Ml Scort 9

advertisement
f ride*. Aril 30. MO
ALMHTtTWHHTrmtt
ftf.i
Frisk liMNiMi
ft. U Sim, 4-2
Ml Clobbers Pods 14-1,
Scort 9 Riis i i First
Collecting nine runs in the first inning and knocking
starting pitcher Dan Zeh out of the box in 2/3 of an
inning, Rennselaer Poly scored a decisive 14-1 win
over State's varsity diamondmen in a home contest last
Wednesday. The Peds now sport a 1-3 record.
Yesterday
t h e S t a t e r s lshed the pltchtafchores for Albany.
t~.in.fc.rl tn ITHno PnllPDW Kimball pitched 6 1/3 Innings, al-
traveled to u u c a college , owlng flve r u n g o n four Uia, t h r e e
McGurrln
hurled
innings, gave
a n d t oNew
m o r r oHaven
w t h e t College.
e a m Will w a iks,
and two
Fed two
errors.
host
up no runs, two hits, and struck out
The game will start at two.
3:00 p.m. on University Next week the Peds go against
Siena, Potsdam, and Plattsburgh in
Field.
"
K.P.I, scored Its 14 runs on 12
hits u d 4 Pad errors. Their scores
came In the'first (B), the' second (3),
the third (1), and the seventh (1).
The lone Albany score came In
the eighth inning. "Pep" Pizzillo
singled, was advanced to second on
Mike Putney's single, moved to third
on Dick Kewley's walk, and then,
with two outs, the speedy third
sicker stole home. It was Plzzillo's
fifth stolen base of the year.
The Peds stroked eight hits, but
were unable to bunch them together.
The leading Albany batters for the
game were Don McGurrln (3 for 4),
Dick Kimball (1 for 2), and Jay
Moore (1 for 2).
Kimball and Don McGurrln fln-
three away contests.
G AB H R RBI AVE
Game
Pizzillo
Putney
Kewley
Inglno
Odorlzzl
Christian
Cianfrinl
Tomaselll
Mason
Hoeth
Moore
Kankolenski
McGurrin
Kimball
Zeh
Nass
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
2
3
3
3
3
14
13
12
9
11
8
5
6
5
2
2
4
9
3
0
1
3
7
5
4
2
3
1
0
1
1
0
1
1
2
0
1
2
2
3
1
2
1
0
0
0
1
0
0
1
0
0
1
0
2
3
1
2
2
al
l
0
0
0
0
l
0
1
.214
.538
.250
.444
.182
.375
.200
.000
.200
.500
.000
.250
.111
.667
.000
.333
A RayView of Sports
by Ray McCleat
Watched the AMIA track meet last Sunday, and to say
I was surprised-nay, amazed—would be an unforgiveable understatement. The meet was the best thing to
come out of the AMIA in recent years, and the biggest
thing to hit the sports department since the c r o s s country team was organized four years ago.
The organization, running, spirit, and times of the
meet were excellent and, above all, encouraging. So
encouraging, in fact, that another meet in the near
future is all ready in the making.
F i r s t of all, let's examine the circumstances of the
meet. Held on short notice, on a Sunday afternoon, and
without much publicity, the meet attracted sixty-two
entrants, representing six teams and independents. Yes,
the interest is there.
The times and distances were outstanding, considering the condition of the field and runners. Bob Glywa's
10.5 100-yard dash and 22.9 220-yard dash were really
fine; Ken Darmer's 39'6" triple-jump and Tom Robinson's 4:50 mile and 2:05 half-mile were equally as fine.
Yes, the talent is there.
The spirit of the crowd was simply marvelous. In
what amounted to an inter-fraternity battle for the
team award, the crowds cheered enthusiastically and
appreciatively for all of the runners. The spirit of the
entrants was great, too, as several entered into events
for the first time, just to win points for their team.
Yes, the spirit is there.
Track is the greatest individual sport in all of
athletics, and nothing creates more spirit and enthusiasm in a school than a track meet with another school.
All the entrants agreed that they enjoyed competing in
the meet, and all expressed the desire for the formation
of a track club. Siena's recently formed track club has
issued a challenge to State's tracksters, and is anxious
to have an intra-club meet with us. Yes, the need is
there.
The sports department of the ASP sincerely hopes
that this meet serves us the foundation and cause for
the formation of a truck club hero at State. The interest, the talent, the spirit, and the need are all present.
We know not where to turn to gain support for this
cause except to the studont body — and turning there,
we rest our case.
A STATE BATTER looks over a nice fat one in Tuesday's home
contest with neighboring rival RPI.
General Counselors (male and female) min, age 19
Waterfront Counselor (male) mutt have Instructor, min. age 21
Tennis Counselor (male preferred)
Weterskiing Counselor (male)
Celf Counselor (male)
Horseback Riding Instructor
Contact; Louis er Paul Krouner. Alb. 438-3210
Alb
A L B A N Y 3 , N E W YORK
Press
MAY 4, 1965
VOL.U
v
C*
During the past week, the State netmen have compiled a 2-1 record via wins over Oswego and Oneonta,
and a loss to RPI. On April 22, the netmen downed
Oswego 6-3, and followed that win up with a 7-2 victory two days later. Last Wednesday the tennis team
lost to RPI by a decisive 7-2 verdict.
to New Haven for the squad's
State's leading point get- travel
first away contest.
ter has been Ken Zachar- Here are the remaining matches:
Away
ias, who, playing no. 2 on May' 1 New Haven
Away
the team, is undefeated af-. May 4 Siena
May 7
Potsdam
Away
ter the three matches. He May 8 Plattsburgh
Away
was one of the 2 singles May 11 New Paltz
Away
May
14
Utica
Home
winners in the RPI match
May 15
Central Conn.
Home
for State.
May 19
Oneonta
Away
The submitting of the results of the constitutional
referendum by Al Smith, chairman of MYSKANIA, was
the main order of business atSunday night's Provisional
Council meeting. The results were 787 affirmative
votes, 91 negative votes, and six abstentions for a total
of 884 ballots cast.
Commuters (apartment dwellers
Twenty-four percent of and those working for room and
board
off campus are Included) and
the student body pnrticithose unable to vote at the appointed
pated in the referendum; times may vote In the peristyles
twenty percent was needed Monday, May 10.
to validate the results. The
Since elections are based on living
passage of the new con- areas as of September.106!!, seniors
may not vote or run for office in the
stitution necessitated the forthcoming elections.
formation of an election
MYSKANIA will organize Inaugcommission to run the new uration Day ceremonies which will
be
held May 15.
election.
In the Oswego match, Albany
copped three of the singles contests
and two of the doubles contests.
Zacharias, Bill Enser, and Howard
Markman were individual winners,
while the doubles teams of EnserMarkman and Guy Nicosia-Stan Kerpel were also victorious.
In the Oneonta match, Tom Slocum, the team's'no. one man, Zacharias, Enser, Markman, Nicosia,
and Kerpel all won singles contests, and Enser-Markman and Bill
Vlgars-Kerpel won the doubles contests.
Powerful RPI swept all of the
doubles matches and four of the
singles matches en route to Its win
over the previously unbeaten Peds.
Zacharias' 6-2, 6-2 triumph and
Markman's 6-3, 1-6, 6-3 win accounted for the netmen's only two
points In the match.
Tomorrow the tennis team will
Freshman Tom Plotrowsui placed
place
33rd out of a field of 76 bowlers in
the national intercolleglateitournament for New York State and Canada,
held April 25-26 in St. Paul, Minn.
Tom was one of the 76 who qualified from over 33,800 bowlers who
entered the preliminaries.
Tom rolled 525, 541, and 526,
for a total of 1592..
Teams entering the event were
from over 40 states and were from
187 colleges and universities.
The qualifying rounds for New
York State were held In Buffalo on
the weekend of February 13. Tom
rolled 556, 601, and 514 to qualify
for the St. Paul tournament.
ASP
* * * * *
* * * * *
Frosh Golfers Win
The State frosh golfers won their
first match of the year last Monday, as they copped four of the six
matches en route to a 10-8 win over
Coblesklll.
Gregg Robinson was low man for
the team, carding a fine 81. He was
followed by Fred Nelson in 82, Tony
Magagno of Coblesklll was medalist
for the day, as he fired a 75,
Other members of the team who
competed were Dave Drucker (90),
Mike Glnevan (00), Bill Pendergnst
(89), and Karl Reynolds.
Here is a rundown of tho match:
Maragno (C) def, Robinson (A), 5-4;
Nelson (A) def, Bernlcs (C), 3-lj
Uushanles (C) def. Drucker (A), 21; Pendorgast def. Case, 7-6; Reynolds and Htltman halved.
The noxt match for the frosh
Unksmon Is Monday, May 3, against TOM SLOCUM DISPLAYS fine form that won him his berth as
Siena. The match will be played at "first mon" on the varsity tennis team.
Siena,
SNAPPY BARBER SHOP
INTERNATIONAL STUDENT ID CARD
for discounts In USA
and 28 countries
W« feature
collegiate haircuts
STUDENT SHIPS
lo Europe
CHARTER FLIGHTS
within Europe
Wrllet D.pt. CP
U. S. National Student Association
265 Madison Ave., New York, N.Y. 1001(1
5 minuti walk from the
Ntw Campus
1148 Weatem Avenue
BOB ami FRANK
N O . 18
i Student Body Ratifies
New SA Constitution
Tennis Team Posts 2-1 piotrowski Places
Record After 3 Outings 33 in Tournament
CAMP COUNSELORS
Camp Schodack, Nassau, N.Y., an eight week overnight boys and
girls camp Pesitltss open for:
The State frosh diamondmen lost
' their third game In a row Tuesday,
i April 27, bowing to Siena, 4-2.
; The game was played on University Field under muddy conditions
thai hampered both sides In hitting
and fielding.
Siena scored one run in the first
inning, two in trie fourth, and one
more in the sixth frame. The Staters
; tallied their two runs in the sixth
inning.
The pitcher for the freshmen was
Joe Best. He gave up four runs,
nine hits, and struck out six in his
seven inning stint.
The freshmen showed marked improvement in the field, as the team
had two double plays and several
fine individual efforts.
Leading batters in the game for
btate were Jim Ballin (1 for 3 and
an RBI), Joe Gorman (2 for 3 and
an RBI), and Gordle Sutherland (1
for 2).
The freshmen play host to powerful Cortland College tomorrow at
12:00. Next week the frosh face
Coblesklll, RPI, and Rockland In
three home contests.
Discussion limiting people to runEd Brovarskl was selected as
chairman of the committee which ning for either a commission or at
large
ensued, but no decision was
includes
Judy
Gelardo,
Stan
Kerpel,
SPRING COMES TO ALBANY, as the advent of warm weather encourages students to pursue thei
Mike Purdy, Rina Nyberg, and Helen reached.
studies In the sunlight.
Williams.
In other action, $200 was appropriated to Statesmen to go to the
Self Nominations
World's Fair in New York on May
Self nominations and voting for 15 to participate in the Day of Song.
office for both Central Council and
money was appropriated from
Living Areas Affairs Commission theThe
S. A. Emergency Spending Line
will take place in the residence halls to pay the traveling expenses of the
and Greek houses.
group.
(continued on page 2)
Commuters should present the
Dr. Samuel B. Gould, State Uni- be a general labor strike in Albany that time, the principal problem same statement on the days apversity President, has conveyed his on or around May 1, he Indicated would be the actual number of class pointed In the Student Personnel
"deep appreciation of the co-opera- that "our present assumptions are days held this semester.
Office. A further schedule will aption of students on the Albany Cam- geared to the dorm opening on
We try to hold to the minimum of pear in Friday's ASP.
pus" In the protest of the recent schedule."
75 days of actual classes. This seThose interested in nominating
budget cut.
Dr. Collins also commented on mester is already down to 73 1/2
In his weekly press conference the recent announcement that the and I don't think we can afford to themselves should present their hall
with representatives of the ASP and Atmospheric Sciences Research lose another day. However, weshall or house present with a statement
WSUA, President Evan R. Collins Center and the Graduate School of schedule an extra reading day next of name quadrangle, and a brief
statement of qualifications and/or
related that Dr. Gould had made Public Affairs would come under the semester If at all possible.
special mention of Albany's efforts administration of Albany State.
Tlie Financial Aids Office has
Evan R. Collins interest.
in his address to the heads of the
announced that students who are
Hall
meetings
will
be
held
tonight
Scientists
Available
Dear
Mr.
Smith:
State University units.
seeking National Defense Studenl
President Collins thought you to explain the procedure and nom- Loans, New York Higher Education
In Dr. Collins words, the Albany
"It involves the presence here of
march had made Dr. Gould "thor- a number of distinguished scientists would like to know that 2 reading inations will begin tomorrow and Assistance Corporation Loans, Reoughly disliked by legislators, which who would not otherwise be avail- days have been scheduled for Fall last till Sunday.
gents
Scholarships, University
he takes to be a sign of Its complete able," he said. These scientists Semester, 1965, and 2 for Spring
Scholarships or Scholar Incentive
The
elections
for
the
offices
will
Semester,
1906.
The
days
so
dessuccess."
would be able to teach classes,
for the summer semester or foland professors and researchers ignated are January 10 and 11, be held Monday, May 10 with the lowing academic y<mr should subDiscipline Impressive
here will have a chance to use (Fall); May 31 and June 1 (Spring). orientation of the newly-elected Liv- mit their applications within tlie
James M- Lewis ing Areas Commission officers on near future.
Dr. Collins commented further facilities not previously available.
Assistant to the President Wednesday, May 12.
that many people had been particuA final topic discussed was MYSStudents who seek the National
larly impressed by "the discipline, KANIA's request to Dr. Collins that
Defense Loan or NY Higher Eduorder, and dignity of the march." one class day be dropped at the end
cation loan should pick up the apHe noted that "It had a considerable of this semester to provide a readplications this week in Draper 210,
Impact."
ing day between classes and final
Each student must make an apThe second quadrangle construc- exams.
pointment with Hollls Blodgett or
tion is still way ahead of schedule,
Miss Janls Kern to discuss their
Dr. Collins explained that he was
said Dr. Collins. Although there may forced to deny the request because
application.
A unique event in the history of him and the excitement of the motlie number of class days was althe
University
occurred
last
week,
ment
can
he
transformed
into
an
Interviews Required
ready at the minimum. Normally
the University tries to schedule when Harold Noakes, Jr. became ordered verbal form without losing
The personal Interview is conthe
first
student
ever
to
publish
a
continuity with the experience.
75 class days per semester. This
sidered part of the application proThe book will be reviewed by cedure, and processing of the apsemester there are only 73 1/2 book, His book entitled "Young Sun"
is
a
collection
of
poetry
that
he
Harry
Staley
of
the
English
Declass days due to the two vacations.
plication will not continue without
Prl.ited lielow are the texts of has written In the past five years. partment and will appear In Fri- the interview. The deadline for subNoakes Is a Junior at State and day's ASP.
MYSKANIA'S letter to President
mitting the application will be May
The book will he sold In the 31, 1065.
Collins, Dr. Collin's reply, and a Is majoring in English. He says
that
throughout
his
life
he
has
had
Bookstore
and
Peristyles
today
subsequent
memo
from
James
M.
In a brief ceremony at tne uuiun.
Students who are now recipients;
Quadrangle this Friday, May 7, at Lewis, Assistant to the President. an overwhelming interest In lan- through Thursday for $1.00.
of the Scholar Incentive or Regents
guage and literature and a great
4 p.m., the Netherlands Government
Scholarship
will receive renewal
love for the "natural which Is unwill present ,13 flags for use in the Dear Prosldent Collins!
applications from the Regents Extainted
by
the
trappings
of
materThe
members
of
MYSKANIA
would
flag room of the Dutch Quadrangle.
amination and Scholarship Center
These flags symbolize the 12 prov- like you to consider the possibility ial progress."
during May or June. Students must
lie says that this reeling was acinces of the Netherlands, and the of cancelling classes on May 26,
submit
to the Regents Center only
quired In a youth spent running
city of Nlmljen, traditionally Al- 1005.
the application which they received
semi-wild
1
1
1
the
Adlrondacks.
Ills
It Is tlio opinion of many students
bany's sister city.
from them.
Hepresentlng the Government of at the University that one study day attributes a short enlistment.In the
Scholarship Eligibility
the Netherlands will be Mr. J, Van prior to final examinations Is not navy as the second greatest Influence
den Uogaort, Director of the Neth sufficient time for proper prepara- on his poetry.
Any student at the University who
In the Navy he found "In an untion, A cancellation of classes on
erlanilH Information Service.
receives the State University ScholReceiving Mr. Van dim iloguert May 26 would help to alleviate this restrained power and Inexorability
arship and believe that they will
of
the sea a spirit of wildness with
will be one of the House Presidents problem by providing an extra day
again be eligible for this scholarwhich he could identify," Recurrent
of the Dutch Quad, and officials for such preparation.
ship for the 1068-66 academic year,
from tho State, the City of Albany,
We would appreciate any and all references to the sea in his poems
should secure the form from Fiand the Town of Gullderland.
consideration you could glvo to this Is an indication of the tremendous
nancial Aids Office prior to leaving
Influence the Navy played on his
As her last official act of office mater,
school In June,
as the reigning Tulip Queen of
Allan R Smith
lie considers his poetry like naThe applications will be avail1084-65, Maureen Glasheou will also
Chairman, MYSKANIA ture because It Is both organic and
able May 19 and should be combe present at the ceremonies.
ordered. To him, the poem Is an
pleted and mailed to (lie Financial
All faculty and students are in- Dear Allani
"organic, verbalized extension of
Aids Office immediately upon reHarold Noakes, Jr.
vited to attend both the presentaAfter receiving your request to an energizing situation or experceipt of the Regents "Notice of
...Publishes
Poetry
tion ceremony and the reception cancel classes on May 26,1 reviewed ience." He writes while the origAward" for tlie '65-'66 academic
following.
this with the deans. As I told you at inating stimuli la still acting on
year.
President Gould Extends Appreciation
To Students for Budget Cut Protest
Financial Aids Office
Receives Applications
For Grants, Loans
Student Announces Publication^
Book of Poetry Now on Sale
Netherlands Gov't
To Present Flags
To Dutch Quadrangle
ft* 2
Tuesday, M«y 4, 1965
ALBANY STUDENT g g g S
Selling Late Permission
I feel rotten. Worst load I ever t i e d on. Probobly never touch another drop,
pick you up Friday.
When did you say I should
COMMUNICATIONS
English Profettor Lauds
Coverage of Convocation
To the Editors)
I wish to thank you on behalf of
the Joint Committee on Honors Convocation for the fine coverage given
the -University's first Honors Convocation and particularly- for the
editorial In last Friday's issue.
At the same time may I call attention to the omission of the name
of Miss Miriam Ward, who was one
of the hard-working members of
Slgnum Laudls who made the day
so successful, and to the misspelling of Miss Elezabeth Burger's
name.
Arthur Collins
Assoc. Prof, of English
Albany Citizen Extendi
Adofce to freedom Council
To the Editors:
I have been noticing with a great
deal of interest from outside of
the State University of New York
at Albany the spirited activities of
the Campus Freedom Council in
their efforts to raise funds to send
a team of students South to work
In the "Black Belt" this summer.
I earnestly support this movement,
if, and only if, It Is done right.
Unfortunately, there has been a
resurgence of the radical left In
many of our universities today.
Earnest, d e d i c a t e d students are
lured Into many organizations by
underground
Communist-front
groups. It is done so that the students who are Inclined to be too
outspoken, who Insist upon wearing
the clothes that mark them as social
rebels (in particular, dungarees,
old-faded colored shirts and sneakers, not to mention the wearing of
not so well-kept beards) would be
chosen by various steering committees to go South. These students
by singing Civil Rights songs and In
their general attitudes being openly
antagonistic may Integrate a few
restaurants and other public places,
but they also cause hard feelings
and dlssentlon among the various
sections of the United States. Thus
many well-meaning students are
unwitting agitators who cause
trouble, hard feelings and general
animosity toward the North.
Here In Albany, there Is a student
movement to educate and otherwise
help Negroes In the slum areas. I
believe that these students are successful because they maintained a
somewhat quiet, determined, and
conservative attitude toward the
people whom they are helping. In
their own area, they are quite obviously doing more for the Civil
Bights movement than all the beard'
and dungaree-wearing, song singing
Civil Itlghters who go South to "try
and make martyrs out of themselves."
Perhaps all that I've said doesn't
cut any Ice with the members of the
Freedom Council, but let us reason
a little bit as college students should
do.
If you were a person In your
forties and fifties and beyond, how
would you feel If some person much
younger, clad In the garb of a social rebel, playing songs on a guitar
came into your area, and insolently
tried to change everything around
without any given reason beyond
"We Shall Overcome?" You and I
both would be liars if we said that
we would welcome It. However,
wouldn't we all be feeling more
kindly and tolerant, if a welldressed, soft-spoken, tactful, but
firm and resolute young person
came Into our same area with good
reasoning to back up their actions.
These people would not cause trouble
and also they would serve to aid and
educate the same Negro neighbors
that we have been scorning for years.
The leftist movement today has
been Infiltrating peaceful marches
and demonstrations and subverting
them into brawls, riots, and general
free-for-alls. It Is no secret that
the riots of last summer in Rochester and Harlem were started by a*
number of busloads of agitators and
not the rank-and-file citizenry.
However, we can Imagine that the
Negro residents are still bearing
the blame for these riots. This is
also happening in the South.
For the ultimate good of Civil
Rights, I am challenging the Freedom Council in the State University of New York at Albany to revise their procedures and try tc
lure the more conservative anc
dedicated student Into their group
and thus send South this summer
the type of student who does not need
to sing freedom songs to bolster
their courage. This type of student
will shun the riots and the general
forms of agitation and go about their
business qulotly and resolutely.
They will be a part in helping the
Civil Rights movement and also In
discrediting the present leftist resurgence.
Before I close, I want to Introduce
myself as Loren Harrlman. I am a
working man In Albany, but I have
been South on my vacations as a
Civil Rlghter. I am an ardent liberal, but I feel quite strongly that
Civil Rights movement must come
off right, or It must not come off
at all. So much can be done to hurt
the movement and thus sot the Negro
back many, many years In his fight
for ultimate freedom and equality.
If It Is done right, the Negro will
soon be able to live In peace and
equality with his fellow man, no
matter where he may be.
Loren Harrlman
Coach Congratulates AMIA
On Successful Track Meet
1o the Editors:
Heartiest congratulations to each
and every student who helped make
last Sunday's AMIA track meet the
groat success It was I The fine
sportsmanship, the large number of
competitors and the quality of the
performances were a sight Indeed
to see.
To Gary Moore, President of
AMIA, Tom Robinson and Ken Uarmer a special vote of thanks for
their work In coordinating so many
of the details In such a meet. Special
acknowledgment, too, to Jake Johnvllle, John Wolner, Dick Abrams,
Steve Ostrove, Bob Flick, Ian Leet,
Ken Klrlk, Don Woodruff, and Mr.
Joseph Sllvey for their tireless and
somewhat thankless efforts in lining
and setting up the field and in judging
and timing the events.
Last but not least is the appreciation of the various fraternities, clubs
and Individuals who participated.
Over sixty students took part and
had there not been several Important
conflicts with other events within the
university an even larger number
would have been represented.
The success of this truly fine
meet was crowned by a perfectly
thrilling team battle between two
strong and energetic fraternity
teams with the championship not
being decided until the final event.
It was a great day and a good time
was had by all.
R. Keith Munsey
Ass't. Professor
Dept. of Physical Education
Student Criticizes Havoc
Caused bu Housing Office
Last Week in conjunction with State Fair, half hour
late permissions fof women were sold at the rate of
$.30, or one cent per minute. This is only the latest in
the long history of hours sales, the discovery of a
"good thing" having been made.
This Saturday would have witnessed yet another bid
for the hundred or so dollars that hours sales usually
pull in, except for a misunderstanding between the organization and Dean Edsall concerning the omission of
such hours provisions in the constitution of Solicitations
Committee. SCOPE is still attempting to obtain the permission necessary to begin the wholesale merchandising
of half-hour late permissions in the Peristyles. Proceeds are to be directed toward this summer's voter
registration project in the South.
We take issue with the entire principle involved in
the sale of such late permissions. By flinging down the
thirty or thirty-five pieces of silver in return for a
sparse thirty minutes of continued liberty, the coed is
put in the position of having to pay for something that
should, by rights, be hers.
The University attempts to keep all those living in
University Housing under close surveillance by requiring 1 a.m. weekend hours, and yet, when money
comes to be involved in the scheme of things, it is
found that trust, too, can be "extended."
There are many good and reasonable arguments to
be used for the revision of women's hours, reasons that
would serve to eliminate any further sales of such a
flexible principle. It is up to AWS to straighten out the
present abberation with the administration, and finally
to arrive at a workable solution for the question of
women's hours.
Council (cont'd)
Debate Council, and Forum of Politics were passed as submitted origA stipulation was added to the inally.
original motion that the money was
to be allocated only on the condition
Student Activity Fee $28.50
that the Faculty-Student Association
The final act in the passage of
refuses to grant said funds to the budgets was the recommendation of
group. The question was raised as a Student Activity Fee for 1965-1966
to why the University does not fi- by Provisional Council. Chairman
nance such a trip.
Friedman moved that it be set at
$28.50.
(continued from page 1)
Budgets Passed
Thursday, April 29, another meeting of Provisional Council was held.
Final action was token on the remaining S.A. proposed budgets for
the 1965-66 fiscal year.
The budget of Freedom Council
was passed after the speakers line,
which was cut to $1,000 by Finance
Committee, was restored to the
original request of $1,600.
Finance Committee Chairman
Debby Friedman moved to Increase
the Parents' Day line of the U.C.A.
proposed budget to $2,100, an increase of $600. Parents' Day cochairman Lin White explained that
the additional funds were needed to
help finance a concert which would
be given In the evening.
After lengthy debate on why the
money was needed for entertainment which was provided last year
by the All University Reception, the
motion was passed.
The budgets of Fencing Society,
It was explained that this increase
of one dollar was needed to balance
the total budget which was higher
than that originally submitted by
Finance Committee as a result of
Council actions reestablishing salaries, conference lines, and other
miscellaneous additional appropriations.
The total 1965-1966 budget for
Student Association is $115,515.82.
Once again, we congratulate the
The 1964-65 S.A. budget was almost
Housing Office on the success of Its
$92,000.
annual Spring Housing Havoc.
Preparations for the long-anticipated event began early In the seArt Council
mester when the housing officers
Arts Council announces Its offiblithely distributed hundreds ' of
cers for the 1965-66 academic year.
harmless little questionnaires laden
They are President, Robert Peterwith such unassuming queries as:
sen; Vice President, William Mur"If it were possible for juniors to
phy; Secretary, Elizabeth Mlckel;
live off campus, would you consider
Treasurer, Ann Barry; Arts Board
taking an apartment?"
for Commission of Community Programming, Mary Ellen Brown and
With much glee and astonishment,
Roger
French.
they noted the overwhelming response of students affirming their
avid desire to leave the University
residence and quotas were set up
to limit the flood of exodlng upperESTABLISHED MAY 1916
classmen.
But what Is this we hear? Cries
BY
THE CLASS OF 1V18
of "Traitor I" rise among the baffled
winners of the lucky apartments,
(What do you mean, we signed a The Albany Student Press is a semi-weekly newspaper published by the student
of the State University of New York at Albany. The ASP may bo roqclied
contract?) Can It be that the enthu- body
by dialing either 469-6481 or IV 2-3326. The ASP office, located In Room 5 of
siasm was merely theoretical? Brubacher Hall, 750 State Street, is open from 7-11 p. m. Sunday through ThursClutching the little sheets of paper day nights.
which Inform them of their prize,
E D I T H S. HARDY - KAREN E. K E E F E R
the doomed flock to the Housing
Co-Edit or s-in-Chief
JOSEPH S. S I L V E R M A N
Office with loud protests.
D E B O R A H I. FRIEDMAN
Managing Editor
Feature Editor
With never a quiver or moment
RAYMOND
A.
MC
C
L
O
A
T
of doubt, however, the glorious band
EARL G. SCHREIBER
Arts Ed.lor
of administrators rises to new Sports Editor
W I L L I A M H. COLCAN
heights of glory and serenely hushes DOUCiLAS C. UPtlAM
Photogrophy
Editot
Executive
Editor
the babbling crowd with promises of
E I L E E N L. MANNING
possible action "next week." To KLAUS S r H N I T Z E R
A s s o c i a t e Editor
those multitudes lacking any housing Associate P'lotography Editor
DIANA M. MARFK
whatever, they bravely assert the JUDITH M. CONGER
B u s i n e s s Manager
Technical Supervisor
need for calm In chaos and attempt
SUSAN J . THOMSON
4he Impossible task of reassigning MONICA M. MC GAUGHEY
quarters,
Advertising Manager
Public Relations Director
Never fear, however, All Is not Assistant Aits Editor
Larry Epsfem
lost. With Its characteristic resi,
,
Ellen Zang
lience the University will weather Desk Editor
Mike Faronell, Larry Y a s h o w l t i , John Fleitinan. Don Oppedlsono,
this new assault on its dignity. Staff.....
Carol Walling, Alice Nudelmon, G . P . Minimus
Those "Wandering Pilgrims" will,
Nancy Neidenbauer, Susanna Chape, Cynthia Goodman
somehow, somewhere find a place v - o l u m " l " ' «
Anno Dlgney, Paul Jensen, Bruce Daniels
to live, (The Towne House Is great Photographers
Gary Woods. Walter P o t t , Steven Kling, Robert McOdore
this time of year.)
Cartoonist
William Slnnhold
In the meantime, an old and poigAll communications must be addressed to the Editors and should be signed,
nant question looms leerllngly over- rtamei
will be withheld on request. Communications should be limited to 300
head; Can't anybody here play this
w d l and are subject to editing. The Albany Student Press assumes no responlenity tor opinions expressed In Its columns or communications, as such e»game?
To the Editors:
Albany Student Press
Nome Withheld
r
presslons do not necessary reflect Its views.
Teettky, May 4, IMS
P«tt3
fiLIAHYiTUBiHTrirVV
Theatre Alumni Association
To M l Drama Recording
The Theatre Alumni Association
of the State University of New York
at Albany, announces the latest recording by Professor Emeritus Agnes E. Futterer.
The recording highlights several
Elizabethan
Dramas, including
Agnes Futterer
...Records " M a c b e t h "
Two State Students
Receive Distinction
At State Convention
At the annual State Convention of
Phi Beta Lambda which was held
at the Thruway Motor Inn on April
23 and April 24, two state students
were selected as Miss and Mr.
Future Business Teacher of New
York State.
Valerie Brlggs and Frank Petrone
were announced as winners of the
State contest. Other SUNYA winners
were Richard Marshall, Mr. Future
Business Executive, and Nancy Carpenter, Miss Future Business Executive.
All four will go to the national
convention of Phi Beta Lambda in
Cincinnati, Ohio from June 13 to
June 17. There they will compete
with winners from other states for
the national titles.
Election of State officers also
took place with Veronica Knapick
of SUNYA being selected as State
Treasurer.
In order to be selected as winners, the contestants have to take
a comprehensive exam in business
and have an interview with various
business educators.
Psychology Club
Tomorrow evening, May 5, the
Psychology Club will present the
film "Joan of the Angels" In Draper
349 at 7 p.m.
This film was shown earlier in
the semester by IFG, and Is being
reshown by the Psychology Club as
part of Its program concerning a
view of Insanity,
Following the film, Dr. Abraham
Luchins will comment, analyzing
this particular viewpoint as an alternative to a Freudian Interpretation.
A donation of $.20 will be collected In order to cover the cost
of film rental. All faculty and students are Invited to attend.
<s
Quality Shoes
For
Women,
Met., Children
203 Central Ave
and
Stuyvesant Plasm
Open Evenings
"Macbeth" by William Shakespeare
and "Dr. Faustus" by Christopher
Marlowe. ''Faustus" was performed'
earlier In the season by the University Theatre under the direction of
Jarka Burlan.
This year also marks the fiftieth
anniversary of theatre at SUNY at
Albany. It represents an achievement of the Drama Department at
State, in that it places this institution among the founders of academic
dramatic presentation.
Miss Futterer's current presentation occurs at a time when the
four hundredth anniversary celebrations for both Shakespeare and
Marlowe are being celebrated
worldwide.
Elizabethan Highlights constitutes
the fourth in a series of recordings
by Miss Futterer. The three previous recordings are as follows:
Forms of Poetry, Selections of Poetry from Shakespeare to Nash, $5.30;
and Lady Windemere's Fan, $4.75.
Any three of the recordings can be
purchased for $14, and all four for
$17.95.
All proceeds from the sale of the
Alumni Association recordings will
go towards the creation of the Agnes
E. Futterer Chair for a Professorship in the Dramatic Arts.
Mall orders can be addressed to
Mrs. Mary K. O'Donnell, Box 8,
.Averlll Park, N.Y. Checks should
be made payable to the FacultyStudent Association, Agnes E. Futterer Fund.
Photo courtesy of the Times Union
Tea brook ( 3 ) , Margaret Dietz ( 4 ) , Jocelynn
Kole (7), Bonnie Mason ( 8 ) , and Diane Floody
(10). Final selection of the Tulip Queen w i l l
take place on Saturday, May 8.
S E V E N A L B A N Y S T A T E co-eds ore among the
eleven finalists in the 1965 Albany T u l i p
Queen Contest. Shown with the other finalists
are Judith Jordan ( 1 ) , Mary Komorny (2), Ann
ReadersCliib toPresent Program
For Three Area Public Schools
S.U.N.Y.A.'s Readers' Club gave
a performance on Wednesday, April
21 in Brubacher. Donna Little was
chairman of the meeting's program
which was "Confusion of the Modern
World."
Several club members — Laurel
Avin, Nancy Crawford, Lynn Hewitt,
Maureen Pearson, Lynn Schelnman,
and Jo West, are now preparing a
program to be done May 4, 5, and
7 for three area public grammar
schools or. the fifth and sixth grade
levels. The children of these schools
have been for the most part culturally deprived.
The reading program Includes:
"The 500 Hats of Bartholomew Cubbins" by Dr. Seuss, "The Elephant's
Child" by Rudyard Kipling, "The
Raggle Taggle Gypsies" (folk poem),
and "Macavity: The Mystery Cat"
by T. S. Eliot. These works are
being accompanied by Lynn Schelnman in various places. Lynn will
drum and
use the flute,guitar,
U_
CAMP
:Mi
rhythm sticks for the desired effects.
Exciting
New
Designs
The program will be given for
the University on May 5, at 7:30
in Brubacher Hall. While the program Is mainly for children, many
elements In it would be of value
to the students and faculty on the
campus. Readers' Club extends an
invitation to all members of the
University and especially to their
children and young friends.
Phi Beto Lambda
The last business meeting for the
19G4-G5 academic year will be held
on Thursday evening, May 0, at
7:30 p.m. in Bru. Nominations for
next year's officers will be called
for.
Phi Beta Lambda's annual Installation banquet will beheld on Thursday evening, May 20, at 6:15 p.m.
at Herbert's Restaurant. Tickets
will be sold at the May 6 meeting
at a cost of $2.75 per person.
COUNSELORS
Camp Schodack, Nassau, N . Y . , an eight week overnight boys and
girls camp Positions open for:
ICee-p s alee'
General Counselors (male and female) min. age 19
Waterfront Counselor (male) must have Instructor, min. age 21
Tennis Counselor (male preferred)
Waterskiing Counselor (male)
Golf Counselor (male)
Horseback Riding Instructor
D
A
M
O
N
D
R I M
<3
s
True artistry is expressed in Ihe brilliant
fashion Styling of every Keepsake diamond engagement ring. L'ach selling is a masterpiece of
design, reflecting Ihe full brilliance and beauty
of the center d i a m o n d . . . a perfect gem of flawless clarity, fine color and meticulous modern cut.
Contact: Louis or Paul Krouner, A l b , 438-3210
The State University Revue) Will
p..sent DAMN YANKEES as its
ninth annual production. The musical will bat staged in Pago Hall
on May 21 and 22 by La* Llss.
Advance mail orders or* now bting
taken. AM seats ore *} 25 and ore
reserved. Because of the groat
demand for Rervua tickets In previous years, w* suggest that you
purchase your tickets now. Complete the form below and mail It
with your check or money order
and self-addressed stamped envelop* to SU Revue, 304 Western
Avenue, Albany 3. Tickets or* not
by Student Ta«. Mali ord*r» postmarkad oft*r May 13 cannot b*
I
Oamn
yon/fees
The name, Keepsake, in the ring and on Ihe
lag'is your assurance of fine quality and lasting
satisfaction. Your very personal Keepsake is
awaiting your selection at your
Keepsake Jeweler's store. Find,
him in Ihe yellow pages under
"Jewelers." Prices from $100
to $2500. Rings e n l a r g e d to
s h o w beauty of d e t a i l . ^ r a d e mark registered.
-3Bfc
filled,
Nam*
Pleese m e n
Address
Fri., Mo* 21 - Set., Mey 22
(circle desired *We)
I prefer ( _ ) Orchestre
City
phon.
a
ticket
••'•*»
Please indicete section end *»*i
Left
•
HOW TO PLAN YOUR ENGAGEMENT AND WEDMM
Pltosf send new 20-pogo booklet "How To Plan
Your Engagement ond Wedding" ond new 12-pog*
lull color (older, both for only 25c. Alto send
special offer of beautiful 44-page Bride's Book
•
Check enclosed for $
•
Center •
Might
•
Self-addressed
stomped
envelop.
enclosed.
Please
mall tickets
Q
Front •
Middle •
Rear
I will
ill accept eltet
alternate seating!
\
| Plaas* hold tickets at bos office.
Name-
ess
y^
•*0t»l«0VlriKpiii['
City
__Co..—State—
'^.I^S*Ki_0IAMONO RINGS, SYSACUSI, N.Y,
T » M * y . Miy 4. 1963
»•* <
DfamondnM Drop Pair
To Utica, New Haven
a
A Free Press,]
by John Fltitman
Albany's varsity baseball-team suffered two major
setbaks last week, bowing to Utica College 7-3 in an
away match and to New Haven College 19-3 in a home
contest. The Ped diamondmen now sport a 1-5 slate,
having lost five straight since a season opener win
over Quinnipiac.
g»™ out of reach for the Peds.
oS ti a. .r ,t .i n g. (t .o„m
_ „o. r, .r. o„ ,w„ "Pep"
Plzzlllo was the big batsm a n f £ s t a t 6 | golng two , or l n r e e
against
Siena,
the
I n Two Days?
Alba
A L B A N Y 3 , N E W YORK
P e d s (and three stolen bases).
have three away games this
w e e k ; t h e y a l s o Will f a c e
P o t s d a m ' and P l a t t s b u r g h
rVtlfaown nn thf> rnnrl
C o l l e g e s o n Uie r o a a .
In the April 29 Utica game, Albany took an early, 3-0 lead. Infielder "Pep" Plzzlllo walked, stole
second base, moved to third on a
wild throw, and then stole home
(the second time he's done it this
year.)
Bill Inglno walked and was driven
home on a single by Andy Christian.
Christian later scored on a wild
pitch.
Utica got back all three runs and
one to boot on a grand slam home
run by their powerful second baseman.
The home team added three more
In the seventh inning to put the
startlng
Ped
nurler
^
Zeh
pitched seven Innings, giving up six
runs, three hits, five walks, and
struck out one. Relief pitcher Don
M c G urrin worked one Inning, gave
u p o n e r u r i l 0 ne hit, no walks or
strikeouts.
Jim Nass pitched the final Inning
for State, and he allowed but one
walk and struck out two.
In^the May 1 New Haven slaughter,
a big 13 run eighth inning completely
burled the Peds chances for a comeback win.
All the Ped hurlers saw action in
the game, but none was able to con-'
tain the powerful batsmen from Connecticut.
The New Haveners got a pair of
runs in the first, one In the second
and fourth, and two more In the
sixth inning.
Golfers Finally B o w a t Home
State's varsity golfers had their
hopes for an undefeated season
crushed by Hamilton College last
Wednesday, as the Hamiltonlans
squeaked out a 5-4 victory.
This was the first setback for the
llnksmen on their home course In
three years. Hamilton had already
defeated such potent golf schools
as Colgate and Lehigh before the
State match.
On Friday, April 23, the golfers
topped the New England Conference
champs Dew Haven, 6-3. In that
match, soph Mike Bloom posted
medalist honors, firing a fine 76
over a windy, rain-swept course.
Doug Morgan had the shot of the
day, as he carded an eagle on the
seventeenth hole,
On the following day, the golfers
ran their record to 2-0 with a perfeet outing against Oneonta. All of
State's golfers won.
Against Hamilton, however, Albany had a letdown. Mike Bayus led
off with a win in his number one
position. Albany forged to a 4-2
lead via a win by Bill Kane and
BUI Haines.
But a State victory was put out
of reach when Bloom and John Urtiah saw all three points slip away.
Jay Owen edged Mike Bayus by a
stroke to take medalist honors; he
posted a 74 en route to a win over
Doug Morgan.
Now sporting a 2-1 record, the
Albany llnksmen still have a good
chance to better last year's mark
of 8-1-1.
Here are the remaining matches
for the golf team: R.P.I., May 6,
home;
Plattsburgh-Potsdam-triangular meet, May 11, (Plattsburgh);
Utica, May 14 (home); Utica, May
18 (away); and New Paltz, May 21
fawav^.
P E D I N F I E L D E R and leading base stealer
at a steal in g a m * with R P I .
Recorded Results
Of AMIA Sports
One Year Ago
Frosh Netmen Register
Impressive 8-1 Triumph
OF V A L U E AT
% TO Vi OFF LIST
BIG N A M E L A B E L S
RCA V I C T R O L A
MERCURY WING
PERIOD
MGM and OTHERS
Va TO Vz OFF GREAT N A M E S . . .
Charles Munch, Eric leinsdorf, Monteux, Fritz Reiner, Paul Paray, Anatol
Dorati, William Steinberg, with the Boston, Pittsburgh, Minneapolis,
Chicago, London, and Detroit Symphonies, Artists included are David
Oistralh, Gilels, Graffman, Brailowsky, etc,
STATE UNIVERSITY BOOKSTORE
Ext. 129
Albany, IS.I.
F R O S H N E T M A N Tom Walenclk, the team's number ana man,
executes a ( i n * running backhand t h e t in h i s win against A i d r ondack C C l i t Saturday.
VOL. LI NO. 19
MAY 7, 1 0 6 5
The "Misanthrope," the final State University Theatre production of the year,
will be presented tonight and Saturday at 8:30 p.m. in Page Hall. The play was
written by Moliere in 1666 and is a satire on the hypocrisy and false society of
his times. It is one of the few comedies written during this period that has survived through the centuries. The play is directed by James Leonard, Associate
Professor of Speech and Dramatics and it stars Dimitri Perdaris, as Alceste,
and Anne Digney as Celimene.
Alceste, the "misanthrope," rebels aguinstthe
false, flattering manners
which characterize the society of France at this
time. His protestations are
complicated by his love for
Celimene.
ASP *****
In last year's May 5 Issue of the
ASP, the following stories were reported on the sports page:
The varsity diamondmen dropped
* * * * *
a 7-4 decision to Siena, due mainly
to a pourous defense thai allowed
6 unearned runs to score. In that
game State led 1-0 until the top of
the seventh frame.
The golf team scored a tie with
Hamilton College, 4 1/2-41/2. Mike
Bayus fired a 72 to cop medalist
honors, and he was followed by
Fred Maurer with 73.
Bob Hart hurled his SLS team
to a 10-6 win over the Sarfs in an
AMIA League I game. Fred Rawe
The State frosh tennis team scored an overwhelming
paced the SLS batsmen with a 3
8-1 victory over Adirondack Community College last
for 5 effort.
The frosh baseball team was clob- Friday, April 30, in a home match. The frosh evened
bered 12-3; Ray Clanfrini was lead- their season record at 2-2, following a 9-0 loss to
ing the team with a .412 average.
The varsity netmen ran their un- RPI on the preceding Wednesday. On Wednesday the
defeated skein to 6 with a 5-1 win rookie netmen will travel to Union College.
over St. Peter's College of New
E n r o u t e t o t h e w i n t h e dack's Al Rosenbergh held off a
Jersey. John Barthelmes was defrosh team copped five of Kev "i „Ma^n „raUy t0 r e g l s t e r a
feated in the no. 1 slot.
tVio „six
u osingles
„matches
. „ + „ K ~ „ 8-6, 5-7, 6-4 win.
j„„,„„
The frosh netmen blanked Adir- the
c Dall
, V . of
, , « « . „the
,,
^ ^ doubles contests, the Ped
ondack CC 9-0 and overwhelmed and
n „ „„
doubles
yearlings qverwhelmed the visiting
Union, 8-1. Ken Zacharlas, Stan
Only three of northern Staters. The first doubles
Kerpel, and Guy Nicosia paced the matches.
of Walenclk and Rosen won
State's wins required a team
team.
their match, 6-1, 6-1.
third set.
The second doubles team of
Glaser-Dobrusin took the team of
In the first singles match, lefty Phil Dwyer (ACC's no. 1 man) and
Tom Walenclk dropped the first set Rich Couglan Into a third set before
6-1, but he rebounded nicely to scoring a win. They won 4-6, 6-4,
score two quick set wins, 6-3 and 6-3.
6-1.
Schusler teamed up with Magin
Neil Rosen continued his winning to complete State's fine afternoon,
ways in the second singles slot, as as they turned in an 8-6,6-4 triumph.
he scored two decisive triumphs,
The frosh still face such teams
6-1, 6-1.
as Coblesklll, Hudson Valley CC,
Tony Glaser, playing third singles and Adirondack again.
also had a pair of 6-1 sets, thus
giving Albany a 3-0 lead.
For the fourth consecutive singles
match, Albany's strength was eviThe ASP sports department Is
dent, as Bob Dobrusln crushed his still looking for people Interested
opponent Rich Coughland, 6-1 and in taking pictures of the spring
6-2.
sports (baseball, boll, tennis, softBill Schuster gave State its fifth ball). The work Involved Includes
straight win to ice the match, scor- taking pictures one afternoon a week.
ing a 6-2, 7-9, 6-2 victory.
Anyone interested is urged to come
State's only loss of the day came Into the ASP office or contact Klaus
In the sixth singles match. Adiron- Schnltzer through student mall.
Press
State University Theatre to Begin
Two-Night Run of 'Misanthrope'
' P e p " P i z z i l l o streaks toward home in successful attempt
- NOTICE -
Draper Hall
135 Western Ave.
Five Tests
A Free
S P A C E C O I N C O L L E C T O R - Mr. Lee T. B r y a n t , graduate t e a c h ing a s s i s t a n t i n the department of p h y s i c s , poses w i t h h i s rec e n t l y completed set of 60 Schuler's Potato C h i p Space C o i n s .
A formula has been d e v e l o p e d whereby the p r o b a b i l i t y of c o l l e c t i n g a complete set of space coins can be c a l c u l a t e d from a
-knowledge of the number of potato c h i p bags p u r c h a s e d .
Golden Eye to Feature
Program on SCOPE
"Yankee Go Home?" will be the topic of a panel discussion at the Golden Eye tonight at9p.m. The panel is
a part of the continuing SCOPE project activities. P a r ticipating in this panel discussion will be Dr. Paul
Wheeler, Sociology; Miss Catherine Newbold, Southern
History; Mr. John Reilly, English; Miss Joan Schulz,
English Honors; writers of the American South; and
Miss Alicja Iwanska, Sociology.
Differing Views
The panelists will begin
the program with brief introductory remarks stating
their different views.
Music Department
To Hold Concert
Celimene, the coquette, captivates
the entire court through her flirtatious ways. Phil into and Eliante
represent Moliere's opinion of sincerity which has adapted to the environment, an adaptation which Alceste has failed to make.
Charles Bartlett and Pamela Boden portray Philinte and Eliante,
respectively. Other characters in
the play are Orone, Arthur Putnam,
A r si noe,
Lillian Spampinato,
Acaste, Dennis Tuttle, Clitandre,
.John Langton, Basque, Peter Nicholas, Dubois and a guard of the Marshalsea, Walter Doherty.
Leonard applies a contemporary
.interpretation to the play. Although
the costumes and setting reflect
seventeenth century France, the
force of the ideas presented transcends the limits of a "period play"
and sxtends Moliere's comments to
the superficialities of the twentieth
century living.
A L C E S T E S U R R O U N D E D by other c o u r t i e r s d i s c u s s i n g t h e f a l s e
s u p e r f i c i a l i t y w h i c h runs rampant through their s o c i e t y .
Netherlands Government to Present
National Flags to Dutch Quadrangle
Leonard has emphasized the modernity and universality of the script
by simplifying thp lavish, overdone
quality associated with the period.
The set which was designed by
The Dutch Quadrangle will r e - The flags will be displayed in the
John J, Moore, Professor of Speecii
and Dramatics, captures the blend ceive thirteen flags from the Neth- flag room of the Dutch Quadrangle.
erlands government today al 4 p.m.
of passing centuries.
Mayor Erastus Corning will repin a brief ceremony at the New resent the City of Albany at the
Tickets are available in Richard- Campus. The flags represent the ceremony. Gordon Robinson, Gullson 2110 with student tax card or twelve provinces of the Netherlands derland Supervisor, and General
$1.50.
and the city ofNiniijen, traditionally Cortland Van Rensselaer, CommisThis Is the fourth production of Albany's sister city.
sioner of General Services, will
the year by the State University
J. Van den Bogaert, director of also welcome Van den Bogaert.
Theatre, their
productions of the Netherlands Information ServMaureen Glasheen, the reigning
"Faustus," "Tiger" and "The Ty- ice, will present the flags to Pat Tulip Queen of 1904-65, will also
pists," and "Etham Frome" has Howard, president of Schuylyer Hall. be present as one of the last of
received praise from ail the critics.
her official acts as Tulip Queen.
in ill
All students and faculty are invited to attend the ceremonies and
the brief reception that will follow.
The University Concert Band and
the University Concert Orchestra
Miss Newbold will speak on the will present their annual Spring
historical background of the south Concert on May II at 8:30 in Page
in relation to the Civil Rights issue. Hall. This year works of Bach,
Miss Schulz's comments will be Ward, Schubert, Hoist, and Sousa
on the response of the southern will lie played.
intellectual to the racial situation.
This concert will e followed by
The place of the Negro sub-cul- the Choral Group concert on May
ture in the country will be analyzed 13. This will be the third year that
by Niss Iwanska.
there have tieen two concerts.
Mr. Reilly, chairman of the
The Orchestra, conducted by Mr.
SCOPE screening committee, will William Hudson, will perform the
explain the purpose of Civil Rights Bach 'Concerto for D Minor for
movements in ttie Soutli such as Two Violins and String Orchestra'
SCOPE.
and the First Movement of SchuFinally, Dr. Wheeler will talk on bert's Symphony No. o in 11 Minor."
the disruptive aspects of social
Tile Bach work is one of the
movements in a community.
masterpieces of the late Baroque
literature, employinga "statement"
Moderator
and "answer" technique between the
The panel will be moderated by soloists and the orchestra. Jo Ann
Ken Fuehsinan, program director Krause and Louise Myers will lie
for SCOPE.
featured soloists.
After the opening statements, the
The Schubert work will he recogpanelists will he given an oppor- nized as the ever popular "Untunity to discuss the questions and finished" symphony, left uncomIdeas that have been raised. Fol- pleted because the composer was
lowing the discussion, the question unable Hi write final movements
of ''Yankee Go Home?" will lie as beautiful as the first two.
opened to the students.
After ihe Intermission the hand
The panel discussion is being will perform the "Prairie Oversponsored by SCOPE In collabora- t u r e " of Robert Ward, The Second
tion with Campus Christian Coun- Suite for Band" by Gustav Hoist,
cil and the Golden Eye committee, and Sousa's "George Washington
Bicentennial inarch."
Ward is a prominent American
composer
who has recently achieved
C O R R E C T I O N I
great success with his opera based
on Arthur Miller'splay "The CruciChinese 1, Elementary Chinese,
ble." His is riinarily a melodic
Mr. W. Woo w i l l be offered from
style
although the richness of the
4t35 - 5:50, Tuos. end Tburs.
twentieth century is in his writing, S U N B A T H E R S T U R N DORM F I E L D into the l e m b l o n c e of a
during the Fall Term, 1965-66,
beach as the weather c o n t i n u e s t o get warmer.
as in the "Prairie Overture."
In M.L. 3.
Nominations Open
For New Gov't
Students interested in running tor
office on the Central Council or the
Living Affairs Commission can
place their name in nomination at
the Student Activities Desk in Brubacher Hall or in the Student Personnel Oflice in Draper Hall.
Nominations will close Sunday
with the elections beginning Monday
in the peristyles for commuters and
during the dinner hour in the residence balls and Greek houses.
When placing their name in nomination a student should submit their
residence hall and their qualifications to their hall president. Commuters should submit the Information to the Student Personnel office,
A committee appointed by the Provisional Council Sunday night will
handle the elections. The committee
Is headed by Ed Brovarskl and In*
eludes Judy Gelardo, Stan Kernel,
Mike Purdy, Ulna Nyberg, and Helen
Williams.
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