In the Name of Humanity

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I, | mi
HlWIIIIlIlf^^
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 15,1971
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
PAGE 12
mi
Albany Student Press X
In the Name
of Humanity
The ASP
Tuesday, October 19, 1971
State University of New York at Albany
Vol. LVIII No. 47
^ ^ ^ 9
b y J a y Hashmall
An ASP
Column
BUYING:
ANYTHING
O u r s y s t e m of p e n o l o g y in America is w r o n g , dead
OFF
wrong. If t h e recent t u r m o i l in our prisons and the
b l o o d y a t r o c i t y at Attica c a n n o t s t i m u l a t e a public
concern
and c o m m i t t m e n t
tions.
Our
society
must
decide
if
it
wants
Judicial System Stresses
gr
HAZARDOUS
t o t h e catalystic institution of prisons.
p e r p e t u a t e a n d multiply it into horrifying propor-
Mf\H
COULLD
t o radically alter this
anachronism, our society is d o o m e d to c o r r o d e due
Prisons d o not prevent crime, They serve only to
THIS
TO
VOLCR
HrJALT/V
to
Srt/U*rt*v\
imprison criminal offenders or help t h e m . It c a n n o t
do b o t h . Prisons c a n n o t serve as security for the
c o m m u n i t y and as centers of rehabilitation. One or
t h e o t h e r , n o t b o t h . We m u s t tr»at criminal acts as a
social illness, m u c h the same as we trent physical
and
mental
illness.
We
must
obliterate
prisons.
People c a n n o t be rehabilitated in a gray p r i s o n cell
s u r r o u n d e d b y u n t r a i n e d guards in an a t m o s p h e r e of
desolation, a n y m o r e t h a n a m a n who owes m o n e y
can pay his creditor from inside a d e b t o r ' s prison or
a n y m o r e t h a n a pre-med s t u d e n t can p e r f o r m an
a p p e n d e c t o m y in his d o r m r o o m using a h a m m e r .
But reform is n o t going t o occur w i t h o u t a change
in political leadership. All of the signs, cursing, and
protests in t h e world c a n n o t move those w h o are
deaf, d u m b , blind, a n d unwilling. O u r d e m o c r a c y
c a n n o t function with leaders who are unresponsive
t o their c o n s t i t u e n c y . And leaders such as Richard
Nixon, J o h n Mitchell, Spiro Agnew, Nelson Rockefeller and J a m e s Buckley w h o issue such i n h u m a n
rhetoric as t h e Vice-President did in the New
Times
(September
York
17, 1 9 7 1 ) saying " t o c o m p a r e
t h e loss of life b y t h o s e w h o violate t h e s o c i e t y ' s
law with a loss of life of those whose job it is t o
uphold
it • represents
not simply
an assault on
h u m a n sensibility, but an insult, t o r e a s o n " and w h o
o r d e r senseless massacre of h u m a n beings in far off
lands, on college c a m p u s e s and inside prison walls
s h o u l d n o t b e leaders. And t h e y c a n n o t b e leaders
without
support;
support
from
insignificant
support
local
from
politicians.
the
No
voters
matter
and
how
a local political ' ' h a c k " may seem to
y o u , he c o m b i n e d with his t h o u s a n d s of c o u n t e r parts, has a t r e m e n d o u s responsibility and influence.
N o w that t h e voting age has been lowered, a new
a n d unified group m u s t e m e r g e . This new voting
bloc
of
people
aged
18 t o
21
must
take
the
responsibility of bringing reform into our society.
T h e prison s y s t e m
is just o n e cancer. T h e r e are
m a n y , m a n y m o r e . Now that we can vote, we m u s t
b e c o m e aware of w h a t every political " l e a d e r " from
t o w n alderman t o U.S. c o n g r e s s m a n is doing. And
we m u s t v o t e t o get rid of t h e bad a n d establish t h e
better. We m u s t vote en masse in every election year
no m a t t e r if it is even or odd
leadership from
and change t h e
the ground on up. A tree c a n n o t
thrive w i t h o u t its roots. Neither can injustice.
T h e D e p a r t m e n t of Speech
P a t h o l o g y and Audiology sponsors the University Clinic which
provides a service for s t u d e n t s
w h o are having difficulties with
oral c o m m u n i c a t i o n . P r o b l e m s
h a n d l e d consist of errors in
speech s o u n d s , disordered voice
p a t t e r n s , i n a d e q u a t e language
skills, s t u t t e r i n g a n d foreign dialect p r o b l e m s . This service includes evaluation and conseq u e n t t r e a t m e n t of t h e p r o b l e m
by a m e m b e r of t h e staff. Outside referrals and c o n s u l t a t i o n s
are made if necessary,
T h e clinic is directed by a
certified speech a n d hearing
therapist w h o supervises the activity of the st;iff. Referral for
evaluation m a y he m a d e by
c o n t a c t i n g Mrs. Moran, t h e director, by p h o n e (457-HM96) or
by c o m i n g t o t h e d e p a r t m e n t
office (Hu 3 1 0 ) or t h e Universii y Clinic (Hu 38-1).
'Community
Concept'
Sliller emphasizes the view that Ihe purpose of
by Glenn von Noslilz
Although
most
existence,
the
students
University
are
1 lie it pioposal is lo serve as a p r e v e n t a t i v e , lather
inn
aware of
Judicial C o m m i t t e e
February
12.
I.!, and
14 of this yeai
by Mitchell Frost
An ASP
Column
EBBlEmEEP:
QtPQENlOT
-The proposal was introduced by
Student
Association
President
Michael L a m p e r t .
•The premise or
foundation
u p o n which this new S t u d e n t Association is to be funded is particularly i n t e r e s t i n g . U is argued that
since the present S.A. s t r u c t u r e
fails t o meet t h e needs of minority groups on this c a m p u s (transln-
t i o n : t h e S t u d e n t Association is a
racist organi'/atio..), a s e p a r a t e
organization, the E.O.P. S t u d e n t
Association, is needed to meet
t h o s e needs.
T h e C o n s t i t u t i o n u n d e r which
the S t u d e n t Association is presently o p e r a t i n g was passed in a
r e f e r r e n d u m last Spring, It was
a r d e n t l y s u p p o r t e d at t h e t i m e b y
the then S.A. Vice President Mike
L a m p e r t , the same Mike L a m p e r t
w h o n o w , as President, casts aside
the s t r u c t u r e . r e g u l a t e d b y this
C o n s t i t u t i o n as racist. H o w can
Mr. L a m p e r t attack t h e Student
MISERY
Ofto. HOVJ V/E LOOK TO
THEtA.,
(SONY MARITIME CQL&Ge)
Association s t r u c t u r e as a whiteo r i e n t e d i n s t i t u t i o n yet, at t h e
s a m e t i m e , defend as e q u i t a b l e
and fair the C o n s t i t u t i o n which
c r e a t e d t h e S.A. s t r u c t u r e ? If the
s t r u c t u r e established by this cons t i t u t i o n is unable to meet the
needs of our black and Puerto
Ilican s t u d e n t s , why didn't Mr,
Lampert oppose the Constitution
as it was p r o p o s e d last yeur as
racist? T h e reason, of c o u r s e , is
that t h e C o n s t i t u t i o n is n o t and
n e i t h e r is the S t u d e n t Association
structure.
T h e racism we should c o n c e r n
ourselves with is the racism of this
E.O.P. S t u d e n t Association, T h e
e s t a b l i s h m e n t of o n e S t u d e n t Association for whites and a n o t h e r
for non-whites should be abhorrent t o t h e conscience of an enlightened s t u d e n t
b o d y . What
clouds the moral question here is
the fact that the bigots m a k i n g
this proposal are black and mil
while Needless to say, if Uov.
(leorge Wallace had p r o p o s e d such
a plan for the University ,,l' Alabama, s t u d e n t s here would d e r i d e
it as racist, separatist, and unjust.
Hul this plan was proposed by
Black and P u e r t o Kicim s t u d e n t s
MI a liberal universiiy in Ihe
North, To some
people that
makes a difference, Of course, it
shouldn't
and s t u d e n t s
here
s h o u l d n ' t stand for it.
T h e setting up of a separate
S t u d e n t Association fui minorities
is irresponsible. It will establish a
damaging p r e c e d e n t and inovitably lead t o further f a c t i o n a l i s m
b e t w e e n groups. O t h e r facial and
e t h n i c groups will s a y : If t h e
black and P u e r t o Rican s t u d e n t s
have their own S t u d e n t Associat i o n , why not us? A n d why n o t ?
T h e same a r g u m e n t s can be trotted out and used b y the J e w s , the
Italians, the Chinese, or any racial
or ethnic g r o u p . T h a t is w h a t
differentiates this a p p r o p r i a t i o n
from one to, say, the skiing c l u b .
Skiing is a s p o r t and skiers c o m e
in all colors; but the E.O.P. a p p r o priation is racially o r i e n t e d and is
aimed at blacks a n d P u e r t o Rieans
only, whereas a skiing a p p r o p r i a tion is designed to help skiers,
whatever their color.
T h e E.O.P. S t u d e n t Association
will inevitably realize thai t h e y
must establish their o w n lax support base or remain forever s u b ject to the good will (sic) of tlu*
present S.A. R a t h e r than having
t h e parent S.A, grant funds each
year to the K.O.P. S.A., the funds
will have in go lo each Student
Association directly. Any senibleiice of unity will he d e s t r o y e d .
More and m o r e groups will d c
m a u d , and righliy so, equal treat
rilenl. Segregation will ( h a s ' ) liec o m e the officially
sanctioned
" o b e y here at S U N Y A . Anil then
s o m e o n e will ask: Why can't we
have one Student
Association
represent the ent ire s t u d e n t body.'
S o I'll ask it. Why can't we have
o n l y o n e S t u d e n t Associationfairly
and equitably run no that it can
satisfactorily represent the entire
student body?
work
proposal
lor
Problems
inherent
outlined,
judicial system
in the present
and
al
proposals w e i e
made
would r e m e d y these deficiencies.
be swill
mouth''
Stillei asks. " U n d e r
if y o u r
professor
hi! you in the
ihe present
system
several major s h o r t c o m i n g s , most i m p o r t a n l of ihese
there would be little y o u could d o . while undei ihe
is a lack
new pioposal you could file charges against youi
k n o w how and
lo
professor."
Anolliei change lo be m a d e under lire proposal
unaware of how lo press charges. Many s t u d e n t s
would be the crealion of a " d e a l i n g h o u s e " which
d o n ' t even k n o w
would receive cases and channel t h e m lo ihe proper
ilia! a judicial system cxisls on
bodies lot hearing. This "clearing h o u s e " w o u l d , in
Another
problem
credibility
g a p . " She claims
believe llial
anything
is whal
Stillei
that
calls
"a
slndents
big
don''
Ihe Judicial C o i u m i l l e e can really do
I'm
t h e m . Judging by
past
experience,
according to Sliller.
effect,
lake
Judicial
c o m m u n i t y members. "If a s l u d e n l starts a fire in
his l o o m . " Sliller says, " w e must p r o t e c t . " Stiller
illustrates this by saying t h a t . " I f a i s t u d e n l starts a
lire in his r o o m , we must protect oilier s l n d e n t s . "
Al the present lime, t h e judicial proposal is being
reviewed
w h o m a crime should be r e p o r t e d , and Ibey are
campus.
fair
til the University as a whole she feels by protecting
s l n d e n t s . These new m e m b e r s of the hearing b o a r d s
Judicial C o m m i t t e e , the system as il now stands has
do not
and hopefully
seinisanclion, Stiller says. The proposal would bene-
"Whal
community. Students
a
Being brought before a hearing board is in itself a
would als i conic under ihe jurisdiction of Ihe new
University
that
had d o n e , as j u d g m e n t by the hearing b o a r d s would
system.
with the
fact
Universiiy c o m m u n i t y . " It would benefit the indivi-
A c c o r d i n g lo S h a r o n Stiller. Chief-Justice of the
o\' c o m m u n i c a t i o n
simple
dual in llial the violator would learn from whal he
system
which
The
be aimed al benefiting " b o l h the individual and the
Ihe
which
SUNYA.
judicial
body.
also emphasizes that Ihe new judicial setup would
[he w o r k s h o p came up with a
a new
punitive
a d e t e r r e n t lo would be criminals, she feels. Stiller
s t r a t o r s , lawyers, and law professors. After a lot of
were
feel sorry for black p e o p l e . "
First the facts:
•The organization ( t o be funded
o u t of s t u d e n t tax m o n e y ) is
called the E.O.P. S t u d e n t Association.
has
was a t t e n d e d by s t u d e n t s , faculty m e m b e r s , adminid e b a t e and
a
credible, effective judicial system exists may serve as
ment of a n e w . reorganized judicial system here.
On
Against a Separate S.A.
than
its
been m a k i n g steady progress toward the establish-
C o m m i t lee sponsored a Judicial Workshop
T h e r e are times ai which I feel
like a m e m b e r of an oppressed
majority group, Such an occasion
o c c u r r e d S e p t e m b e r 3 0 t h while I
attended
the Central
Council
meeting; more specifically, during
t h e d e b a t e over a p r o p o s e d a p p r o priation to the E.O.P. S t u d e n t
Association—a
blatantly
racist
proposal which s h o u l d never have
been taken seriously, m u c h less
approved. But approved it was (by
a vote of 12 to 11) by a coalition
of black racists a n d white bleeding
hearts under the b a n n e r : " L e t ' s all
i-m
the
place of
Committee.
It
Ihe present
would
not
University
actually
hear
cases, bin would serve as an e n t r a n c e point for all
cases in ihe University. As an illustration ol h o w the
by
various
committees,
including
G r a d u a t e Students Association, EOP, and
the
faculty
bargaining agents. The Judicial C o m m i i t e e will meet
again on October 25th lo review these reactions lo
their proposal. Alter Ibis m e e t i n g modifications will
be m a d e . Then
the
proposal
will be subject
lo
approval by several c o m m i t t e e s , a n d ultimately by
President Uene/et. Copies of the proposal will also
he circulated among s l n d e n t s lo gel their reactions.
Al
present
there
are
Iwo
inajoi
obstacles
lo
s l n d e n t s seem lo feel that ihe judicial system is a
" d e a l i n g h o u s e " would w o r k . Stillei cites " T y p i c a l
" s h a m . " Ollici
Case A . " In llus case, a person starts a lire in a
enaclnieni of ihe p i o p o s a l . I-'irst, there are p r o b l e m s
include a p a t h y , although s t u d e n t s paitieipation lias
d o i i n . Charges are filed agaiusl hiiii (or h e r l with the
inherent
been much heller this year than last. I.asi year, due
dealing
for'
members.
lo a lack of interest, only iwo q u a d judicial h o a r d s
sufficient
ihe
agents may result if a faculty m e m b e r is convicted
w e i e sel up - ill Alumni and Colonial.
case lo ihe proper q u a d judicial hoard, l l u s board
by one of the hearing bodies. The second obstacle,
would hear Ihe case, arrive al a decision, and would
according lo Stiller, is t h a t . " P e o p l e aie so used to
p r o b l e m s with the present
sol-up
A n o t h e r factor c o n t r i b u t i n g lo the credibility g a p
:s ihe impression thai ihe Judicial C o m m i t t e e is loo
limited in Ihe lypes of cases it can handle. Hack in
the days of curfews and regulations against alcohol
in ihe d o r m s llie cases handled by die C o i u m i i t c e
ileal I almost entirely with violations of these rules,
l'oday, however, lite Judicial C o n u u i l l e e lias gained
giealei
powei
and
handled cases involving
theft,
.iss.iuh and othei more serious crimes.
Stillei
present
claims llial several major
changes in the
new pioposal is passed. I h e most i m p o r t a n t of lliese
c o n c e p t " winch calls for
Ihe
inclusion of s t u d e n t s , facility, a d m i n i s l r a l o r s , seenilly
m e n , and o i b e i
community
present,
on
ihe
m c m b e i s of
various
ihe
bearing
evidence, the
clearing h o u s e refers
deliver a sentence. II [he defendenl
so desires, he
could appeal his case lo a University Appeals Hoard
which is piovided loi undei Ihe pioposal.
sludenl
when sanctions are made agaiusl
Complications
discipline
rather
with
faculty
titan
faculty
bargaining
community
disci-
pline." Undei the " c o m m u n i t y c o n c e p t " the w h o l e
University
judicial
conuminit}
system.
Al
would
be
present,
the
involved in the
system
is
run
entirely by students a n d for s t u d e n t s .
Il is e x p e c t e d llial the new Judicial C o m m i t t e e
pioposal
spring
will be enacted and
semester.
A
few
lake effect
more
months
by
the
will
be
required before all of Ihe various c o m m i t t e e s have
judicial sei-up will be f o r t h c o m i n g il the
is tin- " c o m m u n i t y
house, and after examining the case
University
boards.
these b o a r d s (including Ihe quad
Al
hiiauls
and the Judicial C n m m i l l e e ) aie made up entirely of
given
then
approval, and
then
m e m b e r s of
the
Universiiy c o m m u n i t y will have lo be found to fill
positions
on
ihe
healing
boards.
Anybody
can
become a memhei of o n e of the boards, and Sliller
is optimistic about t h e a m o u n t of sludenl participation. She claims llial, " s t u d e n t s gripe that they
dou'l have power to do a n y t h i n g N o w t h e y ' r e being
given it - a n d they should use i l . "
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 19,1971
ALBANY STUDENTPRESS
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 19,1971
PAGE 3
PAGE 2
School To Advance 3 -Year B.A.
'Our Man at the Capitol'
Becomes 'Our Man at SUNY'
Bruce B. Detlefsen, an Associated
Press legislative correspondent and education writer,
and the Albany Student
Press's,
" m a n at t h e C a p i t o l , " has been
named
director of c o m m u n i c a t i o n s for t h e policy-making
b o d y of the S t a t e University.
Detlefsen, 3 8 a n d a native of
Y o n k e r s , has been with AP since
1 9 6 5 e x c e p t for a one year period
in which he served as a research
associate for t h e T e m p o r a r y S t a t e
Commission to S t u d y C a m p u s Unrest.
Detlefsen is best known by this
c a m p u s d u e to t h e ASP's f r e q u e n t
use of his material. This c o n s t a n t
usage led to t h e renaming of t h e
office's Associated Press m a c h i n e
to the " B r u c e B. Detlefsen A.P.
Machine."
News Round Up
by Liz Jones
While at A . P . Detlefsen often
was i n s t r u m e n t a l
in providing
b a c k g r o u n d i n f o r m a t i o n on m a n y
e d u c a t i o n topics for t h e ASP.
When t h e existence of t h e Milne
School a n d 9 o t h e r s t a t e operated
c a m p u s s c h o o l s w a s t h r e a t e n e d by
possible legislative action
last
year, he sent a story over t h e wire
about
this t h r e a t
u n d e r the
heading,
"ASP Note"
When
reached later by t h e ASP for
t h a n k s , he replied,"I would give
a n y t h i n g to see t h e look on those
telegraph o p e r a t o r s faces when
they see t h a t head. T h e y ' l l probably be w o n d e r i n g ' W h a t the hell
is ASP?'
INTERNATIONAL
Ottawa - Soviet Premier Kosygin was a t t a c k e d by a m a n o n
Parliment Hill yesterday a n d his coat was half pulled off before
security police hauled t h e attacker away. Prime Minister Trudeau
helped t h e visiting Soviet leader, w h o was half pushed d o w n ,
regain his f e e t . Kosygin's hair was ruffled. T h e attacker w a s said
to be ii m e m b e r of a Hungarian liberation group.
Athens- Vice President Spiro T. Agnew is taking a hands-aff
In appreciation for Bruce B. Detlefsen's aid in times of need, the
Albany
Student
Press renamed its Associated Press machine,
aivctsot
Carol Schlageter
Knickerbocker News Reporter
How to Effectively
Present a Story
Tues. October 26
8:00 pm
HU 129
Hews Staff Please Attend
a t t i t u d e o n the issue of w h e n d e m o c r a c y should be returned to
Greece, t h e c o u n t r y of his forebears which he n o w is visiting.
Agnew is stressing m u t u a l security and alliance in his talks with
leaders of t h e a u t h o r i t a r i a n regime.
NATIONAL
Pittsburgh A massive World Series victory celebration exploded
S u n d a y night into a rampage of d e s t r u c t i o n , looting and sex-inLhe-streets. Police r e p o r t e d a dozen rapes - some of t h e m in full
view of h u n d r e d s w h o c h e e r e d t h e assailants - displays of public
lovemaking, n u d i t y a n d drinking.
" T h i s isn't a riot. It's a g o d d a m n o r g y , " a m o t o r c y c l e c o p said
during t h e d i s t u r b a n c e which left t h e d o w n t o w n area in shambles
and a t t r a c t e d some 1 0 0 , 0 0 0 p a r t i c i p a n t s .
STATE
New York - H, R a p Brown, the black militant on the F.B.I.'s
m o s t w a n t e d list for 17 m o n t h s , was r e p o r t e d in fair condition
S u n d a y after a b d o m i n a l surgery following u s h o o t - o u t with police
during an alleged h o l d u p of a New York crap game a n d Bar.
Brown's a t t o r n e y , William Kunstler refused to identify his client,
but police fingerprint specialists said they believed the w o u n d e d
m a n t o be Brown.
SI SI SI SI SI SI SI SI
HUMAN THEATRES
Just present your student I.
D. and Theatre 1. I). c a r d s , a n d
you get in for S I . Offer good
Monday
Thru Thursday
only,
except
holidays.
CENTER
Some
research
"experts"
say you can't
taste the
difference
between
beers...
blindfolded.
What do you say?
Chancellor Boyer said Detlefsen's
appointment
t o the
$ 2 3 , 8 0 0 a-y ear
communications
p o s t reflects t h e university's desire
to o p e n u p policy deliberations to
the public. T h e j o b involves coordination
of
communications
among the campuses, government
agencies-state a n d local-the media
and c o m m u n i t y groups.
The
n e w c o m m u nications
director for S U N Y Central is a
c u m laude g r a d u a t e in French
literature of D a r t m o u t h College
and holds a masters degree in
French literature a n d language
from Middlebury College.
Community
Service
Schedule
Registration for Community
Service will be held O c t . 25-Nov.l
e x c e p t O c t o b e r 2 8 t h in C a m p u s
C e n t e r 3 7 5 . T h e t i m e s will be
from 9-5 e x c e p t Nov 1 from 9-7.
Preference will be given t h e first
three days for p e o p l e c o n t i n u i n g
in C o m m u n i t y Service at the same
agency if they bring a confir
m a t i o n letter 'for n e x t semester
from t h e agency with t h e m . Interviewing for p l a c e m e n t in agencies
for o t h e r s t u d e n t s will be d o n e at
t h a t time in the s a m e r o o m .
F r e s h m e n c a n n o t take t h e course!
Each s t u d e n t is responsible In
see t h a t his agency supervisor
k n o w s that a grade has to lie
h a n d e d in to us before Dec. It)lh.
Me can either bring it in himself or
m a k e sure t h e agency sends it. 11
m u s t he o n a l e t t e r h e a d of the
agency. Don't forget to c o m p l e t e
y o u r lugs and papers and hand
llu-m in Dee. 7. T h e y ewn Inmailed to Us ;it Ilox 2()2*KK, or
brought in to the office.
.T.lrd
( h i e or t w o persons al-
YOU'VE SAID IT ALL!
ANIIIUMH BUSCH. INC . 5t. LOUIS
Central Council Okays
Funds for Moratorium
by t a r n Goldstein
A bill to give t h e C o o r d i n a t o r of Political G r o u p s $1,750.1)0 from
Central Council's Emergency Spending Line to pay for last Wednesday's M o r a t o r i u m teach-in activities and speakers was passed by t h e
Council last T h u r s d a y night.
As of y e t the bill has n o t been signed by Si mien t Association
President, Michael Lamport. If Lamport does not sign t h e bill within
six days it will a u t o m a t i c a l l y go into effect. If he chooses to veto it,
tin? proposal will return to t h e Council where it can be passed by a 2.f'A
majority vote.
Other Business
T h e I n t e r n a t i o n a l S t u d e n t s Association received a s u p p l e m e n t a l
a p p r o p r i a t i o n from tin 1 council which will allow them to furnish t h e
new office that I hey recently moved into. A budget allotment lor an
Italian Club was also passed T h u r s d a y . Steven Kipnis was approved for
ill.- position of Assist anl C o o r d i n a t o r for U.S. Academic groups.
FINAL SENIOR PORTRArTS
& RETAKES!!!
III.M Selectnc
Ty/ieu'riler
Sprrintiiinii
m
IhH-lnml
Dissertation*
!
1626203
WANT
will speak on
Professionalism & Responsibility in Reporting
other texts
Wodnesiliij, October 2 0
at 7 pm in III 116
in your field?
WANT
/rure.s: Kcttnvdy
for that course
Dec. 2 8 - J a n 8 under $250
Includes.
* round trip air transportation
•breakfast and dinner dally
* tree transportation to and from any ') ski ureas
•tree transportation between airport and hotel
* insurance against theft, loss, injury available
19
22
available on
i-alNM
The. last day to buy texts
will
Wednesday and Thursday)
be
October
22,
1971. fexcept for quarter
courses and reorders. J
1
;
1
1
J. Geils Band »
Friday, October 29th
8 pm CC Ballroom
Remember the Olympics me (here, too!
from 9 am to 4:30 pm.
appointments
\ iVfUil't
i
Bookstore will be open for
pm, and on October
Deadlines tor submission of
items for Graffiti lire now midnight S inula) for Tuesday's
paper and midnight Wednesday
for Friday's paper.
SKI MUNICH, Germany
the text
browsing on October
There is still "world enough and lime enough" to enjoy n canoe
inning lit Camp Dippikill.
—i
thru 21 from 9 .1111 to 8
(evening
As New York S t a t e e d u c a t i o n commissioner, Dr. J a m e s Allen J r .
spoke o u t in favor of equal e d u c a t i o n for all s t u d e n t s , black a n d
white. As U.S. c o m m i s s i o n e r of e d u c a t i o n in t h e Nixon administration, he spoke o u t against the United S t a t e s military t h r u s t into
C a m b o d i a in 1 9 7 0 a n d this criticism cost him his j o b .
Allen, 6 0 , a n d his wife, F l o r e n c e , were a m o n g 10 persons killed
a b o a r d a Scenic Airlines plane o n a sightseeing flight t o t h e Grand
C a n y o n when t h e plane crashed S a t u r d a y during a s n o w s t o r m .
U p o n accepting President N i x o n ' s offer t o b e c o m e U.S. c o m m i ssioner of e d u c a t i o n in F e b r u a r y , 1969, Allen confided to friends t h a t
he did not expect to be on the j o b long. S t a t e e d u c a t i o n c o m m i s s i o n e r
in New York for 11 years, he had turned d o w n a similar offer for a
federal post from former President Kennedy in '61 t o s t n y in N e w
York S t a l e .
Sixteen m o n t h s later, o u t g o i n g HEW Secretary Finch said " h e asked
for and received" Allen's resignation. T h e wedge t h a t drove h i m t o
disfavor with the Nixon a d m i n i s t r a t i o n was his May 2 3 , 1 9 7 0
s t a t e m e n t on the move into C a m b o d i a by U.S. t r o o p s . "I find it
difficult to u n d e r s t a n d t h e rationale for the necessity of the m o v e into
C a m b o d i a as a means of s u p p o r t i n g a n d hastening the withdrawal
from Vietnam • a withdrawal that I feel m u s t be accomplished as
quickly as p o s s i b l e , " he said. Allen's first priority in t h e Nixon
a d m i n i s t r a t i o n was t h e improvement of u r b a n e d u c a t i o n , b u t on t h e
occasion of his o u s t e r h e r e m a r k e d , "1 did n o t believe there was a full
c o m m i t m e n t . It was t h e m o s t i m p o r t a n t a n d critical issue in o u r
c o u n t r y in this c e n t u r y . "
He then joined t h e faculty of t h e W o o d r o w Wilson School of
International a n d Public Affairs involving himself with t h e s t u d y of
e d u c a t i o n a l finance a n d o t h e r projects. T h e Allen's leave t w o children
behind, J a m e s K. Allen III,
Brian King
•162. I b 0 9
The textbook slacks in the
Desk
AP Compilation
1 .,..1 1 >.'l " • . , . ! i| .1.- S i M M i |.
INFORMAL DRESS...
Information
Former Commissioner
Dies In Air Crash
Associated Press Reporter
you didn't take?
Sign up now at the Campus Center
designed t o better prepare t h e
student for graduate school in the
fields of political science, sociology, history, psychology, and particularly, public services.
It has been proposed that the
New School be situated on t h e
Albany d o w n t o w n campus pending the moving o f graduate students u p t o w n . It is hoped that the
d o w n t o w n location will make for
a greater live-learn experience.
PROFESSIONAL T Y P I N G SERVICE
io c o n t i n u e a c o i m m m i l
project working with a e
South
pack established in Mi
Kiul. A n y o n e interested cann find
out m o r e i n f o r m a t i o n at
trution, or call Hob lit 1 :1S7
the detail
WHEN YOU SAY
Budweiser.
Central Council approved a request to pay for the activities of last
Wednesday's Moratorium including Rennie Davis' appearance. The bill
has yet to be signed by the S.A. President.
. chow
Plans for a New School which
will advance the concept of a
three-year baccalaureate degree
are underway. Headed by Dr. Seth
Spellman, assistant t o the president, a c o m m i t t e e of 17 s t u d e n t s
and e d u c a t o r s have drawn u p a
c o m p r e h e n s i v e outline for t h e
proposed New School.
The c u r r i c u l u m p l a n n e d for t h e
New School will n o t follow t h e
usual p a t t e r n of majoring in a
particular area of s t u d y . Instead,
the s t u d e n t s involved will have an
"interdisciplinary e d u c a t i o n focusing on government, t h e economy, religion and m o r a l i t y , education, and t h e family." This curric u l u m is designed to make the
college learning experience m o r e
integrated and relevant to t h e
present times.
The purpose of t h e 3-year baccalaureate is t o eliminate the often
superfluous
introductory
courses (hat plague s t u d e n t s in the
senior year in high school and t h e
freshman year in college. T h e student will apply for this program
during his junior year of high
school. Admission will be based
on the s t u d e n t ' s academic performance through the 1 1th grade, his
desire to pursue t h e New School
curriculum, a n d on recommendation.
The New School will stress a
realistic s t u d y of Man, touching
such areas as: consideration of
goals, values a n d practices of the
area of knowledge being studied,
and historic and c o n t e m p o r a r y
problems. T h e semester will consist of t w o areas of s t u d y , four
modules of three weeks for each
area of s t u d y , t w o weekirof indepeudef' work hi the field of
conce. (ration a n d consul tat ion
with a faculty-mentor and o t h e r
faculty m e m b e r s . A week of faeully student
evaluative
discourse
and a week of e x a m s will conelude the semester. Areas of study
will include major c o n t e m p o r a r y
problems (poverty, intergrouti re-
lotions, social distribution of economic resources) studied from the
vantage points of fine arts, performing arts, literary arts, linguistics,
philosophy, and history. Extensive study of natural science will
not be covered, but the history of
scientific m e t h o d and the purposes of science technology and
math will be studied in relation t o
Man and his contemporary life.
The N e w School education is
7V2I: Honor lldl
•Service tit' ISAS, a division of Associates, Affiliates & T o . ,
registered l-'edurtil Depurlinont of Consumer Affairs and the
National Association of Iteiter lltisiness Bureaus.
I he |>me appearing ill Hie October I.Sib \SI* was an error and should have
been $25(1.
L
$.99 with tax and matching ID
$2.50 w/o tax and proof of
18 yrs. or older
mm«mmlsm!Stm«SI0l«Mtmm>nU«
Sss*
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 19,1971
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
PAGE 4
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 19,1971
Ijjg
TE5TJ
_
^f"
vo/yfAj you,
WHAT DOES
THIS SCORE
MEAN* ?
5 AAA !
W E U _ , Y O U R . TJAW SCOEE IS
2e> o u r OF ? o , MOR W AJ_U*
A r J "F." NOW, I ' V E REBALANCED
T H E S C D R K T O SHIFT WElcbUT
T O A WeW MEDIAN, IN \A/H\CH
V O O g S IS MOW ©3.UAL T o a s - ' M - .
'W HlCtT^iwHATpV
feiter t
editorial comment
Bonds: Benefit or Boondoggle
L22lJmjMIWmMiJ^r\
%£T lU THE CAR! r
V-x CAN'T! THE ~
There lias been a lot of shouting, writing, threatening, and confusion over the
T r a n s p o r t a t i o n Bond issue which conies before the electorate this November. At
stake are some $2.5 billion in bonds (hence debt) for t h e purpose of building and
equipping highways, bridges, and mass transit facilities t h r o u g h o u t New York.
The governor has been accused of using all the pressure he can m u s t e r (and that's ;i
considerable a m o u n t ) to get the measure passed. Opposing forces point to the
already-poor fiscal condition of the state, and to the a m o u n t already spent on
highway c o n s t r u c t i o n , as well as the tactics being used to get it passed. Throughout
this d e b a t e the actual facts of the matter have been confused.
The bill authorizes the legislature to spend: (a) s o m e S I , I 50,(100 on highways and
bridges: (b) a n o t h e r S I , 151),000 on mass transit facilities through all levels of
g o v e r n m e n t and through public corporations; and (c) the remaining $200,000,(100
on mass transit links between upstate communities and New York City.
In a year of recession, it is questionable whether the state should spend so much
m o n e y , especially when we already seem to have paved-over most of New York
State. There is, however, the pressing need for more mass transit facilities, especially
outside ol New York City. Thus the decision comes to a toss-up: Should New York
avoid getting into more debt and more asphalt, or should we accept what remains a
c o m p r o m i s e in order to decently begin work on mass transit systems?
With misgivings a b o u t Rockefeller's "Sell The B o n d s " campaign, we think thai
the voters of this state should approve the bond issue, solely because of the lack ol
kinds lor mass transit. It is. though, such a deep question that we urge you to make
your own informed decision.
Bread And Puppet People
to fit Mr. Cockrell's temperament
by Steve Hirsch
It's a good feeling to renlize you ideally, and he played it beautidon*t have to spray paint "con- fully, especially in the scherzo and
cert" all over campus to get peo- rondo sections of the work. Also
ple to turn out for local musical worth special mention was his
events. This weekend's presenta- performance of the finale of the E
tions by Mr, Cockrell of the Music Flat sonata ending the first half of
Dept. and by the Albany Sym- the concert. All in all. quite an
phony were both well attended enjoyable afternoon.
"The Salute to Students" done
and, I might, add, well received.
Mr. Cockroll's performance was by the Albany Symphony (the
packed to overflow Friday and to sub-title of the concert didn't
almost that level Sunday after- appear on the program) was also
noon; the Albany Symphony al- well received except for Xenakis'
most succeeded in filling the Pal- "Pithoprakta," which can best be
ace? - ii formidable achievement for described to the average listener as
"different." The work, for strings,
any organization.
CockreH's concert, the fourth in woodblock, two trombones, xylohis Beethoven Sonata scries was, phone, and strings (each stringed
on the whole, quite excellent, the instrument with its own part),
only weak spots being a bad start consisted of a remarkable number
in the finale of the A flat sonata of strange and complex sounds,
of opus 26. (I'llis review is of some of them emitting from a
Sunday's concert). Cockrell recov- not-too-tolerant audience. It is to
ered immediately, however, and the everlasting credit of Ilegui
went on to thoroughly charm his that the symphony performed this
audience, which was expecting a piece. It is very inoften that an
lot in this program of the more orchestra beset by financial worpopular sonatas. Mis execution of ries (what orchestra isn't?) esthe famous "Moonlight" sonata pecially in a not very "arty" town
was quite good and the audience (like Albany), would dare frighten
was visibly satisfied, but it was his its audience with an "uncomfortaperformance of Opus 28, the ble" piece of music. 1 can't say 1
"Pastorale" that deserves special like it, but I'm damn glatl they
commendation. This sonata seems played it.
COME WITH US AND
YOUR FRIEND , f
SAIL THE HIGH^mSEAS
LOUIS OK ROCMlMONT'a*
U
WINDJAMMER
0~
rnoM
CM0UKU
~MUA|wa
In Gorgtou. EASTMAN C0L0P
SHOW TIMES
MON-FRI
7:30, 9:45
SHOW TIMES:
SAT-SUN
7,9:15
2+1
coupon
2+1
buy one ticket and your friend gets in free
Albany Student Press
with this coupon
vieki/.eltiin
associate news editor
.
maidaormgher
features editors
John fairliall
arts editor
Jcbbie ntiiansolin
steve aminoff
six>rls editor
roberl zarcmba
assistant sports editor
aland.abbey
* / *
ap copy
'WE LOST FINCHLEY AND SMITH TODAY — THEY TALKED BACK!'
roberl maycr
photo editor
The A Ibany Student Press
ricii alvcrson
announces its
1st annual Halloween Outing at Dippikill
Far all students working or writing for the paper
I'runspurlalion A Shutloi
Courtojly ASP
iMiniiii.il unl 55 rot loud)
l-ui Information &
EU'scrvatiun.s contact
Huh M:iyur in IX'Sit,
Got Away 1'iom It All!
(Meeting tu dticiuu
A i l l v i t i i ' s * Menu
Oct. 2d 4 27)
jell rmlgcr
assistant advertising manager
liuda mill?
technical editors
. .sue scligson
warren wisliarl
business manager
I>1111 mark
advertising production
loin rtiodcs
gary siissinan
classified
'
debhic kacincn
circulation managers
.mark lilctifsky
roil wood
graffiti
sue iiallas
The Albany Studont Press ii incarcurated in Campus Contor 326 courlusy
ol the Slal. Unlvarsity 0 | N o w York at Albany. The crime was originally
committed In 1916 by the Clan ol 1918. The phonos, whan not in no lino
" " *" °u' numerous land verbosel stall, aro 467 2100 and 2194. Bills aro
paid courtesy ol Mandatory Studant Imposition and Ad Monay. Wa admit
mambarshlp in tha Collag. Prats Service and one accessories alter the (act in
the Associated Press.
Communications are limited to 300 syllable. ,„d ore sublect to slicino by
the Chief Word Butcher. Editorial policy originated with the same. Pooco.
. . . solomon
pressed by the way in which
western images could be painted
on an oriental theme so smoothly.
The voice-work was apt whether it
entailed the falsetto shrills of
"Primadonna" (played by Pam
McDonald), or the hoarse hollering of the King of Death
(howled by Avram Patt).
The thing that captivated most
completely, however, was the
fluidity of the movement. There
The music seems at times to be
was grace yet strength in the
unprecedented. The most reliable
definitive strides of the players. I
term for describing these sounds
was treated to an absolutely flawwould be "third stream" because
less "old man" complete with the
it has the interdependence and
delicate handling of a crickety
unity of a classical composition,
branch that served as a cane, and
yet it contains the spontaneity,
some carefully calculated footand pulse of jazz. It is also totally
work in the form of slow, deimprovised.
liberate steps.
There are some wondrous things
Due to the beauty of the perfortaking place on this album; things
mance in execution, one was
that have never been recorded in
allowed to spend more time
quite this way. It is joyful, sorlooking at the symbolic sigrowful, swinging and most of all
nificance of the actions of the
very, very good music. Superb
characters. The mood was clearly
music, as a matter of fact.
established from the very outset,
This record can be purchased by
it was simply that elusive
Writing to Revelation Records,
"message" which had to be found
P.O. Box 65593, Los Angeles,
now.
California. 90065.
Certain images were certainly
By tire way there will be a jazz
stronger in my mind than others, I
concert at the institute of History
mean those flashes of Nixon were
and Art, 125 Washington Ave.
intense to say the least. But I kept
Featured will be Nick Brignola on
myself focused on that cretinousreeds, Lee Shaw on piano, Frank
looking
little old man. He was not
Tusa on bass, Mike Cononico on
only
the person who ushered in
trumpet, umi Larry Jackson on
the presentation with his opening
drums. The concert will be at 2
p.m. and 3:30 p.m., Sun, Oct. hobble across the stage, but he
24th. Tickets are $2 in advance seemed to bring things to a close
with the abrupt demolition of his
and $2.50 at the door, and can be
branch-cane and his exit off-stage
purchased in the SUNYA campus
carrying one of those ominous
center, Deja Vu in Troy, Albany
and Schenectady, and the Arbor "shroud creatures" whom the
Hill Record Shops in Albany. For audience had become quite faminformation call 489-3886 or iliar with by now.
Many thanks should be relayed
434-1495.
-Boh Rosenblum to the Bread and Puppet Theater
for the refreshing breeze of per— e — e — — — e w e — • mitting us to see something pretty
exciting. They also put on this
"street theatre" type thing called
"White-washing the Dirty Sheets
of Attica" in front of the PAC
that afternoon. We dug it.
The time the doors open and the
beginning of the performance are
simultaneously 8:30. We chomped
down the rest of our bread and
entered the Main Theater as the
play got underway. The Bread and
Puppet people took me completely by surprise. I was im-
Jazz on Record
FORREST WESTHROOK
This In Their Time, Oh Yes
(Revelation Records}
All the musicians in this album
extract a particularly beauli ful
sound from their instrument.
Pianist Forrest Westbrook glides
delicately and smoothly from
note to note. Paul Ruhland
ma tch es Ra y Brown for a f u 11,
deep sound on bass. Drummer
Dick Wilson carefully introduces
the listeners ear to permissive out
pourings that range from gentle to
thunderous, but always strikingly
novel. Jim West has that glassy
"Milt Jaekson-ish" reproduction
on vibes and marimba.
Although 1 doubt that any of
these musicians could stand alone
as a soloist, they perform magnificently together,They seem, in
fact, to thrive on one another,
feeding each other ideas, digestion
these ideas and excreting a totally
new one, but consistantly in line
with its predecessor. In this way
they run the gamut of moods,
rhythms, and textures within a
single piece.
No one really solos for any
length of time and the whole
movement of each of the two
pieces seems to be dependent on
this high rate of exchange.
There can be no doubt of the
total originality of those involved.
The Student Associotion Lawyer,
Mr. Sanford Rosenblum,
will be on campus to answer any |
questions you might have concern-
atlvcrtlsmg manager
news editor
good for this film only
by Steve Aminoff
Sometimes you feel as though
you're a puppet in this vast quagmire mortals call the terrestial
plane always being brought before
some magistrate of varying size
and significance who decides a
fate for you which has been decreed long before. And THAT,
ladies and gentlemen, was the
head I was into after I left the
Main Theater of the Performing
Arts Center where I had just seen
the Bread and Puppet Theater's
production of "The Birdcaleher in
Hell (Akyogen)".
There was nothing regular about
this night at PAC. I walked inside
the lobby just in time to sec
plaster-masked people' dressed in
eerie white hand me morsels of
this intriguing sour-dough. It was
interesting to see many of the
patrons interrupt their precious
small talk to accept this offering. I
actually watched the 'ghostly
quality of these mother-like creatures become the pale expressions
of the people who came in contact with them.
——————————
loin cliiignn
editor-in-chief
PAGES
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
SUNYARTS
ttrtmlut IK May Gene Water
(t, A,A1 1W> AlDrU)l*>4
—
IMABOU
•
ing law schools, insurance, or your
legal rights at 7 pm CC 346 .
Tuesday Nite
•• • • • • • • • I —
—'
October 19
• ••••••••••••••••••••••••
— 0 — — — —
Albany HV1-M0
ff*
I _ All
Km,,
PAGE6.
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
TUESDAY, OCTC|R 19,1971
PAGE 7
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
Return With Us Now to Those Thrilling Days of .
COMIC
by Harvey Sobel
While the comic book has been around for some
time, it is just now receiving recognition by the
general public as the art form that it truly is. Comic
books, in this respect, have been compared to jazz.
Both are American in origin, and just as other music
forms failed to recognize jazz as one, so too did the
arts look down on comics.
In 1938, the comic book industry was given its
breath of life in the form of Superman, the
generally-accepted first super-hero. Premiering in
Action Comics number 1, he quickly won his own
magazine. This, keep in mind, was the "real"
Superman, the infinitely better-plotted and bettercharacterized version as compared to the one we
read as a child. For this Superman had to work;
nothing came easy. It took effort and concentration
to stop that speeding train. Like astronauts on the
moon, Superman traveled in a series of leaps, not
by flying. That came later.
j
H
Spider-Man, and the whole Marvel line, fit into the
(logically-named) Second Golden Age. In 1956,
Julie Schwartz and his staff at National brought
back the Flash. This led National to try out more
heroes-both new and revived--and a new market for
the almost-twenty year old super-hero was discovered.
ftS
• > > * •
Jlii?*'fi ,; t
<$<#:
r' --<y ;
^\5fl
L.
{{'.,'•,'.''. w»JrT|.iJ
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if^sai
It was Jack Kirby and Stan Lee, however, who
first gave the industry its appeal to an audience
brighter than the ten-year-olds. Their brainchild was
THE FANTASTIC FOUR, and their audience were
themselves. Lee and Kirby had been in the comics
industry since its embryonic days, and they had
now conceived the Fantastic Four for their own
entertainment. Why not, they reasoned, have their
heroes, while slightly different, still face the same
problems each of us encounters. So, the Fantastic
Four and, by 1963, Spider-Man gave readers, a now
somewhat older group at that, characters they could
identify with, and Marvel set a new trend with its
so-called realistic super-hero.
What would also come later was a borage of more
super-powered heroes. The trend was set by Superman, and companies sprang up, all making a grab for
a chunk of the market. National Periodical Publications, better known as DC, was quick to gain an
even larger percentage of readers by following
Superman with.... the Batman, Green Lantern,
Hawkman, the Flash, and a slew of others. Timely,
forerunner of the Marvel Comics Group, jumped in
with Captain America, Sub-mariner, and the Human
Torch. Dozens of other companies contributed still
other, perhaps minor heroes. Yet comics sold.... in
vast quantities, and in such quantities that they
would never be duplicated. Collectors and professionals refer to this decade of high sales and scores
of heroes as the Golden Age of Comics, for obvious
reasons.
fjfiK*
Almost two years ago, because GREEN LANTERN was selling poorly, National decided to
change the book's format. With Denny O'Neil on
the scripts and who else but Neal Adams pencilling,
GREEN LANTERN
quickly took over where
"DEADMAN" left off...only better. The stories
became relevant. The first issue, in which Green
Arrow, another National hero, teamed up with
Green Lantern, dealt with the slums. Later stories
explored the population explosion, the judicial
system in the United States, and a heroin addiction
mm.
A new breath of creatmiytfinally came about ••
actually two breaths. Holh »«re artist-writers (and,
more importantly, storytellits), and their names
were Jim Steranko and Seal Adams. Steranko took
"NICK FURY, AGENT OFS.H.I.E.L.D.," up until
that time standard spy fare, and molded it into a
graphic delight. Polished art told an intelligent
story. Characters were living people, not lumps on
paper. Unfortunately, Steranko became tired of
doing "S.II.I.E.L.I)." His tle'iarture pretty well
brought about the demise of the strip.
Copyright - National Periodical Publications 1971
"KIRBY IS COMING!" shouted the National
Periodicals. "KIRBY IS COMING!" Yes, it seems
that Jack Kirby, for some time now, had been
disenchanted with Marvel. So last year, after working out the details with Carmine Infantino, the then
editorial director at National, Kirby received full
control of four books, which he could edit, write,
and draw as he saw fit. Starting with JIMMY
O L S E N , Jack Kirby began setting up his own
universe, totally Kirbyesque in nature, with some
brand new and old characters (Kirby had worked
for DC in the Forties, and he now brought back
some of the heroes he used to draw back then).
While Kirby allowed his Marvel heroes to pop up in
each other's books, he now made each of his new
National titles one big continuing saga. The heroes
of THE FOREVER PEOPLE, THE NEW GODS,
and MISTER MIRACLE are all fighting the same
master villain, though each book has its own set of
lesser adversaries. It takes careful readings of all the
Kirby books in order to piece together the complexities of the struggle, as well as to understand many
of the alien concepts presented.
Reviews of the current issues, be they the new
Kirby titles, Marvels, or other Nationals.
More chitchat about the comics scene in general.
Fanzine news, telling you about the better fan
publications put out about comics. Find out where
you can pick up those back issues you've wanted (or
where you can sell them). There are also some
excellent newszines, with comic news months before the magazine hits the newsstand.
Copyright
Marvel, as well as National began expanding, the
former with such heroes as Thor, Ant-Man, the
Hulk, and the revived Captain America, the latter
giving books Lo such groups as the Justice League of
America and the Doom Patrol and to individual
heroes like Aquaman and the Atom. Super-heroes
were on the uprise, but for how long? How much of
the same material can an audience stand? By 1967,
and that date's being quite generous, both Natioanl
and Marvel were rehashing the same, old storylines,
realistically or not. Marvel would add a new title,
but before long, that title would look like any other
Marvel. After, say, Steve Ditko's departure from
THE AMAZING SPIDER-MAN with number 39,
that magazine became almost indistinguishable from
DAREDEVIL . Indeed, Johnny Rom I la was drawing
both strips (with Stan Lee, of course, on the
scripts), and while the characters may have been
different, the storylines, and even mure importantly, the way of telling the story, were not.
despite the fact that all Green Kryptonite on earth
has turned harmless. Batman, on the other hand, has
left the Batcave and gone into Gotham City where,
from his Brucy Wayne penthouse, he operates as the
1940 creature-of-the-night he once was. And Marvel's Sub-mariner also has been looking a bit more
like his 1940 self. He's abandonned his Atlantis
throne and is now searching for his father. The
bitterness he holds (his wife, t)orma, was murdered)
parallels the character's original hatred of surface-dwellers.
COMING NEXT WEEK:
Similarly short-lived was Ihj Alley Award-winning
"DEADMAN." Drawn, and Sometimes written, by
Neal Adams, "DEADMAN" easily became a Tan
favorite. The art was dynamic; the stories had a
certain earthiness lo lliem, (k'lpite the strip's far-out
premise (a ghost hunting his filler). "DEADMAN,"
like so many other, intelligent efforts, failed to sell.
The strip ended, and the magazine, STRANGE
The college student, in discussing comic books,
will invariably bring up... the amazing Spider-Man.
"Yeah! He's really cool. He got girl problems, and
this sick aunt to take care of, and all sorts of real
troubles."
Copyright - Marvirf Comics Group 1971
ADVENTURES turned its attention to reprints of
"ADAM STRANGE." Every once in a while, Deadman makes a guest appearance in some DC book, art
by Adams, of course. Deadman has tracked down
his killer, but is now tangling with Sensei, higher-up
in the League of Assassins, the group to which his
killer had belonged. Hopefully (but don't hold your
breath), this battle will be concluded in the pages of
the yet-to-be-issued DEADMAN magazine, where
Neal Adams might again reign over the adventures
of this superb character.
Copyright - Marvel Comi Group 1 9 7 1
m u c h space per issue musing »bout. Enter the stock
c o s t u m e d villain, and the i of the issue would be
devoted to the oft-times drfcggi;ed out fight. And
every o n c e in a while, when,sal es sank a little too
low (though not too low,
the publishers would
take the book away from usjI, Stan, or perhaps Roy
T h o m a s , would make soml changes (CAPTAIN
MARVEL
is an excellent eSample of this. Every
third issue, the magazine wi6uld have a different
writer, new artist, and new stfliryline).
As the Fifties rolled around, many titles died. The
industry was going through its most bland period, at
least as far as super-heroes went. Horror and science
fiction, marketed by the E. C. line (sole surviving
title -- MAD ), took their place, with stories aimed
at teenagers and adults (which helps explain why E.
C. is considered the best comic company ever). Yet,
the stories were gory, and pressure eventually forced
E. C. to drop their serious titles.
y
BOOKS
National Periodical Publications 1971
(This last one, a well-researched, two-issue tale, was
just concluded in the current issue). And not only
were the stories relevant, they were thoroughly and
totally entertaining. Green Arrow, now hot-tempered and somewhat anti-establishment, fit well with
the more conservative Hal {Green Lantern) Jordan.
"NO EVIL SHALL ESCAPE MY SIGHT!" from
issue number 76 (the aforementioned first team-up)
was voted best story of 1970 by the fans and the
professionals; the strip itself won both groups'
support as best continuing feature.
These awards were well deserved. In the current
oarage of so-called "relevant" comic books, it's
refreshing to really find one. Many comics claim to
be relevant; these, however, are too often pseudo-relevant. You see, with sales so low nowadays, comic
companies will sometimes latch onto any contemporary topic as a draw. Women super-heroines defeating the male members of the Avengers scarcely
makes any point whatsoever about the Women's
Liberation movement, yet a cover featuring this
issue uses the issue to bring in otherwise disinterested readers. In a similar way, Sub-mariner destroys
pollution-causing machines, while Captain America
keeps the peace between blacks and whites in
Harlem. The comic book, which reaches hundreds
of thousands, just doesn't have much to say.
Artistically, no one will argue, Marvel and National couldn't help but to improve. Jack Kirby circa
1967 was at times mind-boggling, especially in
comparison to his earlier material. Unfortunately,
whole the artwork was constantly improving, reaching new peaks of sophistication, the stories were at
best remaining stationary, but, for the most part,
slipping downhill. Marvel, which had captured the
majority of the more mature fans, was formalizing
most of their issues, the same thing that caused so
many kids to turn away from Superman and
Batman in the first place. Each hero would have his
sot of problems, for which he would take up so
Copyrioht
Marvol Comics G r o u p 1971
Some magazines, while looking at what's "in"
now, also keep one eye pointed backwards. That is,
many heroes have returned to their Golden Age
roots. Superman, for example, was do-powered
recently. He once again has to work a little harder,
Copyrioht • M»rv«l Comlci Group 1971
I
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
PAGE 8
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 19,1971
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 19,1971
LGiraffifci
|»BHBBBBBBBH«IBi
PEACE & POLITICS
Attention t
AH students and professors now
actively engaged in off-campus politics
(running for office, etc.) please contact John Fairhall at the Albany Student Press office, CC 3 2 6 by calling
7-2190. Please leave name a n d numoer.
All presidents
or co-ordinators
of
political groups recognized by Student
Association are r e m i n d e d t o attend
tonight's meeting at 9 : 0 0 p . m . in CC
373. Discussion w i l l center o n appropriation requests f o r speakers, etc. and
on an e x p l a n a t i o n of the policy for
obtaining m o n e y f r o m S.A. Call A l
Senia at 7-5261 f o r f u r t h e r infor
mation or leave a message at S.A.
Draft Counseling
Hours:
(CC346,
457-4009):
Mon„
12-4:30 p . m . ;
TUBS., 2-4:30 p . m . ; Wed., 12-4:30
p.m.; T h u r . , 2-4":30 p . m . ; T h u r . night,
7-9 p.m. o r by special a p p o i n t m e n t .
All Absentee Ballots f o r November
1971 elections must be mailed out by
October 2 8 t h .
A l l people interested in w o r k i n g for
the Campaign
of Son. Jackson
of
Washington please call 457-5029:
Next
Major
Anti-War
Demonstration is N o v . 6 in 16 major cities,
including N.Y.C.
Presidential nominations
semlnarThurs. Oct. 2 1 , 4 : 0 0 p.m. SS 249.
Any one interested please attend.
V I E T N A M VETS AGAINST THE
W A R . A Tri-Cities Chapter of V V A W
is being formed. For i n f o r m a t i o n , call
Dave at 463-8297.
ALBANY
COALITION
PEACE A N D JUSTICE. A local
ter o f t h e People's Coalition for
and Justice is in action. For
m a t i o n , call us at Sweet
457-6544.
FOR
chapPeace
inforFire:
A l l those interested in w o r k i n g f o r
the McGovern
Team Please contact
Debbi M c N a m y : 766-3578.
Brian King, Associated Press reporter w h o covered A t t i c a has been
nominated for a Pulitzer Prize w i l l
spBak t o m o r r o w night at 7 : 0 0 P.M. in
Hu II6 o n 'Professionalism and Responsibility i n Reporting.'
Wliat has 30 wheels, 30 legs and runs
from north to south? To check your
answer, call Maddy (7-5238), or J i m
(7-5009) or Dianno (7-5237).
MAJORS, MINORS
Marketing
Club moeiings will be
held each Wednesday at 3 : 0 0 p.m. in
the Business Building R m 3 6 5 . A l l
members are urged to a t t e n d . New
members are welcome.
Society of Physics Students meeting
will be held Wednasday, October 20,
at 7 p.m. in PHY 129. Tours of
various physics labs will be conducted.
PYE Club presents:
Time of Man'
a significant environmental movie
Wed, Oct. 20
LC-1
7:30 pm
no admission charge
mavi wflfo&'iv iwutiu
PAGE 9
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
Geology Club Meeting Tuts., Oct.
19 at 7 : 0 0 in ES 2 4 5 - to plan field
trip on Sunday Oct. 24. A l l interested
come.
P s y c h , majors and prospective
majors, there will be a meeting of The
Psychology Association
on Wed. Oct.
2 0 at 7:30 in SS 250.
Tertulia Hispantca October 2 1 , 3
p.m., H U 290. Coffee hour and
showing of U n Chien A n d a l o u by Luis
Bunuel and Salvador DaM.
& INTERESTED FOLK
The Increasing problem of
speech by Dr. Alan Hinman
given at 8 : 0 0 PM Thursday,
21 in B i o 248, Sponsored by
Club.
V.D.; a
w i l l be
October
Biology
GAY LIBERATION
FRONT. First
meeting of campus gay movement at
S U N Y A will be held Wednesday,
October 20 at 8 p . m . in H U 124
( S U N Y A campus). WSUA will be
broadcasting our talk show Monday at
10 p.m.
WOMEN'S LIBERATION
FRONT .
First meeting of the S U N Y A women's
movement w i l l be held Wednesday,
October 20, at 8 : 3 0 p.m. in t h e
Fireside LoungB of t h e Campus Center.
A l l Former Acts t r » invited t o
watch the highly successful league M l
Acts d t f t t t Potttr Club and S T B i n
the 1971 playoff games. T h a A c a i
management encouragas all former
Acas t o oat in touch with B o b M a i nyk. ( 4 7 2 . 8 0 7 4 ) , for further details.
Urban Vehicle Design
Competition
predecessor to tha M I T "Clean A i r Car
Race". A steam angined low amission
vehicle is being jointly entered by
S U N Y A and H V C C . We need students
to work on this project; especially
w i t h skills in physics, control systems,
and computer operation. Leave information in F A - 2 1 8 , Urban Vehicle mail
box.
• ••• «
The 2nd lecture in the current
course in transcendental meditation
will be given on Wed., Oct. 2 0 at 8
p.m. in the C C . Assembly Hall. Sponsored by the Student's
International
Meditation
Society of SUNYA. T h e
lecture is open t o all interested in
learning about T . M .
A l b a n y State Great Danes D r u m and
Bugle Corps t o practice S u n . night
O c t . 24, at 7 p . m . in Phys. E d . 123.
A n y o n e w i t h music or marching experience is invited t o j o i n .
APO, national
service
fraternity,
wants to come to A l b a n y . Interested?
For i n f o r m a t i o n , call J o h n 7-7798 or
Chuck 7-7985.
WHAT TO DO?
Albany
State
Science
Fiction
Society mBets Thurs., 7 : 3 0 p.m. Fireside LoungB. Activities, magazine
(bring articles, books, movie reviBWs,
art w o r k , e t c ) and radio broadcast
tape project.
HOLIDAY
SING
GROUP
LEADERS.
Y o u must submit copies
of your music to Julie Caravello in CC
364. Deadline Nov. 1.
// Circolo Italiano (Italian Club) w i l l
h o l d a meeting Wednesday October 20
at 7 : 3 0 p.n.. in H U 3 5 4 . A n y o n e
interested is wolcome t o attend.
HOLIDAY
SING
LEADBRS:
Mandatory
November 2, LC 14, 7 p.m.
Ukrainian
Student Organization
at
A l b a n y Stato is h o l d i n g a meeting o n
Thursday, October 21 in the Campus
Center, and a seminar o n Lush a
Ukrainta, the influential Ukrainian
poetess. 'Interested students are welcome t o attend. For more inform a t i o n contact Martha 237-7722 or
Ted 7-8724.
Telethon '72 is coming!
Telethon
auditions will be held 1 1 / 1 5 through
11/17 in the CC Ballroom f r o m 6-11
p.m. Pick up y o u r applications at the
CC I n f o Desk and return them to CC
364 by Nov. 5.
There will bo Israeli Dancing in the
Dance Studio of the g y m at 8 : 3 0 this
Thursday.
The
/4tfa*f
Sept. 8:
Boston, Massachusetts.. .Boston Common
Sept. 1 0 : South Bend, Indiana.. .University of N o t r e Dame
Joy of Cooking
Sept. 1 2 : Phoenix, A r i z o n a . . .Phoenix Travelodge Theatre
Sept. 16: Los Angeles, California.. .Santa M o n i c a Civic Center
Sept. 1 7 : Seattle, Washington.. . M o o r e Theatre
Sept. 1 8 : Walla Walla, Washington...Whitman
College
Leo Kottke
T h a t * will to a number of Special
Administrations i n tha cities and on
tha data* listed above for candidates
who cannot take tha Graduate Record
Examinations at one of the six regular
administrations. T h a dates for the
regular administrations a r t October 2 3
and December 1 1 , 1 9 7 1 ; and January
15, February 26, April 2 2 , and June
17, 1 9 7 Z
Information about fats and registration for a Special Administration
may be obtained from any of tha
offices listed above. There is a $ 5
service charge in addition to tha regular G R E foes. Note that a candidate
may take any test twice in one year at
Special Administrations, but only
once from October through Merch
and once from April through September.
1971:
October
November
December
December
Aptitude
18
22
6
20
Advanced
19
23
7
21
1972:
January
February
March
April
May
June
September
17
14
20
17
15
19
18
18
IB
21
18
16
20
19
Ford ham University
Counseling Center
Dealy Hall
Bronx, New York 10458
Attention: GRE:NYCSA
Tel.: 212-933-2233 Ext. 263
VEGETARIAN MEAL PLAN will
go i n t o effect M o n . Nov. 1 in I n d i a n
Quad d i n i n g hall.
Those people
wishing this f o o d plan should go t o
the housing office, F u l t o n Hall, State
Quad t o pick u p meal cards between
now and N o v . 1 . For i n f o call Maddy
7-523B.
SONG
meeting
Coffoe Cup t o meet pooplo Sunday
Oct. 24, 7 : 3 0 p . m . State Quad Flagr o o m , Sponsored by N e w m a n Association. Everyone w e l c o m e
APPEARING AT:
OFFICIAL NOT1CP
Student
P*€44
will not publish
on Friday,
October 22, 1971
Schedule of Schools t o be on campus f o r recruitment d u r i n g the m o n t h
of O c t o b e r , a n d November:
1 0 / 2 2 / 7 1 - N e w Y o r k University
Graduate School of Business A d m i n istration (Bus. A d m n . , A c c t . , Quant i t a t i v e Analysis).
1 1 / 8 / 7 1 - Boston University L a w
School.
GRADUATE
STUDENTS
ONLY.
11/22/71West Seneca Central
School.
Sign U p Sheets are n o w u p a n d
located in the Placement Service
Library AD-135.
The deadline for incomplete
student's work t o be submitted t o instructor is November 12, 1 9 7 1 .
A l l changes of grade f r o m I n structors t o Registrar's office should
be in this office n o t later than November 19, 1 9 7 1 . (Undergrod b u l l e t i n
1971-72).
Extensions on Incompletes are due
in Registrar's office November 19,
1971.
LOOK FOR
HARVEST
HAPPENING
NEWS
^VonrroTnToTmn^^
Sept. 1 9 : To Be Announced
Sept. 2 3 : Flagstaff, A r i z o n a . . . N o r t h e r n Arizona College
Sept. 2 4 : St. Louis, M i s s o u r i . . . K i e l
Auditorium
Joyous Noise
Sept. 25: N e w York.. .Carnegie Hall
Sept. 26: Chicago, Illinois.. . A u d i t o r i u m Theatre
O c t . 2:
Madison, N e w Jersey.. . D r e w University
O c t . 3:
Washington, D . C .. .Constitution Hall
O c t . 1 0 : Kansas City, M i s s o u r i . . . C o w Town Ballroom
O c t . 1 2 : N e w Orleans, Louisiana.. .Warehouse
O c t . 15: Frostburg, M i s s o u r i . . .Frostburg State College
O c t . 1 6 : To Be Announced
in concert
FrL, October 22,1971
SUNYAGym
9:00
O c t . 17: To Be Announced
O c t . 2 2 : A l b a n y , N e w York...St. University of N e w York
O c t . 2 3 : N o r f o l k , V i r g i n i a . . O l d Dominion University Field House
O c t . 2 4 : Charlottesville, Virginia . . . University of Virginia
O c t . 29: Cleveland, O h i o . . . C a s e Western Reserve University
Oct
$.99 with student tax
$2.00 without student tax
3 0 : To Be Announced
O c t . 3 1 : Denver, C o l o r a d o . . . A u d i t o r i u m Arena
funded by student tax
Some cars
look groat al the
d o a l o r ' s But got thorn out o n
the street a n d it's a d i l l o r e n t story
Forlunatoly lor us ( a n d y o u ) the M G E isn't like t h a i The i n k l i n g s
y o u g o l about H in tho s h o w i o o m are more l h a n roalized o n the
road
A n d I h o roosons aren't h o r d lo f i n d a 1798 c c i w i n - c a r b e n g i n e ,
r a c k - a n d - p m i o n stoonng, racing-typo suspension, Ironl disc
brakos, a n d a t o l l y - s y n c h r o n i z e d •t-speod g e a r b o x .
So c o m o o n in a n d take a look at Iho M G B Y o u ' l l like it. A n d
y o u ' l l still like il alter y o u take a n o - o b l i g a l i o n l a s t - d r i v e . A n d isn't
thai what b u y i n g a sports c a r Is all a b o u l ?
JOHN R. RUDD P0NTIAC, Inc.
1021 State Street
Schenectady, N. Y.
PAGE 10
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 19,1971
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
classifieds
lost and found
Lost:
Mllner's
Psychology
portant
book.
papers
personals
Physiological
Student to live In. Free room and
Extremaly im-
inside!
board in exchange for babysitting.
Reward!
Own transportation. 4 6 3 - 0 5 1 8 .
Please call 7-7810.
Female
roommate wanted: Op-
posite Western Avenue entrance to
housing
campus. Call 489-7964.
D o n ' t delay vote Randy Jackson,
James Walker and Randy Gamble
for a progressive E.O.P. student
council.
Ski
Switzerland (Grindlewald).
Dec.
28-J an. 7. $ 2 9 9 Includes:
Roundtrip via SwissAir, transfers,
double occupancy, American breakfasts and dinners, ski bags, tips,
services,
etc.
Inofrmation
489-0432.
W a l k e r T ' s Experiences every Fri-
tion
Circle
at
7:30,
Saturday,
Rich: O E O U . Ellie.
October 2 3 . D o n ' t be latel A few
for sale
tickets
are
Karen-8993
Female apartmentmate wanted
1 1 / 1 / 7 1 . $ 6 5 . O w n room. Call
Janet. 465-4847.
still
available.
Call
Fribush—I've found you a little
or John-7504. $ 4 . 0 0
tutor to study with.
with Colonial tax. $ 8 . 0 0 with stuFor
Stick
Sale.
1966
shift-5
Simca Sedan.
good
dent tax. $ 1 0 . 0 0 other.
Sandy-How
tires.
Apartmentmate wanted (female);
'64
own room; half block from Draper.
1964
436-7975.
1965
Ford
Econoline,,
with
bright
apt. on park
one
For
big
room.
Fender-Princeton Amplifier—$85.
Linda 457-8938.
roommate wanted, call
Ice skating lessons. Call Debby
7-7813.
489-0773.
Automatic,
sale-1962
Sandy—Never mind how,
did you get the shirt?
Chevy-283V 8 -
tires—Load leveler shocks-Body in
Dear
when
you
behind." Thinking of y o u , Betty Jo
offer.
Will
bargain.
Call
457-3384.
PACKAGE DEAL
1 Suit
1 Sport Coat
1 Pair Slacks
1 Shirt
Beolovski.
Congratulations Milly, with love
from the family.
the week or month. From $ 4 0 per
Happy
week. Contact Bob Burstein. Box
birthday
Goofy
Grape.
Love, Beepo.
50. Indian Quad.
Happy
Klutz.
SELECT FROM OVER
7,000 IM'ODTED
SAMPLES . . .
Get custom measured • • ,,,
lor your tailored Men's f M ' \
Suits. Sport Coats.
iV-'l
Shirts—Ladies Suits. eM'""
Dresses, formalwear,
Coats.
«
S110
need a friend I'm sailing right
in the heart of the Swi:. Alps, by
ALBANY
SATISFACTION GUARANTEED
Kilowatte in Colonial: " I f
Make
DON T MISS THIS OPPORTUNITY
Silk Suits
SISOII U r n ' s SilkWnul Suiii .146.50
.linierc Trtiinwl .$5H.f>() Cashmere Spurt Coats .S35.0O
rw/y / l.aihrs CaMlltiert'
110.0(1 Cashmere O v e r a l l s ...158.50
T ' f i y ' tti'aiM Swrakr«
t 1.50 S h i n - I M n n i i i r a m m c d l . t 3.50
\\m
" r l l l '' < l ''•'"•"' ••
.111.linn H o l y mi.I .MtilllllK)
NEW FASHIONS
H. K. TAILORS
EOR APPOINTMENT:, C A L L M H . 5. PUNJAB
U. S. ADDRESS
at the Sheraton Inn I own.: Mnl.ii Inn
P. O. BOX 6006
I uluphonu: 4 31-4111
RICHMOND, VA. TELEPHONE ANYTIME: IF NOT IN. LEAVE YOUR NAME 4 PHONE NUMBER,
?3222
1
birthday, Brenda. Love,
Classic G u i t a r - F l a m e n c o Guitar.
wanted
Private
classes taught by concert
The State University of New
York at Albany is now distinguished as beine the first institution in New York State as well as
New England to offer the Doctor
of Arts Degree.
In June, 1970, SUNYA was one
of ten institutions, now twelve,
granted funds by the Carnegie
Corporation of New York for the
development of the Doctor of
Arts Programs. As a result of
planning groups at work last year,
the University Senate at Albany
approved three programs. The
trustees recommendation was forwarded to the Board of Regents,
who in turn approved the ammendment and recommended it
to the governor's office. The governor's office reported that the
governor signed the amendment on August 8, 1971, in a
letter to Commissioner N y q u i s t .
guitarist. Methods and recital pieces
for
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5300.
all levels of study: Beginner-
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Must be in excellent con-
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We might have to wait till we're
50 to be alone together!
Wanted'. Good
hornets)
for 2
adorable kittens. Call 465-2069.
help wanted
have you visited
THE
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Rent your room/kitchen facilities,
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$60.00
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Skiers!! Be free of group tours:
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MEN'S
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$50-457-4738.
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An ASP Feature
on W S U A 6 4 0 .
Roommate wanted. Share apt. 3
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month. Call 4 3 4 - 0 9 6 3 .
If
you
pliiy
Programs in economics and
English began immediately this
fall. The English department
granted admission to four students; one has since withdrawn.
Each received a graduate fellowship to enable him to pursue his
studies. The economics department has granted Doctor of Arts
trumpet, coronet,
trombone, trench horn or Tuba you
can
play
PAGE 11
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
Doctor of Arts
Program Planned
day night from midnight to 4 A . M .
Montreal buses—leave Administra-
Roommate
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 19,1971
a bugle in the Albany
fellowships to three students who
had earlier been accepted in the
Master of Arts program in economics.
The D.A. focuses on preparation of a student in an academic
discipline with major emphasis on
his ability as a leacher and minor
emphasis upon his ability as a
researcher. The candidate must be
able to interpret and evaluate the
research of others as well as to
carry out a limited research project himself.
The kinds of examinations the
D.A. candidate will face differs
from those experienced by the
Ph.D. candidate. The D.A. candidate will develop competence in
areas outside his major field or in
additional areas within his major
field in answer to a common
complaint that the Ph.D. is becoming more and more highly
specialized. Examinations will require the student to integrate material from his major and related
fields. A candidate will have a
teaching apprenticeship at SUNYA and an internship on a two
year or another four year campus.
This past summer, the State
University had three proposed Doctor of Arts programs evaluated in
English, economics and physics.
Faculty of the University of Michigan, the University of Washington
and the Carnegie-Mellon University gave high praise to the English
and economics programs. One reviewer said, " The English proposal could well be a seminal model
nationally for the Doctor of Arts
Degree programs in that discipline." One reviewer raised questions about the physics program,
questioning the breadth of cognate study. Because of this, the
physics program came back to
Albany for reconsideration. The
program is now ready for resubmission to the central office.
Other Doctor of Arts programs
are being developed at SUNYA.
Programs in French and Spanish
have been forwarded to the graduate academic council. The Department of Classics is working on
a program. The Dei'trtmtmt of
Comparative World Literature is
considering sponsorship of a Doctor of Arts Degree in literature
that would cut across national and
linguistic boundaries, and the
School of Library and Information Science has expressed interest
in development of a new degree
pattern for subject bibliographers.
Dr. Arthur Collins, Professor of
English and head of a Doctor of
Arts Planning group at SUNYA,
discussed some of the implications
of the degree.
"SUNYA has assumed leadership in an important reform in
graduate education. We shall continue to develop new degree patterns with confidence thai the
^
'
^
^
changes they introduce are both
sound and desirable. In preparing
teachers for graduate school programs, higher education has tended to overlook the necessity of
preparing undergraduate teachers
with solid academic foundations,
well developed teaching skills, and
an appreciation of scholarly research."
Since departmen I adm issions
committees will be concerned
with the total number of doctoral
candidates in the two programs,
Dr. Collins feels that either doctorate does not actually have a
fixed quota to fill. Neither the
economics nor the English department is seeking the expansion of
its faculty by building up a graduate enrollment.
Dr. Collins stated, "We wish to
make butter use of faculty we
have and to maintain a graduate
Stiite D r u m and Bugle Corps. Practice Sun. Oct. 24, at 7:00 P.M. in
Phy
A
Wanted bicycling enthusiasts with
own
with
others.
Call
parking
attendants.
T I C K E T HOURS W I L L B E :
(Sold across from check cashing!
- J U D I T H CRIST,
TODAY SHOW
10-spood to ruee/train morn
ings
BUSSES WILL BE RUNNING BETWEEN SUNYA AND NEW YORK CITY
cracking1
comedy '
Ed. 123. Wo will bo playing
homo (oatbiilt games in November.
Alan
Monday 11-1
Wednesday 11-1
Tuesday 10-12:30
Thursday 10-2
489-0502.
V
Part
OCTOBER 23 and 2A
in 1.C-1H
7 and 10:15 Saturday
STORE
Room 308
in 35mm Cinemascope
Tickets on Sale:
Wed. 1 0 - 1 2 , 1 - 3 : 3 0
MCAT-OAT-GRE
LSAT- ATGSB
NAT'L. BDS.
Preparation lor lusts required for
admission to graduate and professional schools
Six and twolvu session courses
Small groups
Voluminous material for home study
prepared by exports in each field
Lesson schedule cun be tailored to
meet individual needs.
Opportunity (or review of past
lessons via tape at the con tor
iiiiiimiiuiiim
WHO'S WHO ELECTIONS
Thurs. 1 - 3 : 3 0
in CC 308
will be held Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday
$1.00 lux Card &
II) required Cm
euch ticket.
albany
state
cinema
October 19, 20, and 21 from 10 am til 3 pm
A JACK ROLLINS AND
CHARLES H. JOFFE Production
UiMmmnttini iiNtitAU* H I I I A : . I H I I COtti'OHAMON
•
S T A N L E Y H. K A P L A N
GOUCATEONAL CENTER..TO
in the Campus Center Main Lounge.
(212) 336-5300 fe
(516) 538-4555
i i A f , r vi N I N I I S V I I I KI NIJB
•
W # + « , »»»*»»***»* *4*04+*#***+**+*+*+t***+*9*******+********+***+*** »** W****»»*****#»»+»+».i
SINCE t
'''""<''
• ' Wtttntnitm • Union • i ,„ AmjilM
Mi* TuH'iin* .V.w.,.1 u .||ji |.w Huiiunmdt H*ftu
•
•
•
•
•
Food Service Now Has
Weekend Guest Passes
Tower
East
Cinema
dinner lor $!o.
Oct. 22 & 23
PASS B: Any two inoals Irom Friday dinner through
$.75 ami $.25 with
\\
State Quad Caul J J
real
radio
is bach
(on a trial basis)
PASS A: All meals from Friday dinner Lhiough Sunday
Sunday dinner lor $3.
Passes must be purchased ul the Food Service Oflico in
Fulton Hull before 1 pm on Friday. They w i l l not be
sold on lood lines.
The Doctor of Arts degree will
offer highly qualified college instructors. Doctor Collins added,
"The intellectual climate of today
favors a reassert ion of the importance of the college teacher. This
climute developed out of student
discontent with university teaching, that sometimes (as at Berkley
and Columbia) manifested itself in
strikes and riots. It has led to the
next emphasis across the country
on teacher evaluation. The Doctor
of Arts degree is no panacea, but
it meets complaints of graduate
students about the overspecialized
training offered them. It provides
for th<- training and teaching
which undergraduates have complained thai faculties have lacked,
and it offers to undergraduate
colleges, especially two year colleges, faculty with experience in
teaching, and with the expectation that they will be rewarded
for the teaching they do and the
students they assist rather than
for the articles or books they may
write.
ITS ALMOST
TIME FOR THE
HARVEST
HAPPENING
• • • ^ • • • f i . a n d leave the driving to us
<
7:30 and 10
LC—7
l i f t t i l l liiili M I M I Uiuuklf'i N V
All ihidiiift mipt first umtthr freshman and trantbrs may *>t*l
•sua
WOODY ALLEN
JANET MARGOLIN
Summer Sessions
Special Compact Courses
Weekends — I ntor sessions
Admission:
Busses leave N Y C at 4pm on Sundays
* S E t o GO GREYHOUND
WOODY ALLEN'S
"TAKE THE MONEY
AND RUN''
another service provided by FSA
iiiiiiiiiiuii
Twin
Albany.
open 9—4 Monday thru Friday
i
Monday thru Friday. Call
G l u n s o n 463-B996.
Towers Bldg. 99 Washington Ave.
Fine Arts
2:30 and 7 Sunday
-
Walt
Busses leave from the circle at 4pm on Fridays
fr
Morning and afternoon hours available
albany state
cinema
time
. . . alverson
enrollment appropriate to the size
of the department."
THE
GREEN HORNET &
GANGBUSTERS.
WQBK
1300
we're worth listening to
HIGH HOTEL
RATES IN
NEW YORK CITY
Stay si itie world fainuui
Hotel Roowvelt for |utt
dfc
M
^
m ^ * . A D A Y S I N G LI
f
l
$1b.00 Double
WW M % 3.00 lor
H^pF
i"
Valoian'i Oay Rowve now lor
* gila 3-Oav Htilidov wwkand.
Got into it on the East Side,
the best location in the city.
You're within walking distanco
of famous shops, boutiquos,
popular East Side pubt, tho
U,N., the Main Library. Museums and those great little restaurants from every country
in the world.
HOTEL
For reservations call FREE
BOO 522 6449 New York Stall
800-221-2680 All oilier States
Madlion Avenue & 4&th Street
New York, N.Y, 10017
A REALTY HOT6L
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 19,1971
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
PAGE 12
ThtASf*
BootersTrip Stony Brook, 4-2
Despite the talent of their two
all-conference forwards, Aaron
George and Solomon Mensah,
Stony Brook's offense could not
get uncorked against a psyched
Albant State team as the Danes
d u m p e d Stony Brook, 4-2, for
their second win of the season.
The Danes, who in their first five
games scored only four goals, equaled that in an outstanding effort today.
The opening score came at only
3:15 of the first period off the
foot of Demetrius Micheal. Stony
Brook got on the hoard at 12:30
of the first period, as Solomon
Mensah dribbled the ball past two
state defenders to tie the game.
But the Danes suddenly caught
fire as they have not done previously this year. Carlos Alvarez
got the rebound of a shot off the
S.B. goalie to give Albany a lead
they were not to reliquish for the
rest of the afternoon. In the second period Micheal scored on
assists from Alvarez at 12:00 and
16:48 to give him a hat trick and
the Danes a comfortable lead at
half time, 4-1.
With the lead, the Danes
played cautiously in the third
quarter and got burned once on a
break away by Aaron George at
7:25. But Albany came back time
and time again to put shots on the
S.B. goal forcing them to play
cautiously and stifling the always
explosive Stony Brook offense.
Standouts on the defense for the
Danes were John Thayer who
registered nineteen saves at goalie,
and freshman fullback Evan Congress, who consistently managed
to slow the Stony Brook attack.
theJ.V. are Leon Sedafian, Mario
Fleurant, and Dale Cobane, on
defense Mick Walker and goalie
Steven Carlsen. Their next effort
will be at home next Saturday
against the Brooklyn College J.V.
Other good news on the soccer
scene is the suddenly powerful
J.V. with three consecutive wins
this week. After losing their first
two games, the Dane Pups, behind
a revitalized offense beat Union
College 4-3, Fulton Montgomery
C.C. 4-3 and revenged last week's
defeat of the varsity by Pittsburgh by pummelingPlattsburgh's
J.V. 5-2. Standouts on offense for
at 1 PM.
***********
S t o n y Brook:
2
Albany:
4
The AMIA Basketball and Volleyball will commense in midNovember. Those teams wishing
to enter must have a representative at the following meetings:
League I Basketball—Weds.,
Oct. 2 7 - C C 3 7 0 - 2 p . m .
League II Basketball—Thurs.,
Oct. 2 8 - C C 3 7 3 - 2 p.m.
League III Basketball—Tues..
Oct. 2 6 - C C 3 7 0 - 2 p.m.
League IV Basketball—Fri..
Oct. 29-CC370-2 p.m.
Volleyball-Tues.,
Nov.
9 - C C 3 7 0 - 3 p.m.
Shots:
Albany-22 S t o n y Brook-26
Bernie Boggs
Attention
Fraternities
CENTRAL BEER & SODA CORP.
1330 Central Ave.
***********
All Rosters can be picked up in
CC356 and musl be completed
and handed in no later than at the
above
meetings. Anyone interested in becoming a basketball
official must be present at a meeting on Wednesday, November 3 in
^
I wntked into Bernie's room and was greeted instantly by the
friendliest 5'8" 190 lb. tailback I'll probably ever meet, He's an
easygoing guy and the interview went really Well.
Bernie transferred to Albany last year from Temple. Asa freshman,
he started on the frosh team there, on the crux of a scholarship.. He
transferred for a lot of reasons. First of all, he didn't like the pressure
of the schoIarship:"They owned you—it was like a business. Football
should be played for fun; if you're not having fun, you shouldn't
play." The other reasons had to do with thievery, violence,etc, that
was typical of the area.
So on it was to SUNYA, where Mr. Boggs found he really enjoyed
playing, largely due to Coach Ford. "The Coach is a tremendous
person who really knows the game. He believes in living life to the
fullest and doesn't use phony acts to psyche the players up." When
Mr. Boggs enjoys the game, he plays like he means it. He is currently
sporting a 6.4 average yards per carry.
The topic switched to the most contemporary question in football:
violence. "Football is >
; violent sport, but you're not out to hurt
others. Most players feel sorry when they injure another guy."
Finally, our interview turned into an examination (if Bernie's
attitudes toward playing. "You have to play with a respect for the
other Learn." When I asked him about his personal achievements he
said," There are ten other guys out there doing their jobs. If they
don't do theirs I can't do mine." "What do you play for?
"Enjoyment, pride in playing 100%, an accomplishment of a goal. I
can't enjoy football unless I'm in top physical condition, giving 1 00"^-.
I asked if he bad any intentions of going on in football and he
replied that he might like to coach high school ball. If personal
qualities, like modesty, levelheadedness, and friendship have anything
to do with it, Bernie will do as well in that endeavor as he is presently
doing on the SUNYA football team.
Lecture Center 19 ut 3:00 p.m.
***********
Hemic Uoggs: "I'oollmll should he played for fun.
having fun, you shouldn't play. "
you re not
. . . chow
Harriers 8-2; Record Falls
cond. Dennis Hackett
placed
third, and beat out Goodrich of
PI a 11 s b urgh. Larry
Frederick,
John Koch, and Bill Sorel came
across in fourth, fifth, and sixth
respectively. They rounded out
the Albany lop six.
In Boston ,it the Merrrimack
I n vitati'rnal, Munsey's
harriers
beat sixteen other colleges and
placed two of their men in first
and second places.
From the gun, Hackell and
Quinn wenl stride for stride and
paced each other for the long fi.H
by Ira M o / i l l e
In Potsdam with I'lallsburgh,
the Great
Danes of
Albany
whipped their competitors with a
low score of 17 in the crosscountry triangular meet.
"We ran a very controlled race."
Coach
Robert
Munsey slated
later, "realizing that we were
stronger. By alternating the lead
every mile, we expected this win."
Brian Quinn, who as a freshman is
running varsity, captured first
with Scott Abererombie in se-
around the corner from campus
f8>&
(below Fuller Road)
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WOMEN'S
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257 Central Park West
New York, N.T.
Attention
Sororities
i tmwwrif NUMUMN
State University of N e w York at Albany
Tuesday, October 26, 1971
Campus Thefts, Robberies
Continue To Increase
90 Petty Larcenies and Burglaries in Octobei
Sexual Abuse New to Campus
year al this time, there were 6-1.
Since the two crimes are so closeHarrassment
ly related, it is more reliable to
Although the number of assaults
"Two guys approached me and
compare their totals rather than
has not changed (2 reported),
one put a sharp object under my
compare them separately. So the
harrassment, defined as anything
neck. They demanded all my
numbers now stand at 90 petty
just short of assault, has risen
money." This unnamed student,
larcenies and burlaries for October
greatly. There were A last year as
along with many other students,
'7 1, and 71 of these two crimes
compared to 18 this year. Crimihas been a victim of the upsurge
for last October.
nal mischief (e.g. vandalism) has
in the crime rale on the SUNYA
For the month of October last
risen from 18 to 20 reported
Campus.
yenr,
there
were
no
robberies
reactions.
Security statistics for the month
of October {up to
10/21/71) ported. This year, there have been
prove that in most classifications 5 robberies and 2 attempted robStudent Cooperation
of criminal behavior (i.e. burglary, beries reported. Most victims have
petty larceny, robberies, sexual been approached by two males
It must be realized that these
abuse, etc.), the number of inci- who demand money. Securily specrime figures are available only
dents has markedly risen from lasl culates that there are Iwo pairs of
these because people reported the inciyear at this time. Burglary has individuals committing
dents to the security office. It is
risen the greatest amount. There crimes, one pair armed with a
knife,
and
the
other
with
a
gun. possible that these figures are far
have been 11 burglaries reported
from the actual number of crimes
during Ibis month. Last year, for Usually, the pair with the knife
committed on campus because
the whole month, there were only work downtown, but on Thursvictims may not be reporting
10 huglnrics. Although a notable day, a holdup at knifepoint was
them.
increase, these figures musl be reported on the uptown campus.
Security sources believe that this
adjusted in order to obtain a clear Securily also believes that there is
understanding of the situation. one individual separate from the increase can be controlled and
becoming to aecumy uirectur, James VT imams, there are 6V2 There was much confusion last* two pjiirs working by himself. prevented. They would like the
security men per shift. There are some 5500 resident students on the
year over the classification of a Most of the victims were walking cooperation of the students in
crime as a burglary or a petty from or towards the podium at order to deal with this problem
up and downtown campuses. During (he day there are some 17,000
directly, They repeat their prelarceny. This month, there have night when confronted.
people on campus.
...ruxenberg
vious warning: MAKE SURE ALL
been '16 petty larcenies, while last
Sex Crimes
STUDENTS
LOCK
THEIR
Last year's figures showed no
DOORS. Security warns students
reports of sexual abuse but recent
to not resist if confronted and to
reports cited two incidents. One
call Ihem immediately if they are
of the cases involves a female
confronted. In addition, they ask
student who has accused a male
all students to report all "acts of
student in Zenger hall of sexually
coercion" (e.g. being threatened,
assaulting her. The alleged rape
strangers walking through your
took place on oct. 9 between 1:30
mom) and cooperate with investiand 1:00 in the morning, accordgators. Security feels that with
by Allen Altman
ing to the complainant. The comstudent cooperation, it will be
• precedent set by I he appropriali
, (he E.O.P, Student Association by p | i a n i i n l w u s i n l h ( , r m ) m „,• L l u .
easier to apprehend criminals and
Italian American Student Allian
«'<! I>y " rlefendent when the
that many of the crimes will be
took place.
stopped.
by Steve Salanl
Central Council Allocates
Funds to Italian Alliance
"Next year will be tougher."
Munsey stated when the squad
was invited back for next year's
meet. Hut we know better.
HAVE YOU EVER
BEEN TO A
HARVEST
HAPPENING
Waterbed Shop
or write to:
tap equipment available
mile course. Hackett finally won,
by a step, in an outstanding
29:21. Quinn was clocked in the
same lime, and both runners set a
new record for the meet. Peiser,
the lead runner from Bentley College ran third followed by Cavatiaugh of Nichols College. Although tin; meel was dominated
by small New England colleges,
Albany acquired 21 points to a
second place Lowell Tech with HI
points. Keene Stale of New
Hampshire took third. Contributing to the Albany top five were
Frederick, fifth place; Abererombie, sixth place; and Koch, seventh place. According to Munsey, 1''rede rick was considered
"runner of the meel". Bob Flias,
ex eel I en I runner on the junior
varsity was moved up to varsity
and ran in twelfth place. Nick
DeMarco, who has been out with
an injury, followed in fifteenth.
Vol. LVIII No. 48
I B ^
Wholesale
For Information call:
Bud - Bal - Piels - Schaefer - Carling
The Men's Phys.Ed. Dept. wishes to announce that courses in
Handball and Squash will be
offered during the 2nd quarter of
the 1st semester. The courses begin starting the week of Oct. 25th.
Squash will be offered M-W,
3:10—5 p.m.. and Handball on
TU-TH, 3:10-5 p.m.
Munseymen Overpower 16 Teams in Merrimac
459 - 3483
- keg beer in stock -
The AMIA Wrestling Tournament will take place on November
1, 3, and 4 in the wrestling room
of the Physical Education building. All entry blanks can be
picked up in Campus Center 356
and must be handed back to
CC356 by NOON on Wednesday,
October 27. There will be a mandatory clinic for all participants to
be scheduled later.
Final
An ASP Interview
by Bill Heller
Albany Student Press X
.
c
'-Qui
any size waterbed
Walking alone al night may be good tor the mind, hut it's not good for the wallet. In the past week and
1 hall, sonic S armed robberies have taken place, according to Security Director Williams.
with this ad
$20
<>««»*«»«««««»»««*»»«**»««»w>
continued on page \
...aluerson
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