks
by J . S t e p h e n Flavin
Guerrilla Theater Tactics. Crucifixion enacted during Harrisburg 7
trial. Photo taken April, 1 9 7 2 .
All went smoothly at the Hellman until three
persons who had paid the five dollar admission price
got bored with the politics of the film and, spurred
on by the alcohol in their systems, decided t o
articulate their o w n political feelings with s h o u t s
and threats. Cool heads on the part of the d e m o n strators prevented any unpleasantness that might
have occurred. One of the three was asked what h e
thought of the message of the film, and replied, "I
didn't see it, I came here to get drunk."
PAGE SIXTEEN
Our F a c u l t y S t u d e n t Association lives on b o r r o w e d m o n e y t o t h e e x t e n t of
$000,000
unnually.
T h e $ 6 0 0 , 0 0 0 is n o t a loan b u t
a line of credit for F S A t o d r a w
u p o n as n e e d e d , from t h e S t a t e
Bank of Albany. Lines of credit
are u n s e c u r e d ; n o t h i n g is mortgaged. Until this year t h e n e t
w o r t h of F S A has been e n o u g h
to cover loans a n d lines of credit.
FSA, sustaining losses for t h e
third c o n s e c u t i v e year, lists its
net
worth at approximately
$.H;n,()O0 Losses for fiscal year
I'.tVJ totaled $ 2 0 0 , 0 0 0 , a n d lust
year net losses a d d e d u p to s o m e
$;UH,()00. T h r e e years ago t h e
iit'l c o r p o r a t e w o r t h of FSA was
over $1 million.
Norbert Zahm, FSA executive
rlirector m a i n t a i n s t h a t t h e n e t
w o r t h of t h e c o r p o r a t i o n s h o u l d
have been $ 3 million, b u t ineffective m a n a g e m e n t (or as o n e
observer of t h e Board of Directors t e r m e d " m a n a g e r i a l stup i d i t y " ) has c o s t t h e c o r p o r a t i o n
and t h e s t u d e n t s w h o s u p p o r t
FSA dearly. T h e s t u d e n t s s u p port F S A t h r o u g h profits realized o n t h e various q u a d food
operations.
S t u d e n t s for o p e r a t i n g cash or
collateral. All of these p r o p e r t i e s
c o u l d be m o r t g a g e d or sold, a n d
are w o r t h s o m e $'100,000.
Z a h m does n o t see a n y real
p r o b l e m s in o b t a i n i n g F S A ' s line
of credit, claiming t h a t , " w e
may
not
get
the
whole
$ 6 0 0 , 0 0 0 , b u t we m a y n o t need
all of it. This year w e used a n d
paid back $ 3 0 0 , 0 0 0 . We need
less m o n e y for s h o r t e r periods of
time."
T h o u g h n o t c u r r e n t l y in need
of large a m o u n t s of o p e r a t i n g
cash (a result of i n c o m e from
hook sales a n d c o n t r a c t meal
siiles), FSA s h u e o f credit with
the S t a t e Bank of Albany ex
pires in O c t o b e r . F S A m a y t h e n
be forced to m o r t g a g e its re
niaining
properties,
including
Mohawk C a m p u s , Wavedy Place,
r
ii. ) Highland Drive, a n d several
houses rented to I n t e r n a t i o n a l
Even if FSA does retain its
credit line, t h e c a m p u s c o r p o r a
lion c a n n o t afford a n y m o r e
financially " r e d " years. C o n t i n u
ing losses in major program
11 e m s , t h e P a t r o o n
Boom,
B o o k s t o r e , a n d Faculty Housing,
as well as " b e n e v o l e n t
func
l i o n s " will have to be phased out
it t h e c o r p o r a t i o n is to reach a n y
level of financial security
F.S.A. Executive Director Norbert Zahm
Three Prisoners of War Come Home
As people left the theater, the light drizzle had
b e c o m e a torrential downpour. Nevertheless, the
c u s t o m s of the benefit screening were greeted "by
another still drama. On o n e side were t w o " d e a d "
people and a sign over them which said "Dresden
1 9 4 5 : 1 0 0 , 0 0 0 dead." On the other side were t w o
"dead Vietnamese" with a sign over them that read
"Indochina: 6 , 0 0 0 , 0 0 0 killed, wounded or m a d e
refugees under N i x o n . " In the center was a figure
dressed up as Nixon holding a placard in one hand
and the victory sign. T h e placard read, "Who Me?
Learn from the mistakes of the p a s t ? "
As the leaflet they were handing o u t explained,
"We are here t o challenge the morality of massive
attacks on civilian populations u military strategy,
and to challenge y o u t o see this specter of mas*
murder face t o face and know i i i m i of the horror o f
a strategy of terror."
ordinances. Investigators are presently canvassing
many areas where residents have complained o f
zoning violations and there are expected t o b e s o m e
evictions in c o m i n g weeks. T h e Mayor stressed that
this is n o t an anti-student m o v e m e n t o n the part o f
the city and that h e is n o t against students w h o rent
off-campus, but that h e d o e s feel zoning ordinances
must be enforced. Corning also stated that students
living under family-like conditions (unmarried people living together) would probably n o t b e affected
by the renewed enforcement o f the zoning rules.
Other Business
In other developments at the conference, Mayor
Corning explained w h y he was not working officially as an upstate co-ordinator for the McGovern
campaign. "Co-ordinators 1 responsibilities involve
very detailed and t i m e consuming work," the m a y o r
explained, c o n t i n u i n g t h a t h e felt this would conflict with his duties as mayor. He also s t a t e d his
opinion t h a t George McGovern is slowly gaining
ground on R i c h a r d Nixon d e s p i t e w h a t t h e New
York Times poll indicated o n M o n d a y .
In a r e s p o n s e to a q u e s t i o n c o n c e r n i n g T h e r e s a
Cook a n d t h e Albany T a x p a y e r s Association a t t a c k
on t h e city school b o a r d ' s allegedly extravti,fent
e x p e n d i t u r e s over t h e past few years, the m a y o r
could say o n l y h e h a d n o t h a d t h e o p p o r t u n i t y t o
analyze t h e figures involved, a n d thai Ms. C o o k
tended to exaggerate s o m e of t h e figures she h a d
presented in past e n c o u n t e r s .
As for t h e c o n t i n u i n g feud b e t w e e n t h e m a y o r a n d
the city firemen over an increase in salary and
benefits, C o r n i n g s t a t e d t h a t neither side seemed
likely tci c o m p r o m i s e a n d therefore, n o progress can
be e x p e c t e d in t h e c o m i n g weeks, T h e
fire-fighters
have recently received an increase in pay b u t are still
d e m a n d i n g m o r e j o b benefits.
Uncle Sam beats his drum to rune of Viet Cong kazoos. Demonstration of Guerrilla Theater at SUNYA during Nixon's spring
bombing raids. Photo taken April, 1972.
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 26, 1972
by J o h n V i n o c u r
Associated Press Writer
COPKNH ACKN
Three
American pilots released from
North V i e t n a m e s e prison c a m p s
(lew h o m e T h u r s d a y night and
o n e said t h e American people
must beat t h e " r e s p o n s i b i l i t y "
for bringing t h e remaining 4 0 0
m e n o u t of captivity.
Relaxed after a lunch on steak
and s c h n a p p s a n d a visit to a
royal palace changing of t h e
guard, L t . j.g. Mark G a r l l e y , Lt.
j.K. Norris Charles and Maj. Edward El hi* left C o p e n h a g e n for
New York after their first hours
o u t s i d e t h e C o m m u n i s t world.
T h e y h a d arrived in D e n m a r k on
Thursday m o r n i n g from Mos-
c o w , en r o u t e h o m e from Peking
and Hanoi with their a n t i w a r
cliaperones.
A Defense D e p a r t m e n t s p o k e s
mmi in Washington said arrangem e n t s h a d been m a d e for u t e a m
of military officials, including
physicians, to m e e t the pilots
u p o n their arrival at K e n n e d y
Airport in New York.
T h e remark a b o u t responsibility c a m e from C h a r l e s . Il was t h e
toughest, mosl politically oriented s t a t e m e n t t o c o m e o u t of an
airport
news c o n f e r e n c e b u t
n o n e of (he three pilots w o u l d
e n d o r s e a U.S. presidential cand i d a t e or offer criticism or supp o r t for American tactics in
Vietnam.
"II was m y belief a n d the
belief of tlie m e n with w h o m 1
lived in H a n o i , " said ('buries,
" t h a t if t h e war is t e r m i n a t e d
their r e t u r n h o m e will he cur
tain. I have c o m m i t t e d myself to
d o e v e r y t h i n g in my power to
work for their r e t u r n h o m e . "
Addressing himself to Americans, Charles said: " I p o n d e r e d
tin- q u e s t i o n w h o can h e l p m e or
is responsible for bringing tiiese
m e n h o m e . It d a w n e d u p o n me
t h a t jl was y o u , t h e American
p e o p l e . If y o u really want t^>
bring those m e n h o m e y o u can
do it. If y o u really want t o end
t h e war y o u can d o il.
"1 a n d s o m e of the m e n I left
have a ureal deal of faith ' a n d
h o p e in y o u , the American people, I call on y o u to help me in
he! pi u g to b ri ng these m e n
home."
Charles hud been in prisoner of
war c a m p s for nearly a year.
A question on h o w tlie men
might try to influence American
o p i n i o n wus replied to by Gartley, w h o h a d been held for four
years until his release 12 duys
ago.
Referring t o a s t a t e m e n t by
actress J a n e Fonda t h a i she
found t h e POWs backing the
presidential candidacy of Sen,
George M c G o v e r n , t h e filer said:
"Miss Fonda is not qualified t o
speak for t h e general o p i n i o n of
all t h e prisoners of war. T h e
n u m b e r of opinions a m o n g tlie
prisoners of war are as m a n y as
the n u m b e r of prisoners themselves, and 1 personally c a n n o t
speak for d i e general o p i n i o n of
all t h e prisoners a n d I'm sure it
just c a n ' t be done."
Asked about his own choice,
Gartley said: " T h e issues and
policies are not completely clear
to me. What is clear to me is that
the men w h o are still there m u s t
c o m e h o m e and whichever policy is the o n e that can bring t h e m
h o m e is t h e o n e I can support
tlie
most."
I
Pro-Abortion
by Mindy Altaian
Ms. Arlene Emery Brown is a
graduate student at SUNY Albany in anthropology. Aside
from carrying out her graduate
work however, Ms. Brown is the
Upstate Coordinator for the
Coalition for a Free Choice. She
works part time in Albany at the •
new office that the Coalition
Just opened on Washington
Avenue.
The Coalition is a political
action organization which was
started last spring in response to
what Brown terms, "a near disaster" in regard to the New York
State Abdrtion Law. Last spring
the abortion bill was repealed by
the New York State Legislature,
and the repeal then vetoed by
Governor Rockefeller. The Coalition was formed with the specific intent of saving the abortion
law.
According to Brown, the Coalition is different from other
abortion organizations in that it
is purely a political action group.
That is to say, it is nol an
abortion agency, a birth control
agency, or any type of environmental agency. Brown's objective is to "coordinate the efforts
of group and individuals who
want to preserve the present
abortion law." The abortion law
is the only issue of the Coalition.
The Coalition, in lhat it is only
a political action group whose
aim is to work through the
legislative processes, has previously worked primarily in the
downstate area, where it has
made contributions, through
funding and volunteer efforts, to
the primary campaigns of state
legislators of both parties who
voted against last spring's abortion repeal bill. The Coalition
has done much to help save the
abortion law. To raise such
funds was the first act of the
Coalition when it was formed.
And the organization will continue its campaign efforts
throughout the state in the upcoming elections in trying to get
its pro-abortion candidates elected or those candidates running
with right to life candidates
against them. Brown emphasizes
the need the Coalition has, especially with the election so
close at hand, to get its proabortion law legislators into
office. The way she explains it is
like this: that ir President Nixon
wins another term of office,
there is a strong possibility that
he will appoint Gov. Rockefeller
to a position in Washington. If
this occurs, Lt. Gov. Malcolm
Wilson will be takinu Gov.
Rockefeller's place.
According to Brown, Ll Guv
Wilson is a staunch champion of
right to life, and unless there are
legislators in the assembly to
counteract him. there is the
chance that the repeal of the
abortion law will go through.
Brown urges volunteers to
work for pro-abortion law legislators. In the Albany area, she
suggested working for Mary Ann
Krupsak, currently an Assemblywoman who is running for
the New York State Senate from
Amsterdam. Brown says that
those interested in working for
Mary Ann Krupsak may contact
Brown.
After the coming elections,
according to Brown, efforts will
be put forth to organize people
to lobby on a local level and to
also get a professional lobbyist
to work in Albany. Furthermore, she says, some work will
be done for public education in
terms of motivating people to
work for the law. They shoud
write to their legislators, and
apply pressure to counteract the
right to life groups.
Brown is also involved in setting up chapters of the Coalition
in major upstate cities, such as
Syracuse, Rochester, and Buffalo, in smaller towns, such as
Watertown, and also here in the
Tri-City Capitol District.
For the purpose of setting up a
chapter for Albany area there
will be an organizational meeting
Saturday, October 14, from 11
A.M. to 1 P.M. at the First
Presbyterian Church located at
the corner of Willet and Stale
Streets downtown. Brown emphasized that anyone who is
1 ''JiMJ^^^HP^^^^ J
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by David Lerner
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interested in the organization
should come, as officers will be
elected. Many volunteers are
needed to work in the office and
to form committees. The committees will take care of various
actions such as publishing a
newsletter, leafletting and getting exposure on the various
media. The Albany chapter of
the Coalition will be working
out of the same office that
Brown, as Upstate coordinator,
is now working out of on Washington Ave.
Also invited to attend the or
ganizatlonal meeting were the
women's liberation groups from
the Albany area, including the
SUNYA Women's Liberation
Group, the men's liberation
groups, and the public action
groups of various churches in the
area, and groups such as ZPO
and PYE. Volunteers are also
needed to work as day canhelpers during the organizational
meeting to serve those who
come with small children.
October is a JEWISH STUDENTS' COALITION FESTIVAL
OCTOBER 1- 7:30 pm Campus Center Room 315
General Membership Meeting
Guest Speaker: Professor Herbert Gerjouy
OCTOBER 7 7:30 and 10 pm. Lecture Center 1
Film: "The Fixer", starring Alan Bates
Admission: $.50 for JSC Members, $1.00 for non-members
OCTOBER 14-8:pm Campus Center Ballroom
Mixer with RPI, Union, Skidemore, Russell Sage
Rock Music and Beer
Admission: $.25 JSC Members $.75 for non-members
Community Service is a three
credit course open to anyone
except freshmen for a maximum
of two semesters. Its specific
function is referring interested
volunteers to any one of its 130
p a r t i c i p a t i n g organizations.
Everyone taking the course is
required to put in six hours a
week at his or her agency. There
is a lot of freedom in the selection of the agency and it is
assumed that the person would
want to work at least those six
hours since they chose it in the
first place. Over 2,000 SUNYA
students have participated in the
program, logging over 150,000
volunteer hours ranging from tutoring d r o p - o u t s , manning
switchboards, conducting surveys, teaching photography to
ghetto kids, helping out in hospital emergency wards, in short,
there is nothing that can't be
done if you have the time to
volunteer.
The real cure, first of all, is
free. Second, it is of beneficial
service to the community as well
as the campus, and third, it is
not so obvious a ruse as putting
a suit on a derelict to make him
look presentable. The cure is in
LCB 30A next to University
College and has been waiting for
its due recognition for two
years, and it's called "Community Service."
Community Service lias been
actively involved in aiding philanthropic organizations such as
The Albany Association for the
Blind; Headstart, The Urban
League, and The Senior Citizens
Bureau, to name four of the 130
agencies it serves. It also supplies
Along with the six hours, a
short paper is required outlining
the type of work done, the
history and structure of the
agency, the relevance, or lack of
Freshmen may volunteer. In
fact, Mrs. McKinley, Director of
the program, emphasizes that
freshmen are especially encouraged to volunteer (only not for
credit). They need not write a
paper, attend that session, not
put in a minimum six hours
though they are free to do so. It
seems that there are never
enough volunteers to do the job
that needs to be clone, which by
the way, does not include painting Dutch Quad.
Community Service will be
busy recruiting new volunteers
on Community Day, October
23, as well as showing a special
Community Service film while
the Administration will be showing all the visitors the freshly
painted Pool Room.
Hen way's Grand Opening A Smash
by Judy Daymont
Enthusiasm, excitement, and
satisfaction were the sentiments
I iia f reigned s u p r e m e at
Henway's on the afternoon of
this year's grand opening last
Saturday, September 23. The
eagerness expressed during the
ASP interview by Henway's
management was surpassed only
by the reception this unique and
truly co-operative venture was
given by the students of Albany
State.
Over 750 residents and friends
poured into the "Heart of Indian
Quad" and listened, drank and
danced to the music of "Skin "
The following night's entertainment, much to the delight of
Henway's patrons, was the folk
cimimiH of John Simpson.
How, do you ask, will this
seivice be able to escape the fate
of the Bookstore and Rathskeller? The answer is simple,
F.S.A. will not run Henway's,
but instead take a truly advisory
position on its Board of Directors. In fact, what has been
F.S.A.'s role? "(F.S.A.) has
helped us in any way we wanted," explained Brad Allen, comanager.
In essence there is no conceivable way that Henway's
could have opened without becoming part of F.S.A. According
to state law, a liquor license
could otherwise, never have been
obtained. The $5,000 debt accumulated was taken over by
F.S.A. and no stops have been
placed on bids for improvements
or innoval'ons within the limits
of good business practices.
The money story is as follows:
The $.50 cover charge pays for
the live entertainment and one
free beer, or coffee and doughnut. The $.25 charge for beer
and soda covers, in addition to
the price of the beverage, the
cost of the free food, supplies,
overhead, and payroll. All subsequent profits are put directly
back into Henway's and used for
improvements and payment of
their debt.
An F.S.A. bookkeeper will
balance the books, take care of
receipts and registers. No cut
will be taken out for administrative costs. II is estimated that
it will take at least three years to
clear the debt. As to what hap
pens with the profits then, it can
not be determined.
The rationale of the existence
of Hen way "s is perhaps questioned and argued by some, but
it is seen as crystal clear to those
involved with its production. In
a nutshell it fills the yap in the
university's need for high
quality, inexpensive, varied and
convenient entertainment. Not
only does it provide the service
of selling refreshments, but it
offers a place for social interaction, a requisite otherwise un
fulfilled by the Rathskeller and
Campus Center.
The idea of a complement to
our existing entertainment facilities was initially proposed back
in the 1970-71 school year and
had its roots in a recommendation as early as 1966. Original
plans for the "Satellite Union,"
located it in the basement of
two adjoining dorms on Indian
Quad Modeled closely after our
Campus Center, I he selling of
food, renling of recreational
equipment, and a place for students to "go" were its main
goals
However, it was not until April
15, 1972 thai Henway's opened
under the managerial ^uidence
of Tony t'ahill and Rich Jamison
and the watchful eye of Boh
Brodv. then dorm director. He
has left his mark indelibly imprinted on Indian Quad, for not
only was he instrumental in the
realization of Henway's but it is
for his famous dog, that our
night club was named. They
were just about able to break
even last year, though by no
means was its lack of financial
prosperity due to lack of patronage.
Saturday and Sunday night
festivities are open to the SUNY
Albany students and their
guests. To discourage non-university persons, one must show
their Albany college ID. upon
entering or be a guest of an
Albany student. In the latter's
case, proof of age is required to
be^able to purchase beer. If you
are a minor, and not a guest, a
college I D likewise must be
presented, subsequently you will
not be able to buy liquor. Although the price for beer, $.25,
is the same as at the Rathskeller,
there is popcorn and pretzels for
everyone iS Henway's.
Representatives for China
Tom
in each Tower Lobby
Flag Room for Indian Quad
otf>
Girls will b e w e a r i n g c o o l i e hats
times girls will be at stations are as follows:
Deliver at
OCTOBER 27-29 - Weekend Encounter Session and Congregation Ohav Shalom
Details presented at General Membership meeting October 1st.
In addition, Shabbat Services held each Friday, 7:30 pm in the Chapel House
join Jewish students' coalition
September 29 & 30
7:30 and 10 pm
LC 18
< $. 75 w/tax
Members Get Discounts To All Events
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
In accordance with the new
edict issued from the Administration ordering a public relations facelift for the SUNYA
campus, it is hoped that a few
hundred gallons of paint will
provide the panacea in strengthening relations between Campus
and Community. It's been suggested, however, that their remedies for poor community relations are misdirected—not an uncommon occurrence today.
it, to the student's expressed
academic goals and ambitions,
and overall impressions of serving the community. There is also
one mandatory evaluation session during the first semester.
No experience in volunteer work
is needed, not that any of the
agencies expect any. All that is
wanted is reliability and punctuality.
continued on page 12
OCTOBER 20-22 - Dippikill Weekend Retreat
Room for only 37 people
Sign up in CC Lobby October 2 - 6
PAGE TWO
volunteers to the Capitol, but
how charitable that is will have
to wait discussion for another
time.
iMMsjAifcmmM
OCTOBER 15- "Fiddler on the Roof" Theatre Party at Northway Mall
Transportation provided
Price: $2.50 JSC Members $3.50 non members
Tickets available (limited quantity) CC Lobby October 2 - 6.
Dues: $5.00 for the year
Students Service the Community
$1.25 w/out
m
DOWNTOWN
Alden Hall
(SUE GIBBS)
3:30-5:00
5:45
STATE
(JOAN STEIN)
4:00-5:30
6:15
COLONIAL
(ELENOR ALBANO)
4:30-6:00
6:45
DUTCH
(JENNIFER FLAHERTY)
5:00-6:30
7:15
INDIAN
(DONNA IVIARTELLATTO)
5:30-7:00
7:45
Girl wiiJ have, m e n u s
FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 1972
FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 1972
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
I
J
PAGE THREE
MWWIMI
NIXON:
"We Will End the War
Washington AP - Negotiations
between presidential aide Henry
A. Kissinger and North Vietnamese diplomats have reached the
"very serious" stage and Kissinger likely will return to Paris for
more talks next week, the StarNews reported today.
The newspaper quoted informed sources as saying negotiations have narrowed to the
point that the two sides are
bargaining over a political
formula for changing power in
Saigon.
It said the mechanism Tor setting up a new government is to
be lied to the formula President
Nixon proposed May K for a
cease-fire throughout Indochina
and the withdrawal of American
troops.
Kissinger's latest meeting with
the North Vietnamese diplomats
in Paris ended after two days.
That round of talks followed an
1 1-day interlude. Previously,
talks between the Kissinger and
the North Vietnamse had bceii
more than 11 days apart.
Both the White House and the
North Vietnamese have denied
that the two days of talks produced a settlement of the Vietnam war.
However, President Nixon told
an audier-e in Los Angelos Wednesday nig l,"We have prepared
the South Vietnamese so that it
is now veiy clear that they will
be able soon in undertake their
complete defense without oui
assistance. We are going to end
our involvement. We will end the
war."
A Permanent Change for the Good?
F. S. A.
Grows Responsive
Faculty S t u d e n t Association has recently taken t h r e e
actions which indicate a d e e p e r sensitivity to s t u d e n t needs
and a clearer a w a r e n e s s of its role in t h e c o m m u n i t y . We
applaud this incipient t e n d e n c y and h o p e it results in
improved service t o the c a m p u s in t h e long r u n .
H e n w a y ' s . Indian Q u a d ' s s t u d e n t p u b . is o n e beneficiary
ol I'SA's new a t t i t u d e . It is difficult t o o b t a i n a beer
license in New York S t a t e , and especially so for a s t u d e n t
rule o p e r a t i o n . FSA generously provided H e n w a y ' s w i t h
legal counsel and e x p e d i t e d its a p p l i c a t i o n . T h e C o r p o r a tion also c o n t r i b u t e d significant financial aid.
WHAT HAPPENED TO THE HAIGHT? * . • * - * • - * " — « * Sun F r a n c i s c o - At o n e l i m e it
had m o r e than a d o z e n head
shops and scores of b o u t i q u e s
dispensing n o t h i n g m o r e fashionable than heads a n d bells. T h a t
was in 1 9 6 7 , t h e year of t h e
Human Be-In at G o l d e n Gate
Park celebrating beards, long
hair, bare breasts, and d o p e . BuL
by 1 9 6 9 a n d t h e d r u n k e n ,
freaked-out orgy at San Fransisco's Glide Memorial marking
the " D e a t h of H i p p i e , " it was all
over
For those for w h o m it had
never begun, it dragged on for
several years of disillusioned pil
gnmages to t h e Haight There
were i n t e r m i n a b l e " w a r m San
Francisco n i g h t s " still to be
played t o inevitable conclusions:
rapes, rip-offs, and nightmarish
drug freakouts
But by t h e
seventies, the Haight-Ash bury,
much abused symbol for t h e
defunct flower child u h e n o m e
l o w e r East Cinema
n o n , was a s m o l d e r i n g sheil.
Scene of mass arrests, m u r d e r s ,
and public- gang bangs, it was
sealed off from t h e rest of t h e
citv. E x c e p t for t h e gravest of
crises, t h e San F r a n c i s c o Police
were keeping h a n d s off, waiting
for t h e Haight to b u r n o u t . And
burn o u t it did.
T o d a y , even t h o u g h t h e r e is
m u c h talk in t h e Haight a b o u t a
revival, Haight S t r e e t itself still
has t h e d i n g y , b o a r d e d - u p look
of a disaster area. O n l y t h e
hardiest
have
survived
the
e x o d u s in t h e late sixties of t h e
n e i g h b o r h o o d ' s l o n g - t i m e resi
d e n t s . And while it w o u l d n o t be
fair to say t h e r e is a n i m o s i t y
between
n e w c o m e r s and t h e
old-timers, s o m e of w h o m have
lived in the Haight for as long as
thirty years, nil t h e ingredients
for a c o n f r o n t a t i o n are present
T h e r e are, in fact, o m i n o u s
resemblances b e t w e e n t h e long
gone Haight Ash b u r y Independent
merchants
(HIP)-once
headed by H o n T h e l i n , founder
of t h e Psychedelic S h o p , t h e
Haight's
most
famous
head
shop and
Ha i gh t A s h bu r y
N e i g h b o r h o o d ( H A N D ) , o n e of a
m u l t i t u d e of n e i g h b o r h o o d im
p r o v e m e n t associations. Unlike
s o m e city-backed groups, H A N D
wants to see t h e Haight take u p
where it left off before all t h e
drug pushers moved in. Its store
front office is a clearinghouse of
survival i n f o r m a t i o n , free university course offerings, and flop
s p o t listings, and it's the h o m e
of t h e Haight -Ash b u r y Switch
board.
If not exactly flourishing, t h e
old Haight-Ash bury Merchants
Association, which used to clash
daily with HIP, survives After
struggling
through
a n for
them-dark
days of
flower
power, they view with resent
merit and a p p r e h e n s i o n a n y t h i n g
t h a t s m a c k s of u t o p i a n i s m .
C o m m e n t i n g on a H A N D proposal for a mall, Mendel Hersco
w i t / , T>8, Vice President of t h e
Merchants complains, "Where
would we u n l o a d ? I d o n ' t s u p
pose those people have noticed
it, but we d o n ' t have any alleys
t o receive shipments i n . "
Herscowit/., who locks his cash
register after each sale and works
his hardware store with t h e help
o f a t h r e e foot-tall
German
S h e p h e r d and a baseball b a t ,
criticizes as rootless t h e y o u n g
I — — — — —
people who are trying t o u n i t e
the Haight. Of o n e of the organizers, he says, " h e ' s in his twenties with no Lies; h e can drift
away as h e came here, a revolutionary. What has he g o t to
lose?"
But he concedes, " P e o p l e will
never get together d o w n here.
Personal bickering is s t u p i d
While we're bickering, t h e neigh
b o r h o o d is going d o w n t h e drain
and that's why t h e neighbor
h o o d is going d o w n t h e d r a i n . "
While the bickering c o n t i n u e s ,
however, there are signs of
health. New stores o p e n regularly, most of t h e m
furniture
stores, book
stores, antique
shops. And both t h e vacancy
rate and the c r i m e rate have
d r o p p e d -vacancies by 50% and
c r i m e by 6 8 % , a c c o r d i n g to of'fi
cials. Bus service which had long
been discontinued has recently
been resumed a n d m a n y resi
d e n t s say they are n o longer
afraid to walk t h e s t r e e t s in
daylight
What, exactly, t h e Haight will
b e c o m e is a n y b o d y ' s guess Before the pushers a n d o t h e r ripoff types moved in, the Haight
was at t h e center of t h e major
cultural m o v e m e n t s of t h e M \
ties. It was t h e h o m e of i In
famous Sun Francisco
Onu /.
considered by s o m e t h e flashie\
u n d e r g r o u n d p a p e r in t h e In \
day of u n d e r g r o u n d papers am
its gaudy b o u t i q u e s a n d heai
shops o n c e a t t r a c t e d lourisi
from a r o u n d t h e world Tin
poster renaissance originated am
nourished in t h e Haight w h e n
once you could b u y a Jeffersoi
Airplane or Grateful Dead Kill
m o r e c o n c e r t p o s t e r fur ten m
fifteen c e n t s . T h e y were printei
in t h e Haight.
But the printer w h o t u r n e r
t h e m o u t has s o u r e d on i he
aspect of t h e Haighl and m
longer prints p o s t e r s He lias
few slashed s o m e w h e n ' in In
office, but he'll only IIIM'U>
Lhem *vith collectors.
Perhaps in its reaction lo I In
deflowering of t h e flower gejn
ration, the Haight continues. i<
symbolize t h e cultural hist.or\ ••
lis time T h e only dtflen-ni <
between the Haight and ollnparts of ilic c o u n t r y '^ ' hai ' In
Haighl had to hve through ,i
T h o u g h precariously it
< •m
s o m e h o w to have survived
—
———
—————
—— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —
——
——
——
——
—
—
—
I
Homecoming '72 ^%21
<<~\
'Nostalgia "
Float applications for parade
available at CC info desk
JAMES TAYLOR
WARREN OATES
LAURIE BIRD
DENNIS WILSON
. , . . ,1IW, M lull
i|0«»rOiO»* (RJ <XJ>
Deadline Oct 11
SEPTEMBER 29 and 30
7:30 and 10:00
S.S0 w/state quad card
t>lut; Busur Kenton
and Fatty Arbuckl* thorti
PAGE
FOUR
*-C7
$1 w/o
%m
funded by student tax
•—•••••••••••••••••••••••••IBWl,t,t„,tM>„„,„„>,„*l
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 1972
"DON QUIXOm'.
. . MEL-VIN LA/RD ST/J-E
H> I. Will.I W i l l I, BRIGHT
Neglects Nation
for the Military
During lour years in office. President
Nixon has been preoccupied with summits
and confrontations, with the bombing of
North Vietnam and with fear for the defeat
of his protege. President Thieu.
He has had little time or energy lo spare for
the domestic concerns of American society.
He has allowed problems to fester and grow
worse.
Because of this neglect, many Americans
have become disillusioned and have come to
believe our society is in an irreversible decline. My own view is that our society is basically healthy and capable of sell-renewal. We
might all be surprised to see how readily
renewal could take place with an end lo the
war and with a new. more responsible
national leadership under George McGovern.
Since the end of World War II, the United
States has spent more than one trillion, four
hundred billion dollars for military purposes.
Despite the rhetoric about reducing foreign
commitments and altering our national
priorities under the "Nixon Doctrine," the
Administration continues to place primary
emphasis on military expenditures.
Although Mr. Nixon said that his 1972 and
147.3 budgets would allocate more for
"human resources" than lor military purposes, the military budget is increasing,
inflated by the costs ol the massive bombing
campaign in Vietnam. Assuming a continuation of present policies, the Brookings Institution has forecast a continuing increase in
defense spending which could reach about
$100 billion in 1477.
The fact that we are living beyond our
means — primarily because of extravagant
military costs — is obfuscated by glowing
references lo the GNP (gross national
product) and our so-called "trillion dollar
economy." Swept under the rug are such
salient but uncomfortable facts as that inflation and the Federal budget deficits —
amounting to about $125 billion during the
FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 1972
four Nixon years — arc prime contributors to
the overall G N P . Nor does the G N P take
account of an intern iiional balanceolpavments deficit of more than $30 billion in
1472.
The GNP is not a true measure of useful
productivity; it is only a crude compilation of
money spent lor purposes ranging from steel
production to the publication of pornography, from education lo gambling. Kven the
increase in crime is a stimulus lo the GNP,
since we have to spend more on law enforcement. On the other hand, the costs of pollution and a deteriorated environment are not
reflected in the GNP. The National Urban
Coalition estimates air pollution costs at
$13.5 billion annually and water pollution
costs at $12 billion annually. These are included in the G N P only insofar as we try to
combat them and then Ihey appear as part of
the "trillion dollar economy."
Coming down to earth, we encounter a
society deficient in education, transportation,
housing, health care, and community development. During the same decade in which
our G N P has more than doubled, our cities
have deteriorated rapidly while Federal programs designed lo aid urban areas have been
starved for funds.
At the same time, the Nixon Administration insists we can well afford its rising military expenditures. It is a travesty and an outrage that here in the land of the "trillion
dollar economy" millions of our citizens can
not afford and do not receive adequate health
care; millions of our children are denied adequate education; millions of Americans are
forced to live blighted lives in urban and rural
slums; and some Americans even go hungry.
A reordering of our national priorities is
long overdue.
For several years, Jewish s t u d e n t s have wanted to
establish a kosher kitchen on c a m p u s . With the c o o p e r a tion ol FSA, o n e has finally been set u p on D u t c h Q u a d
this year. T h e c o r p o r a t i o n d o n a t e d b o t h kitchen space and
$1 1.000 in funds.
Food Service has in t h e past made n o . distinction
between
purchasing
union
and non union
lettuce.
P r o m p t e d by an open letter to President lienezet (Sept. 8
ASP, p. ')) which explained t h e plight ol t h e migrant
worker and proposed a local b o y c o t t , Food Service j o i n e d
the nation wide effort.
For several years, the ASP and o t h e r media g r o u p s have
objected to FSA's indifferent a t t i t u d e t o w a r d s t h e community it serves. T h e r e have been food strikes, endless
talks, and a series of b r o k e n promises from F S A . N o w FSA
is at last giving consideration to s t u d e n t c o m p l a i n t s and
suggestions. T h e r e is still a lot wrong with the c o r p o r a t i o n :
considering the n u m b e r of years it has been in t h e r e d ,
there is no d o u b t it is in many ways badly m a n a g e d . (See
front page).
T h e absurdly long lines s t u d e n t s must put u p with in the
book store, t h e large losses t h e P a t r o o n Kooni suflers each
m o n t h , and t h e indifference which F o o d Service s h o w s its
s t u d e n t and full time e m p l o y e e s , all d e m o n s t r a t e t h e
c o r p o r a t i o n ' s irresponsibility.
T h e Faculty S t u d e n t Association has long been d e a f t o
s t u d e n t c o m p l a i n t s . Its recent generosity t o w a r d s Henway's and t h e kosher k i t c h e n , and also its b o y c o t t o f
non union lettuce is, we h o p e , the beginning of a
p e r m a n e n t change for the g o o d . But we remain (for n o w at
least) skeptical.
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A United Slates Senator from Arkansas,
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and
members
bet
on
it
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of
costing
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load
place
have
formed
assis-
purpose
for
don't
soon.
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handle
the
be
astro-
will
enough
larger
stamp.
that
there
telegrams
to
towards
selves
person,
the
about
1
to
ejuh
other.
and
Ihem.
ill a I
their
niggers,
us
ourselves
low
But,
word,
we
worry
of
us
business
less
thai
us,
other
hearing
think
m s l i l u t ions
towards
black,
don't
over
Ihey
allow
be
iinjusl
with
them
as
•olumn
> mv
C,ay
is
must
an
I
the
las!
to
the
don'I
want
f;irv
I
tins''
This
article,
I always
straights
as
wish
In
deal
to
k n o w
Ihey
are
gay
came
brothers
I
*V
r y "
lo
and
have
When
I said
did
Bui no matter the medium you
choose, communica e. It's worth
the trouble hecaus • your voice
will be heard. Ant that is the
essence o f
r e p r e s e n l ative govern
ment.
letter
brothers
41B4N1T ST47I CMiMA
article
the
FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 1972
you
and
w h o m
two
"ye
resorted
same)
censor
me.
them
lo
the
Why
not
gay
your
sisters
I admit
debated,
possibly
find
the
and
ever
been
looked
be
h o w
lack
for
stunned,
run
his
1 was
to
on
of
say,
a
re s l l i n n n
wen s o Inmn n r a i d , a n d s o
inn |ih d l i find e n • h o i l i e r
mndi d n pu I I I I h e l l I n l i e
friendly W l l 1 II11VI m i 1 s u s p e c t e d
Cll hidint, H i e r U»> Ml s s , l i e c n l l s e 1
w l III
r< meiTih •red
friendship
could
m ' n i l id limes like thnl 1
w nit
I n l i e y m i r riend, now,
Because
l h rouuh
llll
C l l limn
i pc 1, is one of
I n mi! IV ' ( ' , I n d
Mills1
I n nut if i l l
III '
experiences
in
is Ronnie.
life M y n a n
his
blurted
you
could
I
each
h i m
bed.
of
out,
h i m
Lell
It
one
if
a
long
he
girl,
tune
I
and
then
follow
1 tried
h i m
think-
soothing
nothing,
us."
the
a recent
The
Inie
to
and
I
bad
as
t h o n l y
Ihe
world
portant
has
around
with
only
Ihey
may
be
the
total
may
need
able
Lo
relate
periences
tion.
is
w o m e n .
ginning
such
of
to
discuss
T h e
ofand
m a y
ex-
in
order
Lo
be-
s o m e w h a t
spend
discussing
a
to
the
important,
how-
too
mere
play
as
m u c h
"functional
he
are
the
the
life
lias
each
t h e r e
not,
w o m e n
in
feel
tion?
her
experi-
group.
many
W h y
be
as
realize
problems
not
with
treating
of
that
c o m m o n a l i t y
basic
of
position
as a
ciety.
closeness
as
of
it
the
a
so-
sense
sister
y o u r
sense
means
of
help
of
identity
competimay
allowing
to
of
instead
Consciousness-raising
one
or
same
today's
your
her
unh o w
lime
impressions,
he
face
that
are
relates
w o m e n
they
A n d
same
honest
Whether
what
realizing
into,a
will
touching
n o w ,
that?
roles
the
Chances
and
could
rough
accepted
at
w o m a n
ences
"lady-
as
o f
- not
molded
inferiority.
to
dirty
a
be
is
to
far
was
had
in
and
type
was
res-
it
male
Really,
questionably
being
act
The
w o m a n
her
a
As
w h o
freedom
a
w o m a n
w o u l d n ' t
tumble
these
that
specific
placed
female
wished.
been
"catch
a
remember,
always
o f
o f
certain
to
the
and
kind
a
o f
she
and
m a n ?
source
attractive.
manner.
it
be
career
a
have
order
upon
the
Is
believing
lack
we
bach-
to
identification.
sure
herself
a
alrribute
as
l i k e "
is
into
herself
un-
situa-
or
o f
cultivate
ponsibility
con-
lonely,
w o m a n
work
in
her
and
daughters
A n y
physical
he
situa-
trust
in
be
a
which
w o m a n
causing
is
not
society
group
time
sessions
It
our
present
type
itself,
limiting.
im-
previous
her
requires
establish
in
of
she
her
wilh
This
group
lhal
m a n ? "
ev-
in
same
" h e l p "
appearance
m a k e
m e n .
a
her
the
m u s l
always
vnt\
a
they
way
sense
to
for
m a n y
that
confidence
so
the
really
brainwashed
back
A n
in
that
in
is
in
H o w
mere-
can
topics
of
m a n
happy
rriuhf
in
raising
understanding
A
ac-
Ihey
other
presence
consciousness
a
impossible
which
the
reluctant
while
m a n y
and
immensely
sex-role
w h a t
ibis
are
d o u b t e d l y
m u c h
k n o w n
w o m e n
its
m a i d
influece
social
Unfortunately,
there
Marriage
•
u n m a r r i e d
old
Family
w o m e n
w o m e n
thai
and
an
the
difficult
a
twenties
sidered
been
is a w o m a n
w i t h o u t
allow
Ihem.
to
W h y
We
female
time
and
molded
fers
for
just
thai
means
the
this,
but
presence
way
in
d o r m
f r o m
about
realize
their
of
told
That
a
sia's
a
help
this
w o m e n
themselves.
ano-
a setback
the
Kb
in
au
after
The
has so
far
United
Kremlin.
with
revive
ftus
which
the
C I A
is
lhan
the
U.S.
in
far
press
have
not
(.'IA
Ills
at
the
to
d o w n
critics,
Lhem
lo
avoid
of
in
reveals
the
White
thia
Kremlin
o f
mean
N i x o n
the
ban
we
for
ciled.
the
T o
at
are
told,
voLers
California
talks
more
may
job
thai
prove
Republicans
T u n n e y
cutbacks
in
least
on
part of
year-old
sloop
dor
with
The
K e n n e d y 's
identified
a
York
In
as
Mrs.
28
Lhe
personally
w h o
Kennedy
accompanied
deci-
al
the
lovely
were
not
appeared
Union
talked
brought
t w o
days
Leader
was
A m a n d a
Bur
year
N e w
old
over-
the
sena-
Lhe t r i p ,
by
at
their
sons.
told
to
us
was
by
story
time,
a
he
we
Senator
that
Senu-
definitely
Mrs.
himself,
along
out,
lady
not
Burden.
admitted
friend,
noted,
his
he
hut
wife
Exit
President
to
Hanoi
like
way
turn
All
for
the
Ihe
return
have
and
sent
to
wants
United
our
A
that
Palestinian
danian
travel
is
secret
lo
graceful
and
Leaders
with
report
guerrillas
officials
t o p
whenever
lhe
agents
priests
Jordanian
C I A
of
terrorist
their
assassinate
outside
lhe
Viet-
States
abroad
top
ders.
attempt
and
Christian
them
kill
and
prisoners,
disguised
and
direct
the
September
Muslim
trying
w o u l d
war
Lo
Disguise
Black
ders
he
of
Priestly
the
over
namese
is
Saigon
N i x o n
both
exit
held
with
for
between
President
to
has
talks
Bunker
the
negotiations
the
secret
Thieu.
pave
Ambassa-
Bunker
intense,
negotiations
as
U.S.
Ellsworth
group
sociality.
checking
Tunney,
four
story
Tunney
for
J o h n
c o m p a n i o n
pretty,
City
Sena
ami
spent
Manchester
over
Lhal
definitely
wives
den,
was
us
accompanied,
INTELLIGENCE REPORTS
for
chortling
Kennedy
w h o
the
are
recently
a
ladies
story
told
recon-
eventually
accounts
Ted
aboard
the
also
Since
been
workers
newspaper
lots
divorce.
have
T u n n e y
were
I I
for
two
tors
several
aides
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
filing
then,
(Iraleful
week.
House
was
Rus-
labor
reminding
in
S A L T
defense
bul
all.
a meeting
C o m m i t t e e
President
in
report
a s h o w d o w n
Meanwhile,
angered
able
these
silenced
c o m e
the
Khrushchev,
been
of
election
big
President,
their
toward
opponents
has
secret
Central
Lo
Unlike
some
could
c o m
moves
conservative
he has
favorable
agreement
e c o n o m y ,
States
Brezhnev
uego
reported
Brezhnev's
the
rush
on
Slates
to
Lhe
angering
especially
the
round
with
played,
WHllLs
dispute
N o w
counting
sagging
us
premier
a second
talks
SLOOPINC
trade
shape
tell
h o m e
shaken
highly
worse
lhaL
report.
Brezhnev,
is
according
A
until
of
successor.
Ibnled
grade
delay
fear
and
and
to
i.ans
Khrushchev
policy.
has
ded
disarmament
according
Soviet
harvest
Brezhnev
the
oppo-
harvest
Mideast
ehev's
political
Kremlin,
Nikila
ousted
bad
may
intelligence
was
Party
Brezhnev
serious
iti
Liu t i n g
found
destroy
face
prehen.sive
some
"See,
soon
the
Soviet
Leonid
about
refused
with
Chief
w o u l d
knew
and
r o o m
a
nerve
began
make
"that's
is
late
discussed
being enumerated
aluated.
to-
have
enlightening.
been
facets
change
sessions
Brezhnev in Trouble
W A S H I N G T O N
to
say
unlil
It
time
ther
he
thai
is "
and
has
and
in
jack anderson
Washington Merry-Go-Round
lo
it
feel
il
g r o w
basis
" l i v i n g ? "
society
like,
to
w e e k l y
a " f r e e "
lo
is
trying
O u r
a
w h o
f r o m
that
o n
is c o n s i d e r e d
very
in
meet
open
her
situation.
W e
gether.
will
w i t h
tion
m a n y
don't
ly
ever,
Mideast
watered,
right,
year
1
W
a
the
room.
something
finally
FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 1972
my
his
(hough!
it
hed
me
eyes
inn
ing
asked
This
ll;
over
knew
game
to
at
realized
crying
I
and
nijiht.
tin
UK, t m r
111
anil shared
•ll
inlii
1 111(1
after
wouldn't
months,
f r o m
h-ini
he
Ihe
lie
the
S
were
and
telling
said
that
had
he
w
We talk
llll
sition
played
knew,
h i m ,
casually
out
could
replied
I
and
in
hut
about
tell,
we
had
I le
night
an
S
•rolh
myself
something
the
views'.'
stated
was
on
I
w
si'
closest
afraid
so
really
w o m e n
-
role
realistic living
a n d
she
to c o p e
elor
not
themselves
a
group''
y o u r
l e m e m
us s u s p e c t e d
weni
straight
write
I
thing
I
m y
too
people
was,
lime,
free
conditioning
be u n c o v e r e d
H o p e f u l l y ,
to
- anything.
it
must
be capable
of
exactly
by
find
then
a n d
t o d a y
I
out,
We
revealed
was
of
me
it
me
to
first
remember
if
destroy
one
neither
I
c o m e
a m o n g
faced
w h a t
analyzed.
values
w o m e n
seem
1+ 2
order
t h e m
Ihey
Why
to
if
through.
easy
directly,
there
whal
.'1
in
are
Prevalent
facing
group
realizing
discuss
co-existence
dare
me
brothers.
bul
W h y
gentlemen,
things
lb at even
(juestionud
could
point
nay
begging,
for
our
staling
Second
all
lo
help''
to
of
T h e y
appeal
open
my
and
the
press
for
of
sisters (all
ipiestion
you
Both
bul
art-
"pain
lines
to
the
are
enlightenment
understand
must
were
olhci
first
of
We
that
I
you
he
game
that
you.
is n o l
I
I
me
five
when
don'I
only
it
en-
w o r d
going
ano Iher
ask.
lasl
closets al
out
friend
" f a m i l y . "
the
in o u r
anything
to
the
Forgive
are
sisters a n d
I
things
think
of
IT), a n d
privately
c o m i n g
the
(miiilani
press
meant
Ye I
|nsl
a
The
alienated
you
for
intimately)
si l a i g l l l
I
T o r c h
is
thru
cases
whal
to
the
said
that
uttering
A
self-deception..
bothering
Ihey
people
R e r e a d
. One
closet
her
in
w o u l d
views
Mb
rights!
but
to
problem
B u t
perpetuating
w o m e n
is
not.
of
a group,
of
cepting
otherwise!
Enough!
Hay
a
"Lax
that
c o m m u n i t y
thru
have
by
thing
being
article
ihe
stupid!
strictly
personally,
hegging
"
Ihem.
thai
think
from
begging
referred
the
fully"
the
time
y o u r
argument
expressing
me
the
straights
faggols
T h e
tell
pub-
raised
d a m n
the
family
and
k n o w
is
In
"they
with
ii«h|K)iise c r i t i c i z i n g
tele
column
same
about
all
times
c o m m u n i c a t i o n
them
say
so/i'/v
many
l b
gay
whal
M y
•M
say
inter
iled
brothers
•l.se
. #
de>
the
5,
images
and
y o u rselves
middleclass
gay
busy
brother'.'
white
lire
cultu-
" g o o d "
have
demanding
reading
pre-
mi
press
points
call
Thai's
'72!
you
your
didn't
the
gay
y o u r
" d e c e n t "
y o u
payers"
I
This
were
straight
answer
fellow
We
if
or
to
rival
I
our
each
We
their
care
use
to
objection?
concepts
clear
and
the
per-
"nigger"
A m o n g
for
they
is
couldn'l
names,
with
only
above
or
to
lic, t h a i
m y
far
minds,
and
sisters,
addressing
If
trying
be
with
proud
love
not
ral
I
your
political
too
Y o u
niggers;
whole.
are
a
feelings,
w o r d
are
the
sented
good
to
black
and
" w h i t e y "
dare
m y
with
the
total
am
a by-line
Were
thoughts.
use
we
I
wish
a
person
and
beautiful,
We
I
I c o m m u n i c a t e
we
with
and
of
say,
sexism,
is
in
quad
we
President
w o u l d
Indian
in-
w o u l d
falsity.
living
shall
efforts
Congress,
staff
on
its
" I ' m
might
you're
necessity
for
provide
the
w o m e n
y o u
m a y b e
expression
that
happening
for
Well,
mere
some
to
sist.
this
suc-
raising?
oppressed,"
the
first
pay
Consciousness
not
exaggerate
be
problems."
attitudes
"What should I wear tonight
Janey? I sure do want Frank to
be proud of me at the dance!"
"Darling," says Mother sweetly, "don't you think it's about
time that you get yourself a
man? You're not getting any
younger you know...."
"Boy what a life that guy has!
Twenty-six and a confirmed
bachelor - can't beat that!"
himself.
ends:
the
by Phyllis Hyman
legislative
it's
help
the
concise
Senator
for
to
to
all
both
in
calls
nomical.)
k n o w
his
on
call
free
increased
strongly
of
above
been
their
investment
price
and
salary.
have
Loll
Senator
of
taxes
more
be
or
views
telephone,
speak
one
phone
even
to
to
m o n e y
the
y o u r
Remember,
you
thing,
often
one
an
the
1
needs.
brothers
brothers
use
and
ups
a
Tues-
First,
and
is h o w
gay
a gay
black
\ %
along
another
m a k e
are
im-
public
your
are
y o u
Y o u
decent
choice.
m y
as
in
five
wants
bang
This
When
Application
by
I have
m y
letter
the
(yawn).
I'aggol
emotions,
Degree
for
reputa-
an
they
and
For
forces
and
as
cinct.
costs
Telegrams
cost
legis-
o f
result,
its m a r k
effective.
that
Congress,
the
ASP
points
Con
; -
it
realize
taken
of
to
your
letters,
most
for
acceptable,
do
Faggotales
son
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
Ask
are
put
you
expect
congressman
mail
a
makes
you
their
d o n ' t
to
If
hun-
of
calls
better
writing.
even
that
barometer
it's
in
cases
an
As
others.
Young's
is
view
Telephone
but
receive
each
portant
idiot
steps
members
sisters;
PAGE SIX
(Se-
be
k n o w
attention
n a m e , " )
Senator
have
Get your own subscription to TIME
at special student rates.
At the bookstore or through
the TIME representative on campus.
legislators
opinion.
favo-
notwithstanding,
person
• B/ft/e S f u r / y ,
lators
a
con-
W0;
am
Be Aware
his
be
should
to
his
insulting
homosexuals
.' f
never
Consciousness Raising
##
the President, to Congressmen,
to Senators or to other important government officials. While
a regular 15-word telegram message would cost $5.45, you can
wire your representative in
Washington a message of equal
length for $1.25 ($1.00 for telegrams to your state government
officials). Check with your local
Western Union office for details,
but in all cases remember to ask
for the special rates.
be
or
pieces
answer
b y
don't
letter
some
w o u l d
It
you
not
putting
and
day's
.-(.•
task.
Some
of
Sir:
around
As
A'hjnce
Con-imunrr/
Singing
in
of
T o
signed
personally
especially)
and
sonally
Young's
is n o w
(One
" D e a r
on
tuent
Club
OFFICIAL
Gay
he
cover-
subject.
but
your
thousands
thousands
week.
replies
classic
But
SUNYA
nators
dreds
popu-
reply
be
always
one
Remember,
clay.
Boftca /ttxiir'G C*y'<r»rT*+
'
;
con-
each
of
going
most
tt-f
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letters
by,
was
tion
Camera/Photo
mail
c o m e
signature
t*~n
Why '
University
career
stupid
to
collection
INTERESTED FOLK
- - > - • .'. ,- -.' -,^-* fc-^-J •/
for
if
either
reply.
consti-
what
received
pieces o f
is
ram tan
world
point,
than
a
should
generally
representative
sees
Senate
the
m o r e
and
effective.
page and
surprised
was
letters.
his
states,
hard
/ * • :
Ur
expect
1970,
to
representatives
result,
'
econrjrnics.
/ e m w ,
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of
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m a k e
Association
'. s & u n s o r T / j i) ' e / . t u ' e
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will
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to
one
Tho*s
lous
tntyort
wrote
and
on
L'.car.cn-Siate
other
&'JE"-*32
the
responses
tuents
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around
cryptic
short
do's
telegrams
letters.
res-
your
the
to
y o u r
simple
w h i c h
calls m o r e
Ma-
U S S . "
in
cam-
as a n y
k n o w
few
letters,
First,
of
a
don't's
phone
( D — O h i o )
political
a time
officials
are
y o u r
Sincerely,
retirement
Y o u n g
During
Vo-rls,;-
off.
good
y o u r
and
mis-
" D e a r
as
There
T V . "
one
national
is
views.
do
flashed
Y o u n g ,
his
can
dictated
it
M.
into
congressional
T u r n
let
Please,
I
a
paign
programs,
o n
eyes
record:
indeed
his
crept
what
as h e
o n
k n o w n
dub
m e
during
are
porno-
embarrassed.
shortest
Stephen
Dissertate
even
pornography
Until
E :
about
television
tell
Stephen
prog's"
d o
Senator's
dam:
Sena-
began. " W h a t
has
so
ponses
and
•J-
SUttYA
I'm
the
*or
Doctoral
G.Y.R.O.
It
favorite
about
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to
Senator,
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letter
graphy?
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SUNYA
Group
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Dear Senator..*
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PAGE SEVEN
(
view/leisure/preview/leisure/preview*leisure/preview/leisure/preview/leis
Films:
Calendar
WSUA-640
Friday, 9 pm—1 am:
OLDIES PARTY
I
b y Pam a n d Michael R o s e n t h a l
Alternative
Features
Service
Friday, Sept. 29
Saturday, Sept. 30
Free Music Store: New Trends in music,
8:30 pm in PAC Recital Hall. Free!
Baseball: Fall Intercollegiate Baseball
Tournament at 10 am, 12:30 pm, and 3
pm.
Live Broadcast
COLONIAL QUAD FLAGROOM
Football: SUNYA vs. R.I.T. at 2 pm.
with:
IS | |
Colloquium: Topic, "Muonium and Positronium," speaker is Prof. Veron W.
Hughes, at 3:30 pm in PH 129. Free
Admission.
Eric Lonschein
Free with Colonial Quad Card; $.50 without
v
i
First Home Game!
Soccer: SUNYA vs. Queens at noon.
Tennis: Eastern College Athletic Confer
ence.
Chess Tournament: 9 am to 9 pm in CC
315. Prizes.
Experimental Theatre: "They Told Me
You Came This Way", at 4:00 (preview),
7:30 and 9 pm in Pac Arena Theatre.
Free admission.
this Saturday
Concert: "Poco" and "Gun Hill Road",
tickets are $3.00 and $4.00 with tax and
ID, $6.00 and $7.00 w/out. Doors open
at 9:00 pm in the Gym.
Albany State vs. R.I.T.
Siena College: "The World of Lenny
Bruce" at 8 pm in Gibbons Hall.
!
lf
Live coverage begins at 1:55 p m
Sports
n
Line
Sunday, 7:30-8:00 pm
This week's guest will be AMIA advisor Dennis Elkin
There will be an open telephone line (7 6443) for lis
teners to call in.
Sunday, Oct. 1
I U.C.B. presents
Experimental Theatre: "They Told Me
You Came This Way", 7:30 and 9 pm in
the PAC Arena Theatre, free admission.
POCO
*
*
Saturday Sept. 30
General Ad.
Henway's: Live rock music with "George
Arliss and the All Night Stompers," danc
ing, beer, extras, from 8:30 pm-1:30 am
in Indian Quad U-lounge, $.50 cover
charge.
Personal Appearance: Michael Sacks, star
of "Slaughterhouse Five," will appear at
the Hellman Theatre, 7:15 and 9:30 pm.
^&^fe ^ k ^ f e ^Lf ^kf ^ k ^fe^lf ^fe ^fe ^fe ^Lf *^ ^fe ^ k ^t^ * ^ ^fc * ^ -Jr e ^ * tr *fc "^L* ^U *^ ^^ ^lr « ^ «^U -TIJ- ^ t j ^^ ^Jf* kLi -,| r « ^ «^U * ^ «^^ ^U ^^ -L- ^^ \/
#
Experimental Theatre: "They Told Me
You Came This Way", 7:30 and 9 pm in
the PAC Arena Theatre. Free admission.
Oldies Party: Broadcast live on WSUA
from the Colonial Quad flagroom with
Eric Lonschein, 9 pm-1 am, free with
Colonial Quad card, $.50 w/out.
CCGB Radio Revival: Programs of the
40's and 50's at 8 and 10 pm in the CC
Assembly Hall.
SUNYA Gym
Reserved Seating:
$4 w tax & I.D.
$7 w/out
On Campus
IFG
University Art Gallery: Opening of new
exhibition,"New York Women" unci
"Photography Canada" from 4 - 6 pm.
"The Lodger"
Fn: 7:15, 9:45 in LC-25
Timetable
Off Campus
Hellman (459 SJOO)
"Slaughterhouse l-'ivi
I n : 7:20. 9:30; Sat:
lOWlie {7H3
5539]
" W h e r e D o e s it
fi:IS. H:00.
Hurt?'
Cine 1234 (459 8301
"Tiddler on the
Hoof
I r i i k S . t t : d : 4 5 , <):5l)
Fri&Sat:
8:00
"I Love My W i l e "
h Connection'
I'ri&Sat
10, '); to
Circle Twin (7«5 I.IHX
"MASM"
Fri&Sat: 7: (0
10:00
Tower East
"Two Lane Blacktop"
F n & S ; i t : 7 : 3(1, I 0 : 0 0 in l.C
Colonie Center (459 2170)
I IUVS.H;
8:20
"Marjoe"
( n o s c h e d u l e .ivailable)
Madison (489 5431
Cinema / (785 1625)
SUNYA Cinema
"Everything You Wanted
"Little Murders"
l-'ri&Sat: 7:30, 10:00 in LC-18 Know About Sex"
Fri&Sat: 8:30,10:30
PAGE EIGHT
"Where I ) o e s it Hurt?'
Fri&Sat: 7 : 0 0 , 10:00
"Charly'
Fri&Sat:
8:30
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
"Ieverything You Wanted
Know Ahotit Sex'
f-'ri&Sat: 7: IS. 9:1
Delaware (462 4714)
"Housewife's Report"
ITI: 7:30, 9:30; Sat: 7:35, 9:25
" F r e n c h C o n n e c t ii
l-'n&Sat: '): (0
"Codlather"
l-'n&Sat:
8:0(1
Fox Colonie (459 1020
"Superfly"
Fri: 7:30, 9: 15; Sat: f>:0(),
7:45,
9:30
B u t Marjoe e n d u r e d . In his
m i d - t e e n s h e refused t o c o n t i n u e
preaching,
instead
bummed
a r o u n d , living awhile with an
older w o m a n w h o m he c r e d i t s
for m u c h of his s a n i t y . He w e n t
back t o p r e a c h i n g on his o w n at
the age of t w e n t y .
N o w , s o m e ten y e a r s later, he's
sold his h u s t l e t o the movies,
featured in a d o c u m e n t a r y that
a t t e m p t s t o e x p o s e the Holy
Roller racket-- u film t h a t ' s a
p o r t r a i t of the kind of s h o w h i /
t h a t allows pious A m e r i c a to get
it o n and still be washed in the
b l o o d of t h e l a m b .
T h e movie follows Marjot.* on
his last t o u r , t h r o u g h revival
tents
and
marble
temples,
t h r o u g h t h e singing and the
stomping
and
the
backstage
money-changing
too.
Intercut
are
personal
raps and
confessions, a n d footage from Marjoe's early p r e a c h i n g years-it
terrifying little a u t o m a t o n reciting hell fire by r o t e , but entirely
professional,
Billy
Graham
s p e e d e d u p t o 7H r p m .
1. T h e leadership of the Aral)
guerrilla m o v e m e n t Al F a t a h ,
which provides m o n e y and manpower Lo t h e Black S e p t e m b e r
terrorist g r o u p s , says it has been
receiving aid and w e a p o n s from
a) C u b a ; b) Chile; c) the Soviet
Union.
ifariiAiit A A i l t i t t n i n l e a l t ^ A i l i i l t A A A i f e A A A ^ A A A i f c A i f c alt iksk lit ale ah A A <Ja*al»^A^^i»aJ»*»^^L>
Movie
M a r j o e ' s been p r e a c h i n g t h e
gospel since h e w a s four years
old. We o n c e saw his p i c t u r e in
an a n c i e n t Life m a g a z i n e . He
was six t h e n , w i t h p e r o x i d e d
curls a n d little w h i t e c o w b o y
boots, performing a marriage
c e r e m o n y over a c o u p l e w h o
m u s t h a v e possessed either a
t r a n s c e n d a n t faith or a highlyd e v e l o p e d media-sense.
T h e n a m e is derived from Mary
a n d J o s e p h , a n d Marjoe was t h e
hottest thing on the pentacostal
circuit for a d e c a d e . He s u s p e c t s
that he earned about three
million dollars
during those
y e a r s , t h o u g h he never saw m o s t
of it, his father having split with
the t a k e . A b o u n d i n g with outrageous details, Marjoe's s t o r y
c o m e s a c r o s s as a n o t h e r grot e s q u e saga of person as prod u c t , life as h y p e , slow d e a t h
through merchandizing.
T h i s d o c u m e n t a r y isn't m u c h
of
an e x p o s e . T h e
largely
simple-minded camera loves t o
z o o m in o n crisp ten and t w e n t y
dollar bills, as t h o u g h each
a p p e a r a n c e of filthy lucre w e r e a
sordid and shocking revelation.
T h e r e are also " s e r i o u s " s h o t s
{Marjoe
contemplative)
and
m o r e z o o m s ( a lighted joint at a
New Y o r k p a r t y , t o s y m b o l i z e d
big-city s o p h i s t i c a t i o n Coca Cola
at a p a s t o r ' s p a t i o lunch, t o
stand
for
Middle
American
dreck.)
B u t Marjoe e n d u r e s this t o o .
F o r whatever his motives, sincere self-purgation or a s h a r p
sense of w h e r e the real action is
(or m o r e p r o b a b l y , s o m e freaked-out c o m b i n a t i o n ) , he c o m e s
through as an extraordinarily
talented, m a g n e t i c , sexy, a n d
even likeable s h o w m a n . With his
Pierre Cardin suits and Mick
Jagger strut - he's studied Jagger, and p u t s the act to b e t t e r
use than we've ever seen on the
rock and roll stage-- Marjoe performs miracles of audience involvement. Middle-aged m e n and
w o m e n dance and sing, babble in
tongues, and fall into quivering
orgasmic fits as they " m e e t Jesus
tonight."
T h e r e ' s still the hustle, t h o u g h .
Directors and c a m e r a m e n try to
m a k e us feel sophisticated as we
watch the m a r k s get taken--the
drip-dry, wash ' n ' wear, u n h i p ,
u nelegant,
bra-and-girdle,
Leased-hair, thick- glassed c r o w d
w h o pay, and pay big, for Brother Marjoe's blessing. T h e filmmakers project an unpleasant
sense of superiority over Marjoe's followers that stems, unfortunately, less from (heir being
m a n i p u l a t e d than from their being unbeautiful and u n c o o l . This
comes through in cameras that
are m o r e interested
in grotesquerie than ecstasy, that little
have s y m p a t h y for s p o n t a n e o u s
emotional e x p e r i e n c e when it
means flabby upper arms and
sagging b o s o m s in compulsive
rhythms
News Quiz
Henway's: "Hector" at 8:30 p m - 1 : 3 0
am in Indian Quad U lounge, $.50 cover
charge.
*
$3 w tax & I.D.
*
$6 w/out
*
*
* Door open at 9:00 for Reserved Seats 9:1 5 for General Aud
*
Crossword Contest Rules
"Marjoe/' Hip Preacher
2. After e n c o u n t e r i n g s t r o n g
resistance the Israeli A r m y units
completed
their
withdrawal
from: a) s o u t h e r n L e b a n o n ; b)
n o r t h e r n Syria; c) J o r d a n .
3. T h e H o u s e A p p r o p r i a t i o n s
C o m m i t t e e a p p r o v e d a $ 4 . 2 billion foreign aid bill which was
below w h a t the A d m i n i s t r a t i o n
had r e q u e s t e d for the c u r r e n t
fiscal year by n e a r l y : i ) $ 1
million; b ) $ 2 billion, c) $1
billion.
4. A small army invaded Uganda from T a n z a n i a in an a t t e m p t
to d e p o s e the controversial President of U g a n d a : a) Julius K
N y e r e r e , b) Maj, d e n . Idi A m m ,
c) Maj. G e n . Y a k u b u Gowot).
ft. T h e General Assembly of
the United N a t i o n s c o n v e n e d for
its 2 7 t h annual session and heard
a speech by its newly elected
p r e s i d e n t : u) Kurt Waldheim; b)
Stanisluw T r o p c z y n s k i , c) Brad
ford Morse.
U. T h e S e n a t e a p p r o v e d a major e n v i r o n m e n t a l bill designed
t o : u) help s t a t e s m e e t a developing land crisis; I)) c u r b air pollution in industrial areas; c) c u t
back on the use of n a t u r a l mineral resources.
FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 1972
Puzzle solutions must be submitted to the
It's ironic t o o t h a t filmmakers
from a generation t h a t places
such a p r e m i u m on self-expression, on actively getting it
on, s h o u l d so need t o distinguish
b e t w e e n us and t h e m . Because,
in fact, it looks like t h e y ' r e
getting their m o n e y ' s w o r t h at
least as fully as m o s t rock audiences. Marjoe blesses, clasps,
grabs, touches his flock; If it's
c o n s u m e r i s m , it's a less alienated
b r a n d of c o n s u m e r i s m than we
saw
among
the
unmoving,
glazed- eyed c r o w d on the hilt at
W o o d s t o c k . And m o s t important, Marjoe's people d o n ' t pay in
front. We plunk d o w n our $ 4 . 5 0
or $ 5 . 5 0 to hear some wateredd o w n s t o m p i n ' from Leon Russell, and it's just tough if we
d o n ' t get it on. Marjoe's congregants d o n ' t pay until after the
Spirit hits them. At least they
get t o try before they buy.
Luckily
the
unsympathetic
focus d o e s n ' t destroy the film,
perhaps because we're made to
feel t h a t Marjoe has experienced
some level of r a p p o r t and affection for his congregations. We
may be suckers for his line, just
like his little old ladies, but we
believed it when he said he
enjoyed getting people to loosen
u p and have a good t i m e - t h a t
m a y b e he'd still be in the
business if he could have cut out
the he!I fire and d a m n a t i o n parts.
A n d they do loosed u p : the film
is m o s t exciting when we see
p e o p l e in ecstasy, s h u d d e r i n g
and (Tying, or smiling and hugging. T h e spirit of Marjoe's
people comes through despite all
odds.
Student Press office (CC 334) by Monday, 12 noon
following the Friday that the puzzle appears.
Name, address, phone number, and social security number must appear on your solution.
Puzzle solutions will be drawn at random until three
correct solutions have been chosen.
Each of the three winners will be entitled to a free dinner
for two at the Patroon Room in the Campus Center (not
including liquor and
No one working on or for the Albany Stu
Sorry, only one entry per person will be accepted.
ASP Crossword Puzzle
17
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2
1
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27
1. I'm (IK
You're O.K., Harris
2. 7 7 K ' Peter Prescription,
Peter
:j. () Jerusalem,
Collins and Lapierre
•I. h'leunor
the Years
Alone.
I.ash
I,. Open Marriage, O'Neill and
O'Neill
Contest Winners
Kevin Cruise
Joel Gross
Jerry
Price
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Ik, Headland
1 5 . Pygmy A n t e l o p e
16. Journey
17. Thoatricul
1 9 . Anger
2 0 . Yoko
2 1 . Skin Ailment
Works with Dough
22.
Young Kangaroo
21*.
On t h e Ocean
25.
"Caesar" Conspirator
26.
Moorish Palace
29.
Coral Island
Laurence
3'
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Talk Wildly
37. South American P a r r o t
38, Gainsay
39. P r e f i x i Over
l l O , Cupolas
111, Book of Old Testament
1)2, Shut Off
W»t Haphazard
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50. Sheet Music Term
5 1 . Jujmrmiiu Coin
5 " . P o i s o n o u s Snakes
Improvs
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Dr. F r a n k e n s t e i n ' s
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11:
8
*
_
B:
8:
(Solu ion to last week's
7
"
26
Seagull,
Bach
•1. The Winds of War, Wnuk
:). Dark Horse. Knebel
•1. Captains and Kings, Caldwell
(). August I'.lll, Sojzhenilsyn
6
IB
36
k1
•» 01 u 0 J
cj (| -\. .) j ; u z J I
*
2F
26
N0NFICT10N
7. Official sources n Washing
ton revealed thai II nry Kissinger's trip to Moscow las secured
for next year a seriei of political
talks c o n e ernirtg: a) a general
cease-fire ;ill I n d o c h i n a , b) the
reduction of military forces in
Central E u r o p e ; c) Naval base
installations in the Mediterranean.
H. An agreement to u n d e r t a k e
31) joint projects on environmental
protection
of
cities,
farms, rivers, lakes and air of the
two c o u n t r i e s , and to exchange
environmental
specialists, has
been r e a d i e d b e t w e e n the Soviet
Union and: a) F r a n c e ; b) West
G e r m a n y ; c) the United States,
i). T h e Senate passed an antihijacking bill which requires a
new
airport
security
force,
screening of all passengers and
a) p e r m i t s the death penalty for
hijackers, b) p e r m i t s life impris o n m e n t for hijackers, c ) permits
the pilol to arm himself.
10. An Israeli source said ill
Washington that in response to
repealed terrorist a t t a c k s , Israel,
a) would seek U.N. intervention
against terrorist o r g a n i z a t i o n s b)
would a t t e m p t limited reprisals
against terrorist g r o u p s ; c) plans
a major military effort to destroy terrorist groups.
3
33
Livingston
nt Press is
eligible to win.
FICTION
1. Jonathan
tips). Dinners must be claimed
within two weeks of notification.
" M a r j o e " is now showing at the
Hellman Colonic Center T h e a t r e .
Best Sellers
Albany
UUWN
1
hovurborate
2
Water Pipe
3
5.
6.
7.
H.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
IB.
li:
25.
26.
27.
28.
29.
30.
II.
12.
31.
37.
II:
ti.
U:
'17.
w.
'19.
50.
51.
52.
II:
Facto
Soak
expresses
Sarcasm Device
Trigonometric Ratio
Japanese Sash
Oriental Carriage
of Consciousness
Operatic Solo
Castrate
Out a Living
i-ian' B Name
Close to
Reject
Otherwise Called
Ventures
Troop Encampment
Section
Curved
Harmonize
beatle
bottomless Pit
Well-known
Preside Over
cat
Cheat
Toy Musical Instrument
Became Forfeit
Bigoted
Functions
Bygone
1966 Tennis Champ
Atop
Mythological r.lf
Tale
ungllBh College
Roman hmperor
Cowboy Tom
Basketball Hoop
57.
:ti.M/rtNU V"
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
PAGE NINE
I"
view/arts/preview/arts/preview/arts
FYnPrimPntfll ThPfltrP
I—/VLSVsl II I I w l
David E p s t e i n ' s e x c i t i n g play,
They Told Me That You Came
This Way, will b e p r e s e n t e d this
w e e k e n d , S e p t . 29-Oct. 1, in t h e
P A C A r e n a T h e a t r e a* t h e first
major production of SUNYA's
Experimental Theatre Group.
S o m e w h a t a m b i g u o u s in cont e x t , t h e play c o n c e r n s t w o
POW's t h r o w n t o g e t h e r in a pris o n cell, p e n d i n g e x e c u t i o n , for
c r i m e s u n k n o w n t o t h e aud i e n c e . What w e see developing
is a n a c u t e sense of fear mixed
with confusion a n d reverie as
Alex a n d Peter struggle t o maintain s a n i t y in t h e face of an
i m p e n d i n g and inevitable death.
A strange c o m r a d e s h i p develops
b e t w e e n t h e t w o : Alex-strong,
verbal a n d muscular-transposes
fear into h a t e a n d uses a frightened and w i t h d r a w n Peter as his
only target. Indeed, both char-
II d I
I
acters a l t e r n a t e b e t w e e n a sense
of repulsion a n d c o n t e m p t for
each o t h e r ,
and an inescapable
n e r d for m u t u a l reliance a n d
affection.
A d o u b l e cast will p r e s e n t
T h e y T o l d Me this w e e k e n d :
Joseph R i t t e r ( A l e x ) a n d Keith
Smith ( P e t e r ) in o n e cast; Gerald
Faber ( A l e x ) a n d M. L a w r e n c e
Brown ( P e t e r ) in t h e o t h e r . Each
cast will a l t e r n a t e t h e performances o n F r i d a y a t 4 p m , 7 : 3 0
p m & 9 p m ; S a t u r d a y a n d Sunday a t 7 : 3 0 p m & 9 p m . Admission is free b u t tickets for t h e
show m u s t be picked u p a t t h e
box office a half h o u r before
curtain t i m e .
T h e a c t o r s have m a t u r e d their
given roles u n d e r t h e fine supervision of Dr. J a m e s L e o n a r d ,
director. E. Trelease is stage
manager a n d J o e Riley is de-
Changes in Ticket Policy
With
m ii nn g* P
u/ith tt h
h ee uu pp cc oo m
P oo cc oo cc oo nn cc ee rr tt ,, tt h
h ee University
University C
C oo nn cc ee rr tt B
B oo aa rr dd is
is
initiating a n e w t i c k e t selling policy. F o r t h e first t i m e , C o n c e r t
B o a r d will p e r m i t s t u d e n t s t h e o p t i o n of b u y i n g reserved t i c k e t s .
This c h a n g e in p o l i c y necessitates a different p r o c e d u r e for
c o n c e r t - goers. W h e t h e r reserved t i c k e t s are an i n n o v a t i o n s t u d e n t s
w a n t is still m o o t . H o w e v e r , C o n c e r t B o a r d is a t t e m p t i n g t h e
e x p e r i m e n t for t h e b e n e f i t of c o n c e r t - g o e r s , a n d t h e P o c o c o n c e r t
will d e t e r m i n e its m e r i t s .
T h e d o o r s for t h e reserved t i c k e t s will o p e n a t 9 : 0 0 , a t t h e rear of
t h e g y m building ( t h e s i d e facing t h e t r a c k ) . T h e d o o r s for general
admission t i c k e t s will o p e n a t 9 : 1 5 in t h e f r o n t of t h e g y m ( t h e s i d e
facing t h e p a r k i n g l o t ) . B E T H E R E !
I I W U U \S
signer.
This w e e k e n d ' s p e r f o r m a n c e of
Tney Told Me Thai You Came
This Way s h o u l d prove highly
stimulative, keenly e m o t i o n a l ,
a n d , certainly, m o r e food for
thought.
SUNYA's
Experimental
T h e a t r e g r o u p will h o l d auditions n e x t week for its s e c o n d
major p r o d u c t i o n , Gallows Humor. Written by J a c k Richardson, it is a play in t w o parts
which explores b o t h an executioner's funny, y e t sad h o m e
life, a n d a c o n d e m n e d m a n ' s last
blissful h o u r s of life; i t is a
h u m o r o u s play. J a m e s Leonard
will direct t h e s h o w which will
be presented Nov. 15-18 a t 8 : 3 0
p m a n d Nov. 19 a t 2 : 3 0 pm in
the S t u d i o T h e a t r e . Auditions
will be held Oct. 2, 3, A a t 7 : 3 0
pm in t h e S t u d i o T h e a t r e .
FOR SALE
1 9 6 5 Volvo 1 2 2 5 , a u t o m a t i c ,
m a n y new p a r t s , excellent c o n d i tion, $650, Sue-465-8991.
1967 Mustang 2+2 Fastback.
Power
steering, power
disk
brakes ( b r a n d new). 3-speed
289. 4 new tires (fiberglass).
Many extras. Must sell. Call
482-4568. 3-6 p.m.
Ten-Speed Bicycle. Compagnollo
Equipment; center pull brakes.
$70,472-7813.
Elect rophonlc
AM/FM
unit.
BSR 4-speed changer.
$75/best offer; call Vic 7-8986.
Fender Bandmaster A m p . & 2
mike stands $120.00 or offer.
465-1089.
V I O L I N . Good solid c o n d i t i o n .
Case inch $ 1 2 0 . 237-4862.
Head Kllly 606 Skiis-Spademan
Bindings—210 cm. New 1971.
Used 11 times. Original value
$200.00. Sell for $ 7 5 . 0 0 - t o o
long for present owner. Call
457-3232.
Wanted: Small used refrigerator
in good condition. Call J o A n n
785-8846. 783-5930. Rm. 626.
Free Calico cat (mostly b l a c k orange heart on forehead). Affectionate. Trained. Spade. Can't
keep in my apt. Call 489-0679.
If you want to sell your " I n t r o
to Philosophy" by Stroll and
P o p k i n - c a l l Lea at 465-5935.
Sierra Whitney Down Parka,
Large Red, 1 year old, $25, Pete
465-7071.
Diamond Engagement & Wedding Rings. 3,000 ring selections
in all styles at 50% discount to
students, staff, and faculty. Buy
direct f r o m leading manufac-
e com,»
H E L I M A N S COLONIC
OPPOSITE
MACY S
459-2170
Sidewalk Boot Sale
Whether new or o l d , c h i l d r e n ' s
by
readers
o f all
ages.
The
be lied to ihe posts at the cnrnci
h o o k s or a d u l t . all b o o k s will go
ynuiigei
of Washington Avenue and Dove
for the same price. .Sponsored by
slay lute h o p i n g to take h o m e a
Street on T h u r s d a y . October 5.
Ihe Friends of Ihe l . i b i a i y , ihe
ballon
at 10:0(1 am It) signal Ihe start ol
sale
chases.
Albany Public Library's sidewalk
covering a wide
book
jecls. I'ineec'ds aie used hy the
sale, a bargain
hunter's
offers
hnndieds
"I
hooks
i.uigc ol sub-
ones
along
I he
sale
c o m e early and
with
then
will
t h i o n g b o u t ihe d a y . from 1 0 : 0 0
Friends ol ihe I .Unary to pu>-
to
the festive a t m o s p h e r e
vide " c x l i a s " tin lire coiiimiriiily
nlands Uleeckei Library
discards and gift b o n k s thai are
thai
of
duplicated
Library's icgulai p i o g i a n i
on
Library
shelves
will go on sale for the baigiim
Hie
aie
nnl
sale,
included
in
Ihe
fast I iccuiDing
pur-
c o n I in ue
paradise. Willi music In add to
I iluaiy
5:00
pm in limit
ol
In o n e sense there is n o t h i n g
new a b o u t four-channel s o u n d .
T h e use of several channels for
s t e r o a n d / o r spatial s o u n d enhancement
goes back
many
years and includes such well
k n o w n and inspired efforts as
t h e s o u n d track for Wall Disney's "Fantasia," " T h e K o b e "
and o t h e r films. T h o s e f o r t u n t e
e n o u g h , for instance, t o see
" F r o m Here to E t e r n i t y " in a
large movie house m a y recall the
drill Held scene when t h e s o u n d
s u d d e n l y came from all parts of
t h e t h e a t e r . T h e movies, therefore, p r o m o t e d some of t h e firsi
early e x p e r i m e n t s in the use of
multi-channel a u d i o for entert a i n m e n t r e p r o d u c t i o n , a n d it is
sad to see t h a t today this aspect
of e x p e r i m e n t a t i o n and innovation in movie a u d i o has been
neglected in favor of ex peri
m e n t i n g with wider screen sys
terns such an cinerama and so
forth. (It indeed looks like the
use of three-dimensional audio
in t h e movies has gone t h e way
of t h e three-dimensional film itself a c a s t a w a y from t h e early
fifties.)
What is new a b o u t m u l t i
c h a n n e l t o d a y is t h a t it is being
offered as a h o m e - l i s t e n i n g syst e m for t h e first time - as it
rel ates t o music in t h a t t w o
a d d i t i o n a l c h a n n e l s are a d d e d t o
t h e s t e r e o pair, t h e r e s u l t i n g four
c h a n n e l s being designated an left-
PAGE TEN
I'ronl, right front, left-back and
right-back. T h e o u t l y i n g schema-ties used t o record Ihe s o u n d
in the s t u d i o or concert-hall can,
in lighl of this fact, be used t o
highlight t w o different
philosophies of r e p r o d u c t i v e lech
nology, t h e " s u r r o u n d - s o u n d ' '
form of q u a d r a p h o n i c * or t h e
"ambience reproduction.."
In the " s u r r o u n d - s o u n d " t y p e
of four-channel
reproduction,
the basic idea is to s u r r o u n d the
listener with ;i *H5t) degree sonic
" w a l l . " I n s t r u m e n t s are so recorded so t h a t they a p p e a r to
emerge from any point in Ihe
circular arc .surrounding t h e lis
lener, so that in any particular
work we may have the guitar
emerging from the right front.
the drums in the center-rear, ,i
h o r n in front-left or bass in t h e
right-rear c h a n n e l . While this
form of " s u r r o u n d - s o u n d " rep r o d u c t i o n rarely makes claim
for a facsimile r e p r o d u c t i o n of
reality, it does tend to increase a
listener's p e r c e p t i o n s of a inusi
cal piece and ( y o u can't very
well ignore musical s o u n d when
you are literally s u r r o u n d e d by
it) therefore this type of four
channel r e p r o d u c t i o n has found
its greatest a d v o c a t e in Ihe p o p
and rock music field.
The second
t y p e ol lour
channel r e p r o d u c t i o n , which we
may
call
"ambience
reprod u c t i o n , " provides perhaps Ihe
m o s t valid use of t h e quadrecording m e t h o d in that it at
t e m p t s t o provide those same
sonic
impressions
th a t o n e
would have if o n e were at a live
concert. By placing m i c r o p h o n e s
at strategic l o c a t i o n s at the rear
of a c o n c e r t hall we are able to
pick u p t h o s e s u b t l e nuances of
musical reflection t h a t a d d t h e
w a r m t h a n d i n t i m a c y t h a t we all
associate with a live musical
e v e n t in a well-designed c o n c e r t
hall. By c o m b i n i n g this rear-
Albany Symphony Opens
Mai-
In case
the
Julius llegyi will lead t h e Al-
following day (l-'itday. October
bany S y m p h o n y O r c h e s t r a in its
received
:i) d i n i n g the same limns
o p e n i n g concert of ihe I 'J72-72
music
for
season on S a l n i d a y . O c t o b e r 7 ,
tions.
Shostakovich
S:.!0 p . m . at the Palace T h e a t r e ,
"Fifth S y m p h o n y " while u n d e r
lain,
it will
he
held
QUADRASONICS!
b y R o n Burned
S u d d e n l y , it's advertised nil
across t h e hi-fi s t o r e f r o n t in bin
bold banners. " C o m e in a n d hear
it, yes, we have four-channel
s o u n d ! ' ' What is all this t h a t we
hear Moinj* on the c o n t e m p o r a r y
hi-fi music scene? T o answer the
q u e s t i o n of w h a t this new devel o p m e n t in recorded s o u n d entails, I think it may prove helpful if we take a brief look back
at the history of multi-channel
a u d i o technology.
A real story
millions of people
refuse to believe
i n s t i t u t i o n , is looked forward to
price of 25 c e n t s .
Dozens of colorful bullous will
channel information with the
primary
in f o r m a t i o n
being
played by the musicians on the
front stage of the hall, it is
possible to c a p t u r e an accurate
p o r t r a y a l of the sonic field present at t h e lime the concert was
recorded. What this m e a n s for
the h o m e listener is thai when
played back over the four speakers in his living room the recording will seem to make the walls
"fall a w a y " and the sound open
Up .is if o n e were magically
t r a n s p o r t e d to the concert hall,
all (his accomplished through
the m o d e r n wonder of quadrap h o n i c recording and its ability
to unlock the reverberation present m the ball at the time of the
recording.
Yes,
the interested listener
may ask, " T h a t is all well and
good, but h o w about m e d i a ? "
Well indeed there are now on the
market t w o major ways of enjoying q u a d r a p h o n i c s o u n d , tape
or record. The tape is merely an
adjustment of the already present h a c k s on either a reel or
cartridge,
hut t o put
tour
channel s o u n d into a regular
groove comprised u major engineering feat of the times.
This, then, is basically where
we stand in the field of multichannel audio for h o m e quadrap h o n i c r e p r o d u c t i o n today with
the best bet coining from the SQ
m a l r i x e d four channel records
a n d playback e q u i p m e n t . The
t e r m matrix hy the way means
(in this c o n t e x t ) an algebraic
c o m b i n i n g of four channels to
be transcribed
into and recovered from a two-channel med i u m . When you get right down
t o it this is part of the real
w o n d e r , h o w t h e ensuing technical excellence and k n o w h o w
have gone hand-in-hand to bring
us closer t o t h e realities of musical s o u n d in this, the dawn of
the " a g e of q u a d r a p h o n i c * . "
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
Albany.
The
program
will
be
the
t w o Pulitzer prizes in
censure
devoted entirely t o symphonies - ,
government
with
"decadent"
performances
lowing
three
Harbor's
of the
woiks:
"Symphony
M o v e me n I."
fol-
Samuel
Macbeth
in One
deemed
Beethoven's
'•.Symphony N o . X" and Dmitri
still
during
s
and
Wiihin
the
dilleimg
genie
llieie
kinds
o f the
aie as
of
symphonic
posers.
"Lady
Mtsensk."
It re-
not
clear.
which
eonflier.
Subscription
tickets
this
concert
are
m a y also
sell addressed s t a m p e d e n v e l o p e
ber's
work
I.mope
symphonies
was p e r f o r m e d
before
lo
the Albany
Symphony
cheslia, D & II Building, Suite
in
26, A l b a n y , New York 1 2 2 0 7 or
phone
premiere in America, an indica-
tions.
465-4755
for
A v o n Products. K y o k o 7-4033.
Fuller Brush Dealer for all your
personal or household needs.
Call Jaik 457-5234.
This year skiing in France on the
2nd Annual SUNY Ski Tour.
December 30, 1972-January 8,
1973.
Travel, Meals, Room,
Party, S k i i n g - $ 2 9 9 . Contact:
John Morgan—457-4831.
Green Catherine, Rock f r o m San
Francisco. (518)877-5328.
Found: a recent Bookstore purchase left In cafeteria. Call
457-6249 to claim Items.
Anyone who found Marin's
Llteratura Espanola or has copy
to sell or lend please call Debbie
457-5186.
Dear L t . Columbo,
Ishmael and I wish you a very
Happy Birthday!
Much love, A
Tony:
A Massar in the hand,
is w o r t h three deer
forest.
I hate hunting season.
in the
Guitar and Banjo lessons. Call
Roger or \zzy. 4 5 9 - 6 9 3 5 .
HOUSING
$165-Sublet 4 mo. Unfurnished,
457 Livingston Ave. A p t . 2A.
Roommate needed. For house in
Aver HI Park. O w n room. Need
car. Call 674-2633.
Roommate wanted to share apt.
w i t h Gtad. Student. Leave message at 4 72-3290.
RIDE/RIDERS
WANTED
Ride wanted f i o m Philmont
N.Y. (neai i t . 217 exchange on
laconic) or vicinity to S U N Y A
daily. Must arrive MWF by 8.
Call Mac 457-3444 or 370-2659.
Ride needed t o / f r o m L . I . Oct. 6
weekend. Diane 7-4308.
-Me
Dear P.C.V.C,
Vote for meeeeee!
A.P.S. and Bad girl.
P.S. I don't like your Happy
Birthday!
Hello...Unta Binnie...
Id it werkin.?
Aunt Debet
Welcome home Phantummy!
Car l a !
I need
Buffy's
address—Call
me at work—
8 : 3 0 - 5 - 4 7 4 - 5 9 5 5 . Soon Please!
Thanks!!
Gary
To all my friends who made
Monday so beautiful: I love y o u ,
and thank you for loving me.
Carol
Hello Mister Wells?
Yeeea
Hoooo—
Happy Birthday Joan—You're
Baas
That's A l l !
Five
beautiful
kittens
homes. 372-0678. Free.
Bumperstickers For Sale
2 for SI .25, 5 for $2.45 postpaid
Send To: MONO PRODUCTS CO.
Box 3 3 3 X
Chatham, N.Y.
12037
>-••-•-»•
••••»••»••»•
reserva-
THIS WEEK AT
You've never
seen a movie
like it
MARJ0E
Produced and Duociod r>y HOW.IMJ Smiiri and S.jrah Kuinochan
Exuculive Producer Max Pulovsky • A CinuVuul ManPal I'roclurlion • A Cinema 5 Heluast
HENWAY'S
SAT. Sept. 30
Live Rock with
"GEORGE ARLISS
ANDTHE
a
ALL
NIGHT
STOMPERS
dancing, beer, extras... $.50 cover
SUN. Oct. 1
n\
HECTORn
coffee donuts...$.50 cover
in
need
Dear Larry,
Happy, Horny Birthday!
Love, J and F in 319.
Don't forget rushees....Chi Sig
is having a scrumptious salad
pai ty Wednesday night at 7:00
in Ten Eyck Hall. Be there.
Prompt Return Mail Delivery!
Or-
Bar-
receiving its
home.
It's Our Last Chance
be
m o v e m e n t , while t h e Beethoven
movements.
my
McGOVERNMENT...
still
purchased at $ 6 , $ 5 . $ 4 , $3, and
loin
In
PsiGamma—the best reason
the world to go Greek!
his
available for Ihe season. T i c k e t s
lor
Typing done
869-2474.
stress
It is
for s t u d e n t s . $ 2 . Send check a n d
Shostakovich
Saxaphone
lessons
wanted,
d u ^ - i o c k ) will pay t J / h i Ai482-6019.
Symphony"
in One
occupy
Babysitter
Needed,
near
S U N Y A , daytime, .t lew hour',,
varying time,. Call: 482 21 ? / .
Beethoven
limes of personal
family
Ins
M o v e m e n t " is c o m p l e t e in o n e
and
"Symphony
for
most j o y o u s s y m p h o n y
many
c o m p o s i t i o n s as there a i e coin-
of
Soviet
press
SERVICES
PERSONALS
A d m i n istrat ive Assistant
for
general secretarial and girl/guy
Friday duties for SASU—the
Student Association of the State
University—an association of student governments to represent
students on a state-wide basis.
Requires 25 hours per week at
first, occasional night work, traveling one weekend every other
month, and will expand to fulltime by the legislative session
(Jan.
1). Preferably someone
with secretarial experience and
commitment to social change,
political action, or student government-type work. Should not
be too long removed from college environment. Starting salary: $2.25/hr. or other arrangements. Send resume and letter
explaining w h y you want this
job to SASU, 109 State St..
Albany 12207.
Wanted:
Elect ionics expei t
minor
repan work Cassette
t e a s o n a b l e C h r i s 2()J Van
Rensselaer.
his
opera
his " t ' i g h t h
Shostakovich's " S y m p h o n y No.
symphony
o f Ihe
and
HELP WANTED
composiwrote
h i m for reasons
are
wrote
later
Wanted to buy: Payne and
McMorris,
Educational
and
Psychological Measurement. Call
279-1224 after 6:00 p.m.
Typist needed to assist yearbook
portrait photographer from Oct,
16-20. $1.85 per hour. Call John
Chow 457-7796 or 457-21 16.
tion of its c o s m o p o l i t a n i s m . He
two
WANTED
V o i t Avalon I I , single hose, 2
stage regulator & snorkel, $ 3 0
like new. Dave 457-5194.
Brittany Spaniel Puppies. A K C
Championship bloodlines. Pets,
hunting. Reasonable. 434-6914.
mm
turer and Save! 'A carat $ 1 7 9 ,
3/4 carat only $ 2 9 9 . For free
color folder write; Box 4 2 ,
Fanwood, N.J. 07023.
Chi Sig is making you an offer
you can't refuse
A bash with
APA in Clinton Hall Friday at
3:00. All rushees invited.
Chi Sig - the O N L Y reason in the
world to go Greek - with love
from all their fans.
W
SEIDENBERG
JEWELRY
earrings
2 for $1
patches 2SC
Moil Fn 10 9
Sdl 10 6
264 Central Ave.
cor. No. Lake Ave.
Albany
463-2455
Starts Friday Sept. 2 9
FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 1972
FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 1972
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
PAGE ELEVEN
New Council fights Security Problems
by Mike McGuire
Security problems in Alden
and Waterbury Halls dominated
the discussion as the Walden
Council held its first meeting of
the year of Monday, September
25 in the Waterbury Lounge.
Alden Hall especially has been
plagued by a high rate of crime
this year, culminating in a student's room being robbed at
knifepoint on the night before
the meeting.
57 Fuller Road
Suggestions offered, at the'
meeting included beefing tip
Alumni Quad's soon-to-start Student Security Patrol, putting
lock-boxes on all outside doors
and keeping them locked after a
certain hour (they are theoretically kept locked after eleven
p.m. now), getting the SUNYA
Police to walk through the two
halls nightly rather than drive
past, and the stationing of a
SUNYA policeman on the quad
at all times every night. Dorm
Director Jim Croft of Alden Hall
ROCK
proudly presents
HAH
just finished at SPAC with Chuck Berry
Friday and Saturday Night
9:30 - 2 am
$2.00 admission and 1 mixed drink or 2 beers
informed the Council that originally a University police officer
was to be stationed downtown,
but that the funds for this officer have since been eliminated.
A Security Committee was
formed to pursue the matter
further.
Also discussed was a proposal
to start a movie series on Alumni
Quad. Educational Committee
Co-chairmen Mike McGuire and
Brent Kignor,claimed that a film
catalog they had received offered recent films at low prices, and
that the Council could break
even or possibly make a profit if
they charged 50c admission. A
downtown series would have the
advantage of saving downtown
residents the trip uptown to see
a movie. The movies would be
scheduled so that they would
not conflict with the uptown
film series sponsored by Albany
Slate Cinema, Tower East Cinema, and the International Film
Group.
In other Council business, newly elected Council President Ira
Birnbaum asked for the creation
of a committee to revamp the
Walden Association Constitution. Among its deficiencies,
he said, was its lack of any
procedure t.o amend the constitution. A committee was set up
to redraw the Constitution.
Henway's
Henway's has come a way
from last year, and the prospects
its managers see are that much
more fantastic. It is hoped that
it will be open Thursday and
Friday as well as Saturday
( 8 : 3 0 - 1 : 3 0 ) and Sunday
(8:30-11:30) nights. When this
occurs Friday will be designated
as folk night, Saturday as rock,
with Thursday and Sunday open
to varied and diversified entertainment. The hours to be open
will rest on the participation of
the student community.
The question of the type of
liquor to be served also relies
greatly on the tastes of the
constituents, as well as economic
feasibility. Where a beer permit
costs $300 a year, a beer and
wine license goes at a cost of
$1,300. Although no commitment can be made as yet, if
sufficient interest is shown in
wine, according to Rick Ginsberg, the added cost will not be
a factor. As of now, Henway's is
operating on a daily permit basis
of $20 a night.
Definitely the most significant
of the proposals for Henway's is
the inducement of full student
participation. This extends fur-
CAN A DRINK THAT HELPED DEFEAT
THE JAPANESE SECRET SERVICE IN WORLD WAR II,
HELP YOU GET THROUGH COLLEGE?
Answer the ten questions
of the Brass Monkey Undercover Scholarship Contest,
and win a year's tuition to college.
The Ten Undercover Questions
1. W h a l war, t h e n a m e ol ihe J a p a n e s e Secret
2 . How did Ihe B r a s s Monkey C l u b gel its n a m e ?
\boul a year
-rid a hall a g o w e
i n t r o d u c e d a drink
c a l l e d Ihe Brass Monkey,
It's m a d e Irom a secret recipe
w e l e a r n e d Irom a n old Iriend ol
H. E!. Rasske, w h o w a s p u r p o r t e d lo
b e the Brass Monkey himself, a n allied secret a g e n t ,
o p e r a t i n g out ol M a c a o d u r i n g World War II.
The l e g e n d ol the Brass Monkey w a s so laser
noting, w e p i e c e d together a n d r e c o n s t r u c t e d a s
m u c h o l it a s w e could in our a d v e r t i s i n g . It r e a d s
like a B-movie script, c o m p l e t e wilh spies, counter
spies, s m u g g l e r s , soldiers -ol-fortune, m e r c e n a r i e s ,
river pirates a n d mysterious d i s u p p e a i a n c e s .
II you've e v e r lasted Ihe Brass Monkey a n d u r e
familiar wilh Ihe three a d s lhal w e ' v e b e e n running,
you've got a pretty g o o d shot a l a n s w e r i n g the
following ten questions.To m a k e it a lillle easier,
we'll g i v e you t h e h e a d l i n e s ol t h e a d s a n d w h e r e
they a p p e a r .
H e a d l i n e s : T h e Brass Monkey Returns"
"The Brass Monkey Is Worth Two
Aircraft C a r r i e r s In T h e C o r a l S e a "
" W a s T h e Brass Monkey A W o m a n ?
W h e r e They A p p e a r :
"Rolling S t o n e " O c t o b e r 12,
O c t o b e r 26 a n d
November 9
R e m e m b e r , the besl a n s w e r s to these ten
q u e s t i o n s win a year's free tuition at a n y college
ol'your c h o i c e in t h e country (provided
you're enrolled, of course). G i v e it a
try. You've got nothing lo lose, a n d
c o n s i d e r i n g t h e price of e d u c a t i o n
n o w a d a y s , a n a w l u l lot lo g a i n .
P l e a s e mail all entries lo:
Brass Monkey
U n d e r c o v e r S c h o l a r s h i p Contest
Post Office Box 2016
Hartford, Connecticut 06101
G o o d Luck!
3 . Whal w a s Ihe n a m e ol Ihe street w h e r e Ihe
Brass Monkey C l u b w a s located?
4 . II the Bruss Monkey w a s a w o m a n , whul Iwo
possible n a m e s could s h e h a v e h a d b e s i d e s
H. E. Rasske?
ther than just offering your services, but a genuine part'in its
management. Brad Allen, Rick
Ginsberg, and Mike Siembieda
are the student operating managers and are paid by the hour
for their services, along with
their staff. They all are vehemently opposed, however, to
Henway's becoming dictatorially
run, either by administrators or,
particularly, students. Therefore
every Monday night at 7:30
there will be a town forum to
discuss and field the impressions
and opinions of the students at
large.
Of course the most important
aspect of Henway's governing
body is the Board of Directors.
These people have been extremely co-operative in their
dealings with the managers. The
directors include: Norbert Zahm
(Associate Director of Faculty
Student
Association), Gary
Jones (Head of Student Activities), Charles Fischer (Head of
Residence), Tom Daley (Dorm
Director of Indian Quad), Dave
Jenkins (Quad Co-ordlnator), a
Quad Board member, and the
three operating managers.
Henway's relationship with
Indian Quad and university is
one of co-operation and peaceful
coexistence. It is in competition
with the Campus Cenlor, but
this is taken for granted by 'Oth.
Beinr; situated cm the quad and
in, theortically, usable and used
space, the area occupied by
Henway's, when not. in use by
same, is available to quad, dorm,
and other organization's activities. Because of a lew incidents
last yoar-the management has
written a statement of policy
concerning the use of "drugs,"
Let it he sufficient"The management of Henivay'ss recognizes its responsibility as regards all Federal and
Slate laws, as well as University
policy, concerning the use of
"drugs" on the premises. We
discourage the use of any such
"drug" (marijuana, hashish, and
"hard drugs") on premises.
Anyone attempting to use or
consume any "drug" in Henway's will be asked to leave."
The most thrilling interview
was between an ASP reporter
and Henway. As quoted from
Henway, "RUFF, RUFF, ARF,
RUFF," which roughly translated means-"Ya'll come down
to Henway's, hear? "
5. Whal is t h e color ol t h e Brass Monkey
Cocktail?
At last....
contraceptives
through the
privacy of the mail.
6.1 low diti Admiral Kokura die?
7. W h e r e is H. E. Rasske reputed to live now?
8 . During World War II, w h a l w a s l e p u l e d to
b e the principal lorm ol c o m m e r c e in M a c a o ?
9. Whul w a s the n a m e ol Ihe q u i n i n e d e a l e r ?
10. L o y a n a s a n y "My Love is a M a n
ol Gold." What d o you think the lyrics ol
Ihis song might h a v e b e e n ?
continued from page 3
revealed that he's finally learned
to control his warm, husky voice
in a way that makes it as much
an instrument of expressiveness
as his guitar has long been. He
gave a rendition of Paul Sicbel's
"Louise" that was so poignant
that it left a mesmerized audience momentarily in stunned
silence when he finished. He
balanced the fairly somber lyrics
of his infrequent vocals quite
nicely with a repeloirc of truly
weird, wryly humorous Ml tie
talcs that covered Ihe frequent
intervals in which he was tuning
his balky guitars. The guitars,
which he explained never quite
recovered from Ihe effects of
having an amplifier drop on
them, provided the only imperfect note in what was otherwise
an houi and a hall ol sheer
brilliance.
Dorian Quintet Plays Here
by Andy Palley
tion was stunning, the wind writing flawless, and the excitement
surprising.
Unfortunately, not every piece
on every program can be popular, and the Milhaud Trio and
The Rivera Cappricio were too
atonal for most of the audience
to sit comfortably with, though
the Milhaud was hardly atonal at
all, with some delightful figures
for the bassoon thrown in for a
chuckle or two.
The Rettmann Iranscription of
a Mo/.art sonata for Panharmonium was well-writ ten, but
the piece impressed me as being
just a little on the dull, repetitious side. The melodies were all
beautiful, late-Mozart, but they
were overused and underharmonieally developed. At any
rate'I was bored.
The Paul Taffanel work which
closed the program proper was a
romantic piece of excellent conception and structure. Some of
the writing was so virtuosic as to
he nearly unplayable. At any
rate, the piece showed many
faces, and if it wasn't all that the
Dorian could do to keep up with
it, then they are the best in the
When The Dorian Woodwind
Quintet came to the SUNYA
campus last year, it was a rainy,
horrible night, and everyone decided that it would be really
great to stay home. I didn't. And
I was happy...it was one of the
highlights of last year's schedule.
Last night the Dorian played to
half a house-a crying shame,
since the main theater is not (hat
large. And the concert was belter than last year's. It contained
less novelty in terms of "modern" music, and more novelty
in terms of new arrangements of
old pieces.
When one speaks of u band,
any type of band, one talks in
terms of togetherness. The Dorian Quintet i.s together, impeccably so. They work as one, and
this is only possible because they
are all so good at their particular
instruments that they needn't
worry about missed cues and
wrong notes. Only the best in
the business can get away with
this. And the Dorian is certainly
one of the best.
The most obviously popular
piece on the program was a
The encon was a cherzo from
Mordeehai Rettmann transcription of the Vivaldi-Bach double
Reicharl onata for wood
;1
violin concerto. The transcripwinds, and /as not altogether
aopoooooooooooopoooooooooooooooooooooooo 00000 '
LITTLE
MURDERS
I Population Plannlni A u o c l a t a i
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| Chapil Hill, N X . 2 7 5 1 4
1
I Please rush me In plain package:
|
> G Sampler pack ol 12 astorled con- t
t doms- three each of lour brands plus '
I Illustrated hrudiure- U
\
. D Illustrated brochure only. 25C
s
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
Don Cooper opened the Leo
Kottke show al Union's Chapel
last Saturday with a relaxed,
folksy performance that entertained the audience for almost
an hour...until Don got a bit loo
relaxed and broke the mood with
a morbid lit tie dilly about a
dying Victvel whose dogtags
didn't fit between his teeth
when they were placing them
there down at the morgue and so
Ihey had to... Until he pulled
lhal gem out. this writer was
wondering why Don hasn't had
Ihe success thai, say, Kenny
l.oggins is having Don closed on
Ihe upbeat, though, and left Ihe
crowd nicely propped I'm leu
Koltke.
A lew Roadiunner cartoons
later (Concert Board-are you
taking notes?) and Leo came
on. From the first instant, he
held the overflowing Chapel
spellbound. I'm glad I'm not a
guitarist; I'd feel intimidated
after hearing Leo. Fingers flying
across his electrically amplified
acoustic twelve-strings in a conlinual blur, he created magical
tapestries of sound-swirling slide
leads, ringing rhythm chords,
and sinuous bass lines all at
once. His masterful set of techniques, and Ihe lovely, hell-clear
tones of his guitars, became all
the more impressive when set
against his keen and accurate
sense of whal fits, creating a
totally satisfying, and wildly
applauded result.
He's even turning into a strong
sirrger. lie didn't do too many
vocals, but those thai he did
September 29 & 30
Whether yon live in ;i hie ciiy wild Hs
nowdcil UHIB'-UHCS, tit in a MiniII lown
where pcuple knuw each oihcr MI well,
nhiiiinine male uiniiiKcpiives withoni
cmh.tri.lament tan he a proMcm
Now, Population Planning AsMxiaie*
has solved ihe problem .. by otTcring
icliable, fanions brand male tonlraLcplivei through the privacy of the
mail Popular brands like Trojan and
Sulian, Ihe exciting prc\haped Conlure Ihe supremely sensitive I'rime
And many more All arc electronically
tested and nieel rigorous government
standards uf reliability.
We'll be glad to send you our free
illustrated brochure which describes
the products and services lhal we have
been bringing to 10,0111) regular customer* for nearly two years <)i send
just i3 for a sampler pack of a dozen
contraceptives - ihrcc each of four
leading brands plus our brochure
Money back if run delighted1
hot I rrc brochure »r J J \amptrr
itunkiiin plain imkiwr. wHu-
the greatest encore I've heard,
but it was enjoyable. The concert as a whole left me with a
better impression, though, and I
await the return of the Dorian
with impatience. They should be
here twice a year!
M
Albany's own Michael Sacks opens at the Heflmann Friday.
VD Blues" on Channel 17
"VI) Ulues," Ihe special which
will launch the nationwide campaign against venereal disease,
will he hosted by Dick Cavetl
Monday, October 'I, at K Oil
l'.M. on WMm/Chanircl 17.
Then al '1:00 P.M. guest expeils
al the WMIIT Television Studios
will answei viewei telephone
calls with advice on venereal
disease, combining music and
dramatic segments, has Us frivolous momels as well as its serious
ones. Hut the purpose is dead
seiious. This is an entertainment
show, noi a documentary piogiaiu, aimed primarily at the
young folks. It is a show they'd
walch. not a program they'd be
told lo walch "
WNIiT's Don I'ousei, producer
ol Ihe special which will he
ie broadcast on Saluiday, Oclobei II at 2:00 I'M., said Cavetl
was chosen as host because ol
his "wide appeal lo people ol all
ages, particularly the young. He
is admired anil recogru/ed by
young people am! he has Ihe
SOLI.II consciousness lhal would
enahle him lo hud nine in Ins
veiy busy schedule to undertake
whal we think is a vitally important and necessary function."
Among the contents of "VD
Ulues" aie original dramatic
sketches by playwright Israel
llorovit/., black journalist ClayIon Riley and liinmy awardwinning television writer Gary
Helkin. Performing musical nuinbeis aie recording artists Karen
Wynian. "Doctor Hook and Ihe
Medicine Show" and Novella
Nelsorr. one of the stars of "Purlie."
Miss Wynian will sing "What
AM I Gonna Do Now." which
was will ten especially for "VD
Ulues" by composers John Kander and Fred Ebb. "Doctoi
Hook and the Medicine Show"
p e r f o r m s S l i d - Silverslein'i
"Don't Give a Dose to the One
You Love Most." Miss Nelson's
contribution is the Phil Moore
song, "Carrier."
Docs your son oi daughter
have VD? Do you have VD? IX
you even know what venerea
disease is? Channel 17 has VD
Tune il in.
8th Step Stuff
Thursday, October 5, The
Eighth Step Coffee House will
present Mr. Harold O. Wood of
Scotia, NY. in an evening of
music of all varieties from jazz
to fold, western to ballads. The
program will consist of both
vocal and instrumental music
and will feature Mr Wood accompanying himself on the liar
monica, guitar, autoharp and
banjo
A versatile performer who hails
originally from
Boise, Idaho,
Harold Wood started his musical
career with a group that toured
the country from I 9117 to 1941.
I laving married a local woman,
he shifted his base of operations
to this area in the late forties.
Within the last year he has
appeared at the Cafe Lena in a
guest spot, The Schenectady Historical Society, The International Center in Albany, and
The Eighth Step.
The musical program that he
will present on October 5 will
include a large selection of folk
tunes, ballads, traditional jazz
iongs, pop music from the twenties to today and n selection of
western songs
Program lime is 9:00 p.m. with
he doors opening al 8:00 p.m.
Admission will be by a $1.00
Annual Donation. The Kighth
Step is located at II Willetl St.,
in Albany
dp=*ic==3fc==ifca
Finest Selection & Preparation Oi
I
l
M%£*»WlM I
I
ALBANY STATE CINEMA W
CANTONESE AND MANDARIN DISHES
7:30 and 10 pm
LC 18
$. 75 w/tax
HEUBLEIN COCKTAILS
PAGE TWELVE
by Bill Brina
FUNDED BY ^
1
All entries will bo rudrjed by an independent ludymfj organization. No will wo will bo judged alter 12/31/72. Employeeaand Iheirdepsndenls
ol Houbleln. Inc., its subsidiaries, allllioles and Ihoir atjonnun or ludainn organization are not ollrjlbls lor this contest.
Leo Kottke Stuns Union
$ 125 w/out
Chinese Specialties & American Food
Convenient lo Ihe Campus
]
\J
V
enclose payment in full
169]
f
FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 1972
0rders to Take 0 u t
223 Central Ave.
Tues.-Sun. 11 ami 0 pta
462-2236
"•O00O900O00O0OOO0WO00000OOP0OO0OOPO0t»0OOOOOPOOO0CP"
FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 1972
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
PAGE THIRTEEN
iUHIgli
PICKS FOR THE WEEKEND
AM/A
League I Standings
QDX
Space Rangers
EEP
APA
STB
Indians
TXO
!
W
3
3
1
1
1
0
0
L
0
0
0
2
2
2
3
League II Standings
T PTS
0 6
0 6
0 2
0 2
0 2
0 0
0 0
L
0
0
0
0
1
1
2
2
3
3
W
4
3
2
1
1
0
KB
9th Floor
BPS
Freaks
ALC
Fragile
L T PTS
0 0 8
1 0 6
1 1 6
2 1 3
3 0 2
4 0 0
League III A
League HIB
W
Johnson HI.
2
2
Losers
2
GDX
2
EEF
Colonists
2
1
BC
1
Camels' Hump
0
Oy-Oy's
Fernando's Gang 0
0
Other Side
Football-Albany v» RIT
The Albany football team returns home tomorrow
afternoon against RIT, one of three varsity teams to
face the Danes this season. The recent success of
Albany can be attributed to a tough defense. In
fact, Albany has a shutout string of 11 quarters
dating back to last year.
RIT is basically a running team. They depend on
John Humphrey who had a long gain last year
against .Albany & Jack Romano who ran for 82 yards
last week against Hobart. They have a top notch
pass receiver in Mike D'Avarzo who caught t w o
TD passes last week.
Against Stony Brook, Albany fumbled 8 times,
losing 5 of those. If they play this sloppy against
RIT, they will be eaten alive. Bertuzzi must establish a passing attack to open up the holes for the
running backs. This game should be a real good
contest.
Prediction: Albany 21-RIT 20.
T
2
1
0
0
0
1
0
1
1
0
W
G.M. Boys
3
1st Floor
2
Jungle Rot
2
STB
2
Aces
2
Irving HI.
2
Fellowship
1
Hash Marks
1
MBA
1
Van Cortland 0
PTS
6
5
4
4
4
3
2
1
1
0
L
0
0
0
2
2
2
1
2
3
4
T
0
1
1
0
0
0
1
1
0
0
PTS
6
5
5
4
4
4
3
3
2
0
Soccer • Albany vs Queens College
The Booters return home tomorrow after losing
two games on a combination of bad breaks, and bad
calls. Hopefully their luck will change against
Queens College.
Prediction: Albany 4-Queens 2.
Cross-Country: Albany vs Army
The Harriers face their toughest opponent ever
when they travel to West Point to face Army. Army
has a powerful team. Three of Army's runners have
bettered Albany's cross-country record by 30
Soccer meeting—Tues. Oct. 3 --3:30 p.m. CC 370.
Team Rosters due.
Cross Country meeting -Tues. Oct. 1 0 - 4 p.m. CC
315. Teams & individual entries . Team & 1idividual
Rosters due.
Z
ART LANGUAGE
HISTORY
BLACK STUDIES
482-3549
The Jets offense looked great last week with Joe
Namath throwing for 6 TDs. However the defense
was not too impressive. The Jet secondary has to
tighten up.
Look for New York to return to a running attack
which proved very successful in the opener. The Jets
have an easy opponent in the Oilers. The game is
not being televised on Sunday.
Prediction: Jets 31-Houston 17.
Pro Football - (Monday Night) Giants vs Eagles
Two of the worst teams of football square off
Monday night. Now York didn't look bad against
Super Bowl Champ Dallas last week and should win
their first game of the year. Norm Snead is the
probable at Quarterback.
Prediction: Giants 27-Eagles 21.
muiiui i mmuiiiii linn
Open:
Suggestion Box for Senior
Week Activities and Graduation
tUPPOUT IID oicm
h e lP .
£
us
Speakers injfflffinfflgBgQHffllBBHHBBB
the Ballroom
maesm
by Bill Heller
Returning from Stonybrook
with a 14-0 victory, the undefeated (1-0), unscored upon,
1972 Great Dane Football team
will put their talents on display
for their Albany fans tomorrow.
They will face a veteran Rochester Institute of Technology
squad, who pose a threat on
both offense and defense. Don't
be misled by the fact that RIT
got bombed by Hobart, 63-13
last week, for Hobart is possibly
the number one college team in
New York State (they shutout
RPI 47-0 the week before). Although Albany showed fairly
well last week, they will have to
play better Saturday, or possibly
get run over.
|
help
TITir lirrri
""
were helped by an offensive line
that played consistently well,
especially freshman center Andy
Lee. The ground game clicked so
effectively that quarterback
John Bertuzzi tried only four
passes, all incomplete.
The only real question on offense was sloppiness. The Danes
fumbled five times, yet Coach
Ford isn't too worried. "It was
mostly carelessness, aa most of
Against Stonybrook, the Danes
used an explosive running game
(271 yards) and an unyielding defense to do the job. The Wishbone trio of Marvin Perry (HB),
Lonnie Davis (FB), and Carvin
Payne (HB) rolled up 82, 70,
and 55 yards respectively. They
by Nathan Salanl
The Albany women's varsity
tennis team swept every set in
their match Wednesday against
Oneonta on home courts, The
team plays the University of
Vermont today, and Middle-bury
tomorrow, both away.
Advised by Mrs. Peggy Mann,
the players are: Carol Bown,
captain; Kay Bennett, Carol
Glowinsky, Nancy Ketz, Chris
Miller, Betty Lee, Marcy Cain,
Come ski with the A L B A N Y S T A T E
SKI C L U B In Solden, Austria. 12
Days • Jan. 4, 1973 -Jan. 15, 1973.
Price of $ 3 1 2 includes:
-Flight
•Transfers
•Day in Zurich
•Accommodations
•Meals
•Taxes & Gratuities
Parly
•Ski Bag
Contact:
Rohert
Waldman, Box
1 7 8 D D - S U N Y A , 1 4 0 0 Washington
is,,
12222.
5 1 8 4 6 5 3706
the fumbles occurred after the
backs had the ball, and not
during the handoff."
Meanwhile, the defense limited
Stony Brook to 145 total yards,
only 45 rushing. Big days were
enjoyed by tackle Dom Pagano
(in on 11 tackles), safety Jeff
O'Donnell (2 interceptions), and
cornerback Tim Myers. Myers
helped on 12 tackles and had a
crucial aerial-theft on the Albany goal line. All in all, the
defense really jelled and should
be able to do it again Saturday.
However, it won't be that easy.
RIT uses an unbalanced line,
that could confuse 'ho Dane
defense, and possess their own
quality runners. To begin with,
there's tailback John Humphrey,
who went 67 yards from scrimmage to score on the first play
against Albany last year. Along
with Humphrey, who likes to
run wide, is fullback Paul Romano, an inside threat. Finally
there's Joe Woode at slotback.
and freshmen Louise Covitt and
Donna Present.
Last Monday the netters beat
Mt. Holyoke, 5-2. In the .second
doubles match against Mr. Holy
oke, Beth Smith lending a hand
from junior varsity, and Betty
Lee played three sets before
losing a Lie breaker in the last
set.
Ill previous matches this
semester, the team lost to St.
Lawrence, winning two sets
played by Chris Miller and
Many Cain. Albany defeated
Oswego, losing only two sets.
The Albany State booters lost
3-2 last Wednesday despite outplaying Hamilton for most of
the game. The Danes came out
fighting, and jumped out in
front early, when George Kele
shian blasted a 22 yarder into
the lower left corner of the goal.
The lead looked like it would
hold up for at least the first hair,
when suddenly Albany's offense
seemed to Tade. The result was
similar to last week's loss to
(ieneseo; defense, no offense,
and two Hamilton goals. The
first goal was scored on a perfect
cross and tip in, the second on a
penalty shot thanks to the referee who called a hand ball on a
35 yarder which appeared to
have bounced off a fullback's
chest. The ref claimed the ball
hit his shoulder, and thus a hand
ball. The call was a poor one
because the rule states that on a
shot, a hand ball is only called
when a player deliberately and
flagrantly places his hand or arm
in the path of the ball. The half
ended with Hamilton leading
2-I.
The second half began with the
Danes dominating play, and after missing eleven shots, including a breakaway which was
Br
The nexl home game is against
Vassar nex I Tuesday on the
Dutch Quad courts a! 3:39.
Shortly there will be the Eastern
Collegiutcfi Albany will send six
representatives The season ends
I he last week of October.
xmxxm aw* X»Ko*& x»& x*& >** >m&xm#Mm&& ***
lHfl*A
ONCE.IM THE PERFIDV OF MY
YOU7H,I WOULP HAVE
SNATCHEP YON SCHAEFER
BEERE FORTHWITH...
BUT THEN I LEARNED THE
WIS POM OF THE EAST...
September 29 & 30
WHENCE THE BOOK SAYETH
IN ITS WISPOM:
"WHEN THE CLOUPS ARE LOW
IN THE EAST ANP THE MOON
SHINES GOSSAMER UPON
WATERS...
TAKE THE BEERE."
a^w^zsm&Gsmxssifm
SchflSlo; QtewCim New Yorfc ond Albany NY
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
PAGE FOURTEEN
.
•
.
;
•
.
.
.
:
-
:
:
Wggg^ggtgSSBSm
booted over the crossbar, AJva-.
rez picked the far corner and
tied the score at 2-2. Was the
score to remain tied? Not if the
refs could help it. First, Alvarez
was tripped up in the penalty
zone, but no call was made -- for
one reason or another - and play
continued. Then, at 30:00, Hamilton scored, thanks to some
faulty footwork on the part of
the Danes' defense.
Finally, a combination of our
own stupidity, and the referee's
ability to see through a wall of
defensive players, put the game
out of reach just when the tying
goal appeared to have been
scored. With 7 minutes left,
Keleshian headed a cornerkick
into the goal, only to have it
nullified by one of the officials,
who claimed the ball had
touched George's shoulder as he
headed if. I guess that it's just
another case of the "ref with the
x ray eyes." The Danes went to
the arguing game, and lost more
than the goal when Alvarez put
his hand on the refs side to try
to get him to turn around and
listen to the argument. Alvarez
was automatically thrown out of
the game and the Danes were
forced to play shortbanded for
the rest of the game.
The one man advantage for the
final ti minutes put the game
away, despite some fine offensive play by the Danes. Final
score: Hamilton 3. Albany 2.
ANP NOW MUST TOSS MY
COINS TO THE WINP...
Baggy Jeans
LITTLE
MURDERS
ANP SEEK IN THE BOOK OF
KNOWING THE RULING OF
THE FATES...
Woode is a dangerous runner
who likes to catch the football.
Both offensive and defensive
lines are studded with returning
lettermen and are capable of
doing everything they'll have to,
to make the day miserable for
Coach Ford.
What will Ford try to do tomorrow? "Defensively we've got
to stop Humphrey on the sweep
and Romano on inside dives.
Offensively, we want to establish
our inside running game with
Lonnie Davis and see what they
try to do to compensate. Basically we want to probe for weaknesses. As far as passing goes,
well throw more than last week
to pen them up a little."
There you have it. In 1970, the
Great Danes upset RIT 30-21,
while last year Albany was
crushed at Rochester 41-21. Tomorrow, look for a punishing
battle, but expect the Danes to
utilize the run and to come out
on top, something like 23-14.
Booters Drop Second
GIRLS TENNIS
by Audrey Seidmun
Campus Center Ballroom
October 3
10-3 pm
Wed., Sept. 27... 10:30-4:30
Thurs.,Sept. 28 ...10:30-9:00
Fri.,Sept. 28..10:30-4 :.10
Sat.,Sept. 30...10:30-4:30
benefit Bryn Mawr College Scholarships
f-llTERATURE SCIENCE WOMEN'S RIGHTS PHILOSOPHY
Pro Football • Jets vs Houston
BLOOD DRIVE
used and rare b o o k s
° BRYN MAWR BOOKSHOP
£J one arcadia al Western
j£ I just beyond Dunkin Domils)
Today at 12:30, the Albany State Baseball team
faces SUNYAC champ Oneonta in the opener of
Albany's Fall Baseball Tournament. Oneonta has a
tough team and figures to battle eastern power LIU
for the tourney championship.
Prediction: Oneonta 7, Albany 4, LIU should win
the tourney.
Class of 1973 sponsors a
25 thousand books
10° each
E
BRYN MAWR BOOKSHOP
>_i
Baseball - Fall Baseball Tourney
iiuimimimimiiniui
MUSIC
* Book Sale
a
o
seconds.
Prediction: Army will win easily over the Danes.
Danes Come Home; Meet Tough Foe
Eiallii'iuip MtJ l.ulmjh Vulluy Mo
FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 1972
Pleated Parrts
Men's and
Women's Shoes
j
Stacked Heels
7:30 and 10 pm
LC 18
$.75 w/tax
Platforms
albanv
$1.25 w/out
2 Washington Ave.
F U N D E D BY S T U D E N T T A X
mmmmmmmimmmmmmmm mmmmmmmmmmmiM
FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 1972
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
H
R
M
A
D
I
L
t r o y MJ
1 1 72 Third St.
o
PAGE FIFTEEN
m a
5B38W
..JWUAJU.'iJIV'
ASP Interview
Lampert "Sound M a n "
for Student Opinion
ibL./
-.J"-
hy Michael Stewart
Ifow did you get to be President of the Student Association ?
I guess I started as any one would. As a freshman I was interested in
student government. I attended my first committee meeting and
read through a copy of the constitution. In October of that year I
became an at large commissioner. In November of my freshman year
I became vice-chairman of the old religious affairs commission which
has since bee,n abolished under the new S.A. constitution of the
spring of 1970.
Under the old constitution I became a council member and later
was elected vice-"ftwiident in my Sophomore year. I became
President at the end of my Junior year, winning the election over
Ken Stokem who is now chairman of the Central Council. I was
re-elected for my Senior year because people have been satisfied
with my performance.
Who turns out to vote in the Spring?
Nearly twenty percent of the students do vote. That's a high
percentage for a student election. Some school district referendums
have lower turnouts.
What is the scope of your activities as President and what might be
a normal day for you?
For a variety of reasons I am just what my office is called—a chief
executive officer. The Vice-President is the chief administrative
officer. As President I count on the Vice-President to be an
administrative officer. He makes many of the discretionary decisions
and I make only the ones I need to. I don't need to know
everything—that's called management by exception. Only the problems crop up to my desk.
The problems the clubs might have \>o to the Vice-President ...and all
of that's the inside job.
The outside job is mine.
In the absence of Central Council action the President speaks for
the S.A. I am an ex-officio member of the University Senate
Executive Committee; obliged to meet regularly with the hoard of
directors of the Alumnai Association; speak to outside community
groups; serve as a "sound man" for student opinion on Administration decisions and for other university and outside publics as well.
AH for a sample day-Next Friday I have a meeting for Community
University day at 9:00—an effort to bring local people to campus to
see it in action. At 1 :00 I'm expected to attend an FSA hoard of
directors meeting. Issues on student wages and employment will be
discussed.
Later I'll attend the University Council meeting where they'll
adopt parking regulations and I will have to repiesent students.
Additionally, I'll be in my office to deal with S.A. problems. I'll also
be keeping abreast of developments in the state student's association
meetings and meetings of the State University Board of Trustees.
All that is not a common day, but, it comes out that way every
few weeks. Most of them are a little less packed.
Don't you carry any clauses?
Certainly, I carry a full sixteen hours. I have a 9:00 and a 1 :00
Monday, Wednesday, Friday class and I steal the notes from the S.A.
Controller who is in the same class. I have a night class and a six
hour independent study, the hours of which are rather flexible.
Have you had trouble with hours during other semesters?
No. Every semester I've had some sort of independent study since
my sophomore year.
Do you live off campus?
On campus in Dutch. Living off campus would be tough
accessibility wise.
In my Sophomore year—after the campus demonstrationsSomebody tried to flush a cherry bomb down one of the Johns in
the campus center and blew up the whole John. We could just pop
out of bed, with no hassles und convince the administration that
there was no plot going to blow up all the Johns in the school.
Three fourths of the students live on campus and I experience the
same problems of crappy food, late laundry, standing in lines, and
the rest. I don't consider myself as different from other student*,
even though there are some people who do.
How are S.A. relations with other groups in the school?
With the clubs—good.
At the end of the year problems arise and we get labled bad guys
That's when funds run out or when decisions have been made that
special interest groups don'L like. Those things will happen though.
Generally things are good.
Our relations with the administration are good loo. However there
are increasingly things that disturb me, and I won't say more than
that.
AH far as the outside community goes, we'll he working on that
this year. They don't always hear about the good that happens. They
hear about the political speakers but not the one-hundred and
fourty one pints of blood donated in last weeks' drive We'll be
working to change that
How are your S.A internal relations?
I get along well with most of the people here We have different
styles and perspectives and we disagree some But, that's healthy.
Diversity is one of the interesting things about a university as a
university. It keeps us from boredom.
Progress a Threat to Pine Bush
Area Adjacent to Uptown Campus
by Robin Dotz
destructive logging operations of our pre-
and Ann E. Bunker
Again,
bringing
progress
waste,
moves
decessors.
in.
irreversible
Progress:
destruction,
pine and oak, boasts
innumerable
other species. Berries abound, ferns dot the
the focus is on the Pine Barrens, a few
hillsides
and
thousand acres shared by Albany, Colonie
Rabbits,
field
and Guilderland.
their home with goldfinches, orioles and the
even
wild orchids
flourish.
mice and chipmunks
share
Thousands of years ago, as the glacial ice
rare eastern bluebird. Insect life thrives; in
receded, Lake Albany was formed. As this
fact, the discovery of a new sub-species of
inland sea dried up, winds drove the sandy
butterfly,
sediment into dunes. Time passed, and the
Albany's Pine Bush.
and
the Karner Blue, was made in
From an historical perspective, the Pine
Bush has much to offer. Historians point out
pine forests . . . the Pine Bush.
Over the years the Pine Bush has evolved
that remnants of the oldest westbound trail
into a unique eco-system. It can be likened
from
in nature to the pine barrens of Cape Cod,
traced through the Pine Bush. This "King's
M»j»
Long Island and New Jersey, but it retains
Highway" was the route used by soldiers
K,
features entirely its own. The combination
heading west during the French and Indian
of plants, animals and geographic features is
Wars. Settlers followed
not
Mohawk Valley and beyond.
duplicated
anywhere
else.
Scientists
Albany
to Schenectady can still be
this trail into the
across the nation recognize its uniqueness
Today, the Pine Bush is facing a battle for
and emphasize the importance of its preser-
survival. Already, it has been violated by the
vation.
onslaught
Periodic fires in the Pine Bush act as a
control agent; that is, they keep the vegeta-
WW
The plant community, while dominated by
pitch
death to the natural environment. This time
former lake bed was covered with oak
of progress: roads and
garbage
dumps, houses and commerce. Steadily and
relentlessly, man is devastating this area.
tion from becoming overcrowded. Without
Of the original 16,500 acres destignated as
this burning, the Pine Bush would long since
pine bush in character, conservation sources
have evolved into the white pine climax
say that only 4,000 acres remain " p u r e "
forest typical of much of this state. Many
pine bush, and of this, only about 2,000
such forests were wiped out years ago by the
acres are considered salvageable. These 2,000
acres exist in five blocks, separated
".../ experience the same problems of crappy food,
late
laundry, standing in lines, and
the rest, I don't consider myself
as different from other students,
even though there are some who
do. "
What part of New Yorli are you from ori%inully' Where is your
home?
Nassau County on Long Island is where my family IN i spent my
early life in New York City until I was In the fifth grade.
I sat down to figure it all out last summer I guess I call New York
my home, '/"his year, however, 111 spend ten weeks in Washington,
ten weeks on Long Island, and the rest of the time I'll be spending in
Albany. But where can a student really call home'/ Is it where he
spends most of his time? Or where his family is? That's u problem
that puzzles me. Hut in the end I suppose Massapequu Park, Long
Island urhronie
"The possibility of Albany and Schenectady ioininq in
like. Two of these blocks lie entirely within
the City of Albany, one entirely within the
one endless urban sprawl is a not-so-distant
threat."
Town
of
straddle
Would you evaluate S.A. as it stands now?
I suppose like the popular joke, it's both good news and bad news.
There's been a lot of good in the past four years, and a lot 1 like.
We've tuken steps toward providing better services for students in
the form of Bus Line ticket service, etc.
Innovations FSA has improved over its past. They've moved to
better management of services for students
Perhaps FSA SA services are leading effectively toward n student
co-op on campus services.
We've been able to establish heller quality programing without
raising the student activity fee. We've also logged up good
representation records on such items as the tuition, parking
regulations and phone subsidy refunds.
In the bad things, there's always the danger of becoming over
bureaucratized. Lately also I've been concerned over some signs in
the administration and a certain amount of gaming developing
between the Central Council and the Executive branch. I forsee
possible problems in such competition.
Han being President helped you in any way as a person?
Sure. 1 ) It has been an interesting experience^ learning about
groups, people, systems, and processes. 2) I've learned about the
University, its problems and legal environment. A) I've met a lot of
people I'm glad I met for varieties of reasons.
Just a while ago, I tallied to a student and ashed if she hail uM.t
feelings on SA She said il was cliquish. Do you feet any sin-It chartfe
in justifiable?
That's an understandable comment, though I must say it is wrong
I agree with the logic, but not the choice of words. It's not a
clique....That implies snobbishness and exclusivism which isn't the
case,
There is a self-e teluaion process which motivates similar kinds ol
people to be interested In the same kinds of things like newspapers
radios or student government That may appear like a clique, but It't
not.
There are some people who call all tho third floor offices, the
"third floor clique."
FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 1972
Guilderland,
the
and
the
others
Albany-Colonie-Guilderland
boundaries.
The fact that the areas of interest
cross
lines of political jurisdiction is perhaps one
of the primary obstacles in attempts to save
the Pine Bush. Each community acts with its
-tf»V
' i^'
own individual interest foremost in mind.
The
primary
concern
of
Colonie
is
to
broaden its tax base, according to the Town
Supervisor. Guilderland feels that their pine
.%**#«!
bush holdings are best suited for commercial
and
industrial
development,
with an eye
towards broadening their tax base. The City
of Albany claims it has a true interest in
preserving part of the pine bush but points a
finger at the lack of cooperation on the part
" •**• w
of
and
Guilderland.
And so
it
ecology and nature.
tffe &
/
Colonie
continues, as politics and economics overrule
Preservation of the Pine Bush is important
for several reasons. For one, the Capitol
V
District is shamefully short of recreational
and open-space needs. In fact, the possibility
gold
of Albany and Schenectady joining in an
endless
Periodic fires in the Pine llusli are responsible lor slowing natural succession and maintaining the area's unique
urban
sprawl
is a
not-so-distant
threat. Should the Pino Bush be left in its
natural state, part of this problem would be
alleviated.
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
from
each other by roads, development and the
What sort of plans do you have after uraduation?
Law school in Boston. Every budding young lawyer would like to
go to Harvard...but we'll see. It's all to soon to tell. But I'll think
about it seriously this coming month. Beyond that it's all in the air.
character.
PAGE SIXTEEN
'A
continuid on po«« 2
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