Statewide Comment

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Statewide Comment
The Faculty Student Association has been guilly of gross
inconsidcration Inward students by its reluctance to raise the base
wage rate of $1.85. It is the height of inconsistency to maintain
an organization that is supposedly geared toward serving the
students while at the same lime refusing to pay those students a
decent living wage.
Promises thai the wage rate may soon increase do not erase the
bad image that FSA has accrued to itself by this policy. Moreover,
the wage that is indicated, $1.85 does not go far enough toward
establishing a living wage. No one in 1970 can live on an income
that is less than $2.00 an hour, particularly when thai income is
docked by the time allotted for meals.
albany student press 7
managing editor
news editor
associate news editors
arts editor
sports editor
city editor
business manager
advertising manager
technical editor
associate technical editors
production manager
photography editor
circulation manager
Albany Student Press i
Vol. tVII No. 2 9
A Living Wage
editor-in-chief
neill e. shunahan
AMERICANS FROM THE
\ SIDELINES?
W6LL, co/HE ON, \
" Misra SEH6EANT,
^~
-\MEUI\E
The recent rulings which grant University administrations the
power to review and censor the appropriations of student
governments on campuses in New York pose an intolerable threat
to student autonomy. The procedures that have been established
by the Executive Committee of the Board of Trustees allow
University presidents to impose their own political beliefs and
biases on the entire system of student governance.
This system must be eliminated, and the rights of students to
self-governance must be upheld. It is vital that the Student
Associations of the State University (SASU) take immediate
action at its October 24th meeting to insure that these rights arc
reclaimed.
The attempt to sabotage student rights in New York State not
only deprives students of the freedom to run their campus
activities; indeed, it threatens the guaranteed constitutional
principles of self-determination and political expression.
At the meeting this Saturday, therefore, student governments
must take immediate action reasserting their sole, legitimate
authority over the disbursment of student activity fees. They
must move as quickly as possible toward freeing themselves from
the crutch of mandatory student t es. It is this crutch thai
fostered the present situation that does not allow students to
govern themselves.
If all that emerges is pious rhetoric or statements of principle,
then student association leaders will have failed in their first
responsibility: protecting the freedom of that government.
From that meeting should emerge a call for a statewide
referendum on mandatory fees and plans lor an effective
campaign to educate the student voters to the necessity for
voluntary fees. From that meeting, as well, should emerge I he
basis for a plan for the implementation of a voluntary fee. For it
is apparent that student governments must now "enforce" llieii
own collection through price differentials and through rendering
the use of their facilities and membership in their clubs,
contingent on the payment of lees. In short, student governments
must move immediately to a separate corporate status.
The matter is urgent. Never has the need for constructive and
collective action been greater. To allow the situation to worsen is
to surrender inalienable rights. Student Association loaders face
the responsibility of reclaiming the authorit) ihey have surrendered through dependency on stale and university protection.
^*5
aralynn abure
carol hughes
bob ivurncr
uicki zeldin
tinda waters
daue fink
elmore bowes
chuck ribak
Jeff rodgers
torn clingan
sue seligson
don williums
gloria hollister
jay rosenberg
sue faulkner
The A l b a n y Student Press is located in room 3 2 6 of the Campus Center at
the State University of N e w York at A l b a n y . T h e ASP was founded during a
particularly low period of the first World War, and is funded by involuntary I
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Communications are limited to 3 0 0 words and are subject to editing.
Editorial policy is determined by the Editor-in-Chief.
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For Blind People Only
by Elmore J. Bowes
this. Possibly someone simply
made a mistake. But then, if we
On a wall in a New York City accept this as just a mistake why
post office hangs a sign which hasn't someone corrected it? Just
reads, and I quote, "No dogs too minor to deal with, huh?
allowed, except for seeing eye There are much more important
dogs." Now, it could be that you things to worry about, right?
see nothing at all wrong with a Right! Things like...the war, for
sign like this; could be. However, instance. All right, that seems like
if you give it a little thought a valid argument, on the surface
you'll realize that only blind peo- anyway, but if we look deeper we
ple have seeing eye dogs and blind see the same mistakes being made
people can't read signs. But then, there, too. An example? O.K..,
maybe it wasn't meant for blind how's this, according to the prepeople; maybe. It could be that it sent administration, and recent
was meant for sighted people, administrations, the reason we are
with dogs, in which case someone militarily represented in southeast
has decided that one dog is better Asia is to insure the freedom of
than another dog. Now, just to the southeast Asian people, corshow you how simple I am it had rect? O.K., now the usual arguoccurred to me that, just as peo- ment is why don't we insure the
ple are people, dogs should be freedom of the people here first.
dogs. Of course, some are tall and Personnally I find this to be a
some are short, some are light and valid argument however, this is
some are dark but all are dogs not the mistake I had in mind.
nevertheless. This is obviously a
Instead, let's assume that it makes
ridiculous assumption.
some sense for us to be there, that
our fighting for freedom is justiPerhaps I'm making too much of
God Wouldn't
by Barry Kirschner
Once upon a time, the world
was pretty empty There was only
one man, and he didn't even have
a name. Rumor has it that he was
a damn good fellow, so this
chronicle will call him A-damn.
A-damn was pretty happy with his
female partner, Even, though they
didn't have things like movies and
television. They tried to make the
most of their positions, proving
themselves able.
Wanting to move to the suburbs,
they sought eviction from their
country garden. When asked why
'they wanted to leave their original
home, A-damn and Even only said
I hat I hey wanted to avoid the
wrath of god (who was raising
cam). By this lime A-damn's wife
bore two children, and there was
no telling how many children
would have been bored if they
only ale fruit and vegetables.
They traveled to their new home
,by ship. A-damn got sea sick
which allowed Even more time lo
skipper the boat. The oldest son
proved to be a very able member
of the crew, but the second son
didn't want Lo follow orders.
Throughout the entire trip he was
thinking of the Caine mutiny.
When the voyage was completed
no grudges were fell against the
second son, a Christian act indeed.
Eventually more people started
popping up and the world got lo
be a pretly groovy place. They
..
PAGE 8
still didn't have movies or televisions but comedians like Mel
Brooks
entertained
regularly.
Everything was going well until
somebody asked what purpose life
has. For no apparent reason this
made everybody around paranoid. All of a sudden people
started asking questions like Why?
and what is reality?
These questions, and others like
them, were causing turmoil in society. Masses flocked to the individuals of high status like
O'Reilly, and Hoover, and Mitchell for answers, but they didn'l
know from shit. People were upset about their inability to find
direction, and even the invention
of the compass didn't help.
Then people decided to petition
god. A flock of leaders went to
this shrub thai was on fire and
started asking questions of it. The
shrub didn't talk much and the
leaders gol furious, demanding
answers, Whal about free will? Do
we have il or not? How about
purpose? Whal's our pur post??
Soon the crowd was yelling,
"Whal do we want? purpose
When do we want it?- now
What do we want—purpose
When do we want it—now
Purpose now! Purpose now!''
God didn'l think too highly of
the methods of his petitioners,
bul realized that if he didn'l
answer quickly, they might burn
all the shrubs down. He agreed to
speak with a few of the organizers
fied, O.K., so we're over there
(not here) fighting...for peace,
spending a great deal of money, in
an attempt to bring freedom and a
better life to the Asian people. If
this is true then how come we're
fighting? I mean, it would seem to
me, that if freedom is our goal,
instead of fighting our money
would be better spent in peaceful
endeavors. For example, the government could help support the
Care program, or the S.S. Hope
Medical shop, or Radio Free Europe, or offer better salaries to the
Peace Corps volunteers. Maybe
even the USO could get some of
the funds, especially since they
deal directly with the servicemen.
And why doesn't the government
adopt a few foster children? In
fact, why don't they adopt a lot
of foster children?
But then, like thinking all dogs
are dogs, these suggestions are
ridiculous but, it does give you
something to think about, doesn't
it?
Budge
of the insurrection about the issues involved. The meeting was
helled in god's office.
There were about 10 demands
discussed and god gave in on each,
but then said he had 10 commandments of his own. Quoting
John Arbuckle he said "you gel
what you pay for," so don't expect something for nothing, The
only questions still lo be discussed
were those of purpose and free
will.
God wouldn'L budge on the purpose demand, leaving that for man
himself to decide. The resolution
(if the free will problem was
worked on for quite some time
heron1 one of god's administrative
assistants proposed a compromise
acceptable to all. Under this plan
any man could decide his own
destiny, as long as it was an
unhappy one.
Needless to say this was ;i monumental decision, Because of il we
can read about Oedipus, Hamlet,
Willy Loman or anyone else
whose fates seem to run parallel
to our own. Most have decided
not to bother with the free will
clause (clause 22 in the covenant),
Those thai have, have lived and
died or are somewhere in the
process.
And what of god.' He sits proud
of himself in his house of warship
wondering how people can he set
stupid to bargain with the guy
who makes the rules.
Albany
State University of New York at Albany
Friday, October 23, 1970
Position Albany Reaction to Kent
Memorial Service Called
planned for this afternoon at
planned for as not many present
This nation has taken another step in the repression of individual
by Martha Nathanson
whi
Dr. O. William Perlmutter,
were in favor of it; 'A major
rights and liberties.
Dean of the College of Arts and problem was to publicize activities
Within the past week, twenty-five indictments have been handed
Fifteen
student leaders at Sciences will be the keynote
and inform the rest of the comdown by a grand jury which investigated the Kent State tragedy and
Albany State issued a joint call speaker. A service is also being
munity of what was going on.
eighteen indictments by a Brockport grand jury student activities
late Wednesday night for the Uni- ,prepared by the campus ministry.
At other colleges throughout the
during the strike.
versity community to take part in
Last night Central Council voted state, meetings were held last
Fifteen students and faculty at Kent State have been arrested: ten
a day of reflection, This came in to endorse the concept of a memnight to plan actions. There will
more will be arrested shortly. Even the student body president has
response to
plea by Craig Mor- orial service and also urged that all
be marches downtown at SUNY
been placed behind bars and charged with inciting the Kent State
gan, student government leader at members of the University Comat Binghamton, SUNY at Buffalo,
disturbances. Incredibly, the National Guard has been cleared of all
Kent State, for a moratorium by munity participate in the Friday
and at Syracuse University.
responsibility.
students across the country to workshops. President Benezet
The grand jury action at Kent State directly contradicts two other
protest the indictment of 25 Kent issued a memorandum slating that
reports prepared for the government. One was written by a national
State students and faculty mem- he hoped that the memorial sercommission headed by William Scranton, former Republican Govbers.
vice would include "discussion of
ernor of Pennsylvania. It called the student deaths at Kent State
The Albany statement issued in- rational steps that can still be
"completely unnecessary."
cluded background on the indict- taken to explain the University to
The second report was prepared by the F.B.I. It concluded that
ments handed down by the Grand the American people."
sixty-one shots were fired by the Guard at point-blank range and that
Jury in Ohio and also the eighteen
Within the last few days, Studthe shootings were "unprovoked."
by Maida Oringher
indictments at Brockport.
ent Mobilization Committee has
Even James Ahern, the New Haven Police Chief, has constantly
Throughout the day, eight work- held several meetings to support
Seventeen black students and
stated that the student deaths could not be justified. But the Grand
shops are being held, all dealing the Kent 25, and decide on action
Jury has disagreed and now students, faculty, and even the student
with the topic of repression of for today. One student brought one white professor have been
government president have been placed in jail. They, not the Naitonal
civil liberties in America. The up the idea of picket tines to indicted at Brockport State ColGuard, have been blamed for the deaths of the four students.
workshops start at 9:00 and run convince the students not to go to lege. They have .been charged with
Meanwhile, at the State University College at Brockport, eighteen
until 3:00. A memorial service is classes. However this was not rioting, criminal mischief, assault,
arson and attempted coercion durindictments have been handed down by the local grand jury for
ing the strike held last May. Some
student activities during last year's strike.
of the students are members of
Once again, civil liberties and the objective rule of law have been
the Black Liberation Front; most
pushed aside by irrational fear and rhetoric. This is another in a long
are on EOP or Summer Start
series of dangerous precedents. How long can we continue to allow
P r o g r a m s , The professor, a
the selective denial of justice and life? How long can we keep our eyes
woman, taught at Brockport last
closed and not cry out in protest? How long will it be before what
year. '
occured at Kent State and at Brockport State happens at other
the National Guard, the Grand
colleges in America? How long before it happens here?
The Monroe County Grand Jury
Jury stated:
Students across the country acting at the request of the student
issued the sealed indictments and
by Stephanie DiKovics
"It
should
be
made
clear
that
we
president of Kent State are mobilizing for a nationwide moritorium
these were publicly announced by
do not condone all of the activithis Friday; a day of reflection to protest the Grand Jury's action.
The indictment of 25 members ties of the National Guard on the the D.A., Jack Lazarus, on OctoHere at Albany State there will be workshops at 9:00 a.m. Friday
ber 2. Since then, three have been
of the student body and faculty Kent State University campus on
morning and a memorial service Friday at 1 2:30.
arrested and 15 have surrendered.
of Kent State University by an May 4, 1970. We find, however,
On a recent telephone interview,
We, acting as concerned individuals on the Albany State campus,
Ohio Grand Jury has aroused a
Brian Knapp, editor of the Brockurgently call for the members of the university community to put considerable reaction across cam- that those members of the Nation'
al
Guard
who
were
present
on
the
port
campus newspaper and an
aside their daily routines to join together in this time of national
puses nation-wide.
hill adjacent to Taylor Hall on organizer of last year's strike, statconcern.
The indictment resulted from an May 4, 1970, fired their weapons
ed that the indictments were not
We think of the continuing destruction of personal liberty. We think
investigation by the Jury into last in the honest and sincere belief
served sooner because "the D.A.
of the events last spring. We think about the deaths that have occurred
May's incidents at Kent State. and under circumstances which
wanted to avoid violence on camin this country—at Kent, at Augusta, at Kansas, at Jackson, at
Included in the findings of the would have logically caused them
Chicago, in Vietnam, in Cambodia, in Laos. And most of all, we fear
pus."
jury was the determination that, to believe that they would suffer
for what we are becoming.
Since the indictments have been
"those who acted as participants serious bodily injury had they not
Mark Anthony, S.M.C.
and agitators are guilty of deliber- done so. They are not, therefore, served, the administration buildMark Belkin, S.M.C.
ate, criminal conduct. Those who subject to criminal prosecution by ing, the science building and four
Phil Cantor, Senator
were present as cheerleaders and the laws of this state for any classrooms have been bombed
J. Stephen Flavin, C.P.S.
onlookers, while not liable for death or injury resulting there- simultaneously. A "defense" rally
was held on October 12 by five
John Foeth, Y.S.A.
criminal acts, must morally as- from."
" i n t e r e s t e d " students
Walt
Doug Goldschmidt, Free School
sume a part of the responsibility
The
Ohio
Grand
Jury
exonerSteward, President of Student
Joe Kaiser, Chairman, LAAC
for what occurred."
ated the Guardsmen, the Scranton Government; Dave Combs, an orLeonard Kopp, Chairman, Student Affairs Council
No National Guardsmen were Commission found "that the
ganizer of a proposed weatherman
Michael Lampert, V.P., S.A.
indicted by the Grand Jury al- 13-second burst of M-l rifle fire
faction on campus; Pat Gilliam,
David Neufeld, President, S.A.
though both the Ohio Grand Jury that killed 4 students was 'unjustone
of the indicted; Larry GosAl Senia, ASP Reporter
and the President's Commission ified and inexcusable'." It is this
tein; and Dave Copeland. At this
Neill Shanahan, Editor-in-Chief, ASP
on Campus Unrest, headed by inconsistency in the determinarally, the need for "unity" and
Steve Villano, Chairman, N.D.C.
William Scranton, concluded that tion of blame which has caused
"solidarity" were stressed. 400
Robert Warner, News Editor, ASP
the Guardsmen held responsibility student leaders to call for a nastudents attended.
Dick Wesley, Central Council, Senate
in the incident, only students and tionwide moratorium on October
These "interested" students and
(TITLES ARE FOR INFORMATION ONLY)
faculty were indicted. Concerning 31.
people sympathetic to their cause
have been collecting money from
citizens in Rochester and in the
surrounding area to be used as bail
bond; several professors have also
signed the bail bond. Although
the bail, as originally set, totaled
$40,000, the D.A. "relented" and
the fee has been reduced to
$9,000.
Jerry Lefcourt, head defense attorney for the Panther 21 in New
York City, Dick Gregory and Jane
Fonda are expected to speak at
the campus in order to raise
money for the Brockport 18,
A questionnaire has been distributed among the Brockport students asking for opinions concerning the indictments. Most common replies were: "I just want to
be left alone," "Last year's strike
accomplished
nothing," and
"Black students are hostile to me,
now they are asking us to give."
According to Knapp "there has
been no concerted effort by the
leaders to involve the campus in
their cause; the student government must organize!"
Arrests at
Brockport
Kent State 25:
Moratorium Urged
A L B A N Y STUDENT PRESS
F R I D A Y , OCTOBER 2 3 , 1 9 7 0
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 23,1970
• H n i l l H i B
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All
those
wishing
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work
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" T E S L as A Career" is t h e topic
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Adam
Oct. 27 at 8 p.m. i n CC 3 2 3 .
A t t o r n e y General please call A l l e n
Oct.
Reiter a t 4 5 7 - 8 7 5 2 o r Steve Shaw a t
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The Students I n t e r n a t i o n a l Meditation
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472-8754.
w i l l be offering a
Meeting: Sigma A l p h a Eta (Speech
beginning w i t h an i n t r o d u c t o r y lec-
Pathology
ture o n Thursday O c t . 29 a t 8 p.m,
Nov.
in LC 7 .
Guest speaker
Transcendental
Meditation
technique
being
the d i r e c t
guidance
of
honorary),
7 : 3 0 in
Humanities
U n i t e d States w i l l be described by
Thursday,
the panelists: Dr. Richard L. Light,
5. Business meeting 7 p.m.
Dr. Frank G. Carrlno, Dr. H . R y l a n d
7 : 3 0 . Speaker: Dr.
is a
Mary Stewart G o o d w i n speaking o n
taught
A u t i s m . CC Assembly Hall. Refresh-
t h r o u g h o u t t h e w o r l d today under
27 at
ments. A l l w e l c o m e .
H e w i t t , and Dr. R u t h M . Blackburn.
Sunday dinner on Colonial Quad
every Sunday—Hot Dogs and Soda
Maharishi
in the U-Lounge. Dogs-$.25. Soda-
Mahesh Y o g i . N a t u r a l a n d effortless
C A T H E X I S sponsors an informa-
$.15.
tional meeting o n graduate schools
in psychology, led by Dr. S i m m o n s ,
f o r m e r l y o n the A . P . A . Board, o n
ence increased energy a n d enjoy-
Mon.,
O c t . 2 6 a t 3 : 3 0 p.m. in SS
Wed., Oct. 28 at 7 : 3 0 in Phys. E d .
259.
Bring
dance studio. A l l new members are
A l l are invited t o a t t e n d .
man, or a B o l i v i a n , or etc., e t c . ,
all those
unanswered
questions and u n f o u n d e d o r realistic
R
r URE 457-5300<: f
DRUGS F R U S T R A T I O N B A D T R I F
T R n l l B I F HFI P SUICIDE FRUS
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T R O U B L E H E L P PRESSURE A N
X I E T Y DR-UOS B A D T R I P A N -
T h e Fencing Club w i l l meet on
welcome.
TROUBLE
B A D TRIP
DRUGS NEED A N X I E T Y
meeting Tues. Oct.
The
27, 8 : 3 0 in Physics Lounge. Sailing
classes start at 7 : 0 0 .
C A T H E X I S sponsors a f i l m illustration
of
Albert
Ellis
form
of
psychotheraphy on Wed., Oct. 28 at
With
a view
toward
improving
VH*T THIS COMfil
Hiens• l £
being
bookstacks
rearranged,
Additional
a n d seating are being
installed. We deeply regret any inconvenience caused to library users
Club
tour
of
GMFFlfl |
the
Facilities
scheduled for M o n . , Oct. 2 6 at 8 : 0 0
p.m. has been cancelled!
8 : 0 0 p.m. in LC 3. A l l are welcome.
service in the library, the f u r n i t u r e
is
Biology
Biology Bldg. and Major
HELf
HELF
=457-5300-
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Sailing C l u b
Deadlines
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in practice, i t enables an individual
t o expand his conscious m i n d , gain
deep rest a n d r e l a x a t i o n , a n d experiment in daily l i f e .
Advertising
week lor a Jordanian, or a French-
guage in foreign countries and In the
course in Transcendental M e d i t a t i o n
unique
campaign
Kent State Speech Jury Not Representative
Urges Non-Violence Bowen Case to be Appealed
Make friends w i t h a Korean this
urged t o attend a m e e t i n g , Tuesday,
Walinsky's
The deadlines for placing an
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We appreciate your cooperation in this matter.
Ski in Austria w i t h Karl Schranz.
H o b b i t s , elves, and queensnakes
rejoice! Oct. 3 0 is c o m i n g . Be prepared, and be sure to bring a K u m quatl
Call B o b Burstein at 4 5 7 - 5 0 4 7 .
A n y w h e r e in the w o r l d . Contact
Bob Burstein at 4 5 7 - 5 0 4 7 .
and ask your patience in co-operation during the move w h i c h should
be
completed
by
the
October.
end
of
Vets C l u b - M e e t i n g on Thursday,
Oct. 29 in B A 2 1 4 a t 1 2 : 0 0 .
As an English student, d o y o u
remember last spring's discussion of
5 0 - 5 0 equal student-laculty
sentation
in
the English
repreDepart-
ment? A r e y o u still interested? A
Give the cold shoulder
to winter in a Woolrich
Norfolk Jacket.
In ribbed or uncut corduroy with wool tartan lining. Gets you
the custom treatment in detachable cartridge belt, patch
pockets. Get into it and light someone's fire. Sizes: 36 to 46.
Regulars and longs. About $40. Prep's 12 to 20. About $35.
g r o u p of
English students is con-
tinuing
the
discussions
" 5 0 - 5 0 " and we n o w want
about
Part-time
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is open
B l o n d e D u t c h Boy
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times,
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Furnished
1961 Buick,
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For
Rent-l'/i
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referendum, or are n o t given a f o r m
in class, please call K a l h y 457-<1091
195 c m . Head
bindings. Call B i l l y 4 5 7 - 8 7 5 7 .
wig,
d u m on the forms of s l u d e n l parti-
you
Skis:
w/Look-Nevada
Hungover f r o m last night? Aren't
l o r m of sluclenl representation y o u
Please vote once and o n l y once. If
Sale:
you
l u ask
c i p a t i o n in your classes, Oct. 26-28.
For
360's
SUNYA,
Campus Center 3 4 6 .
N E E D A N T I F R E E Z E ? Call Jeff
each English student exactly
female,
Nov.
must
$400
be ileal - A v a i l .
includes
utilities.
4566829.
Want
t o b u y : good used stereo
system, call Carol 4 5 7 - 8 7 6 6 .
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1961
Buick
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Buy 2 - G e t 1 Free
w i t h this c o u p o n
457-4378.
Cheap n~ .tress w a n t e d . Call Dale
at 4 5 7 , 8 5 1 .
either
I
MIKE'S
1965
NEBA
Dodge
Coronet
500-Convertable-318
cu.
Auto
matic. 4 7 7 - 7 5 4 3 .
Giant
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SUBMARINE
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to
Columbus
deliver
'66
Ohio.
VW
GOOD A T A L L LOCATIONS
The following
is the text of the speech delivered by Craig Morgan
Tuesday
night, October 20. Morgan is the President
of the
Student
Association
of Kent State and was among the 25 indicted by the Ohio
grand jury.
g
tradition of freedom a n d e q u a l i t y .
I w o u l d like t o address myself
T o this e n d , we at Kent are
briefly to t h e nation as a whole,
asking for a n a t i o n w i d e m o r a n o t t o those s t u d e n t a n d faculty
t o r i u m o n business as usual. We
m e m b e r s w h o already agree with
are asking t h a t for o n e d a y stuus, b u t t o those s t u d e n t s w h o are
d e n t s d o n ' t go t o classes, d o n ' t
apprehensive about the concerns
spend their t i m e d r i n k i n g beer or
expressed. It is u n d e r s t a n d a b l e
playing football, b u t spend t h e
h o w m u c h a college e d u c a t i o n
day talking a m o n g themselves,
m e a n s to y o u . This o p p o r t u n i t y
with faculty m e m b e r s , with their
m a y seem t o o precious to jeopard- parents, and with college adminisize by b e c o m i n g involved in w h a t
trators a b o u t w h a t is h a p p e n i n g t o
a p p e a r s to be extra-curricular actus, a b o u t w h a t is h a p p e n i n g t o
ivities.
civil liberties in America t o d a y .
But let me ask, o n c e you have
We are asking t h a t s t u d e n t s across
y o u r degree w h a t k i n d of a life d o
the n a t i o n d e m o n s t r a t e their uniyou w a n t t o lead? D o y o u s u p p o r t
ty in w h a t e v e r m a n n e r they dea political s y s t e m based o n trust
sire, w h e t h e r t h a t be by fasts,
and reconciliation, o r will y o u
teach-ins, rallies o r w h a t e v e r : with
a c c e p t political rhetoric which dionly o n e r e s t r i c t i o n , it must be
vides a n d polarizes y o u r c o u n t r y
d o n e non-violently. T h e r e are
and t u r n s t h e r e s u l t a n t fears into
politicians in this n a t i o n w h o are
h a t r e d for u n p o p u l a r m i n o r i t y
banking on a violent upheaval o n
groups?
any c a m p u s in A m e r i c a in o r d e r
to get t h e m s e l v e s elected. We
We all u n d e r s t a n d t h e pressure
c a n ' t give t h e m t h a t o p p o r t u n i t y .
which exists in a giant university.
Any o n e w h o d o e s n ' t see t h a t is
S y m p a t h y m u s t be given t o those
politically blind.
w h o fear t h a t t h e s y s t e m m a y
reject t h e m a l t o g e t h e r , t h r o u g h
In a d d i t i o n , t h e s t u d e n t governthe t y r a n n y of grade-point averm e n t of K e n t S t a t e University
age, bringing c a t a s t r o p h e t o future calls u p o n University c o m m u n i t i e s
careers and personal advance- a n d o t h e r citizens across t h e
ments.
c o u n t r y t o s h o w their c o n c e r n s
B u t we ask each s t u d e n t , if he over increasing political repression
can find it in his conscience to
t h o u g h a manifestation of u n i t y
take the risks i n h e r e n t in becom- on O c t o b e r 31 by participating in
ing involved in the greater issues
the non-violent mass d e m o n s t r a which t h r e a t e n t r a g e d y t o o u r
tion t h r o u g h o u t t h e c o u n t r y .
Soul Food Kitchen
Center of Friendship
A
deeply
concerned
and
involved citizen of A l b a n y ' s Norih
End g h e t t o will talk with s t u d e n t s
here o n M o n d a y evening a t 7 : 3 0
p.m. in t h e C a m p u s C e n t e r Assembly Hall.
Pete J o n e s is a black m a n w h o
grew u p in t h e g h e t t o a n d knows
w h a t it is like to be a h u n g r y and
ill-clad child. T h r o u g h his successful e s t a b l i s h m e n t of a soul-food
kitchen n e x t - d o o r t o t h e Palace
T h e a t r e at 1 6 8 N o r t h Pearl Street,
Pete has been able to facilitate
and subsidize t h e feeding of sixty
school-age children every d a y . He
calls his r e s t a u r a n t " O u r P l a c e , " a
center of activity a n d friendship
a m i d s t the depression of t h e
N o r t h End G h e t t o .
to
474 3886,
468-8406.
offer expires Nov. 15th, 1970
SUPPOSE
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK
they gave a moratorium
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and nobody canit'....
JUNIORS
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Send Now for FREE Informuilon
—To—
DIAL-A-DATE Box 5401
Albany. N.Y. 12205
WSUA, t h e s t u d e n t r a d i o station, studied P e t e ' s s i t u a t i o n a n d
agreed with h i m t h a t the involvem e n t a n d s u p p o r t of the s t u d e n t
b o d y a t A l b a n y S t a t e could be
vital in energizing funds a n d facilities. In a d d i t i o n , s t u d e n t s from
B e t h l e h e m High School have b e e n
helping Pete build a day-care center o n t h e floor above his restaura n t ; this project, t o o , needs m o r e
student participation.
J o n e s will b r i n g s o m e of his
volunteers a n d children in t h e
program a n d s h o w slides and r a p
a b o u t t h e p r o b l e m s of t h e g h e t t o ,
his programs, a n d the history of
shameful neglect on t h e part of
local, s t a t e , a n d federal governm e n t s which m a k e c o m m u n i t y
action a last resort. Hopefully,
s t u d e n t s will r e s p o n d t o the idea
of
c o m m u n i t y - i n v o l v e m e n t especially since this i n v o l v e m e n t
was realized as u r g e n t during last
semester's political upheaval a n d
re e x a m i n a t i o n of the University's
purpose.
Applications
for
the
188 Of 7 3
A Night at the Races
Tues. night meetings
Saratoga Race Track-Tickets on
s a l e in CC Lobby: TODAY f r o m 10-2
at 9 pm
T h u r s d a y , October 2 9 t h
in the
Red Cross Blood Drive
CC B a l l r o o m f r o m 9-3
McManus & Riley
Campus Center
51 State Street
by Terry Wolf
t h a t all t h r e e a c t i o n s could n o t
have o c c u r r e d a t t h e s a m e t i m e .
On t h e g r o u n d s t h a t t h e j u r y
was n o t r e p r e s e n t a t i v e , Michael
Feit, defense a t t o r n e y for V e r n o n
B o w e n , is challenging t h e A l b a n y
Police C o u r t ' s decision a n d J u d g e
T e p e d i n o ' s m a x i m u m s e n t e n c e of
o n e year in prison s t e m m i n g o u t
of charges from an incident last
year. E x c l u d e d from t h e jury, h e
p r o t e s t e d , were t h e y o u n g , t h e
Black, a n d t h e lower socioe c o n o m i c groups.
V e r n o n P. B o w e n , a s o p h o m o r e
at A l b a n y , c u r r e n t l y o u t o n $1500
bail, is going a h e a d with plans t o
appeal his S e p t e m b e r 8 t h s e n t e n c e
as a result of the incident in t h e
Colonial Quad cafeteria o n April
15th. B o w e n was arrested in May
o n t h r e e a c c o u n t s : h a r r a s s m e n t for
pushing a n o t h e r s t u d e n t Colonial
Q u a d , criminal mischief for breaking t h e glass in t h e food display
case, a n d theft of services for
stealing a meal. J u d g e T e p e d i n o
p r o n o u n c e d him guilty of t h e first
charge w i t h o u t a jury o p i n i o n . A t
this t i m e B o w e n ' s lawyer w a s
J o n a t h a n Harvey. T h e last c o u n t
was dismissed since it was held
At 6 : 3 0 p . m . o n F r i d a y , Sept e m b e r 4 t h , t h e six m e m b e r jury
delivered a verdict of guilty of
criminal mischief a n d s e n t e n c e
was passed. Vernon s p e n t Labor
Day weekend
in t h e A l b a n y
C o u n t y Jaii. His bail h a d been
revoked a l t h o u g h Feit said he h a d
p r o d u c e d a Certificate of Reasonable D o u b t signed b y S u p r e m e
C o u r t Justice E d w a r d S. C o n w a y
w h o set the bail a t $ 1 5 0 0 . T h e
c o u r t issued a d e t a i n e r o n t h e
g r o u n d s t h a t V e r n o n , during t h e
s u m m e r , had violated p r o b a t i o n
resulting from a charge m a d e
three years a g o . O n e week later
a n o t h e r hearing t o o k place a n d
t h e detainer was w i t h d r a w n . Before t h e C o u r t n o w is a N o t i c e of
Appeals a n d a n Affadavit of Errors. A brief is being researched
b y Feit a n d t h e trial is t e n t a t i v e l y
s c h e d u l e d for N o v e m b e r .
John
Kaufman, a friend o f
B o w e n ' s , described s o m e of t h e
c o m p l a i n t s s u r r o u n d i n g t h e trial
and sentence. Objections were
raised with the fact t h a t V e r n o n
was o n l y o n e of 7 2 identified a n d
t h a t h e was deliberately cited b e cause of his association w i t h t h e
Panthers. The most
conflict,
however, c e n t e r e d a r o u n d t h e
jury. Both K a u f m a n a n d F e i t
p o i n t e d o u t t h a t o f t h e six j u r o r s ,
five of w h o m were female, all
were over 5 0 years of age, w h i t e ,
a n d four worked for N e w Y o r k
S t a t e . This raised s o m e c e n s u r e
because the charges were b r o u g h t
against Vernon b y t h e S t a t e .
A n o t h e r a r g u m e n t is t h a t t h e
three witnesses for t h e prosecution w e r e w h i t e while t h e d e fense's witnesses were four Blacks
w h o testified t h a t B o w e n w a s in
the lecture center a t t h e t i m e of
the incident. Also q u e s t i o n e d w a s
t h e s e n t e n c e . O n e y e a r is t h e
m a x i m u m term a n d to s o m e this
a p p e a r s t o be t o o harsh.
T h e issue, Kaufamn s u m m a r ized, w a s n o t V e r n o n ' s guilt o r
i n n o c e n c e , b u t t h e m a n n e r in
which t h e case was d e a l t with.
Kaufman, o n e of t h e leaders in
the collection of bail for B o w e n ,
said t h a t m u c h m o r e m o n e y will
be n e e d e d to further V e r n o n ' s
appeal.
New Outlook For Campus Center
Podium Extension the Solution
by R o y S. Lewis
As t h e S U N Y A s t u d e n t population grows, G a r y J o n e s is faced
with a c u m b e r s o m e p r o b l e m . As
d i r e c t o r of the C a m p u s C e n t e r ,
J o n e s m u s t find new a n d imaginative o u t l e t s to successfully accomm o d a t e t h e large volume of stud e n t s utilizing C a m p u s Center
facilities. In answering this n e e d ,
b o t h i m m e d i a t e a n d future plans
have been d r a w n u p .
O n e of t h e special p r o b l e m s of
the C a m p u s C e n t e r is t h e availability of space to t h e m a n y groups
on c a m p u s , especially during seasons of peak activity. Already
m a n y C a m p u s C e n t e r functions
have been diverted to t h e L e c t u r e
Center
Complex
through
the
office of the Registrar. T h e Brubacher facilities d o w n t o w n have
also been b o o k e d for various
meetings a n d groups.
lounge a n d cafeteria space during
lunch hours. T h e p r e s e n t facilities
are i n a d e q u a t e l y p r e p a r e d t o handle such a large volume.
An i m m e d i a t e e x p e r i m e n t a l solution t o s o m e of these p r o b l e m s
will c o m e a b o u t very s h o r t l y . O n
F r i d a y a n d S a t u r d a y nights, t h e
C a m p u s C e n t e r building plans t o
r e m a i n o p e n until I! a.m. with t h e
Snack Bar Facilities o p e r a t i n g until 2 a.m. T h e only areas which
will n o t have e x t e n d e d h o u r s will
be t h e P a t r o o n L o u n g e a n d t h e
Patroon Room Restaurant. These
e x p e r i m e n t a l h o u r s will c o n t i n u e
t h r o u g h this s e m e s t e r a n d h o p e fully they will allow t h e C a m p u s
Center to accommodate
more
p e o p l e on t h e w e e k e n d s .
T h e future o u t l o o k of the Campus Center is bright. T h e five-level
•west-end e x t e n s i o n of t h e Acad e m i c P o d i u m will include blocks
for S t u d e n t Association
. T h e Space C o m m i t t e e
on c a m p u s will designate this
space as they see fit. In a d d i t i o n ,
e x p a n d e d food service facilities
are
planned
which
will be
e q u i p p e d t o c a t e r special functions.
J o n e s also p o i n t e d o u t t h a t
q u e s t i o n n a i r e s are d i s t r i b u t e d in
the spring t o groups for C a m p u s
Center reservations for t h e following year. Each g r o u p is d i r e c t e d t o
any o n e of six specialists in o r d e r
t o help t h e m plan their activity.
O n e final i m m e d i a t e o u t l o o k for
the C a m p u s C e n t e r is t h e plan b y
the C a m p u s C e n t e r Governing
Board to r e d e c o r a t e t h e Snack
Bar. A special c o m m i t t e e is n o w
investigating s t u d e n t preference
a n d a n y plans for a c h a n g e m u s t
be a p p r o v e d by t h e Board, t h e
Director, the Architects a n d t h e
Plan Office. If a p p r o v e d , J o n e s
hopes to c o m p l e t e t h e redecoration during t h e e x t e n d e d Christm a n V»P»ttt
1
T h e shortage of office space for
S t u d e n t Association activities is
b e c o m i n g critical. J o n e s p o i n t e d
out t h a t WSUA a n d t h e A l b a n y
S t u d e n t Press were t h e last groups
on c a m p u s to receive a d d i t i o n a l
space in the present building. " I t
is t h e policy of t h e Campus Center to maintain a healthy balance
be I ween office a n d recreational
s p a c e , " said J o n e s .
T h e clearest e x a m p l e of overc r o w d i n g is seen in the increase in
the
n u m b e r of people usini
F r i d a y , O c t o b e r 23rd-81.50 for
t r a n s p o r t a t i o n & a d m i s s i o n to
Albany
DAY
CARL CENTER are now available at the Campus Center Information Desk.
The Class of '72 is Sponsoring
Stuyvesant Plaza
PAGE 3
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 2 3 , 1 9 7 0
Jefferson Airplane Concert
Friday, November etn
MILES DAVIS
tonight
in the gym
lix in CC Lobby
NEED HELP?
Upstate
Abortion
Service
Htiti 7 7 7 7
Referral
A ly|ticnl afternoon scene in the Campus Center snack bar. Crowded
chairs and tables, and people predominate.
„u^
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
PAGE 4
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 23,1970
PAGE 5
ALBANY STUDENT *RE&
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 23,1970
*'f
"Make voyages! Attempt them!
There's nothing else..."
Lord Byron,
Last week, the Theatre Department presented CAMINO REAL,
t m s semester's major production,
by Tennessee Williams. The show
featured a cast ofmore than thirty
actors and actresses.
CAMINO REAL was first performed on Broadway in l l )53. As
a play, it is artistically inferior to
Williams' previous work • namely,
A STREETCAR NAMED DESIRE and THE GLASS MENAGERIE' Those were lightly structured, dynamic plays; CAMINO
appears lax in comparison. It
drags. Williams, in a fit of selfindulgence, allows his characters,
especially in the last act (or
blocks), to rhapsodize, when ihey
should he wrapping things up.
Allowing for the poetic, lyrical
effect Williams was aiming for. il
dropped. An ear lor audience
remains true that CAMINO lends
yawns might have helped the proto bore people.
duclion there.
To avoid this, director Joseph
In compensation. Balfior direcBalfior might have deleted some
led several of the pails beauli. of the more turgid lines in the
fully.
Richard Learning, as
play. He did not. Many of the
Gulnum, brought Marlon Brando
characters are allowed to prattle
loinind on a number of occasions,
on endlessly; thus, all semblance
The bawdy, sanguine Gypsy, actof movement within the play is
ed by Marilyn Libcrati, was
in the play to extremes. A certain
gentleman who, oddly enough,
was the town drunk of the
('AMINO REAL, conducted himself in the manner of a wet bag of
CAMINO
laundry the crew forgot to take
off-stage; or rather, a poor unforlunate mollusk suffering from an
apparently severe case of St.
Vitus' dance. And Alan Ceppos,
superb. Yet Balfior's crowning
achievement was Jack Casanova,
Eric 1'oppick. who played the
part, was brilliant,
It is unfortunate that litis
restrained sensitivity of Poppiek's
did not carry over to some ol the
other characters. That well-known
bundle of energy, Holly hitler,
took Williams'calculated vulgarity
the pilot of the Fugilivo, exhibited uninlmile capacity to mumble
in monotone, while his face, thai
mobile work of art, represented a
perfect example of pillared lethargyThe rest of the casl were more
competent. A good handler of
caricature. Hank Kuivila, as the
gay Baron l)e Charlus, gave
CAMINO much-needed comic relief. Lord Byron, played by
Timothy lircmian, was belicvablealthough he did mil add that extra
dimension vital to his hues in
particular, finally. Gary Maggio,
as Kilroy, the hero of CAMINO,
did a decent job; yet, by no
means was his breath-taking performance.
Moie along those lines was
Robert Donnely, who designed nn
imaginative, graceful, and most
important, workable set. The
lighting designer, Jerome Hartley,
shone in some spots ton. Costumes were as they should have
been. Choreography, however,
was loo similal to that of
ORESTES; I hope Adiicnne
Posnei's fountain of creativity will
How again soon.
JIKKAPHI©
FORUM O F POLITICS
pUUflti
review by ali hu/,-/.ah
Mate and Wane/to Qo\ hma
photos by wait silver
' i rRYEI3ool5,l7i|W'1edc5rioc5
Former Senator
MILES DAVIS
with
w&m
Nick Brignola
Every fish that swims silent every bird that flies freely
Every doe that steps softly every crisp leaf that falls
All the (lowers that grow on this colorful tapestry
Somehow they know that if man is allowed to destroy all we need
He will soon have to pay with his life for his greed @
FROM A N E W ALBUM
ON MKDIARTS R I C O R D S
212 W/\6rf/NGT0N AVE . AL/3ANY -162-H 40
432 BROADWAY
TROY
112-7172
HOUR5 Moncty-Woy 12-3: JatVdcy 12 7
Wayne Morse
M:,
DON A/F JFW
* l ' J / 0 Mayday Music, Inc.. Yaliweh Tunes, Inc
Who Will Speak on
America's
Policy in
Vietnam
Friday, October 23rd in the Gym
Tickets sold in the Campus Center Lobby
10 am- 2 pm
$1.50 with tax-$4.50 without
Monday, October 26th
CC Ballroom 8 pm
FA6E6
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 23,1970
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 23,1970
EXPRESSWAY PROTEST...
•••
r~
PAGE 7
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
community groups tangle
•JO'
story and layout by anita thayer
photos by andy hochbetg and amy grossman
How do you stop a superhighway that scarcely
anyone wants and probably isn't needed when the
politicians and the governmental bureaucracy have
decided that the road will be built?
A number of area citizens groups are currently
confronted with this problem. Their object of
concern is the proposed Susquehanna Expressway
that is planned tolink the Binghamton-Appalachia
area with the Capital district.
Bozenkill Valley
with cement monster
The Bozenkill Valley is a beautiful area of immense ecological importance. The Valley, which is
only about 20 miles from the Albany urban area includes among its natural phenomenon a stream
gorge with four spectacular waterfalls. The Nature Conservancy, a national conservation group, is
attempting to keep the Valley forever wild.
The Susquehanna Expressway which is in the planning stages and will connect the Albany area
with Binghamton is slated to cross the Bozenkill Valley. Three of the alternative routes directly
cross the Bozenkill creek, the fourth alternative would have an effect on the Bozenkill drainage area.
Also near or in the path of various corridors is tfti Christman Sanctuary, the Abbet Pulliam Nature
Preserve, Sheldon falls, Darby Hill Wildlife Preserve, and Bear Swamp as well as many other
historical landmarks.
*lfc:
This highway will have drastic repercussions on
the human environment of an area that already has
more than its share of superhighways. The proposed
routes all cross the Bozenkill Valley and will cause
irreparable damage to a beautifully unspoiled area.
The Susquehanna Expressway (also known as
Interstate 88) has been planned to repalce Route 7
as a direct thoroughfare between Albany and
Binghamtun. Most likely this road will eventually
connect with an Interstate highway system to
Maine. The state has plotted four possible corridors
from Schenectady to the Schoharie County line.
These routes were the subject or a lengthy public
hearing in May at which time over 1,000 area
residents voiced their disapproval of the proposed
routes. Many expressed total disapproval of the
superhighway mode of transportation.
Some urban areas, most notably Washington, D.C.,
have experienced extensive freeway revolts, but this
is one of the first sizable expressions of protest in a
semi-rural area.
The local citizens' groups have ben utilizing
various channels and levels of protest but with little
success to date. Petition drives, letters and personal
visits to government officials, appeals to elected
officials, picket lines, and intensive studies of
various aspects of the situations have produced little
tangible improvement in the situation; highway
plans are progressing without interference or review.
This proposed highway is not an isolated thing
which affected only a limited number of people in
its immediate path. It is a sympton of something
larger. The Albany area is in the grip of a frightening
highway mentality. So far we have just had a
taste-the Thruway, the Northway, the Washington
Avenue Extension, the Slingerlands Bypass. This is
just the beginning. An incredibly strong highway is
strangling the transportationpolicies and resources
of this state andof the country. Transportation is
conceived of almost solely in terms of the needs of
automobiles and there is very little concern with the
need* of people.
The New York State Department of Transportation encouraged by Governor Nelson Rocker
feller and the incumbent Republicans, and wilh the
loyal opposition of the Democratic Party i.s ready to
build roads, lots of roads. A few of the coming
attractions one can find mapped out at the Regional
offices of the Department of Transportation are the
Selkirk-Schenectady Corridor, the Scotia Bypass,
the Erie Boulevard-Maxon Rond Corridor, ihe Km
terdam Arterial Corridor, the Route 146 Corridor,
the Schenectady Route 50 Corridor, and the AI
buny-Schenectady Expressway.
A committee of Albany State's Protect Ymir
Environment Club (PYE) is currently undertaking :i
serious and intensive study of the whole situation.
They hope to amass the kindof information lh;ii
will be useful to citizen groups opposed to the
Expressway. This kind of information can he used
to either deal directly with the N.Y.S. Department
of Transportation or as a basis for litigation. This
committee is intimately involved with area citizens'
groups from the affected area.
When people are confused about issues of public
policy, the Lime is ripe for political opportunism.
With the imminence of elections, there has never
been a lack of statements concerning this highway
and the Bozenkill area from all levels of candidates
One of the more popular schemes i.s ii plan
advocated by Assemblywoman Mary Anne Krupsak
which calls for the moving of the Interstate H*
m
terminus from the Schenectady exit of the Thruway
to the Amsterdam exit where the highway is
supposedly wanted (at least according to the elected
officials of that area).
Governor Rockerfeller has publicly stated that the
Department of Transportation will not choose a
route tht would "adversely affect the Bozenkill
Valley." However all of the routes that have been
submitted for a public hearing will affect the the
Bozenkill Valley-three directly and one indirectly.
It seems very likely that no public decision will be
announced until after the upcoming election, although there are definite indications that a corridor
for the local segment of Interstate HH has been
chosen.
The 130 mile long Susquehanna Expressway was
authorized by the N.Y.S. Legislature on the recommendation of a special Rockerfeller Commission
which stated that priority hsould be given because
it would economically benefit the depressed "Appalachia" area. However, pressure for this road had
been exerted by certain pressure groups in the
Southern tier for a long time even before Appaalachia became an issue. Rockerfeller is publicly
committed to building an Alhany-Bingahmfon
Road. This is the most likely explanation lor the
complete insensitiviLy of the Department of Transportation to the needs and problems of the people
directly affected by this proposed expressway.
yk
^BofM Odtij md dnJtMttofc SS
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 2 3 , 1 9 7 0
PAGE 8
State Judo Club
Begins 4th Semester
Footh alhWhat ItIs
Gridders Travel To Towson State Saturday
by Mike Piechowicz
T h e G r e a t Dane gridders take
their w i n n i n g p h i l o s o p h y o n t h e
r o a d t o m o r r o w when t h e y seek
o u t v i c t o r y n u m b e r three s o m e w h e r e in t h e recesses of Maryland.
T h e i r o p p o n e n t will be T o w s o n
S t a t e , w h o s h o u l d offer t h e greatest resistance Albany has faced t o
d a t e , as t h e y r o u n d o u t t h e first
half of their schedule.
" T o w s o n might be t h e strongest
line we face," c o m m e n t e d c o a c h
F o r d . " T h e y ' r e bigger defensively
than we are offensively, a n d
t h e y ' r e very good against t h e
rush."
T h e S t a t e backfield of Boggs
a n d Vido could be in for a rough
a f t e r n o o n , and if they c a n ' t m o v e
the team, t h e call will go t o Bill
Flanagan lo t h r o w the ball. If
T o w s o n has a defensive shortc o m i n g , it's that they are weak in
the s e c o n d a r y .
T h e y ' r e good, but in t h e w o r d s
of coach F o r d , "We can beat t h e m
if we play a relatively errorless
game."
T o w s o n is a well balanced team,
with o n e of the finest q u a r t e r backs we're likely t o face this
year. His name is Al Ootids, and
he finished M t h nationally in t h e
dec at ha ton last year, a test of
all-round athletic ability. Last
year lie also passed for 6 2 % a n d
over 1 5 0 0 yards in a d d i t i o n t o
doing t h e t e a m ' s p u n t i n g , and
a c c u m u l a t i n g a 4 0 yard average.
If we b e a t Towson, we'll have t o
s t o p D o d d s just as we s t o p p e d
Muscarella of R.I.T., a n d Grasso
of Siena.
A l b a n y will be faced with s o m e
p r o b l e m s they haven't experie n c e d before. Injuries are starting
t o t a k e their toll. C o r n e r b a c k
Dave Benedict may be lost for t h e
season with b o n e chips in his
elbow. Actually, both elbows are
in bad shape, and one is in a cast.
T o further complicate m a t t e r s in
an already shakey
secondary,
safety H e / Braswell hasn't put in
an a p p e a r a n c e in t h e last t w o
practices, and is believed to have
quit t h e team.
On t h e offensive line, Dick
Wesley m a y have bruised s o m e
ribs in t h e Siena game, and s h o u l d
any u n e x p e c t e d losses, or injuries
occur during the T o w s o n c o n t e s t .
S t a t e c o u l d be in serious t r o u b l e .
Flanagan a n d Boggs are sure
starters in t h e backrield, but t h e
Fullback position is in d o u b t .
R u d y Vido had a r o u g h t i m e
against Siena, picking up only 2K
yards in 16 carries, a n d b o t h
Terry Lee a n d Larry Petersen are
c o n t e n d e r s for his post.
Ernie T h o m a s played an o u t standing game last week and will
start again at slot back, with Ed
Danes Crush New Paltz
Run Mark to 9-1
Coach Bub Munsey's Harriers
traveled to New Pall/. Wednesday
and defeated the S o u t h e r n e r s for
tin.* eighth
eimseeut ive year,
2l-:ir>, despite the fact thai the
D a n e s ' leading runner,
Dennis
l l a c k e t l was out with a fool injury.
It seemed that, H a c k e t f s loss
just m a d e S t a l e try harder as they
look seven of the first ten positions including first and second
place. Nick Do Marco was firsl in a
time of 2;"): 10 over the five mile
cou rse.
Senior
Pat
Gepfert
finished in t he r u n n e r - u p s p o t
only 2\\ seconds behind DeMarco.
Bill Meehan, Larry Frederick, Sal
Rodriguez, J o h n Koch a n d Orville
Eaeker took t h e sixth t h r o u g h
tenth places, respectively.
DoMarco's lime was t h e best yet
for an Albany runner. I liiekel l
h eld
t he
previous
record
(25:2.'!.5). Nick is the firsl freshman ever lo win a varsity cross
c o u n t r y race lor Stale.
T h i s win brought t h e D a n e s '
record l o !)-l lor the year. Saturday, they lake on Hart wick a w a y .
T h e junior varisly also ran
against New Pall/, and presented
an even m o r e impressive victory as
they shut out Ihe h o m e t e a m
iT)-r>(i
bill Sorel was firsl lor t lie
Baby
Danes
mile
course.
llirough
Ugelow,
berl,
in
1 7 : 1(1 o v e ; l h e
Taking
seventh
Lou
Mike
Ihe
Carley,
and B o b Schiller,
second
places were
Cuevas,
Rene
Joe
Wh
Selh
lle-
Perka at tight e n d , and Ed
Williams split.
Coach Ford s u m m e d u p t h e
game by saying, " A g a i n s t a team
of this caliber, we'll find o u t just
h o w good we really a r e . "
Maryland is a long w a y from
friendly
Albany.
Let's
hope
" L a d y L u c k " likes t o travel.
Coach
Ford a w a r d e d special
praise t o t h e following players for
their p a r t s in t h e victory over
Siena; Offensive Back of t h e
Week: Bernie Boggs
Bernie was t h e driving force
behind State's win with his 159
yards rushing, o n e t o u c h d o w n ,
o n e field goal, a n d t w o e x t r a
points. Offensive L i n e m a n of the
Week: Dick Wesley
Dick turned in an o u t s t a n d i n g
game, a n d was a prime reason why
the A l b a n y backfield ground out
21H yards. When s o m e b o d y went
t h r o u g h a hole, t h a n k Dick because, chances are, he m a d e it.
Defensive Lineman of t h e Week:
Steve F i n n
Soccer Team
Loses Overtime
Decision to
Hamilton
T h e varsity soccer team traveled
In Hamilton College Wednesday
but t h e change of s c e n e r y d i d n ' t
help as the h o o t e r s losl a tough
2-1 decision in overtime.
This game was a perfect e x a m p l e
of o n e learn d o m i n a t i n g througho u t the c o n t e s t but when Ihe final
whistle is b l o w n , they a r e on the
s h o r t end of the score.
S t a t e oufshol Hamilton 3n-B.
T h e y got n u m e r o u s o p p o r t u n i t i e s
lo score but jttsl could mil put t h e
ball in Ihe net. According l o
Coach Bill SchieflVlin, " w h e n you
gel t h a t many good changes and
you d o n ' t pul t h e m in, you can'I
expect l o w i n . "
Schiefl'elin cited halfbacks Bruce
A e k e r m a n and Jeff O'Dimnell and
fullback Nick Acieiwio for having
fine games. T h e coach also comm e n t e d that J o h n T h a y e r played
his usual could game in goal.
This S a t u r d a y , t h e Danes travel
to S t o n y Brook. T h e Colonials are
(i I t h u s far this year and according lo SchieflVlin, " T h e y ' l l be
lough."
Against
incredible
o d d s , the
great WSUA sportscasting team
will a t t e m p t
SKI TRIP TO AUSTRIA
ba n y - T o w s o n
to cover Ihe AlState
football
game live from M a r y l a n d . T u n e
in a t 2 p . m . S a t u r d a y
January 1 • January 16
only $285.00
Includes:
•Flight from NY lo Munich lo NY
*Bus: Munich/Bad Gastein/Municli
•Hotel (double rooms)-singlcs on request
•Breakfast Daily
•Dinner for 1st seven days
•Krce entrance to Gambling Casino
•Free entrance to Hot Springs
•Ski pro to assist you
•All gratuities and taxes
Sponsored by Albany State Slii Club
For more information, contact:
Robert Burstein
DB 107-2
Indian Quad
457-5047
Farnsworth
R o y ' s play was characteristic of
a steadily improving c o r p s of
s e c o n d a r y m e n . He t u r n e d in a
key i n t e r c e p t i o n t o halt a Siena
Defensive Back of the Week: Roy
drive.
o u t if we succeed.
to
find
by Dave Fink
This is the second installment
of a three part series. Next
week'«
final article will deal with a coach's view of what football is.
W e d n e s d a y ' s issue of t h e K n i c k e r b o c k e r News featured an article
dealing with a p r o b l e m that m a n y football coaches are n o w dealing
with t h r o u g h o u t with personnel. T h e y recruit high school ballplayers,
help t h e m gain a d m i t t a n c e to the school and give t h e m scholarships.
T h e n , c o m e fall, these men decide t h a t ihey d o n ' t w a n t t o play
football. In t h e words of H o b a r t ' s varsity football coach, " T h e best
defensive tackle in the school has never p u t on a j e r s e y . " O t h e r
players c o m e o u t for t h e team and th on cjuil. Wh:it is thu reason for
it?
It is q u i t e e v i d e n t t h a t our entire American culture Is u n d e r g o i n g an
i m p o r t a n t change. We are b e c o m i n g aware of m a n y social ills. Wo have
begun t o c o n f r o n t ourselves, not only as a nation, hut as individuals.
Many of us a r e frightened by w h a t we see.
Our c u l t u r e has been characterized by regimentation. In the past, we
were t a u g h t For all i n t e n t s and purposes not lo question. We
c o n d u c t e d o u r lives in a m a n n e r exactly like our predecessors. N o w ,
we have a w a k e n e d to o u r situation a n d , consequently, have begun t o
question—to look deeper into our existence. Some of us have c o m e t o
realize t h a t l o be ruled by t r a d i t i o n , not lo think hut to blindly
accept, is to s t a g n a t e ourselves. This is why we find it hard to listen t o
orders, w i t h o u t q u e s t i o n .
Indeed, an analogy has been m a d e between the marine drill sergeant
and t h e football coach. In -some instances, Ihi.s c o m p a r i s o n is valid.
T h e point it, if t o d a y ' s coach is to lake a step to eradicate his
pcn.onnel p r o b l e m , lie must not s o u n d like a sergeant, he must not
run a team like a coach of I 0 years ago, for he can no longer appeal t o
Ihe phrase, " W i n o n e for old Stale U . " lie must learn lo u n d e r s t a n d
each player as an individual, lie musl not demand shorl hair or crew
neck sweaters. His sole concern should be wilh a man's p e r f o r m a n c e
on the
field.
Only
if h i s a p p e a r a n c e
affects
by James McGlynn
New m e m b e r s are n o w being a c c e p t e d into t h e S t a t e Judo Club. The club, beginning its fourth semester
o n t h e S U N Y A c a m p u s , has previously been geared t o w a r d readying judo players for competitive
t o u r n a m e n t s . This year, t h e c l u b ' s instructor, Mr. R o b e r t F o u n t a i n , Nidan (2nd degree black belt),
a n n o u n c e d t h a t t h e program will be considerably e x p u n d e d . He w e n t o n t o express his understanding that
people are interested in j u d o for m a n y reasons; self-defense, muscular development, agility improvement,
as well as competitive sport. T h e
club
is now correspondingly
changing t o m e e t t h e desires of the
varied m e m b e r s .
Leading Ihe J u d o C l u b again this
year for t h e fourth c o n s e c u t i v e
semester is Kevin K a z a c o s , S a n k y u
(1st degree b r o w n b e l t ) . Assisting
Kevin are Mike Pavy, vice-presid e n t , Sue Berg, s e c r e t a r y , Jeff
Opal,
treasurer,
Angella
Scarfoletti, assistant secretary, and Jim
M c G l y n n , public relations. Any
problesm or questions c o n c e r n i n g
the club should be d i r e c t e d t o w a r d
o n e of these officers.
A n y o n e interested in viewing or
participating in t h e J u d o Club
should c o m e to a n y of the three
weekly club meetings. T h e y are
held o n M o n d a y a n d T h u r s d a y
evenings from 6 : 3 0 - 8 : 3 0 p.m. a n d
Friday
afternoons
from
1 2 : 3 0 - 2 : 3 0 p.m. in t h e wrestling
room, For any further information,
call
Jim
McGlynn:
457-7030.
Ins | ) l a y s h o u l d I h e c o a c h
concern himself wil h it.
Whether or mil I be coach can c o n f o r m to ilii.s is o u r <|ueslion. T h e r e
is, h o w e v e r ,
has c o m e
society
come
in
a much
lo
are
lo
see.
mil
now
realizes
cHlllies
inherent
Asia
racism
to
hi I
problem
and
of
lhe>
air
I h e halt
iilli'irelaled,
values
player
problems
Thus,
of
our
lie
has
In m a y IMM-S. he s e e s a
h e is d e m o n s t r a t i n g .ic,;nnsi .1 v i o l e n l
ihe
our
which
I ha I t h e c u r r e n t
f o o l b i d I Willi h i s o w n
For, one m o m e n t ,
Southeast
taught
more deep sealed
lie
separate
relale
conflict.
abilily
culture
his o p p o n e n t
lo
and
hale
Ihe
which
next
war
rharaelen/.e*
m o m e n t , he
as h a r d as h e c a n , l o m a k e
is
Ihe
being
ihe m a n
feel
FOR WOMEN ONLY
pain.
Ih- r e a l i z e s t h a t
a violent
RUDY VITO IS seen scoring here against Siena. The Danes will have
lo d o this often if they are to beat Towson State Saturday.
...rosenher^
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The Mail HON, P.O. Ilox 2417
San Francisco, Calif.
if
we
have'nol
lo
al
Ihe
football
maintain
Albany
Ihey point
and
Gribble
lnrlep.
Indep.
Gribble
Gribble
lor Ihe
We
block,
we enjoy
progressed
are
satisfaction
winning
seeing a violent tackle
much
from
the
days
when
players
these
reaction
values which
is l o
rra't'l
whose
ool
thai
personal
feelings
the
spoil
lie
he believes to he correct
are similar
succeeding
in
ft
.ill.nmiir
working
Ihen
goal
al
In v p e j k i u g l o
players
lo Ihose staled
..hove
I ha I l h e . \ a r e a w a r e o f I h i s e m i t r a d i e l i o u a m i y d
Ib e satisfacl
leels
.aid
Willi I n o i h e i
mm
continue
akc
lhe\
.. • , n m l
football
attractive,
Obviously,
lbs
choice
those
what
t h i s is .. d e c i s i o n l h . i l e.u-h p l a w .
m :
,y
previoosl>
11 is
lor
lie
centered
staled
The
around
point
e
nnisi m a k e In.
motives
m
<
mu.sl
ho\V il r e l a t e s I , , oil i e \ i . l e i t r e
look
Iiimsell
• .i- n o b l e
a
kill
as
fm
11 e n o l i n n e l \ ., t v u n -
it is e v e r y t h i n g t h a i o t n c u l t u r e h a s h i . . . o n -
15) George Keleshian
7) Ed M c C a b e
H) Mike Avon
!l) Sieve Ward
10) Gary Bruber
A.P.A.
A.FA.
Gribble
Indep.
Gribble
1 I (Wesley Lain'
12) Mark Chazan
Ill) Ed Esriek
1 I) Glen Carver
IB) Dave R e y n o l d s
Indep.
Lndep.
lndep
A.FA
A.P.A.
16) S c o t t Brady
I 7).Ian R h o d e s
A. F A .
Indep.
TEAM CHAMPIONSHIP
G r i b b l e 2H pis.
A.P. A. f-iH'/j p i s .
2 didn't
lii ..-ih: J. Lipsky, Topler
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Tins pusl weekend al Now 1'alt/.,
the w o m e n ' s tennis loam completed S l ' N Y A ' s most successful
showing lo dale in the H a s t e n
lutorcollegiiile Tennis Championships lor Ihe Middle Allanlic Divi
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the
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seeing a crushing
as
ol o u r c u l t u r e
m nvaiiy c a s e s , for t h e s a k e o f
I h e s a m e l i m e , c o n t i n u e l o p l a y , is h y p o c r i t i c a l
i
League III
W 1, T
is t h e p e r s o n i f i c a t i o n
W e a r e b e n l o n c o m p e l il i o n . n o l
unfortunately
We e n j o y
Thus,
CROSS COUNTRY FINISHING
I ) Rich flower
2) Walt M a y o
:t) Bernie T o s k y
I) Chris Kellog
ft) Rich B u t t e r
hut,
seems
thai
I. eague 1
VV
football
society.
of w i n n i n g
liEP
t'alahrese
respectively.
Coach F o r d again said, " S t e v e is
p r o b a b l y our b e s t . " Finn was o n e
of t h e prime reasons J o e Grasso
was held in c h e c k , a n d why Siena
was Torccd t o go t o t h e air.
PAGE 9
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
Sailing Club
Wins Corinthian Trophy
by Jack W l h n r l o u
\ . . . Ii l
ITi.- " H i l l In- S |
u . i s ih,.
l.asl w e e k e n d , for Ihe lii-l nine
I . i s l e s l , .,1.-.I v a c l t l
in Mi,. I i r h l ,
in Hs history. Ihe Albany Sailing
bill il also i "I I
i l : well ahead
t'luli senl h-.mis In l wo regal I.is .il
,,l Ihe i , „ „ | „ Him . In pl.„.,. l „ , l
Ihe s.uiie 111111 • One Ii-.iivi was sent
IIIKlri
Ill,
l l . i l l i l ,. .,,, A , | , , „
|tj
l o s a i l al Ihe S l u m l o r d S ... Iii Chili
s l u m : o i . ' i I '• i i i i n i i l e s a h e . n l o l
in S t a m f o r d . Conn . while Ihe
I h e see, m,l s a r i n , i h e ,'oliihilleil
oilier 1 n unsuccessful!;, com
Albany S I , , m l .
I, I r a n i w
he
poled for Hie Novnis T r o p i n .11
lr,,ph\
awarded
b>
I'll.- ( ' ,
Kings Point
Illl.llls
t h e I r a n , Was M , I , , H , , u s
T h e loam al Stamford c o m p e t e d
over
siieh
lop
rated
learns
as
against I I oilier schools through
M , r n u i l e <'.
ge t
out
Ihe N,utile.islcrn
I'nilo,
m l l ' S C o a s t < I n.ii ii A e a d e i m
Slates in a race sponsored l,\ Tin
The
Alliam
Sailing
Chili
ill
Corinthians, a group ol yaehi
„,,
,.,,,„„ ,,„,,.„ W | | „
owners w h o provided :tn Hi loo,
,.,.,„.,„,,.„„.,, in
,,,.„
„„m|„.„,
Sllboals lor I he college teams Hue j . , . ^ S | | . . , „ | „ . , ; , , , | , n l | . v
Hml
to a s h o r t a g e of yaehls. Ihe M,,,,,,,.,, ,,,„, ,|. u .|, Artliurlnil. Ill
Albany loam h a i l l o p a i r i i p w . i l ,
,,„,.,,„ M , . M „ . n w ^
aeeoinp.iiueil
four sailors from S l o n v b r i
I he loam as l.ieull v ..dviso
the yacht " W i l l i S p i r i t " o w n e d by , — y V
^v
*%r^|1<Z
Forbes Morse, Under Ihe direr
*
lion of S t o i i y b r m i k skipper Brian
N e w m a n , A l b a n y l a r u r i a n (lleiin
Fuden and Mr. Morse, Ihe n e w
a d a p t e d well l o the unfamiliar
craft. Mr. Morse was not allowed
to advise racing luetics, bill did a
superb job in instructing tin crow
on h o w lo handle his II fool
In her lllh ye,,, al K i t ' , roach
Peggy M
I.lereil Hirer singles
and two doubles trams
Both
Nancy
K e l / and cooiiplain
Helm,la Si,,,Hon advanced lo Ihe
2nd round where Ihey losl lo
lough
o p poll, -ills
C,,pl
lieorgalln .lose exl ended Skid
more lo three sets before bowing
2 Ii
Ii I. :'. II in I h e
|sl r
I
She
Ihen went on lo advance to ihe
,|U,
rlinals ol I be Collsolal loll
loiiin.iinriu
In Ihe doubles.
Uoltllle l i r r k r , ami Penny Virginia
roiluerd Querns Ii II Ii 0 in then
ea] e d u c a t i o n building in r o o m
12ft.
T h e girls are looking forward t o
a n o t h e r fine year, with many of
lasl year's players r e l u m i n g . Last
Sports Shorts
There will he an AMI A basketball captains m e e l i n g t o d a y , October 23 al I till p.m in r
n 1'E
12ft of Ihe Physical Kilucalioii
your tram will not I
romp
ilered in
ovei S
h Lawrence lo lose in Ihr
I'mI ,,,,in,I i 1, II p. I II Consider
lug
necessary.
Illshrd
i,
was
|,e
ol
1hen
ill al
I.Mill
their
firsl
I si
MIC
I line
Ihe
II i l n l i
sel
in
doubles
ami
I.mil.,
Ira,I
colli
dill,
West
l a k e d l i l a l i n e u i h III a d v a n c i n g
I h e ijn
7
.".
rl'n,als i l ' r r l n n u i a r . v
I (J u c e l l s I.
I Kredi
I,
I Lehman I
Isl
Hull
d 3rd
In
Ii I,
(II.
(i'J
I ,
N Ii
Ii
are n o w available in t h e Intramural Office, PE 13-1. T h e lournamenl will be held t h e week of
November 2.
Building This meeting is compulsory failure I,, attend will moan
There will he a basketball officials meeling on Friday, O c t o b e r
in .,1 I IH) p in in I'M 12ft, All
men wishing to official,' should
.illeiul No previous experience is
-I
year's team had a fine won-lost
record of 6 and 3 u n d e r t h e
coaching of Miss Barbara Palm,
w h o will again b e t h e female
G r e a t Dane's c o a c h .
Knlry forms
elimination
for I h e AMI A single
Soccer
This is Ihe lianl week for entries
for Ihe Paddleball Ladder T o u r n a ment. Knlry forms m a y he procured inlhe IM office.
Listen lo C l u b h o u s e J o u r n a l
Willi Elliot Nircmberg for Ihe
lalesl in Campus S p o r t s . F r o m
Interviews t o Editorials • every
Monday night al K:,'l() on WSUAII III on your radio
Tournament
'J Ii. Ii Ii i S y r a
ellsell
The
I).
Distaffs
hope
elude a n o t h e r undefeated
against
N.'W
I'all/
on
I,,
eon
season
I h e HM 11 ill
h o m e Thus far I h n r record is 7 II
111! Novrmln'i 'Jnd Ihe Women's
luloivollegiale
Hu.skclb-.ill
Irani
will have a meeting for I hose
women
interested
ill
playing
basketball I Ins year Tho meeling
will be al 7 1)11 p ill in Ihe phys
MX
XK
xie=^»er|
FREE DELIVERY
|
when you order
II submarines
,
from
University Sub Shop :
BOOKSTORE HOURS
Mon thru Thur: 9-8
Fri: 9-4:30
Sut: 9-1
FREE DELIVERY
434-0266
i
94126
J
PAGE 10
FRIDAY,.OCTOBER23,1970
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
REGISTRATION TIME
is almost upon us!
Following is the alphabetical schedule by days and times by which students will be permitted to
but may do so on the
pre-register. No student will be permitted to draw class cards before his stated time,
days following.
THE TIME PERIODS SHOWN HAVE THE FOLLOWING LIMITS:
A.M. - 9 : 0 0 - 1 2 : 0 0
P.M. - 1 :00-4:00
REGULAR SESSION STUDENTS
Restoration has begun in the State Quad suite in Eastman Tower
which was the scene of a fire last spring.
...goodman
Epilogue on Fires
by Bob Baldassano
Today, the condition of Colonial Quad Flagroom is much the
same as that of last Muy according
to Nancy Wightman, Assistant Residence Director. The suite on the
fourteenth floor of Eastman
Tower, is being restored now.
The Dormitory Authority of
New York, which owns both
buildings, has completed only
very preliminary restoration.
Last May, a fire bomb was
thrown into the Flagroom causing
$35,00 worth of damage, during
the summer, action was taken to
restore the Flagroom.
First, the insurance adjuster
came to assess the extent of
damages. A request for restoration
was then made to various construction firms. The contract was
eventually awarded by means of a
sealed bid, to the firm of
McManus, Longe, and Brockwell
of Latham.
The fire that destroyed a suite in
Eastman Tower began in a single
room and then spread to the rest
of the suite. This damage was so
extensive as to require the aid ol
an outside agency,
At this moment, the work in the
Flagroom has been of a very
preliminary nature according to
William Tisdale, Assistant to the
President in the division of Plant
Planning and
Development.
Smoke damage, inflicted last May,
proved a formidable obstacle to
the repainting of the walls. The
vinyl wall coverings have been
removed and the lighting system
must be re fixed since the ceiling
which anchors the lighting system
was destroyed in last May's Fire.
Mr. Tisdale indicated that he
hopes the work will be completed
within six weeks.
Meanwhile, the work in the
Eastman Tower suite is being
done on u similar time schedule.
The windows are in, and the door
casings are now fixed. Also, the
suite has been painted. Judy
Condo, the State Dormitory
Director, voiced the hope that the
suite will be ready for occupancy
by next semester.
Wednesday
October 28
Thursday
October 29
Friday
October 30
Monday
November 2
Tuesday
November 3
Wednesday
November 4
Thursday
November 5
Friday
November 6
November 9
Monday
Tuesday
November 10
Wednesday
November 11
Thursday
November 1 2
Friday
November 13
Monday
November 16
Tuesday
November 17
Wednesday
November 1 8
Thursday
November 19
Friday
November 20
Monday
November 23
Tuesday
November 2-1
Wednesday
November 25
A.M.
P.M.
A.M.
P.M.
A.M.
P.M.
A.M.
P.M.
A.M.
P.M.
A.M.
P.M.
A.M.
P.M.
A.M.
Bl-Bq
Br-Bz
Ca-Ch
Ci-Co
Cp-Da
Wb-Zz
Aa-Ar
As-Bd
Be-Bk
Gj-Gq
Gr-Gz
Ha-Hh
Hi-Jz
Db-Dn
Do-Ei
A.M.
P.M.
A.M.
P.M.
A.M.
P.M.
A.M.
P.M.
A.M.
P.M.
A.M.
P.M.
A.M.
P.M.
A.M.
P.M.
A.M.
P.M.
A.M.
P.M.
A.M.
P.M.
A.M.
P.M.
A.M.
P.M.
Ej-Fe
Ff-Fr
Fs-Gi
Mc-Me
Mf-Mo
Mp-Ne
NfOs
Ot-Pe
Ka-Ki
Kj-Kz
La-Le
Lf-Lz
Ma-Mb
Si-Sm
Sn-Ss
St-Td
Te-Uz
Va-Wa
pr-Pr
Ps-Rh
Ri-Rt
Ru-Sb
Sc-Sb
OPEN
OPEN
OPEN
FRIDAY, OCOTBER 23,1970
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
Security Head Announced
Youngest of the Candidates
by Kathy Kelly
The newly created post of Director of Security has been filled
after extensive review of some SO
to 90 candidates. Unanimous
recommendation of James R.
Williams was made by the Search
Committee composed of faculty,
students and administrators. President Louis Benezet announced
the choice at his weekly news
conference last Wednesday.
Meal Price Hike
Predicted by Haley
by Joan Zuckerman
Responding to an invitation to air grievances, approximately sixty
Dutch Quad residents met with Food Service representative Peter
Haley Wednesday night.
The meeting was sponsored by Dutch Quad Board as their first
session of Firing Line, an attempt to bring various speakers onto the
quad to discuss services available to the campus and to answer student
questions. In the future, they hope to present representatives from
Student Health Service, University Counseling Center and Refer.
Wednesday night's meeting focused on several problems with the
Food Service on Dutch and attempts of the recently organized Food
Committee to deal with student complaints. To date, the food
committee has instituted weekly meetings with the chef in charge to
discuss the menu and to represent student opinion. As a result of
these meetings, scrambled eggs are now being served until 8:30 and
' the kitchen has been offering a more varied menu.
Haley revealed that because of Food Service attempts to keep pace
with the spiraling food costs (in some cases, almost double those of
eighteen months ago) and their desire lo bring student employee
salaries more in line with the current minimum wage of $1.85,
students should anticipate a raise in contract meal rates starting in
September.
Haley also stated that, for the first time, students may be allowed Lo
alter, though not break, their meal contract plans. After Thanksgiving
recess, those students wishing to drop a meal (other than dinner) or
add one they are not now contracted for, will be able to do so. Details
will be announced as soon as the proposal is approved.
Among the quesitons raised by students was the reasoning behind
mandatory contract dinner for all dorm residents. Haley answered
that Food Service was not responsible for that regulation, that it was
part of the contract between the residence office and Food Service. A
student told the group that the question of breaking meal contracts is
coming up on the University Senate's agenda. When asked about the
success of the newly installed dividers in the dining halls, he said that
according to the more than fifteen hundred students he has spoken
with this year, there has been both a decrease in he number of
students being served and an improvement in the efficiency of the line
service.
Haley concluded the session by stating that there now are food
committees on all three uptown quads (Colonial Quad will have its
first meeting today at one o'clock) and invited all students to bring
any complaints to his office at Fulton Hall.
At 29 the youngest candidate
interviewed, Mr. Williams has
nevertheless had considerable educational and job experience. He
attended the U.S. Merchant Marine Academy and is now a candidate for his M.A. in history and
political science at Butler University in Indiana. He has also attended seminars on group therapy
and drug abuse.
As for employment, the future
Director of Security is now Associate Director of the Indianapolis
Human Rights Commission, responsible for the areas of housing
and police-community relations.
Earlier, Mr. Williams was a Senior
Parole Officer for the Indiana
Department of Corrections, counselling parolees and investigating
criminal activities. He was also a
caseworker for the Department of
Public Welfare.
Unlike many of the other candidates interviewed, Mr. Williams
has had no military intelligence
experience in Southeast Asia. He
has, however, served as naval officer aboard an oceanographic research vessel. At present, he is a
lieutenant in the U.S. Naval Reserve.
Mr, Williams is expected to
come to this area during the first
part of December to assume the
post of Director of Security,
according to Mr. John Buckhoff, a
member of the Search Committee.
The Director of Security is a
new position on each of the
SUNY campuses. It is part of a
general improvement of security
thoughout the system, stimulated
by last spring's unrest.
The Search Committee, in addition to recommending Mr.
Williams as Director of Security,
recommended the formation of
two committees: an Advisory
Committee on University Security
Lo cover the areas of policies and
procedures, and a University Security Review Committee to consider grievances and complaints
about Security.
PAGE 11
Revolutionary Role
of Workm Probed
by Linda Ulsh
"Workers have to take a Revolutionary role" was the theme on an
SDS meeting held Wednesday
night. Two representatives from
RPI informed a small group of the
history, goals, and objectives of
the national and local organization, which are according to Dave
Schop to "materially and concretely attack war, racism, and male
chauvinism."
The representatives from the
RPI chapter of the SDS explained
the national objectives of the
march planned in Detroit for Election Day. Their goals or slogans
are 1) Elections are hoaxes, 2)
U.S. out of S.E. Asia, 3) Cops out
of the ghettos, 4) Support Strike
of the auto workers and an additional one of 5) Freeing political
prisoners. Detroit is considered a
good area in which to have such a
march because of the auto
workers' strike and the high unemployment in the area.
Participants will march and canvass and show their support of the
striking auto workers with a
march on the GM general headquarters starting from Wayne (
State and the Dodge auto factory.
Draft Course
A course aimed al teaching interested persons the mechanics
and information necessary to
becoming a draft counselor, will
be offered, through the Draft
Counseling Center here, sometime
in the next few weeks.
All those students who have
signed up for the course will be
notified at least one full week
prior to the first session.
For any further information, the phono number of the
Draft
Counseling Center is
•157-1009.
The SDS has "concrete goals" and
they wish to unite with the
workers on these goals.
At RPI, SDS is trying to remove
ROTC from the campus and to
get a day-care center established
on campus. They also wish to
further their national goals.
At this time there is no SDS
chapter at SUNYA. The National
Organization of SDS is now just
gaining back strenght after their
split. Anyone wishing information
about SDS or the trip to Detroit
should call Dave Schop at
274-8752.
The following items are being
stored in the Security Office.
Owners can pick the items up
upon properly identifying them.
9-4 Monday thru Fri.
Class Rings
Sacred Heart H.S.-1966
Christopher
Columbus
H.S.-1969
Susquehanna H.S.-I968
RyeNeckH.S.-l969
Various other finger bands
Stereos
Senator Symphonic Portable
Lafayette LRE Portable
Bicycles
Pierce Arrow
Dunnelt
Sears
THIS WEEK'S
HAIRY KAZOO
STUDY SPANISH
IN CUERNAVACA. MEXICO
OF THE WEEK
AWARD
TIME SCHEDULE FOR LATE AFTERNOON, EVENING, AND SATURDAY STUDENTS ONLY
Monday, November H Thursday. November 12 ...Registration will be open 6:00 - 8:00 each evening in
addition to daytime hours.
goos t o :
Saturday, November II ...Registration will he open 10:00 • 1 :00
I F YOU HAVE TO LEARN SPANISH
NOTE: Please schedule an appointment with your adviser before reporting to pie-registration as advi.st
may not be available during these hours.
AND HAVE TO LEARN IT WELL
STUDY AT CI DOC IN CUERNAVACA
WORK SIX HOURS EACH DAY
FREE!
FREE!
P O T T E R
CLUB
m
PAY $135 FOR EACH MONTH
WALTS SUBMARINES APPRECIATES
YOUR DELIVERY ORDERS
START ANY FIRST MONDAY
SUNY jludenu can c-btdin (urttiui information oh suendituj
a lerfn in Cuoinavatd fioni unliei Dl Frank Carimo (-172
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WRITE
GET A WALTS SUBMARINE FREEI
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When you have ten (It)}, turn them in to any Walt'«Submarines unit and get your choit'i
of any Wall's Submarine FREE {except Watt'a Double Suhtnunnci
All ten (HI) receipts must have the sume
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TO:
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Take your receipts lo:
WALT'S SUBMARINES
954 Central Ave., Albany, N.Y.
2H.i Ontario St., Albany, N.Y,
4(>.l Troy-Schenectady Rd., Latham, N.Y.
FREE:
9-5
467-7626
E)
BAHAMA VACATION
Leaving Jan. 5, 1971
Returning Jan. 12, 1971
$199 per person
INCLUDES:
•Roundlrip scheduled flights
via Pan American World
Airways from JFK airport
*7 nights accommodations at
the Kings Court Apartment
•Bach apartment equipped
with complete kitchenette
* All gratuities and taxes
"Daily maid service
DEPOSIT OF $H5
this will insure reservation
For more information:
Hob Buratein
4B7S047
/7T\
TO
Have you thought about spending the spring semester in
Austria, Switzerland, Costa Rica, Denmark, Puerto
Rico, France, Mexico, Italy, Greece, Germany, India,
Great Britain, Singapore, Malta, or any of the other
20 countries in which the State University of New York
sponsors academic programs?
[; UNIVERSITYBEAUTY |
SHOP * "
on.-Fri,
m
W
FOR REALISTIC HOMECOMING SPIRIT AND IMMACULATE TASTE IN AN
OUTSTANDING
HOMECOMING FLOAT
.Campus, tenter
FOUR STUDENTS PER TEACHER
ra/ii
S®
There are over 80 semester, academic year and summer study
abroad programs open to qualified State University
students. The cost for a semester or year abroad
is comparable in many instances to expenses for the same
periods on your own campus, and your transportation costs
are reduced on University charter or group flights.
Recruitment for spring programs is now going on at all
sponsoring campuses for students who feel they can benefit
from the stimulating atmosphere of a new academic and
cultural setting while earning degree credit.
Think about it. Talk about it. See your campus
Director of International Education for details soon.
Dr. John Slocum
Administration Building, Room 238
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 23,1970
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
PAGE 12
Contents copyright 1970.
FIVE CENTS OFF CAMPUS
k ^
Albany Student Press 4
The Kent State 25
We have witnessed the slaughter of thousands of
Americans, Vietnamese, Cambodians and Laotians.
US bombers continue their systematic destruction
throughout most of Indochina. Yet, when American
students rise to protest this daily violence, they are
gunned down by the National Guard and then
found guilty of their own murders.
The indictment of student leaders at Kent State
symbolizes the complete breakdown of American
justice and sense of proportion. We are blind to
widespread deaths in Asia, yet indict those who
raise their voice against it. We are blind to the
repressive policies at home, and exonerate those
who fulfill them.
This is precisely the policy of the national
administration. Anti-crime bills bring thousands of
FBI agents on the campuses, lock citizens in jail
without bail or charge or trial, while government
lawyers effectively sabotage the prosecution of
those who massacre Vietnamese children. Moreover,
our determined support of the landed elite in
agrarian nations results in massive death and destruction. This nation is engaged in the systematic
erosion of democracy and minority rights here and
abroad.
But now we are tired of demonstrating and we are
tired of beating our heads against brick walls. It
seems as if we have accepted defeat and the
demoralization that it brings.
The fact remains thai the Vietnamese people are
tired of fighting and the fact remains that the
leaders of the Kent State government have been
arrested just this week and the policies of repression
continue to escalate. President Nixon is intent on
supressing the voices thai dare raise their heads
against him, whether those voices be New York
senators or student government leaders. There will
be more Kenl States and more Jackson Stales and,
as the trial of Black Panther Vernon Bowcn shows,
it could happen here.
The issue for us is not whether we are violent,
whether we are violent or not, the police will be
violent. Since the student strike, the Defense Department has appropriated 250,000 M-16 rifles for
use by the National Guard rifles which shool at
machine-gun speed and which arc currently used
against the Vietnamese people.
The issue for us is that for the moment we must
bury political differences. The issue is lhat those
whose sense of morality and proportion still exists
mobilize themselves to raise the point again and
again: that this nation is on a course doomed lo
bring the destruction of itself, destruction of ils
principles, and death or imprisonment to millions
here and abroad who stand in ils way.
albany student press 7
editor-in-chief .
noil ahanahan i
executive
managing editor
editor
carol hughes
aralynn abare
business
manager
chuck ribak
advertising manager
jeffrodgers
technical editor
tomclingan
associate technical editors
sue seligson
dan williams
production manager
gloria hollistcr
circulation manager
sue faulkner
news
editors
. bob wamer
. vicki zeldin
arts
editor
. linda waters
sports
editor
. . .dave fink
city
editor
. elmore bowes
layout
editor
j . Stephen flavin
photography editor
andy hochberg
i
Tho Albany Sudani P r m li locatad in room 326 of th* Cramped Cantar at
lha Slat* Univaraity of Ntw York at Albany. Tha ASP w » foundad aaai ago
and It fundad by atudant Mx. Our ptionai an) 467-2100 and 2 1 M , but
nobody a war thara.
Communication! ara limited to 300 words and art MibkMt to aditlng.
Editorial policy li daiarmlrud by tin Edltor-ln-CMaf, Conianti copyright
1070 by tha Albany Sudani Praaj.
, ....
Vol. LVI» He. 3 0
State Uniuerjity of New York at Albany
Tuesday, October 27,1970
Kent Memorial
Ends in Voice Bout
by Vicki Zeldin
News
'W9H M.M" ' '•
Needs Help
T o the E d i t o r :
I am w o n d e r i n g if I could use
y o u r good graces t o try t o reach a
senior or a g r a d u a t e s t u d e n t , o r
t w o , or t h r e e , . . w h o might b e
interested in exploring with m e
( 1 ) the n a t u r e of play, (2) t h e
n a t u r e of religion, a n d ( 3 ) in
considering w h e t h e r there is a n y
r e l a t i o n s h i p b e t w e e n the t w o .
During the winter semester, in
my scheduled cours Philosophy
5 2 8 , officially called Theory
of
Religion,
scheduled to meet o n
T h u r s d a y s from 3 : 4 5 to 6 p.m., I
h o p e t o d o just this. I just need
s o m e h e l p . I h o p e to find a few
s t u d e n t s already interested
in
some
particular a p p r o a c h
to
u n d e r s t a n d i n g play a n d / o r religion, say from p s y c h o l o g y , sociology or art, etc., and at t h e same
time be also interested in a p p l y i n g
this particular interest to a consideration of this suggested broader philosophical relationship.
If any s t u d e n t s are interested in
talking over the course with m e
they can d r o p me a line, or b e t t e r ,
c o m e by and see me some Monday from 3 to 4 or some Wednesd a y from 2 t o 3 (or by an
a p p o i n t m e n t ) . My office is in
Humanities, room number 2 5 1 .
Sincerely,
T.R. M a r t l a n d
D e p t . of P h i l o s o p h y
Smears?
T o the E d i t o r :
On S e p t e m b e r 2 4 t h , newspapers
gave banner headlines to B o s t o n
Police Commissioner McNumaru's
s t a t e m e n t t h a t the bank r o b b e r y
and the killing of Boston patrolman Schroedor were c o m m i l t e d
by
a
' 'revolutionary
student
g r o u p . " By c o n t i n u i n g , day after
day, lo fan the idea thai radical
and even liberal college s t u d e n t s
are involved in terrorism, t h e press
and the police arc acting to gen
erate a climate of fear to try t o
discredit the s t u d e n t m o v e m e n t in
the eyes of the rest of the American people and to divert a t tent ion
from growing problems at h o m e .
In the Boston area, there have
been s t u d e n t antt war a c t i o n s ,
e.g., against ItQTC and war research
at
various universities,
d e m o n s t r a tious against
racist
luring practices, firings, and murders, and militant Iy pro w o r k e r
a c t i o n s , e.g., refusal Lo allow U.K.
recruiters on c a m p u s e s during t h e
strike. But t h r o u g h o u t , the radical
s t u d e n t m o v e m e n t has c o m e o u t
overwhelmingly against terrorist
tactics.
N o t h i n g has been proved so tar
against t h e people who ure re
ceiving a "trial by p r e s s , " and
c o n t r a r y t o t h e allegations m a d e
by
Commissioner
McNamara,
n o n e of the t h r e e ex-convicts on
w h o s e t e s t i m o n y all t h e stories are
based has any r e v o l u t i o n a r y backg r o u n d . B o n d , for e x a m p l e , w h o
claims r e v o l u t i o n a r y leadership,
was t h r o w n o u t of S D S meetings
at Brandeis by s t u d e n t s w h o believed he was a police agent, because of the inconsistency of his
racist a n d p r o - w a r views with his
posing as a r e v o l u t i o n a r y instigator.
In several of t h e handful of cases
in w h i c h small g r o u p s of p e o p l e
have been arrested with d y n a m i t e ,
the leader of t h e g r o u p has t u r n e d
o u t t o be a p o l i c e m a n . F o r exa m p l e , in t h e S itue of Liberty
b o m b i n g plot, t h e p e r s o n w h o
b o u g h t the d y n a m i t e a n d organized t h e g r o u p was a New Y o r k
p o l i c e m a n . A n o t o r i o u s case, rep o r t e d recently in the New Y o r k
T i m e s , was t h a t of " T o m m y the
Traveller,"
another
policeman
w h o posed as an " S D S regional
traveller," and tried t o get two
s t u d e n t s to b u y d y n a m i t e . It is
plausible t h a t the p r e s e n t case is
a n o t h e r e x a m p l e of police a c t i o n s
to instigate illegal acts in order to
try t o s m e a r politically-oriented
s t u d e n t groups.
T h e deep wrongs of our society—the war in S o u t h e a s t Asia,
the oppression of our n o n - w h i t e
m i n o r i t y groups, low wages a n d
bad working c o n d i t i o n s of m o s t
w o r k e r s ( w h i t e as well as nonw h i t e ) " these a n d o t h e r persistent
(and indeed intrinsic) injustices
are at the r o o t of the agitation felt
by s t u d e n t s a n d o t h e r s e g m e n t s of
the p o p u l a t i o n . We should turn
our a t t e n t i o n t o changing o u r
society so as t o eliminate t h e
wrongs, and n o t be h o o d w i n k e d
into a t t a c k i n g , hysterically, t h o s e
w h o are agitated by their awareness of the injustices.
John Danzinger
Professor of
Astronomy
Harvard I University
Jerome Let Ivin
Professor in Utology and
Electrical
Engineering
M.I.T.
Hilary P u t n a m
Professor of
Philosophy
Harvard
University
William H. Pinson, Jr.
Professor Earth and
Planetary
Sciences
M I T
George Bailsman
Professor of Physics
I 'niversity of
Massachusetts
Bertram Scluirf
Professor of
Psychology
Northeastern
University
Marx W Wartofsky
Chairman, Dept, of
Phihmphy
lioston
University
Philip Morrison
Professor of Physics
M.I T
Associate
FSA
T o the Editor:
I urge President B e n e z e t to redirect the priorities of F S A regarding t h e d i s b u r s e m e n t of its
net profits.
A c c o r d i n g to the 1 9 6 8 - 6 9 audit,
the latest audit of F S A as of n o w ,
half of F S A ' s $ 7 5 , 0 0 0 of e x p e n d itures was a p p r o p r i a t e d t o t h e
" m a i n t e n a n c e and o p e r a t i o n s " of
the Mohawk and Dippikill campuses. T h e o t h e r $ 3 7 , 0 0 0 was
allocated for various university
activities which are e n u m e r a t e d ,
though s o m e w h a t vaguely, on the
attached copy.
T h e profits t h a t are a c c u m u l a t e d
over the year s h o u l d be invested
in food service a n d / o r the books t o r e , so t h a t prices, m a y hf held
d o w n or reduced. This allocation
would directly be helping stud e n t s , whereas the p r e s e n t policy
benefits s t u d e n t s indirectly, if at
all. T h e reduction of the meal
contract
price a n d
bookstore
prices would hold the line on the
inflationary trend in the cost of a
college e d u c a t i o n .
Bob Warner
News E d i t o r
Not Offended
T o the E d i t o r :
Please be notified t h a t the n a m e
of Alpha Lambda Chi F r a t e r n i t y
is not Alpha L a m b d a Alpha or
Alpha Chi Lambda or any o t h e r
c o m b i n a t i o n of letters Greek or
otherwise.
Do not assume from this that we
are in any way offended by y o u r
errors in this area. We realize that
you would not be offended were
we to refer to your n e w s p a p e r as
the ASS.
Sincerely,
Richard S, S l r o m e r
Alpha Lambda Chi F r a t e r n i t y
i&lMo
Now you can send the
ASP to all the folks back in
Bath for the diminutive fee
of $4.00 (or $3.00 with
Tax card). Just fill out the
form below tk send it to:
Sua Faulknar, Campus Cantor 3 3 4 .
14O0 Washington Avanue, Albany,
N.V. 12203
Pricu is tor Fall somostot n n l y
Name
Street
City .
Slate .
Zip!.
J o h n K a u f m a n , g r a d u a t e s t u d e n t in history a n d a leader of the May First S t r i k e C o m m i t t e e , a n d Dean
O. William P e r l m u t t e r of the College of A r t s a n d Sciences d e b a t e t h e politics of the university p o w e r
s t r u c t u r e , after the Kent S t a t e Memorial Service held last Friday a f t e r n o o n in the b a l l r o o m . P e r l m u t t e r
w h o was the lust speaker at the p o d i u m s o o n found himself engaged in dialogue after the service's
conclusion.
...benjamin
FLQ Fight for Independence
Brings Martial Law to Canada
COLLEGE PRESS SERVICE
T h e group of r e v o l u t i o n a r y y o u t h in Q u e b e c was
s t a r t e d in 1000 by George Shoesters, a University of
Montreal s t u d e n t w h o felt t h e " t i m e had c o m e t o
sow in the p r o v i n c e a spirit of i n d e p e n d e n c e . " T h e
small group emerged from under the d i c t a t o r s h i p of
former Premier Maurice DuPlossis a n d t h e r e was a
strong taste a m o n g university radicals for a state of
liberation. T o o often they had seen Q u e b e c o i s
workers engaged in b i t t e r bloodshed b a t t l e s with t h e
police force of the province over the rights t o strike
for belter wages and living c o n d i t i o n s . Because of
the colonial s i t u a t i o n , Quebecois were worse off
than workers in Canada. As a c o n q u e r e d ualion,
Quebecois were o p p r e s s e d as workers a n d as Francophones,
A n u m b e r of sporadic b o m b i n g s in the posh
English s u b u r b of Weslmoimt sparked Tear a m o n g
the Montreal managerial class that lives there, bill
the revolutionary group then lacked training, discipline and m o n e y , and as a result, m a n y of their
a t t e m p t s proved to be abortive. Soon however, t h e
F L Q invoked strict disciplinary measures on its
m e m b e r s a n d t h e group b e c a m e m u c h m o r e selective in its recruiting campaign.
What followed in t h e next four years were
h o l d u p s of large banks, financial h o u s e s o w n e d by
English Canadians or Americans, and d e p a r t m e n t
stores, all which has helped to finance t h e organization against " t h e English ruling c l a s s . " With the
inflow of discipline, a firm revolutionary ideology
and m o r e financial backing, tho F L Q has been able
to e x t e n d its o p e r a t i o n s into cells technically free
from each other with m e m b e r s not k n o w i n g the
m e m b e r s of others. Tins cell n e t w o r k has m a d e the
work of the federal a u t h o r i t i e s an almost insurm o u n t a b l e task.
T h e spark that lit volatile Quebec c a m e early
Monday m o r n i n g , Oct. f>, when J a m e s Richard
Cross, Senior British Trade Commissioner in Mon
h e a l , was k i d n a p p e d from his plush u p p e r Wesl
moinil liome T h e F L Q ransom n o t e d e m a n d e d : the
publication of a manifesto they bad p r e p a r e d , the
liberation of liil political prisoners " F e h | u i s t e s "
(FLQers), the freed political prisoners t o be placed
aboard an aircraft b o u n d for Cuba or Algeria, the
post office was told to reinstate all -100 LaPalmu
e m p l o y e e s the g o v e r n m e n t fired last April in a
dispute over union rights, payment of $ 5 0 0 , 0 0 0 in
gold to he placed a b o a r d the aircraft carrying the
political prisoners, identification of the most recent
man t o inform of the activities of the F L Q and
publication of his n a m e a n d p h o t o g r a p h in all
Q u e b e c newspapers, i m m e d i a t e halt of any police
activity in t h e h u n t for the kidnapped d i p l o m a t .
T h e F L Q gave t h e g o v e r n m e n t s involved 48 h o u r s t o
comply.
T h e first waves of c o n c e r n immediately rippled
through g o v e r n m e n t c h a m b e r s at both the federal
and provincial levels and what was to follow was a
chess game b e t w e e n flabbergasted g o v e r n m e n t officials and the F L Q m e m b e r s , which has resulted,
thus far, in the imposition of the War Measure Act
a n d the death of L a b o u r Minister Pierre L a p o r t e .
On T u e s d a y , Oct, 6, word was passed on by
federal a u t h o r i t i e s , federal, provincial a n d local
police in Montreal and Q u e b e c city to impost? light
security measures but " t o play it cool and d o n ' t
panic the a b d u c t o r s . " T h a t smae day the Q u e b e c
cabin-el held an emergency three-hour session in an
a t t e m p t to c o m e to grips with a situation they said
" t h r e a t e n e d " the freedom of Canadians.
Since Oct. ft, t h e provincial and federal a u t h o r i t i e s
have been h o l d i n g h a n d s . T h e a t t e m p t to root out
t h e F L Q " a b d u c t o r s " and halt " s u b v e r s i o n " in
Q u e b e c has been carried on mainly by u n d e r c o v e r
police w h o are in t o u c h with the FBI, Scot land
Yard, and I n t e r p o l .
External affairs
minister
Mitchell Sharp i m m e d i a t e l y called for police protection of all foreign diploma Us in Canada and guards
to watch I be premises of every embassy and
consular office. Canadian officials bad c o n s i d e r e d
any threat to their embassy or personnel so r e m o t e
t h a t they had little part in discussions that led to
t h e establishment of a special 7 0 0 - n u n executive
p r o t e c t i o n service " h u t 1 guess this br.irgs us very
m u c h into pla;,
>v official c o m m e n t e d . "We are
no longer just o b s e r v e r s . "
Nol long before, newspapers across the c o u n t r y
printed at least e x c e r p t s of the manifesto of the
F L Q . " T h e F L Q is neither tho Messiah nor a
m o d e r n day R o b i n H o o d , " says the Manifesto. "It is
a group of Q u e b e c workers w h o have decided t o get
everything in m o t i o n so that the people of Q u e b e c
may definitely take their destiny into their own
h a n d s . " The F L Q describes itself n o t as a m o v e m e n t
of aggression, but " t h e answer t o aggression, the o n e
organized by high finance t h o r u g h the intervention
C o n t i n u e d on page three
Editor
" I t is a time t o heal and build
u p , a time t o speak, a t i m e for
p e a c e . " T h i s was the essence of
t h e message presented at F r i d a y ' s
m e m o r i a l service held in response
t o the events at Kent S t a t e .
The
memorial
service
was
o p e n e d by David Neufeld, Stud e n t Association President, and
carried on by four clergymen and
Dean O. William P e r l m u t t e r . The
first clergyman t o speak, Revere n d F r a n k Snow, addressed the
crowd of a b o u t 1 50 present, and
led t h e m in prayer for those w h o
had died over the last d e c a d e . He
told the crowd t h a i they had died
for " d e c e n c y and p e a c e in our
land and a r o u n d the world...these
p e o p l e t h o u g h t t h a t t h e y were
doing the service of m a n k i n d , and
then were betrayed by m a n k i n d . "
T h e next o r a t o r urged those
present t o "divorce themselves
from the controversial issues."
"We are a b o u t the same thing, and
will c o n t i n u e t o do the s a m e thing
until t h a t which we are trying to
create is realized." " I t is s a d , " he
said, " t h a t Lhosc c o n c e r n e d and
d e d i c a t e d Lo s o m e t h i n g may lose
their lives."
" W e are here t o h o n o r victims
and m a r t y r s , but we arc also here
t o h o n o r freedom, " said Reverend
William Small. T h e Reverend rem i n d e d the ever dwindling group
p r e s e n t t h a t "violence does in fact
beget v i o l e n c e . " "We m u s t build a
new s o c i e t y , " be c o n t i n u e d , " w e
m u s t love and n o t h a t e , we m u s t
'orgive even WIILMI a n g r y , " this is
the way to build.
T h e n e x t to speak from t h e
r o s t r u m was Father Paul Smith.
While he asserted t h a t t h o s e gathered h a d c o m e t o m e m o r i a l i z e
those w h o had laid d o w n their
lives, he also affirmed t h a t those
present
had come
to
gather
strength. "We m u s t find a creative, imaginative a p p r o a c h t o militance, b u t we must n o t let the
hatred of others drag us d o w n to
their level," be r e m i n d e d the
group.
T h e Dean of the College of Arts
and Sciences, and also a former
faculty m e m b e r at Kent Stale, O.
William Perlmutter, was the last
scheduled speaker, lie referred to
the past year as a " b r u t a l and
tragic o n e lor the young and for
those c o n c e r n e d with American
ed u c a t i o n . "
"We're
somewhat
b e a t e n " he c o n t i n u e d , "anil the
last b l o w c o m e s o u t of Ravena
and K e n t a n d a strange grand
jury."
P e r l m u t t e r described t h e m o o d
of t h e n a t i o n as o n e t h a t "seeks
revenge a n d vindictiveness, t h a t
seeks t o divide a n d b r e a k . " He
said t h a t this m u s t b e a time " n o t
for breaking o r hat, b u t rather a
time for reconciliation, unders t a n d i n g , a t i m e for healing." T h e
Dean s p o k e particular!' of the
University's role in the creation of
this n e w m o o d . T h e University, as
he envisioned it, is a place of
service—service t o p e o p l e . " T h e
U n i v e r s i t y , " h e said, "is a place to
share h u m a n i t y . "
P e r l m u t t e r referred to the Scranton R e p o r t as an a t t e m p t t o
" r e m a k e A m e r i c a in its own
i m a g e . " " T h e t i m e , " he conc l u d e d , "is to let things be, not t o
stir up t h o s e w h o have undergone
violence."
Dean P e r l m u t t e r ' s speach was to
have c o n c l u d e d the service, but
t h e r e were some a m o n g the audience w h o were evidentally not
pleased by the t h r u s t of the memorial. One girl in a fringed suede
jacked w e n t t o the p o d i u m and
pierced the heavy air of the ballr o o m . " W e are n o t memorializing
our b r o t h e r s a n d s i s l e r s , " she
positied, " w e are trampling on
their g r a v e s . " " H o w can we memorialize fascism?" she declared.
J o h n K a u f m a n , a graduate ins t r u c t o r in history, and also active
in last y e a r ' s strike activities,
denied t h a t this was a time for
reconciliation. He cited the relationship b e t w e e n the y o u n g and
Nixon as irreconcMiable. " R e c o n c i l i a t i o n , " he said, "is to live in a
d r e a m w o r l d . " He told the group
to t h i n k of Agnew and then t o
think of Charles O'Reilly . T h e
Bo wen issue he c o n t e n d e d , c a n n o t
he dealt with by reconciliation.
He w e n t o n t o c o m m e n t t h a t
military research o n c a m p u s must
be s t o p p e d , and also made special
n o t e of the fact that there was a
police a c a d e m y on the periphery
of t h e c a m p u s . He closed by
declaring t h a t " w e must struggle
to kill t h o s e w h o keep us from
our freedom—All Power l o the
People!"
Q u e s t i o n s concerning the role of
the
University
were
tossed
about.
A continuing
concern
seemed t o revolve a b o u t t h e question of w h o o w n e d t h e University.
Dean P e r l m u t t e r fielded questions
and a t t e m p t e d to defend his position as s t a t e d in his speech.
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