advertisement
Friday, Octoto ft, 1965
ALIANY STUMHT r * l t t
YAMAHA
4 RuyView of Sports
A <
4> 9M4:
MOTORCYCLE
Fine's'Ante Solet
t m 5 Central Ave.
by Ray McCloat
As the AMIA football season draws to a close and
Kappa Beta appears to have won its first football
championship, we feel that the AMIA and football
commissioner Dave Sully, in particular, should be
commended on a fine season. To KB — also our con
gratulations; you were clearly the best team in the
league,
Two items in the league's functioning, however,
did detract from the overall effectiveness of the
AMIA. These are the inconsistency in the refereeing
and the abuse certain players heaped on the game
officials.
While we will hasten to agree that the referees
did call the plays " a s they saw them," we did note
on too often an occasion different interpretations of PLATTSBURGH'S GOALIE watches ball go over the net in
the same rule. Mistakes will be made in every ref- Wednesday night's game at Bleeeker Stadium. Danes lost the
ereeing job in every sport. This is only human nature game 3-2.
at fault. But when the league fails to hold even one
clinic to inform the officials of its rule policies and
leaves the interpretation of the rule up to each individual, an inexcusable injustice is dealth to the competing teams.
Many a heated argument and long official discusby Bob Wenger
15:45 of the third period, and
sions took place because of this inconsistency. Such
the Cardinals led again, 2-1.
needless delays often do irreparable damage to a A crowd of 500 turned Then with 9:55 left in the game
team with a drive and momentum, and surely no spec- out Wednesday evening Swartout kicked a magnificent shot
40 feet out to tie the score
tator enjoys the stopping of action. It may be too late only to see the Albany from
once again at two apiece. But
to remedy this situation for the football season, but state soccer team lose a with 7:05 to go, Plattsburgh's Pete
the same problem can be avoided in the basketball 3-2 heartbreaker at the Mahalko kicked the ball out of
Dane goalie Jerry Leggeri's hands
season if only the organizers take steps to do so. hands of highly regarded into
the goal for the decisive point,
Plattsburgh State.
Joe LaReau, who started tne
Even though a referee does make a mistake, there The first half was a defensive game
for the Danes in the nets,
is no excuse in the world why he should have to suffer battle as neither team was able to had to leave the game with 10:40
score. Captain Udo Guddat and
the abuse and gesticulations of some babbling hotheads goalie Joe LaReau were the de- to go in the game because of a
Injury. He had 20 saves at
who seemingly take delight in giving the refs a hard fensive standouts as they stemmed head
the time in preventing Plattsburgh
time. Those who played AMIA football know who these the Cardinals' offensive tides.
from adding to its total.
at 4:55 of the third period, State's next game Is with Potsloudmouths are — and you know how revolting the EdButLeStrange
scored unassisted dam tomorrow at Potsdam. The
situation can be.
in front of the Dane goal and the booters now have a 2-4 record.
Cardinals led 1-0. The hooters The frosh soccer team sufIn high school, college and professional football came
right back, as Maurice Tsoits fourth straight setback
leagues, players are not permitted to shout at the dodo gave a perfect pass to Gary fered
Wednesday, this time to the RPI
Swartout
10 feet ln front of the frosh by the score of 2-1. Dane
refs from the sidelines without penalty. Yet in the
Cardinal goal at 10:25 of the same Yutulu Sililo scored the only goal
AMIA, players not only shout from the sidelines, but period.
of the game for the frosh at 11:08
they also shout while in the game — often using the wattsburgh's Pablo Hosesa of
the final period. The frosh's
foulest of language to make their point clear.
booted one from 30 feet out at next game is at New Paltz,
It's a downright shame that a few such people can
make the AMIA, at such times, a bush league,
Dane footers Bow,
Face Potsdam Tomorrow
Danes Defeat New Paltz
Keating Sets New Mark
by Bill Shriftman
The Albany State cross-country team won its
fourth straight meet Tuesday afternoon by defeating
New Paltz, 16-49, on the loser's course. Joe Keating
won the race in the record time of 20:30, bettering
the previous record mark of 21:10, over the four
mile course.
The r m « t n<m0o , i n m
ine Great Danes dominated
the
m e e t as they
took
ten D leight
a c e s iof
n c l uthe
d i n gfirst
rhp
Tne
Albany State frosh harriers
bowed to Coblesklll Wednesday aft e r n o o n by a s c o r e
of 26_30 '
Don Beevers won the race for
the D a n e s ln
17:38A t wover
m l l e c o u r s e Mlke
e 1 1 the
a"d P aflfth
"3.2
I
p i a c e s i n c l u d i n g t n e B r e s l i n f l n l' s h e d f o u r t n mfi
four,
P a u l D u r b i n , respectively for State.
Bob Flick, and Bob Mul- Coach Tom Robinson was very
pleased but was sorry that his
vey finished behind Keat- h""s
could not pull it out.
ing.
Sensory Deprivation
Keating, Durbin, and Flick all Students are needed to participate
bettered the previous record and in sensory deprivation studies being
were only 13 seconds apart. Flick conducted for NASA's Apollo procame ln Just five seconds behind gram, announced Sidney ln the NeuDurbin, and Durbin finished eight ropsychological Laboratory, Yeshiseconds after winner Keating.
va University,
Jim DeVolk of New Paltz was Subjects will sepnd three days
fifth, followed closely by Doug resting ln bed ln air conditioned
Garner and Ken Klrik of State, rooms, meals supplied. Various
Jerry Baker was ninth and Mike painless measures will be taken
Parker tenth for Albany.
before, during, and after the stay.
Coach Munsey commented that Participants will earn seventy dot
"everyone ran closer together t h i s l a r s f o r t n e f o u r d a y study. All that
week which is especially good when l s required is the willingness to
there is little pressing from the s t a y the amount of time assigned,
opposition."
Studies will ne run weekdays and
State's next meet ls Saturday weekends.
Interested
student!
afternoon when they host New should contact SY 2-2200, ext. 558.
Haven and Plattsburgh In a t r i - T e s t schedules will be suited to
angular meet, The Great Danes *ach individual participant,
are now 7-1 on the season.
ten
top
PINE HILLS CLEANERS
340 Western Avenue
CLEANING and EXPERT
TAILORING
We Call end Deliver
^ Gerald's Drug Co.
217 Western Ave. Albeny, N Y
Phone 6-M10
o|i Your Favorite Brands/of
IV 2-3134)
FACT
OUR PftlCES ARE SO LOW WERE
NOT ALLOWED TO ADVERTISE
GOME l)f AND SEE FOR YOURSELF!
By the Case/.By the Si* P»ek,.8y the Bottle
"OUR EVERYDAY LOW PRICES
ARE TNE OTHER fiUT? SPECIALS"
DISCOUNT
BEVERAGE
CEI
Sow ml 2 foi
Albany
fret Parking
.>UiI.i*~.A..:
A WITCH HUNT?
Colenie
Juit fail of Fuller Id.
free forking
Alb
Neither rain
norsnow
norheat
nor Liz
ALBANY 3, NEW YORK
OCTOBER 29, 1965
VOL. LI,N0.<lf J£T
Audit Report Criticizes
FSA Profits, Workings
%M
Faculty Student Associations at State University
of New York at Albany, Buffalo and New Paltz have
been operating at "very substantial profits" on
textbooks and food was disclosed by the State Department of Audit and Control Tuesday.
The nineteen page r e - pensive.
The auditors also criticized the
port criticized the lack space and utilities for the operaof student voice in the tion of vending machines and launassociation's operation. dry services, which operate with-
PI
mum
SOUTHAMPTON DIXIE, RACING and clambake society will be entertaining Homecoming Weekend. They will perform in Page Hall Sunday, November 7 ot 2 p.m. and 8 p.m.
Homecoming Weekend Activities
To
Feature Parade, Soccer Game
"Remember when
can ever
wrinkle
his
Press-Free
Post-Grads
Notning puts a crease in
these pants where a crease
doesn't belong. They hold
their crisp, neat look hour
after hour. No matter how
often they get washed, they
never, ever need ironing.
Trimly tapered with belt
loops and cuffs. Colors and
fabrics for casual and dress
wear. 65% Dacron* polyester/35% cotton, $6.98. Flannels, hopsacklng, reverse
twists, Acrllan'acrylic, $7.98.
(Slightly higher in the West.)
All his. clothes,
including combo-suits,
sold at
Iriii Laemtfuux
25 Warren St. M 1 3 3 0 Central Ave.
•lull Below tincoln Fork
IS AN AUDIT
Cohen's Men's Shop
20 Central kit
The audit said that the three
faculty student associations investigated were Incorporated as
non-profit entities with the top
administrators of each school on
the board of directors, but none
of the three examined, had student representation.
The auditors emphasized that
the rapid growth of the State Universltles had thrown the entire
prlclng structure out of shape.
*
The gross Income at this University was $697,072 with a net
profit of $140,704.
out paying the University.
Albany's association was criticized for being lax. They attributed
this to poor purchasing practices.
They said that the faculty student
association paid $39,885 against a
state price of $31,727.
Administration Kcbuttol
The Administration said that
«je auditors neglected to note that
S ate con
" ' a ' ' P h a s i n g nrovis
t0
° " s a r e not , ™MMe
Acuity
student associations.
Comptroller Arthur Levitt said
that In watching over the affairs
;
E T £ S r " ••=,£ sis a s
Paltz at 5 percent discount
m e n t i o n w a s m a d e 0 , U ) e c o l ,'
Auditors did stress that the activities which have been supassociations served a useful pur- p o r t e d b y f a c u l t y s t u U e n t a s s o c I a .
pose in feeding, housing and rec- t l o n funa-s_
reatlon
a
cafeteria
ls
style
luncheon
will
today
from
11:30
until
1:30
a
n
d
> but s a l d t n e y believed
will be the theme of be available in the Dutch Quad- next week from 11:00 until 2:00. " t n e associations
have made proHomecoming '65 when the rangle dining room. Following Also at the Student Activities D e s k f l l s a n d accumulated surpluses
far
d
lunch,
from
1:30
p.m.
until
3:30
in
Bru
from
3:00
until
11:00
until
bey°»
that
contemplated
at
weekend commences F r i Branch aofficers
will beforheld.
workshop
Alumni November 5.
their formation.''
day, November 5 with the P.m.,
A varsity soccer game witli
They proposed that the operaThe Albany Student Press, in
tions
judging of Homecoming C. W. Post College is scheduled
Homecoming Concert
be brought under closer sufrom
2
p.m.
to
4
p.m.
on
Saturday.
The
Homecoming
concert
feaP
e
n
s
i
o
n
by
the
State
University,
conjunction
with Beverwyck Hall,
Queen finalists in Page
Presentations during half-time In- turlng Ian and Sylvia and the South- D r - S a m u e l Gould, president of the will present a panel discussion on
Hall at 1:25.
slate
clude Homecoming float wards, ampton Dixie, Racing and ClamUniversity, agreed that Wednesday night, November 3, at
bake Society Jazz Band will end tighter policing and better book- 8:00 p.m. in the U-Lounge of BevFinalists for the crown are
were
19GD
sorority
scholarship
cupthis
year's
Homecoming
weekend
keeping
necessary.
erwyck.
Maria Maiiiacl, Sue Nichols, HarHe added
"the comptroller's
The topic will be "The Philoriet Tucker, Anne Bourdon, Vera awards and coronation of Home- festivities on Sunday with performalices in Page Hall at 2:30 and review happened to coincide with sopliy of Ayn Rand." Miss Rand ls
Koinanowski, Gretchen Van Vleet, coming Queen.
8:00.
'
a review of a special committee he well-known for her novels "Atlas
Lynn Kurth, Joan Clark, Anne DigPorude
Ian and Sylvia are well known appointed for this purpose."
Shrugged" and "The Fountalnney, Evelyn Gordon and Patricia
The parade will begin at 1 p.m. among folk music lovers through
F ° o s Be Discontinued
head" and is considered the
Halsey.
The auditors suggested the col- founder of a philosophy known as
Also on Friday the State Uni- on Saturday and proceed from their appearances on Hootenanny
versity Theater will present "Of Thurlow Terrace to Partridge St. and the Bell Telephone Hour. They lection of certain fees be dlscon- Objectivism.
Tlle
The Homecoming Dance will be also have several records on the tinued and that food prices be
l JaJlel w111 Include two facMice and Men" beginning at 8:30.
drastically cut. The report said 'ulty members and two students.
A bonfire honoring the soccer held Saturday from 9:00 p.m. to market.
lal
Dr Mark
1:00 a.m.
They began
their performers
careers sep" tenfood
prices percent.
could be reduced Education
'
Berger,
the Philosophyand cross country teams will be Music
will atbeRafael's
providedRestaurant.
by Henry arately
and were
in by
to twenty
Departments;
Mr. Wiltheir own right before they met
The report pointed It out that " a m Grimes, Philosophy Depart
lield at 7:30 on the University Torgan and his Orchestra.
Bids are available at tin e e d o l - and began to sing together In a similar items purchased under the ">enl; J. Roger Lee, former ASP
Field.
lars
State
and commentator for
• a. o per
r o . couple
v.UuFlc in
1., the
uio peristyles
r » . . . ' i « . Toronto
loromo coffee
conee house.
house.
state contract
contract would
would lie
be less
less exex- columnist
'
WSUA; Lester Greenberg, editor
Tour of New Campus
of Banner.
Saturday's events range from
The Objectivist philosophy is
tours of the new campus to a
based on what Miss Rand calls
dance. Hourly guided tours of the
University field and surrounding area was of"rational self-interest." Called
new campus will be conducted ficially chosen by the Albny Board of Education for
from 10 a.m. through 4 p.m. and the site of a new senior high school. The special
" F a s c i s t " by many of her early
coffee will |je served.
readers who did not understand the
From 12:30 p.m. until 1:30 p.m. meeting held Monday, October 18, asked Mayor
philosophy, she is radically opErastus Corning to "use his good offices to get the
posed to Socialism in government.
s t a t e t o g l v e m u c n of
le
r
rt
f
•
D».»*L I
* *
" P °Pe y hack to the city."
After the publication of tier first
Tlle
•)0CIQI I S f C n O I O y l S f
2f- a cre site, which is located on Washington
major novel "The Fountainhead"
**
Avenue and Patridge Street, was given to the Uniln 1943, Objectivism became one
versity in 1944 as the location for a proposed gymof the most controversial philonasium, which was never built. Presently the land
sophies of the post-war period.
ls used for outdoor physical education.
To meet the Interest ln her Idea,
"The Social Judgment-InvolveMayor Corning sent a letter to Dr. Samuel B.
Miss
Rand helped organize tlie
ment Approach to Attitude and Gould, president of the State University of New
Nathaniel Brandeu Lectures in maAttitude Change" will be the topic York, asking him to cede the property back to the
jor American cities and the Obof a lecture by Dr. MuzaferSherlf, city. The mayor said that the site was chosen
jectivist Newsletter.
Friday, October 29 at 8 p.m. in the because II is the "most central location as «to
Draper Auditorium.
present population and as to anticipated future
Dr. Sherlf is an lnternatlonall> population."
recognized authority on social psyMembers of the Administration could not be
chology — specializing in the be- readied for comment. It Is expected that they will
Election Commission has anhavior of the adolescent. He ls the not object to the proposed plan.
nounced the results of the recent
director of the Institute of Group
The city lias offered to move the University's
replacement
elections. Klaus
Relations at the University of Okla- facilities on the site, tennis courts and soccer
Schnltzer was elected to Central
homa, and has written several field, to Beverwyck Park, immediately to the east.
Council from the commuters.
books, Including "An Outline of
Action by the city's legislative body, Common
In the race for positions on LivSocial Psychology," "Reference Council, and the stage legislature will be required
ing Areas Affairs Commission
Groups," "Groups ln Harmony and before the city can take title to the property.
Stephenson
Photo
Jeanne
Mauer, Sal Villa, and Jim
Tension, Social Judgments," and
A date has not been set for the plan to be voted AREA THAT r i T V „l Alk„_. i n i L
I
Whiting were elected from the
Y
Y
Uom
"The Psychology of Ego-Involve- on but the school board officials said they would go 1 . U»i . 1
•
A
,J"
Colonial Quad, commuters, and
ment."
right ahead with planning for the building.
the University includes soccer field, tennis Alumni Quad, respectively.
courts and the equipment shack.
Panel to Discuss
Ayn Rand PMosophy
Albany to Purchase University Field
To Discuss Attitudes
Election Results
AWAMTSTODiHTMISS
***:*.
, -
v
Daniel E. Button, editor of the Albany TimesUnion, spoke in Brubacher Private Dining Room on
Wednesday, October 28 at 8:00 p.m. The topic of his
discussion was John Lindsay, the Republican-Liberal candidate for Mayor of New York City.
Button told of the way
.. t
.
book, practically chapter by chapter.
Lindsay's public image was defended by Button, to such an extent that the only other person
who could have done a better job
would have been Lindsay himself.
Campaign Manager
Button also discussed at length
Robert Price, Lindsay's campaign
manager. This was the same man
who swung the Oregon primary
for Nelson A. Rockefeller ln the
summer of 1904. Button had al-
Elsenhower measures, and during
administration he
Kennedv
likewise backed the administra«°n's program.
l_ind.oy's Position.
Fiscally, Lindsay Is a conserva«ve. However, he has favored
civil rights legislation, studies on
the
urban p r o b l e m s wlth an
emphasis
on the housing problems. Concerning the Viet Nam crisis Lindsay would like to have a national
debate for Lindsay questions the
exactness of Johnson's policy In
South East Asia.
DANIEL BUTTON, EDITOR of the "Times Union" discusses
Button got a warm response "John Lindsay: the Man and Politician," in Brubacher private
from the audience when he told dining room Wednesday. To the right of Button is Ken FuchsLindsay's tireless campaign man, president of Forum of Politics which sponsored the proof
houses in gram.
ln
large
apartment
N . Y . C . His aides would ring the »-*
™v
m
.
f
doorbells on one floor and when I I p i ' V I O H t t i P i l t
Wftth'SrlO!)
t r
r
TT
answered
their
doors
*
^
^
«
'
«
*
Y
'
»
"
*
"
«
"»
noitU[*
tne people
Lindsay would appear and greet r r l
, , .
--»
.
.
n
v r
aThe had C u S for Prlce them w"h' "Hel10-"
1 o Be Held in Brubacher
• John V. Lindsay is the ItepubUsing^this methodlol' campaignt T r Xvotes,
m Z while
l ^ ZPresident
m ,
V A were
^ &
J to
S Button's
R
cussion
devoted
80,000
Lindsay carried
"carried
" " '
* , B district by The last few minutes of _the
. dis
Johnson
it this
by
75,000.
personal comments on Lindsay.
His record in Congress shows
Lindsay voted for most of the
Odds Against Lindsay
Lecture on Dante
Resumes Series
Dr. Audrey Kouvel, professor of
Romance languages and literatures
and comparative literature at the
University, delivered the second in
a series of lectures commemorating the Dante anniversary, yesterday in Brubacher Hall.
Dr. Kouvel discussed "Dante
and the Modes of Love: An Analysis of the Paolo and Francesca
Episode."
The next scheduled lecture is
Tuesday, November 9 at fl:lD p.m.
in Brubacher Hall, lower lounge,
when Dr. George Clifford will discuss "Dante's Ulysses." Dr. Clifford is president of the Dante Society of America and Emeritus
Wade Professor of Modern Languages at Tufts University.
The series of lectures began
last spring and Is sponsored by
the Department of Romance Languages and Literatures and the
Department of Comparative Literature.
Dr. Anthony Glsolfi will conclude
the series with a lecture in Italian
Tuesday, November 18.
[ ^
m „Vocational De.
-lopmentjheory^ln
Modern
Thursday,
November the
4, in
Brubacher.
At
h
o/iiap
At Ithe
h o morning
m n c n no- session
cocclnn
the address will be given by Dr.
Harold Munsen, chairman of the
department of guidance and personnel University of Rochester,
Small group discussion will follow Dr. Munsen's address. After
lunch there will be a general meetlng at which discussion leaders
He told of the mathematical
odds whlcli Lindsay must overcome, namely an enrollment of
three Democrats to every one
Republican. Button noted that
among the Republicans there Is a
10% Off
feeling of "professional pessi
mism" while among Lindsay's on Yarn
personal followers there is an
"upbeat optimism."
B u t t 0 n feels that Lindsay will
be able to carry New York City.
At tne
10% Off
on Yarn
KMT 'N' TIME
YARN SHOP
beginning of the discussion
Button had taken a straw vote to
determine the preferencesofthose
212 Western Aoe. at Quail
open daily 1 0 - 6 p.m.
_Wed. 1 0 - 9 p.m.
present on Tuesdays election. At
10% Off
^
d ,th discusslon
on Yarn
10% Off
on Yarn
ons raised
b
tne
sn.aH
groups.
J J . J j W j * .
the
question
period
He will be Introduced by Dr.
Gladys Murphy, director of graduate studies at Siena College and
chairman of the workshop. Participants will be welcomed formally by Dr. Frank Mayer, president of Capital District Personnel
and Guidance Association.
The Medical Office has announced that the Influenza vaccine
has arrived and shots will be administered In Draper 011, Tuesday, November 2 and Friday, November 5 from 3-5 p.m.
The Medical Office will lie closed
to all other patients at these hours
except for Individuals with special
appointments and emergencies.
The office has emphasized that
students who know they have health
problems such as rheumatic heart
disease, kidney problems, diabetes and respiratory problems
are the ones who need protection
the most and for whom the shots
are advised.
There is only a limited supply
of serum and so the program will
be conducted on a first come,
first served basis. It is recommended that students who are unable to get innoculated, should see
their physician over Thanksgiving
for the shot.
Director of the Universily lleallh
Service, Janet Hood, M.D., suggests that one shot Is sufficient
to boost immunity if a student has
received influenza vaccine before.
Otherwise, you should oUain a
second shot when they are ottered
here ln the future.
Parential consent is not being
required for this procedure since
It is a standard public health
measure approved by the Surgeon
General of the United States.
If students have any misgivings
they should clear with their parents before getting the injections.
e e e e e e e e e e e e e * * *
SNAPPY BARBER SHOP •
*.
•
Wt feature
collegiate haircuts
5 minute walk from tht
Ntw Campus
1148 Western Avenue
BOB and FRANK
•
e
50 w e d d i n g i n v i t a t i o n s
50 m a t c h i n g r e c e p t i o n cards
50 matching respond cards
100 luncheon napld
5 0 book m a t c h e s
l
1
1
1
Ad
Anyone can
GOOF.
With Eaton's Corrasable Bond Typewriter Paper, you
can erase that goof without a trace.
Not a telltale smudge remains. A special surface permits quick and qasy erasing with an ordinary pencil
eraser. For perfect papers every time, get Corrasable.
In light, medium, heavy weights and Onion Skin. In
handy 100-sheet packets and 500-sheet ream boxes.
At Stationery Departments.
"publish or perish" being the rule
of thumb.
Last Friday, October 22, ln
Page Hall, David Reisman, ProAcademic = Vocational?
fessor of Social Relations at HarThe academic has become a vvard University, delivered a lec- catlon. Previously, a specified octure, "The Coming Victory of the cupation was considered vocationAcademic?" It was the second al, one was trained for one's future
lecture in the SUNYA-sponsored Job. The academic has become a
symposium, "America at Mid- means to an end.
Century."
Mr. Reisman pointed out that The greatest enemy of the now
colleges were becoming "routine 'victorious academic is the colsorting stations" for people with legiate. This includes sororities,
average amounts of discipline, mo- fraternities, or the "fun and games
tivation and social skills. College culture" as Mr. Reisman pointed
was turned to "ln rejection of the out. Although at present the acaalternatives of army, unemploy- demic Is stomping out the threatenment...with the additional grace of ing collegiate, it has the greatest
potential of offering competition
being socially acceptable."
to the academic.
by Monica McGaughey
Registrar
Candidates applying for a degree
at the end of the semester should
file applications in the Kegistrar's
office, Draper 200, by November
15.
The graduation fee of $19.00
which Includes a $10.00 placement
charge must be paid by December
1 to the Faculty Student Association Office in Draper 049.
Law
*
c
$20.00
#
•
e
4
*
•
,
C E N T R A L COMPOSITION CORP.
323 Control Avo.
Albany, Now York
HO 2-3895
School
Students interested In attending
all or part of Albany Law School's
Open House Monday, November 8,
sign the registration from lnD-105
prior to Wednesday, November 3.
SLS
The following men have been informally inducted into the Brotherhood of Sigma Lambda Sigma:
George Beck, Howard Commander,
Carmen Chicone, Richard Clark,
Arnold Fox, Ken Horn, George
Liebowitz, Joe McClusky, John
Moosehaven,
Robert
Mulvey,
James O'Brian, Tom O'Hagen, Ron
Greeney and Casper Sedwick.
Academic Infiltration
Neighborhoods tend to become
"tipped" with college-educated
people once the initial break has
occurred by the first generation
student. Social and employment
pressures force high school students into Institutions of higher
learning.
In the areas of business and
politics culturally educated men
are admired and demanded as an
Integral part of their organizations.
Mr. Reisman cited the growth of
right wing groups on campuses as
another example of academic infiltration. Students attempt to
break away from their provincial
backgrounds throught these right
wing groups, but In the final analysis, retain their old philosophies.
The popular media Is also permeated with the academic. The
academic output of published material has greatly Increased with
I
Los Innovatcurs
The results of the French Club,
Les Innovateurs, elections held on
Thursday, October 14, 1960 were
Sue Pfreundner, President; Elaine
Clawson, Vice President) Jan Serlplio, Secretary; John Gilbert,
Treasurer.
Regents Aids
Mr. Paul Brown, Associate in
Higher Education, New York State
Education Department, will be on
campus Monday, October 25 ln
D-136 from 10 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.
to discuss Regents Fellowships for
College Teaching, Doctoral Study
ln Arts, Science, Mathematics or
Engineering, and the Herbert II.
Lehman Fellowships in Social Sciences and International Affairs.
'OBSERVATION'
the magazine of Visual Arts
eeeeeeeeeeeeee*.
NEEDS YOUR ART WORK
painting, drawings, sculpture,
i
photography, pottery, graphics, etc.
MOTORCYCLE
F i n e ' s Auto Sales
1025 Central Ave.
Changing Character of Colleges
Discussed by David Reisman
NOTICES
4 J l m i r s : V-I::W or by n/iiKtinInnnl
1
n good
AtMKTITODfHTMIM
j
1
CLASSICAL *JAZZ*
SHOW
OPENINGSPECIAL
TUNES!!!
FOR 3 WEEKS
ONLY
EVERY RECORD AVAILABLE AT
FAHTASTICALLY REDUCED PRICES!
A COMPLETE SELECTI0H!
anyone interested in submitting contact
ART KAPNER
Writes all types of insurance
LIFE - AUTO
HO 5-1471
HO 2-5581
FRIDAY SPECIAL
SHRIMP STEAK
TAILORING
„
„,„
with French Fries, Lettuce & Tomato
IV 2-3134;
Gerald's Drug Co.
217 Western A v e . Albany,
Phone 6-3610
N.Y.
55*
STUDENT UNION SNACK BAR
N O DISGUISES HERE!
AT DISCOUNT BEVERAGE
CENTERS OUR EVERYDAY LOW
PRICES ARE THE OTHER GUYS'
SPECIALS!
STOCK UP N O W ! SAVE
RAY ALLEN
oia student mail or call 462-0140
Open Your Lambert's Charge Account
No interest or carrying charge
COURTESY CARD
MAJOR RECORD DEPARTMENT
IS NOW AVAILABLE
AT W W CAMPUS STORE/
State University Bookntore
EATON PAPER CORPORATION. PITTSf IEUD. MASSACHUSETTS
- FIRE
Hospitalization
75 State Street
EXPERT
*?. p.
Ill
^ClmUnC.
Central Ave.
J«wel«r.
Phono HC ±7915
Albany, New York
• ION IN
INK HIRE
•
This Card Entitles You To
2 0 % Off On All Cash Sales
(Repairs Excluded)
Fine Watch and Jewelry Repairing
Dane on Premises
By the Case, by the Six Pack, by the Bottle
DISCOUNT BEVERAGE CENTERS
NOW AT 2 CONVENIENT LOCATIONS
Just Below Lincoln Park
Only Eaton makes Corrasable.®
Questions?
During the question period which
followed, Mr. Reisman was asked
for a frank evaluation of which type
of climate seemed to prevail at
our own SUNYA.
JUST IN CASE YOU DIDN'T KNOW IT . .
340 Western Avenue
C L E A N I N G and
ture by stating that the academic
should be opposed ln order to offer
the university community a healthier atmosphere for learning. The
non-academic and the anti-academic or collegiate should assert
themselves.
Mr. Reisman showed clearly that
he had taken the time and energy
to acquaint himself with representative communication organizations such as "Primer," the
"ASP" and the "Torch." SUNYA,
as a university college was evalThe non-conformist undergrad- uated as being tops by Mr. Reisuate culture also offers the aca- man.
demic competition, but It tends to
remain undirected. It is constant,
We have the elements of the
but unorganized. Non-conformists academic, non and anti-academic
are nourished by the academic, in healthy and valuable Interaction.
but yet oppose them as dominant, Mr. Reisman considered the congroups in the university commun- troversial statement of last year's
ity.
"Torch" that we were a university
Mr. Reisman concluded Ills lec- "on the make" as very apt.
PINE HILLS CLEANERS
We C a l l and Deliver
and two favored William Buckley.
1
Friday, October 22, 1965
R A L P H B R A D F O R D DISCUSSES the present status of American capitalism before a group of business students in Bru
bacher Lower Lounge Tuesday.
I WEDDING INVITATIONS *
he revealed his findings. Thirty
p e l . s ons favored Abraham Beame,
YAMAHA
toft
Medical Office
To Administer
Flu Vaccine
Times-Unian' Editor Discusses
Aspects of Lindsay Biography
. . . .
. T . J„„„
in which he m e t L i n d s a y
and of the w a y in w h i c h
t e s b o o k c a m e to b e p u b lished. His next point of
diSCUSSion Was On t h e
t e c h n i c a l a s p e c t s of t h e
J~ "
-?*£ „ , „. „
Frldoyj October' 29,"
Draper Hall
135 Western Atz.
Ex 129
Albany, N.Y.
Open evenings till 9
Saturday till 6
Downtown Albany
Plenty of Fro* Parking
4684128
Just East of Fuller Rd.
Colonic
Plenty of Free Parking
482-8308
Friday, October 29. 1965
ALBAHV I T U P t T P R I M
Pt|*4
large mass demonstrations radi In a neighboring house they killed
ated national pride and free- ten women and children In the
The city was upheld by true cate that 32,000 Hungarians died
patriots. Behind the guns stood In the fighting, but the actual numfactory workers, draftsmen, and ber is probably much higher.
students. Their faces were tired,
Destruction in Budapest was
but their goals were healthy and everywhere. The dth had not withonest, free of Nazism and antl- nessed such torture since the end
semitlsm. Yet, the time of victory of World War II. Two hundred
and glory lasted only eleven days. thousand persons, 2% of the popuThe Russian Invasion that fol- lation escaped to the West through
lowed on the 5th of November 1956, Austria after the vandalistic Red
decreased our hopes hour by hour. invasion.
The embittered fighting caused The Russians sent their wildest
both sides heavy casualties. The and most uninformed soldiers to
Red Army lost five tanks, twoBudapest. Some of them thought
trucks and about 200 men In a they were In Egypt and looked for
matter of minutes two hundredcrocodiles in the Danube; others MODERN B U D A P E S T IS for different from the war-torn city
yards from my house where we were told they had to fight against which was scattered with rubble of the revolt. The order and
built barricades to stop the tanks. German Nazis.
quiet of the present scene contrast sharply with the Buda-
pest of 1956.
National Pride
In the next moment the Russians
Russians Trade Sides
We knew: "Hungary was ready destroyed four apartment houses
A number of Russians fed up
co die standing rather than live and a movie house from where with Communism, took up the Hunkneeling." The speeches made at they thought the sniper fire came. garian flag and turned against their
fellow countrymen. Even in a few
Primer
isolated . areas the Reds traded A cause, a cause, give me a cause
their vehicles for bread and other Wrap my angry head in bloody gauze
kinds of food, because their supply Let the leaves fall, let the snows come
lines had been out by small revo- But without a cause I am nothing but a bum
lutionary groups.
Give me a cause, because
It is difficult to describe the Without one I am nothing but a crum.
no good to trump), and the dummy exasperation that ruled our actions Make me take a bath, make me get a Job
by Harry Nuckols
won the ace of clubs. The club ten In the months of terror that fol- But without a cause I am nothing but a slob
was led from dummy, covered with lowed the uprising. Ten million
Give me a cause, because
The first tournament of this the jack and king and trumped in people, the whole population, was Without one I am nothing but a blob.
on strike for about four months.
semester was held on Oct. 10. the West hand.
bum, crum, slob, blob
Two newcomers to State, Marty
The diamond return was ruffed The schools reopened In February Oh, Oh, give me a cause.
Bergen and Al Tepperberg, were In the South hand, and South then 1907, but ev.en then scattered
the winners, with Betty Van Wick- drew trumps and conceded a club shooting was reported in some
This Is not the kind of poem PRIMER wants. The person who wrote
len and Brook Wolkoff placing to East. One more top for the win- areas of the capitol.
this accidentally set fire to himself while trying to burn his draft card
second.
ners. And yes, sharpies, a diaWhile people cried Joy on Octo- and Is no longer with us.
The hand which appears this mond lead defeats the contract. ber 23, 1956, they melted into
What PRIMER does want Is an honest expression of the literary
For the tournament as a whole, tears a montli later realizing that tastes and talents on this campus. Contributions in the form of
week Is one the winners played
against this writer and his part- the turnout was disappointing. No all the blood, sacrifice, and suf- poetry, short story, play, and essay are welcome and may be subner. Bergen Is sitting South. The faculty members were there and fering was in vain. Yet, 1956 gave mitted to the PRIMER office In Room 10 of the English Annex, The
opening bid is characteristic of fewer students than expected par- me something valuable to learn, I deadline for the fail Issue is November 8.
third hand openings at duplicate ticipated. The next game will be learned In those 11 days that the
Oct, 31. Hopefully, more players word freedom was not like any
bridge.
South's overcall was routine. will be there to challenge the other word.
It was an Idea worth fighting and
North's jump raise is excellent, champs.
dying for if necessary.,.And freepromising near an opening bid and
SA62
dom
was' the word that made me
good support. South naturally conHK53
choose the United States as my
tinued to game.
DJ987
new home, over one year ago.
This writer, sitting West, opened
CA107
the nine of spades, and a small
card was played from the dummy, S98754
N
SK103
allowing East to make his king. H10704
W
E
HQ
The spade return was won in the DQ432
S
DK106
South hand and a low trump was C
CQJG532
won in the dummy with the king,
SQJ
felling East's queen.
IIAJ982
The spade ace provided a parkDAS
ing place for South's losing diaCK984
mond. The South hand was re-Dealer: West Vulnerable: E-W
entered with the diamond ace.
THE AUCTION
South now led a low club, a wise
decision. If he had drawn three WEST NORTH EAST SOUTH
Pass
1C
1H
round of trump at this point, good Pass
3H
Pass
411
defense would have defeated the Pass
contract.
Pass
Pass
Pass
West discarded a spade (it does Opening Lead: 9 of spades
Primer Seeks Literary Talent
Building Better Bridge
Surpr
your ArtCarved D i a m o n d Ring c o m e s
lo you o n its o w n p r e c i o u s t h r o n e .
Chess Corner
by Bob Morrltt
Tile queen Is the strength and
might of the chess arsenal and
as such should I* used with caution. Beginners, especially, allured by her power, are In great
haste to develop the queen In the
opening moves,
This practice Is fundamentally
erroneous and frequently lethal,
As a general rule, propitious opportunities for the queen arise
between the eighth and fifteenth
moves, and then oftentimes to
anchor a strategic place.
The best way to profit If your
opponent develops an "early"
queen Is Immediate harassment.
The knight serves this purpose
excellently.
Developing
your
pieces while simultaneously forcing the queen to move gives you an
overwhelming tempo.
Two key squares to remember
while deV' loping are Kill and QUI,
3. N-QB3
Q-QR4
This prevents continued harassment by the knights and gives
black strength in the center. However, It Is defensively weak offerlug no protection to QUI or to the
king side. Also its mobility can
become severely limited.
Q-Ql Is sometimes played but
defeats the purpose of the opening.
Q-K-lih exposes the queen adversely,
4. P-Q4
N-KB3
White gains a foothold In the
center,
5. B-QB4
B-B47
B-Q2 offers needed protection.
P-K3 or P-B4 is better yet.
0. B-Q2
P-K3?
The Queen's' bishop Is defensively useless, and black has overlooked a discovered queen check,
7. N-Q5
Q-R5
8. B-NGch QXB
9. NXPch K-Ql
Center Counter Game
10, NXQ
WHITE
BLACK
Black's exposed king became an
1, I'-K4
P-K4
easy victim for an ingenious knight
2. 1'XP
QXP
fork, There will lie a brtefdlscus.
White gains the advantage al- slou of this game at the chess club
though the king pawn provides Sunday from 7-9 in Brubacher
better protection in the opening private dining room.
Ten members of State's Outing Club took advantage of the fall weather to spend last weekend at
Camp Dippikill. The trip was one of both recreation
and work, for the camp had to be cleaned and p r e on
pared for the winter.
e participated waspreparingarid
Don Norton, a director " ? " T ! n S ? e a l 1; Th ? ? o d T
•
t
ai
. _
plentiful and well-cooked on the
of Stuyvesant Tower, a c - two gas ranges in the kitchen.
Companied
chaperone.
the group a s
fd'l use was made of the paper
Also on the <;UPS *"d plates available, although
i « s i T . . . . . . . n i /n _
u. u " was necessary to use someregt r i p w a s 3 1 / 2 m o n t h o l d ular dishes, thus increasing the
E d d i e , s o n o f t h e C l u b ' s work of the clean-up crew.
president
Sandy Mene- , The dl , s "- washers P«' °« '«?«•
*"
'
task as long as possible, extendln
e r * ' •• ... ,,. _. ^
.
S t h e conversation around the
Mr. Hollis Blodgett, Assistant dinner table. They finally had to
Director of Student Activities, had g i v e UP) however, and get the
gone up to the camp earlier in the dishes done,
week and installed the gas-driven
Cleaning up was a bit more of
generator.
a problem, since the hot water
By the time the members ar- tank was not working. It didn't Jjj
rived at the farmhouse on Friday take too much longer, though, to
evening, the space heaters were heat water on the stove,
working and the water tanks were
Sunday was devoted to getting
full. All that remained was to ready to leave the camp. Both
build a roaring fire in the fire- floors of the farmhouse were enplace, which the men quickly did. tirely swept out. The water tanks
Friday evening was spent in un- were emptied and the generator
cards. and putting away supplies, wasme
group i e
„ smaay
afternoon
%?.%°T'1
I °I'T^t
" " " " ^ ^ °< *»*">
.«""' * " • * / • ^ " ^
packing
unhooked
and
taken back
to the ^ " j S ' X X
leavingagency.
Dippikill to the mice until , WO I ^ M I
u"
i
,° l a s , , . , h T 8 h " v e r o 1 s l t i i n 9 *»P* « " " winter. It also helped
and later,
in
numerous
games
of
rental
to clear the farmhouse area of a lot of dead wood.
Fuel for the Fire
the next weekend trip.
A major occupation for the men
on both Saturday and Sunday was
the hauling and cuttingofflrewood.
In addition to the needs of the weekend, enough wood had to be gathered
to last the winter, since Outing Club
often uses Dippikill for weekend
Dippikill has seen many
Since that time little has been
skiing trips.
Members can stay at the camp,
improvements since it done except for the minor repairs
and cleaning that groups using the
and it is only a short drive to the
was first purchased by camp
do. In furnishings, the major
ski areas at North Creek and Gore
Student Association in additions have been bunk-beds,
Mountain.
While the men collected wood,
January, 1956. Most of mattresses, and lounge furniture
the group houses.
the girls cleaned up the inside of
these have been connected from
Some $65,000 is in a capital
the farmhouse. Since it Is the unwith the farmhouse on construction fund for Dippikill,
disputed domain of field mice most
but as yet there has been no
of the time, all food, dishes and
the property.
as to how the money
flat surfaces had to be checked and
When first acquired, the farm- agreement
cleaned.
house had only a kitchen, dining >s t o ** s P e n t >
There was plenty of time for just
room, and three upstairs bed,
walking, around, however.. One
rooms. Work parties of students
group went up to Fraternity Rock,
added a large, uninsulated living
which stands at the top of one of
room with a fireplace and an
the high ridges beyond the farmequipment building.
house.
SAFE
A S COFFEE
Pine Paneling
Greek Symbols
Later work parties completely
insulated and pine-paneled the living room, and made the equipment
building into a long room sleeping
about 20 people. This room was
-also insulated and paneled with
Representatives of all of State's
fraternities have left visible evidence there that they have inspected the camp and found it satisfactory. The fraternities have
also carved their Initials Into some
e
,
. „ ..
I T ' S S T R I C T L Y A STAG G A M E , as little Eddie watches the P"' ,of the farmhouse furniture.
lo in
These early work parties of
Newly fallen leaves were six,Ph e y 9 techniques of D i p p i k i l l ' s card-sharps Card games filled students were organized by Stustretches of r a i n y weather.
inches thick or the path leading
dent Association and were pro- F R A T E R N I T Y ROCK, conspicdown to the lake and the water
vided with their meals. Work on uous evidence
that
State's
was crystal clear. Some of the
the camp In later years was done Greek brothers get
men took a quick trip around in
around.
by paid workers.
the rowboat there, but reported
One of the major expenditures
that they had to ball as fast as
on the camp was the building of
they poled.
a road at the cost of about $10,000.
During the intermittent rain
The road was paid for before It
showers, and at night, the fireplace
Camp Dippikill Is available for to biUld their first fire.
had been inspected, and groups
became the local point for the use by any group of students upon
The University also requires trying to use It found that the angle
group. Studying, conversation, and proper registration with Camp that If the group is mixed, a of the road was too steep for orcards were the major activities, Board at the Student Activities Of- chaperone be Invited for each ten dlnary cars. It also had a tendency
as people relaxed from the actlvl- flee. Rules for the camp include students.
to wash out every spring, and is no
ties of the day and the pressures providing a sufficient supply of
Outing Club, the major user of longer used,
of the school week.
firewood, and leaving enough the Dippikill facilities, has found
Wa,or and
Light5
Another activity in which every chopped wood for the next group this chaporone rule to be the main
obstacle to organizing trips to the
By 1903 > 'he rooms had been
camp,
repainted and the ceilings fixed.
Chaperone Rule Main Block
To Use of Dippikill Facilities
Merriod Students Ineligible
Agt Carved*
D 1 \ E A M D I A M O N D FLINGS
Now Vo'k 10017
See Dream Diamond Rings only at these Authorized ArtCarved Jewelers
F. J. Lambert
211 Central Ave.
Two gas ranges were provided in
the kitchen, and a gas-powered
Outing Club Includes at least generator for lights and running
FARMHOUSE
two married couples, both of whom water had been installed, A hot D I P P I K I L L ' S
have been to Iho camp numerous water tank and space heaters were n a s 5 e e n many additions and
times. Neither can serve as chap- added.
improvements,
erones for a trip, however. The I
University requires the diaper- |
ones to be members of the faculty, since only they can assume I
legal responsibility for a group.
This point of legality has led to
some unique situations. On one trip J
last spring, for example, three]
married couples who wanted to use [
the camp for a weekend had to have |
a faculty member go along to chaperone.
Dippikill is administered by I
Camp Board, composed of both
students and faculty, Present [
members of the Hoard Include
Kavlu Moody, Chairman; William,[
Slnnhold, Vice Chairman; andRonnl Braunsteln, Secretary.
The faculty members are Mr.
All stylos shown w.ih iho.t liiiio ihionos. charmingly gill boxotl
Irom $150 ID $1200 bnckod by Iho wcillon AclCnivoU
guaianloo and Poimanant Valuo Plan
For l.oo foldm mile J k Wood & Sons, Inc JIQ E 46lh~SI
'!
Dippikill Work Includes
Farmhouse Renovation
When you can't
afford to be dull,
sharpen your wits
with NoDoz,M
NODOZ Koep Alort Tablets light off
the hazy, lazy loellngs of montal
sluggishness. NODOZ helps restore
your natural monial vilality. •. helps
quicken physical reactions. You become more naturally alert to people
and conditions around you. Yet
NODOZ is as safe as coffee. Anytimo
. . .when you can't afford to be dull
sharpen your wits with NODOZ,
£X>
by Edith Hardy
Editor* Note: The following story, hearted enthusiasm. The redair-raid shelter to retaliate their
commemorating the anniversary of white-green colored Hungarian losses.
the Hungarian revolution, l« writ- flags flew over every building In
Russian casualties which have
ten by a Hungarion refugee who Budapest and over the Parliament never been officially announced,
givei o first hand account of thewith hope never before promised have been estimated to exceed
revolution.
15,000 men. Official reports Indito the Hungarian people.
There are moments of grinding
pain and unspeakable happiness in
a man's life that he remembers
with the vividness of the actual
experience throughout many yearn.
The thought of the 1956 unparalled
freedom flight of the Hungarian
people brings such vivid and immortal memories to my mind.
I remember the first seconds of
freedom when my parents and some
of the neighbors were standing In
our room listening to the sounds
of the Anthem which has so long
been misused by traitors and foreign occupants. The tears in our
eyes were proof that a tremendous
wave of emotions overcame us.
/UtWiTyWHTrHIH
Work, Relaxation Mark
Weekend at Dippikill
Student Remembers Hungdry19S6\
Recalls National Pride* Enthusiasm
by George Nagy
f H * y . October 2 9 . 1965
E
- -V.E.R. Y
- .O. N. E GETS I .N T E R E S T E D when the food is served
SINCE THB LEGEND OF ABRAHAM LINCOLN, studying Yy
J S r R t o t o f t p "
meals bore l i t t l e resemblance to dorm fare, but no one seemed R i d i a r d Hauser and D r , Arthur ' " • l i 9 l " h a s n a d ° ' f e c i a l attraction. T h e huge fireplace at
to mind.
Long of the science department. Dippikill provides the right background for such an endeavor.
i
.
<
•
•
•
•
'
•
I",
fi\*»f, o«taMr n:mt
AtlAHY$Tlrt»IHTM«»
tstA
Facts Not Yet Established
PIP ALL THE HOME,,
..WILL Qgr -me SCHOLARSHIP?
WORK ASSIGNMENT?
HAS P e ^ E K V E O 0 M S K I N 6 O N THE C A M P U S ??
Coming's handling ot the South Mall
project shows how astute a man can be.
For decades every capitol city has
tried to obtain tax relief from the state
The race for mayor in the City of New York has
of which it i s the capitol. The reason
is that the state-owned land in theobtained national attention. This is due to the multicapitol city i s always extensive and million dollar campaign to create a John F. Kennedy
image for John Vliet Lindsay. The image is a fraud.
tax free.
Lindsay was outsmarted by Rockefeller and, to
Corning obtained large payments
from" the state for both the city and the a lesser extent, Javits when he was placed in the
county for the tax losses involved in the race. He has not been able to maintain the support
loss of the many acres in the mall pro- of the official Republican district leaders. He has
apparently sold the office of President of the City
ject.
The main topic of discussion from Cpuncil to the Liberals and Alex Rose.
Lindsay's recent statement that Beame could not
the Republicans has been the Albany
water supply. Perhaps the Republicans wait for the deaths of Herbert H. Lehman and Mrs.
blame the Democrats for the drought. Eleanor Roosevelt to knife the reform movement
in the back is worth considering.
We do not.
If this statement is typical of the mindof Lindsay,
Perhaps the Republicans are suggesting that the ciiy should plan for we think he fails to deserve even his own vote.
We had high hopes for Lindsay; we thought he
the unexpected. Perhaps they are too
naive to know that one does not throw would run an intelligent, interesting campaign based
tax money around planning for theon worthwile issues. Instead we have had useless
plaudites, unconstructive criticism, and retreads
unlikely.
Again we say, Olshansky does hot of old programs and proposals. These have had the
want to be mayor; Corning does. 6 l - backing of the largest campaign chest in recent
shansky has only the vaguest quali- years. This does not add to their validity.
Lindsay does not have the support of even half of
fications; Coming's qualifications are
the enrolled Republicans in the city, if the straw
exceptionally good.
polls are correct (they have rarely been wrong and
never by more than one o r two percent.) He fails
therefore in his primary effort to represent the
Ever since the Student Association be. The opportunity for a small group view of his own party.
The Republican party in New York City is comacquired Dippikill some 9 years ago, of students to live and work together
many students have questioned the wis- as a group for a weekend adds to the P°sed of more conservatives than liberals. It i s
therefore somewhat falacious to assume that a
dom of spending a lot of money on a charm of the camp.
Although the amount of money which liberal like Lindsay could ever effectively r e p r e camp so far away.
sent nls
party.
Meanwhile a small number of stu- has been spent may seem high, we feel
that
Dippikill
will
become
an
increasThe Republican party is basically a conservative
dents have regularly been goingto Dippikill and using and enjoying its facil- ingly necessary part of our recrea- party. No amount of pretending will change this,
tional facilities.
William Buckley's showing will prove this to all
ities for the weekend.
Especially with the highly formalized doubters; since many conservatives aretoodevoted
Many improvements have been made,
to
so that students may now have the com- and structured living facilities and a c - t h the Republican label ever to leave the party line,
tivities
on
the
'
new
campus,
and
the
e Buckley vote will be a low estimate of the conforts of heat and running water with
relatively little effort. The farmhouse day-type recreation which the Mohawk servative strength in the city.
Lindsay offers little understanding of the probnow accommodates some thirty people. property will probably provide, many
Dippikill may never be used by a students will welcome the opportunity tems of New York City. His district is the oldest
large proportion of the student body at to really get away for a weekend to a congressional district in America with a mean
the same time. Nor, perhaps, should it place where things a r e still small, age of more than 45 years. The problems of the
city are unemployment, crime and dope addiction,
education and traffic. All of these center largely
Albany Student Press
on young people.
Lindsay's voids of knowledge indicate that he will
E S T A B L I S H E D MAY I f U
continue to depend heavily on dozens of $10,000 a
• V T H E CLASS OP 1 V U
year advisors.
Beame, on the other hand, has spent his life work_ _ s . m i - w a . k l y n.wspap.r published by l h . slud.nt body 7~ihe stole UnUenity oi Ne
Tht Albany Slu _
Tha ASP o l f i c , located In Room 5 of Brubachsr Hall at 750 Stat* Strsa
fork _.
at „.^any.
All
is open iron. 7-ii p.m. Sund.ing w l t n t h e p r o b i e m s of the city. He knows the city
Ihroujh Thursday nights. Tha ASP may ba raachad by dialing 434-4031.
and its p r o b l e m s . It i s true that Beame feels a s at
JOSEPH W. GALU - JOSEPH b. SILVERMAN
home with political l e a d e r s the ilk of C h a r l e s BuckCo-Edltort-ln-Chlal
KLAUS SCHNITZER
EILEEN MANNING ley and Adam Clayton Powell a s P r e s i d e n t Johnson
RAYMOND A. M c C L O A T
Photography Editor
Sport. Editor
DIANA M. DOMKOWS'KI d o e s w i t h Jumes O. Eastland and Eugene Talmadge.
MONICA M. McGAUCHEY
EDITH S. HARRY
Bo
Advertising
Manager
usines, Monager Does this have any significance. We think not.
EiecullVo Editor
A Y W 5
W e fee
WILLIAM H . C O L O A M
LARRY EPSTEIN
A...oi...
Pho,o
l that Beame would maKe use of the best
g ,op hy t°°. ,
Arts Editor
Enacutlva Editor
minds in the city including William F. Ryan and
Beame For New York City
Dippikill Necessary Facility
r^vzj™^*
Ad«mS. We ^ ^ u ^ WOuid con-
C . M. Corson, Sue Chape, Margaret Dunlap, Malcolm Provost, Richard Kase, M g r k t M U O t O r e l y O n t h e o r i s t s
Cunningham, Nancy Mledenbauer, Sosan Steljer, Barbara Blodgett, Robert Cutty, Bob f x j „ w V I - . P L - P H i r
Winger, Bill Stirlflmon, Linda Bregmon, John Sprass, Janet Hess, Steve Curtl O I N O W Y O r K L 4 t y ,
Anna Olgney, Stave Walter, Harry Nuckols, Jim Begley, Douglas Rothgeb
Photographs
c
W e feel
•••••"
John Fotia s a y
B e a m e
WO uid
OTnO k n o w l e d g e
WOUld b e 3 m a y o r
d e v o t e d tO
. . . .
r
,»
. ' : „, c .,,„n v „,|, c , |,, ,;.„,.
Lind-
be devoted to rebuilding the Republican
and building the future of John V, Lindsay,
All caraeunlcalieni
eiusl be
addressed
should be
an request. C o m m p a r t y
..
—
— „ v .la
. Ihe
, , _ Editors
. j i t o r s and
and should
Be signed.
signed. Names
Names will
will be
be withheld
will
••liens should
should be
be limited
limited tla
e 100
300 wards
wolds end
and ere
are subject
subject to
to editing.
editing. The
Tlia Albony
Albony Student
Sr '
"
— ne
- r-e s
-p o nLs i'b l e ,
•fallens
Press
assumes
„„_,„„
'•» opinions eseressed in its columns eftf cemwiunlcetions. as such eeareesiens Mja ne
'- - • •
that
With little
Waller Post, Gary Woods, Too Moon Lee, Robert Stevenson S o l v i n g t h e p r o b l e m s Of t h e C i t y . W e f e e l t h a t
«"«»i«i
vlr in
8
( R l t a Tushlngham) fresh from the
countryside who is trying to find her way to the
One of these days (hopefully by the time this r e - Y , W , C , A " N o w . o f course, the only thing Colin needs
view is in print) that bright new award-winning
, . k n a c k i t s e l f ' a n d b y ">e time he finally does
e
,10U h
British comedy "The Knack...And How to Get It " ag dozen
i • econventional
B madcap
situations have arisen to fill
comedies.
will
packing
them
in
Delaware
. . . t i l be
•._ _
__I_I
i
i
>.. at
_ . the
. .
„
.
*
it Hrr/PIl f<nntlnnllnnnl „...„„,JI„„
What can one say about ''The Knack?" To start
Soxy Bachelor
with it won the Best Picture award at the Cannes
from the long-running stage play by Ann
Film Festival this year, was directed liy Richard T eTaken
lllcoe
The
Lester, that brilliant Philadelphian who has twice ;
. "
Knack...And How to Get It" is as
1
put the Beatles successfully through their paces, and, innoffensilive and spunky a comedy as one could hope
s t a r t t0flnlsn
Is one of the funniest, most daring, offbeat comedies •
.
" k e e l ) s «P » frantic pace,
to come along in many a moon.
nearly bursting at the seams with a whole arsenal
llilar ous
What's the movie all about? - why, the knack of
'
sight and sound gags. A bouncy music
course. And what is the knack? Well, it's Just the S C ? r , e . y J o h n B a r r y (G°ldflnger) fits in approth e a c t l o n
knack, that's all. If you have It, it
it means that your P„
, ' ,, Y„ . " " " ,. e a c " ° ";; Charles
v a r i e s Wood's
wood's screenplay ^
life, and your apartment, is filled
9d with legions of ? a s t " " " w ' t t y ; a n d dlr « !cl °'- Lester doesn't let | I | | J » C t
s l a c k f o ra
beautiful girls, girls you can pick up and toss aside t h e
<*<"«*•
UUf?5f
at your discretion. If you haven't
you're
n't got
got it,
i t , you're
. .
1
Almost a Genius
miserable, and your sex life Is next to nothing.
To say that Richard Lester has scored another hit j
witn
Spunky Comedy
The ASP believes that Mayor Erastus
Corning, II will make a better mayor
than his opponent Jake Olshansky. We
believe that Olshanksy has no interest
in becoming mayor and is in the running onlytoplacate the leaders of all
major parties.
The apparent purpose of Olshansky's
race is to get a judgeship for Olshansky. He i s regarded a s a "nice guy"
and even a " g r e a t guy." He i s considered to be an outstanding lawyer.
This might make him a good candidate
for a judgeship, but it does not make
him qualifiedtobe mayor.
In Albany, as we have said in the
past, the government is and will be run
by the Democrats. The overwhelming
majority of Albanians want it this way.
Reforms where they are needed and
when they are necessary or demanded
will be and are being made.
The plan for a new high school i s
one indication of the more progressive
attitutde of the Corningadministration.
Mayor Corning i s unquestionably
qualified to serve another term. He is
now completing his sixth term and
shows no sign of tiring of City Hall.
ft.fr 7
yomg
by Douglas Rathgeb
Corning For Mayor of Albany
Columnists
ALBAHYSTUPtNt PRESS
Lester Possesses 'The Knock'
Spunky English Comedy Scores
The auditor's report on the faculty ington and explains the reporttou s .
We hope that anybody who is interstudent associations of the three State
Universities seemstoverify the stu- ested in the auditor's criticisms o r
dent's age-old complaint about the high is contemplating taking any action would
prices he pays for books and meals. attend the President's p r e s s conferWe feel that before an evaluation of ence to be held Monday at 1:25 in
the report can be made, there should President Collins* office.
be a thorough examination of the difThis report is the first important
ferent criticisms in the report. This
criticism ever made of the faculty
can only be done if you have a broad
student association's operations and
knowledge of the intricate workings of
can precipitate changes that might
the faculty student association and its
improve their operations.
components.
But we hope that no action will be
We feel we do not have this knowledge and will not be able to take an taken by the State University or by
intelligent stand on the issue until the student body until the report i s
President Collins returns from Wash- carefully considered.
^i^
?*&*&. October » ; 1f«5
r>„
We prefer Beame
Tolen (Ray Brooks), a sexy bachelor has the
ack. Colin (Michael Crawford), a very sh'yschoolacher and the landlord of Tolen's London house
hasn't got the knack and is properly upset. So To en
goes about teaching him. First, says Tolen one needs
double
-a very large
i
. I . . . . U I - bed,
i . - j next. an
_ unassuming
' . virgin
fresh from the countryside, to practice on and finally, of course, one needs the knack itself.
"
T h e
Knack" i s not really saying much.To say '
(AHMHA
jOPlCMO
L . .
JOflll
D» ...2
BlICCI
"
'
r
Highlights Brahms' Program
, l sa B e n i u s l s WtisiPS saying too much; but it's
", Vfry , f a r f r o m t l l e t r u t h - Lester, who began his
T w o S c h e n e c t a d y s o l o i s t s Will S i n g w i t h t h e C a p i t o l
dlrectora
J career with a way-out British television H i l l C h o r a l S o c i e t v i n a n a l l R r - i h m c . ' n m r r r n m rm
65
T h e Goon Snow
and
f.f' /„
'"
" * " Proceeded to " . . " „ S 0 C ' e t V ' " a " a " B r a h m s p r o g r a m o n
fll ns
' "ke "Mouse
on the Moon," and the two Beatle F r i d a y , N o v e m b e r 5 a t 8 : 3 0 p . m . , a t C h a n c e l l o r s
P
a
.making
e p i c?'
s , ,„
h a s aPhenomenal
Dhennnipimi "knack"
«'knarlr»» for
fnr
miL-in,r the
n , « Hall
M a l l in
I n Albany.
Alhnnir
, ? ? V, ' f i l m l n B techniques, even overexposure,
Judson Rand, director, announced that Joan Bucci
h
' 0 0 yk r i S
t-One
would
suppose
that
a
picture
that
took
_
.
„
-.„ .
. .. . .
, ..
f
e weeks to ,llm (tlle usual l s ,rom t n r e e t0
Tom (Donai Donnelly), a wild Irish beatnik moves ?"
Schenectady would be the soprano soloist, and
into the building, but he isn't much interested in
months) would come out looking hopelessly un- J o h n M a l t h o u s e , a S c h e n e c t a d y t e a c h e r , w o u l d b e t h e
bari
either the knack; or how to get it. He has his own J
^
MX^IT™!^'™*
*"**"
t ° n e soloist. T h e alto s o l o i s t will b e Louise
passion for painting things white, and so is com- „ " , " ' f .„„ fjy'nlng but amateurish.
A r m < ! t m n u n f N o w Vnrk- CiHr
pelled to paint white everything that Isn't, including , " T " ' ' ° 0 ' ^ l o n e , 0 t n e delightful foursome of A r m s t r o n g o l N e w Y o r k C i t y ,
W
every square inch of his flat.. But he goes along with „„,™
„" d L_
, B . r .°., oks, '. ,D P, n e ,l l V. . a " ° " " a Tushlngham,
h „ „,.„
wh
Colin anyway.
<-„II«
— -..
o prance through the whole thing with a mirthful
B r a h m s ' Program
tongue-in-cheek attitude and a naturalness that shows
tha
y a re t n o r o u
The
Brahms'
program
will include "A German
or
at
L'!!f
,
.
BMy
enjoying
the
mad
goings
on.
junkyard, and then, to their supreme joy,
least Colln's, who comes along but an unassuming What, then, Is The Knack?" Why, a minor Requiem" with the full chorus and soprano and
miracle, that's all.
Pre-View Tries Broader Spectrum,
OUCCeeUS
D e S p i t e
by F r a n c i s Goodwin
The performances in last weekend's Pre-Vlew varied from excellent to unfortunate. The show was
organized sufficiently well that it
Is possible to deal with the acts as
they appeared.
The show was opened by Dennis
Buck playing his own arrangement
of the overture to Camelot.Tlie arrangement was outstanding; Buck's
playing was not. He played well, but
his playing was overshadowed by
other piano performances.
Helen Stoll and John Fotia, the
co-chairmen of the event, introduced themselves vocally with a
much changed version of "Hello
Dolly." It was a good idea and
came off well, but it was not worth
a repeat to introduce the second
section of the show.
The jazz sequence was liegun by
a blues performance by trumpeter
Lou Strong and pianist HankMueller. Strong's highly interpretive
playing overshadowed Mueller and
the song they played.
baritone soloists; "The Alto Rhapsody" with Miss
Armstrong and a men's chorus; and "The Wall of
Heaven," a motet to be sung by the full chorus.
Allen Mills of Schenectady will be the accompanist.
UTIjOrtUnClte
^ x C r S c h o r a l Society audiences. She received outstanding
reviews
her
earlier appearances
_,..
„„ in
... the
„„, 1962
•"»<"•""'= for
<"«>- h
» ' ~..»-i;««
byrtnetrSner:oausneess:ily *""**" vers!'.'""' the P a u l McCar "> ey performance of Verdi's "Manzoni Requiem,' and
t
n
e
1
9
6
3
The folk section was concluded
Daine Bradley's "Love Tastes
performance of Handel's "Messiah." Her
by the Hudson River Valley Boys' Like Strawberries" was very good recent credits include two summers in the role of
vocal selection. Again the reaction although the movements of her
the Mother Abbess in a touring company production
was more than warm.
guitarist maintained eye interest,
thereby taking attention from Miss of "The Sound of Music."
One ot a Kind
Bradley.
Vikki Francis was the last sec"You Are Woman, I Am Man"
F i r s t Appearance
tion of the program l«fore the by Vikki Francis and Tom Bond
This will be Joan Bucci's first appearance with
intermission. Miss Francis is was nothing short of great. The
somewhat impossible to describe, combination of their outstanding t h e C h o r a l S o c i e t y . Her credits include many Con-
M e 6 r m r and* B a r b ^ ^ i s ^
emEor,Pr^e,,Cteheir,egre:r'^ce0sf
C 6 r t S
With
^
^
a r e a
C h
°
r U S e S
a n d
^
P
^
0 r
"
The result is obviously both unique brought the program to a i>eautifui c h e s t r a s , and appearances with the Lexington Choral
and enjoyable.
high point.
Society in Boston, the Utica Symphony, and the New
She sang "Funny Girl" and did
The finale was "That's Enter- Y o r k C o n c e r t C h o i r A. n a t i v e o f M i s s o u r i s h p in t h p
an encore. She also appeared in tainment" featuring the entire cast
°
, ° . 7.
. ° , ' \\ n a t l v e O I M i s s o u r i , She IS t h e
the second half in another stand- plus four invaders. While the cur- w l l e o i S c h e n e c t a d y a t t o r n e y E a r l M . BuCCl.
second section of the pro- tain call was sloppy, the song was
outnie
performance.
John Malthouse is a f o r m e r m e m b e r of the Choral
gram was begun by Helen Stoirs number
of people
involved.
and
well done
by the large performance
Society, and of
was
baritone
soloist inHe
theis1963
thethe
Mozart
"Requiem."
the
rendition of " I Left my Heart in good
The finale was very appropriate;
San Francisco." It is doubtful that the idea that Fotia had in mind buss soloist at the Trinity Methodist Church in Althe song would be her favorite if W as to broaden the show lo include
Tony Bennett's style was as life- a broader spectrum of entertain- bany, and a music teacher at the Draper School in
les'sashers.
Rotterdam.
ment, lie achieved his goal.
First Classical
Section
Masters' Print Sale
In Richardson Hall
Nonprofit
Association
The three highly varied numbers
The Capitol Hill Choral Society is a nonprofit
of a classical nature were all exKaufman O u t s t a n d i n g
tremely successful. Donna Jay
association
of Albany area musicians. Later this
The first really impressive per- Epting's ballet dance to "Maria"
year, the Society will present Handel's "Messiah"
formance was turned In by Ellis S U f| e r e ( j | 1 0 m the lack of depth
Kaufman. His singing of "Anyplace of Page stage.
at Chancellors Hall on December 17; Rossini's
Interested area residents will
I Hang My Hat is Home" brought the
Chopin's "Polonaise in A Flat" have an opportunity to examine and "Stabat Mater" and three Passion Motets at tht
audience to its flrsl major burst of was played by Deimitri Perdaris.
purchase original prints by modern Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception on March
applause.
While noi a Jose Iturbl, Perdaris
The applause, at the Saturday acquitted himself very well. The and old master artisis next Novem- 8; and Mendelssohn's "Elijah" at Chancellors Hall
performance, was sufficleni to rate familiarity of a good section of ber 4. A sales representative from
an encore, but one had uul been the audience added lo the interest the Ferdinand Roten Galleries of o n M a y 11
Baltimore, Maryland, Mr. John D.
Tickets for the concert may be purchased at
prepared.
in his performance.
The jazz section was ended by The best ol this generally excel- Wilson, will lie at the Commons in down to wn Albany music stores, from Society memlower
Richardson
Hall
from
10:00
Carol Rosenthol who sang "The lent section was Carla Rinelll's
bers, or at the door the night of the concert: adult
Man That Got Away." The mike singing of "Un Bel Di." She was a.m. to 2:00 p.m. Thursday, No$2.50; student $1.25.
did not work. She was not com- required by lone applause to do an vember 4.
On view will be approximately
fortable In the key she was in.encore. I .suspect that if the encore
The folk section liegan well with had lieen short she would have had 500 original etchings, lithographs
and
woodcuts by such artists as
the Hudson Hlver Valley Boys doing to do another.
Picasso, Chagall, Lautrec, Renoir,
a song programmed only as "InJell Chertok's highjlnks as the Rouault, Goya, Plranesi, Baskln
strumental." The crowd's reaction magician were amusing, especially
Open
Rensselaer
County
H i s t o r i c a l Society
to the bluegrass banjo plucking was his unrehearsed verbal battle with and many others.
Original prints are impression.1 November 3-6
enthusiastic.
House, 4 : 0 0 - 6 : 0 0 p.m.
William Laundry.
on fine pajJer taken from plaies
The Calgary Four's "Rider"
woodblocks or lithograph stones
Monday M u s i c a l C l u b Program. 8 : 3 0 p.m. A l was spotty. Three of the lour sang.
Duets and Humor
prepared by the artist and hand- November 1
bany I n s t i t u t e of H i s t o r y and Art, open to the
Only one of these three had any
Diane Somervllle and Tom Bond printed by him or under his superpublic.
stage presence. The result was sang "Jusl hi Love." The result vision. No photo-mechanical prounimpressive, especially after the was pleasing, but It was not mem- cess is employed as In reproduc77M* Philosophy
of \yn Hand, d i s c u s s i o n a t
Hudson River Valley Boys.
November 3
orable. Sue Nichols' "Something tions of paintings, etc.
8 : 0 0 p.m. in the U-lounge of V e v e r w y c k . P a n e l Wonderful" showed her need for
Original prints are usually limi s t s : D r . Mark Berger, Mr. W i l l i a m G r i m e s , J
U n u s u a l Song
some basic training like bow to ited In number and often the modRoger Loe and L e s Greenberg.
Ed S i l v e r ' s " T h e Shape of breathe, how to stand, und how lo
ern print is signed by the artist.
T h i n g s " was another highlight of use a potentially great voice.
Prices for items to 1« displayed
P r i n t Sale, L o w e r R i c h a r d s o n , 1 0 - 2 .
the evening. As Silver said i n
John Webb's "It's in the Book" range from $5.00 to $2000.00 with November 4
prefacing his song, the song was w as a sensation. His comedy was the majority In the under $100.00
Of Mice und Men, U n i v e r s i t y T h e a t r e ProducNovember 3-6
intended to be sung by a woman; unbelievably great. He concluded range.
H o n . Pat e H a l l , 8 : 3 0 p.m.
but this did not mar his perfor- with a great rendition of "GrandAll works are for sale and [iur•nance.
m a . s Lye Soap.''
chases may lie charged or paid
Brahms Requiem
by t h e C a p i t o l H i l l C h o r a l
November 5
The performance of Lorraine
Ronald Waddoll's "Yesterday" over a three-month period.
S o c i e t y . C h a n c e l l o r ' s H a l l , 8 : 3 0 p.m.
Seldel and Gall Saflan of "Two failed to create an Impression
aiarftnfocfo
Friday. October 29, 1965
A U A N Y STUP1NT PRESS
GOLDEN EYE
A RayVum of Sports
Film Festival
begins
by Roy McClogt
This is.the twelfth issue of the ASP this semester,
and in each and every one of those newspapers we
have had one most unpleasant duty to perform —
refer to our athletic teams a s the Great Danes.
What may appear to be a petty complaint from an
overworked sports staff is, in reality, the seemingly
prevalent opinion of the student body.
We have yet to hear any complimentary remarks
about our nickname, we've been asked by outsiders
as to the significance inherent in our canine mascot,
and we've been unable to justify last y e a r ' s Mascot
Committee's selection of the animal as a likely successor to our deposed Penguin.
To be entirely fair, we do think that contest winTishter Photu
ner Kathy Earle did present excellent credentials
VARSITY CROSS-COUNTRY coach R. Keith Munsey gives his
for the Great Dane in submitting her entry. She harriers a pre-meet pep talk prior to last week's triangular
claimed the dog was "typically American, bred for meet. He must have said something right, as the Danes won
size, weight; strength, character, courage, speed their ninth of the year.
and stamina." If it were running for office in the
ASPCA, the animal would win in a landslide.
However, we fail to see any connection between a
Great Dane and any of the traditions, goals, or
characteristics of Albany State or the surrounding
area. We feel that the most primary consideration
in the choosing of a nickname and mascot is the r e The Albany State varsity cross-country team
lationship between the choice and the school. RPI scored its ninth win of the year last Saturday, with
reflects itself via the Engineers, while Union r e - a triangular meet triumph over Plattsburgh State
calls a proud tradition with its Dutchmen.
and New Haven State at Washington Park. The score:
The Mascot committee claimed that its selection State 21, Plattsburgh 43, New Haven 74. Albany
was based on "originality, applicability to our dominated the meet with eight runners finishing in
athletic teams, applicability to this area, and ap- t h e f i r s t t w e l v e .
rounaing into shape, was too strong
propriateness to our new university." Its originality
Once again it w a s soph "ear "><* finish.
v~nu*.„
„,h~ ™ „ „ , i
Flick was clocked in 25:37, Manwas never in question, not for one teeny-weeny JT«o Qe K
e a t i n g w h o p a c e d n e r s l n 2 5 : 5 4 | ma D u r b l n i n ' 2 6 . 0 4 moment.
t h e D a n e s . K e a t i n g w o n i n Also placing well for Albany was
The problem of our Great Dane by-name has yet 2 5 : 1 1 . 2 o v e r t h e 4 . 5 5 m i l e Bob Mulvey, who placed fifth in
to loom as acute. In soccer games the cries of the c o u r s e . K e a t i n g o p e n e d u p 2 % 2 ^ t r s i t y faces'LeMoyne on
crowd are carried away by the wind, and visitors a s l i g h t l e a d h a l f - w a y November 2, election day. When
pay little heed to them. But when basketball season t h r o u g h t h e c o u r s e , a n d t h e t w o t e a m s m e t l n t h e LeMoyne
arrives, and the cheerleaders step onto the court ha h^iA « „ f« ,.,i« „ . , „ . , Invitational a month ago, State
for an organized cheer — well, can't you just hear h e h e l d o n t o w i n o v e r p l a c e d f o u r t n b e h l n d t h e h o s t
team's third place showing.
them now: "Milk-Bone, Ken-L Ration, Go Danes t e a m m a t e B o b F l i c k .
T h e ,rosl1
Flick, whose efforts earned him
cross-country team,
Go!" or worse yet, "Woof, Woof, Bow, Bow, We
"Runner-of-the-Meet"
honors, p a c e d b* M l k e S w e l l ' s thirdplace
need a basket, get it now! "
nis
wound
In a three battle for most " " '
"P l n t l l e number
Please note that we avoided using the cliche caught
spot at tne
of the race. Flick, Ken Durbln t n rAe e total
annualVlkingRun
of
17
competed,
"State is going to the dogs." That is definitely be- and Pittsburgh's Ralph Manners at Hudson Valleyschools
lastone
Saturday
with Albany beingCC
only
of two
burst
opened
It
up.
neath us. However, we are quite upset when rumors Flick's
remained bunched together until frosh squads in the primarily junManners
tried
to
stay
with
Flick,
ior
and
community
college
field.
are about claiming that Albany gives out bachelor
but the Scotia runner, who Is just Siena's frosh finished 13th,
degrees, master degrees and pedigrees!
Harrier's Mark at 9-1
After Triangular Win
PotterPygmies
Pace Round 1
The AMIA League II pygmy
teams have recently completed
their first round of play, with
undefeated
Potter leading the
league.
Potter gained the lead via a
20-0 trouncing of the KB pygmies,
In a highlighted contest last Monday.
Potter, led by the passing and
running of quarterback Jim Curley, scored its three touchdowns
on passes to Dan Crlppen and Fred
Nelson, and a run by Curley.
As the league enters Its second
round, the teams will play each
other In the same rotation. Here
Is a list of the pairings: APATower, Potter-Waterbury, PotterTower, APA-KB, KB-Tower, Potter-APA, Waterbury-Tower, KBWaterbury, Potter-KB, and APAWaterbury,
The standings for the first round
are as follows;
Potter
4
0
KB
2 ;i 1
A PA
2 11 1
Wat
1
3
Tower
0
4
NOTICES
The AMIA officers for 1965-68
are President Jim Wlngate, Vice
President Jack Kenny, Secretary
Tim Ambrosino, Representatives
to Recreation Board Tom Guilfoyle
and Jerry Montague.
Men Interested ln refereelng
AMIA basketball games for pay
should sign up at Robin Annex
before November 1.
BIG DUMB DOG
9 p.m. tonight
Neither rain
norsnow
norheat
nor Liz
A L B A N Y a. N E W YORK"
n
U;'%
A
can ever
wrinkle
h.i.s
Press-Free
Post-Grads
PIZZA
SUBS OR SANDWICHES
].35
1.65
1.65
1,65
1.75
1.75
1.75
1.75
half & half
2-00
combingtion-4 items
chef special (everything).
2.25
3. 25
-BUCKET OF SPAGHETTI"BUCK N' A HALF A BUCKET"
'Spaghetti sauce
'Italian rolls
'Imported cheese
"Enough to feed a Hungry Gang"
hot meal ball
hoi meat ball & pepper
hoi sausage
hat sausage & pepper
roast beef
steak sandwich
pastrami
hot roost beef & gravy
hot roast turkey & gravy
roast turkey
tuna fish
.
. 75
.85
.85
.95
85
85
85
95
,95
85
.65
SUNDAY DINNER SPECIAL
Hot Roast Beef or Roast Turkey
Mashed Pot. & Veg.
(1.25
WE DELIVER Call: 434-3298
CORNER - Ctntroj Ave. & Northern Blvd.
Central Council Accepts
Supreme Court Nominees
Members of the Supreme Court according to the
Central Council Constitution shall be chosen in May.
Due to the organization problems, Supreme Court
has just been officially approved by Central Council.
After several extensions of the application period,
the committee of MYSKANIA members — Maria
Maniaci, Pep Pizzillo, Udo Gudclat, and Al Smith
interviewed the appliconstitutions of Living Area Afcants. Their finallistwas
p r e s e n t e d to the Council
n J. i
no i-v
J. ix.
on October 28. Due to the
fairs Commission and Solicitations
Committee were approved by the
Council. Questions over absences
from
lneetlllgs and pollcy ot the
l i m i t e d n u m b e r of a p p l i - screening board were brought up
c a n t s , o n l y t w o s e n i o r s concerning LAAC and Solicitations
i the
j.u Court.
o
<• Committee respectively,
were namedi to
'
According to the constitution, P / M P l
there should be four members • • " " I
til
"»
nilflflCP
VilVUtfV
tChr°eSee"from'nthe Junior' class "mi FJWP QllGGII F 113 I S t S
two from the Sophomore class. " , , w * • • " " " • • • « « • " « » »
However, this court consists of
The twelve finalists for Homeseven members. The seniors are coining Queen will lie narrowed to
Gretchen Van Vleet and James five Friday, November 5, by a
Ward; juniors: Constance Moquiat, panel of nine judges. The panel
Frank Penskl and Hay Cianfrlni; consists of representatives from
and sophomores: Barb Chemelll fraternities, Independents, llomeaiul Rosemarie Vairo.
coming Committee and faculty.
The members were present at
The twelve finalists are Anne
Thursday's Central Council meet- Bourdon, Gretchen Van Vleet, Sue
lng. Their appointment was ap- Nichols, Vera Kamanowski, Jeanne
proved by the body, and official Mourer, Harriet Tucker, Pat Halinauguration was scheduled for sey, Maria Maniaci, Anne Digney,
2:30 p.m. on Sunday.
Evelyn Gordon, Joan Clark and
fiepresentative-at-large
from Lynn Kurth.
the commuters, Klaus Schnltzer,
The finalists will answer queswas sworn In by MYSKANIA Chair- tlons from the panel at 1:25 p.m.
man, Al Smith. Schnltzer Is r e - in Page. They will be judged by
placing Harold Lynne who re- their
replies, composure and
ing music with Hoy Guest he moved signed from the Council this fall, dress. In addition to these facto Toronto where he met Sylvia in
The press conference concern- tors, the audience reaction to each
a co„
h
l n g the auditors report on book girl will be given much weight ln
Apart
from
.
.... a few
. .piano
. lessons, prices and .food
. . service took place the decisions of the panel,
Sylvia learned everything she at 1:20 p.m. on Monday in the of-. The week preceding the judging
knows of music on her own. She 'ice of President Collins. Bill the twelve finallts will have to
, n a s t e r e d the autoharp and looked Cleveland will report to the Coun- wear purple and gold ribbons,
for new frontiers. Then she met cil on that meeting.
The five finalists will be announced
Ian in Toronto.
A committee was chosen by Stu- Friday night at the Homecoming
The
apparent simplicity of Ian dent Association President Dick Bonfire.
They will ride in the Homea | | ( ) syi v i a » s musk is the result of Thompson, and approved by the
intensive work with their material council, to appoint student mem- coming Parade Saturday and attend
and inspired performance.
hers to the Housing Committee, the soccer game against C W.
Tickets for their concert are T h e members of this new com- Post. During the half-time, Pat
being sold al the Student Activities miltee are Mark Summa, Sharon Fasano, last year's queen will
Desk and in the Peristyles for Teves, Dr. Knotts, Eleanor Die- announce the Homecoming Queen
$1.60.
^ ^
ner and Dill Bate.
_ for 1905.
U ^ B
^ B
r
B
B
B
P
Ian, Sylvia to Highlight
Homecoming Concert
"
choose
anchovios
poppers
onions
mushrooms,
hot sausage
hamburg
pepporoni
President Extends
Hopes for Success
In a letter addressed to the students of the State University of
New York, Dr. Samuel B. Gould,
president of the State University
of New York, extended ills wish to
all students to have a successful
year and welcomed the freshman
class.
Dr. Gould said that he "would
prefer a greater measure of personal communication with State
University's student body" but r e gretted that this was impossible
under present circumstances.
He said that he was grateful to
the editors of the college newspapers for allowing him to communicate with the various student
bodies through this letter.
Dr. Gould said that becoming a
"member of the University is more
than learning some rules and customs. It is, rather, making yourself an. active part of a vital educational adventure, catching and
holding onto the spirit of restlessness and urgency we all sense as
we view the possibilities for the
University and for the future, determining that you will do your
utmost to contribute to the fulfillment of both these possibilities."
He called the students " a great
band of comrades who share an
enthusiastic desire to acquire
knowledge and wisdom."
The President said that his hopes
and the student's hopes are the
same, for the student's progress
and growth "will enhance similar
progress and growth for the whole
University."
He concluded the letter with the
assurance that he will use all his
lun and Sylvia will highi
M ,","" 7" ;"."" ,. u
,, " „
°
power to make available to the l i g h t
the
Homecoming
student
p „o„n„c„e „r it S
C :u, ,n„dHa. .y„ With
, „ : « , «t ,h, e. :i .r.
worthy of University
the stud: experience C
r e p e r t o i r e of E n g l i s h a n d
.
.
.
i ii i
A m e r i c a n Class DalladS,
mountain music, Negro
b l u e s cowboy b a l l a d s and
TTfon/.h r •n.irli ir, a^no'o
1 rencn uanncuan songs.
Both Ian Tyson and Sylvia FlickJ l e r wore performers In their own
right before they met and sang
I together in a Toronto coffee house,
'.'i Together they have done concert
" l tours, dramatic roles on the
Canadian television network, and
I innumerable nightclub engage; ments.
They won quick recognition on
United States television with their
: appearances on the llootenanny
program and the Bell Telephone
Samuel Gould
..Extends wishes for success Hour.
VOL. u , Nb.g3r^
N O V E M B E R 2. 1965
Notning puts a crease in
these pants where a crease
doesn't belong. They hold
their crisp, neat look hour
after hour. No matter how
often they get washed, they
never, ever need ironing.
Trimly tapered with belt
loops and cuffs. Colors and
fabrics for casual and dress
wear. 65% Dacron* polyester/35% cotton, $6.98. Flannels, hopsacking, reverse
twists, Acrilan'acrylic, $7.98.
(Slightly higher In the West.)
All h.i.s. clothes,
including combo-suits,
sold at
Cohen's Men's Shop
20 Central k i t
Council Defends
Classical Stand
"We stooped to Ferrante and Teicher, and
we stooped to Pete Seeg e r . " "We have enough
of that trash around."
These statements were
made by Cheryl Flis, officer of Music Council.
Infuse Personalities
They are known for infusing their
own personalities into ;t song, giving it lire, without even intruding
to the point where (hey would tietract attention from the essential
value of the song.
"The New York Times" said
that folk singers could hardly find
a more tasteful model than the
work of Ian and Sylvia in reviewing one of their recent record releases.
Other critics have acclaimed the
duo's invaluable ability to judge
what is good and what is not,
Both singers are Canadians, Ian
grew up on a farm In Canada's
cowboy country, the far west province of British Columbia. While
ho was recovering from a rodeo •
injury at the age of nineteen he
became Interested in country music and learned to play the guitar.
Miss Flls was asked til,, ul the
purpose of Music Council. She defended the opinion that folk and
popular music is not music. She
stated that the Music Council
means classical music when they
use the term mue.c,
She said that State has weekends
like Homecoming and Parents' Day
to bring in folk music and other
Begins Singing
forms of popular music.
After graduating from college,
Miss Flls Insisted that the p r o . he started singing wherever lie
was able to get a job, After study(continued in page 3J
.S'lcp/ictivon
Photo
FOUR
STUDENTS MARCH on Capitol Thursday' In protest
a l . , to,
»,u t and.
not
on magazines.
( " » ' • « a«
or the
me .sales
tax „„
on ,textbooks
Download
Related flashcards

Medieval literature

42 cards

Series of books

21 cards

Fiction

18 cards

Typographical symbols

20 cards

Cinematography

19 cards

Create Flashcards