C n t r o l Connacticvt 102, State ... Ptds

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Cntrol Connacticvt 102, State 8 0 ;
Ptds End Year With 16-6 Record
The Albany SVite varsity basketball team wound-up its season Wednesday night
with a 102-80 loss to a powerful and big Central Connecticut State in an away game.
The score, was 36-31 at the 15:00 mark of the first half, but the home team poured
in 15 straight points to pull to a 51-31 halftime lead. They were never headed again. .
Co-captain and leading scorer Dick Crossett once again paced the Ped attack with
i followed by Dan Zeh who netted 18 points.
This was the last game
for seniors Crossett, Dan
and Bob Zeh, Jim O'Donovan, Bob Hart, and Marty
Eppner.
The loss was
State's third in four starts.
Press
ALBANY 3 . N E W YORK
. Everybody got into the game for
.., Albany as eight players scored and
four hit double figures. Crossett
was again hot from the line, hitting
on 11 of 13 shots.
This game Was close until the
five minute mark of the first half
.when Connecticut cut loose. In the
Pbota-by KUng
second half the Feds ran with Connecticut and totaled 49 points to
DAN ZEH scares a basket behind a wall of enemy arms while
the winner's 51.
Seven men scored for the home teammate Dick Crossett is poised to assist.
team, five In double figures. The
high scorers for Connecticut were
Gene MuraskL, with 26 points, and
Bob Plosky with 25.
Volleyball
When Crossett left the ball game
In the final match.of the ThursBowling
the Connecticut fans rewarded him
day
volleyball
league, Psi Gamma
Phi Delta, Commuters, and Bru,
with ovation for his fine perfordefeated Sigma Alpha, 6-13, 11-4, the winners of the Tuesday, Wedmance.
9-8, to finish undefeated and win nesday, and Thursday bowling
Here are the point totals for the
the championship of the league. leagues respectively, will begin the
game:
This was one of the best matches playoffs for the championship on
STATE
in intramural competition this year Monday, March 8, at 4:30 p.m. at
as both teams displayed excellent the Hice Bowling Lanes. Phi Delta
NameFG FT Total
teamwork. Linda Bergendahl, Joy will play Bru.
4
Crossett
11
26
Swain, and Chris Massal sparked
Bru will then play the Commuters
2
O'Donovan
12
Sigma Alpha in a great team ef- at 2:00 p.m. on March 13. The final
2
D. Zeh
18
fort, but Psi Gamma's spiking by match of the round rotin tournament
0
B. Zeh
1
2
Kathy Farnsworth and Bunny Whalen will be on March 15, at 4:30 p.m.
0
Bloom
2
4
proved to be the deciding factor of
0
Lange
5
10
the contest.
Bosketball
0
Man nix
2
4
Psi Gamma will play the ComThe intercollegiate basketball
0
Constantino
2
4
muters
in
the
playoffs
for
the
chamteam
will
travel
to Hartwick on
Total
36
B0
pionship at 7:20, March 9, in Page March 10.
Gym.
Photo by Kling
State Cagers Close Out
Highly Successful Season
Prior to Wednesday night's contest with Central
Connecticut State, the Albany State varsity basketball
team had a 16-5 overall slate. The team, one of the
most successful in Albany's illustrious history, established a new consecutive winning streak mark with 12
triumphs in a row, extending from Dec. 18 to Feb. 20.
The Peds opened the sea
(
son on Dec. 1, against
Montclair. Dick Crossett
starred in a losing effort,
chipping in 35 points as
the Staters bowed, 77-71.
CENTRAL CONNECTICUT
Muraskl
Rellly
Plosky
Salarno
Pelcher
Penella
Jackson
Total
5
8
11
6
2
5
6
43
0
10
3
2
1
0
0
16
10
26
25
14
5
10
12
102
Doc' Souers: Outstanding
As Coach, Amateur Athlete
State bounced back to top Siena
on Dec. 5, 75-49. The team then
nipped Southern Connecticut In a
"home game, 78-76. Three days later
the cagers traveled to Buffalo and
absorbed an 89-65 trouncing.
Albany hosted Utica College the
following Saturday night, and won
handily, 89-65. The Peds then entered the Capital City Tournament
and bowed to Siena, 50-48. In a
consolation contest, Dan Zeh netted
38 points (record) as Albany toppled
Marlsl College, 82-60.
Won First In-'45
In the first game of the new year,
the Peds edged Cortland, 69-68. The
following night, on Jan. 9, State
whipped Potsdam, 60-50, making It
three in a row for the Peds.
Oneonta next fell before the sharpshooting Peds, bowing 68-56 In an
Armory game. During intersesslon,
the Sauersmen oppfd Pratt Instltue, 69-63, and Pace College, 85-61.
Albany took on visiting Oswego
College on Feb. 4, and scored an
easy 74-63 win. The following Saturday, State traveled to Hobart to
chalk up win number eleven, 69-44,
Richard " D o c " Sauers, varsity basketball and golf
coach is one of the most successful coaches in the
history of Albany State. In his hometown, Irwin, Pa.,
he attended Perm Joint High School, where he lettered
in basketball, baseball, and football. He received his
B.S. from Slippery Rock State College in 1951.
In
college,
"Doc"
re-
ceived four varsity basketball letters, one baseball
letter, and one tennis letter.
From May 1951 to September 1954
Coach Sauers served In the Navy,
most of the time overseas on the
U.S.S. Block Island. He thenentered
Penn State University, received his
Masters in June 1355, and attended
summer sessions there (or his Doctorate, receiving the degree in 1961.
"Doc" came to State in September, 1955, as varsity basketball and
baseball coach. He wa i basebau
coach for four years, until 1959.
Oneonta No. 9
Oneonta hosted the Stage cagers on
Feb. 10 and became the team's ninth
straight victim, 57-54. Ilarpur
bowed to the Peds two days later,
74-44.
In the team's greatest triumph of
the season, the Peds dropped highly
touted Plattsburgh, 83-81, in double
overtime. This was win number 15
for State, 12 in a row.
NCAA-bound Buffalo ended Al'bany's win streak with a 69-58
victory in the Armory on Feb. 20.
On Feb, 23 the cagers traveled
to New Paltz to register win number 19, 68-63. Ithaca toppled State
and ended the Pads' chances for a
post season bid with a 78-74 Armory
triumph on Feb. 27.
-•ufi*
"Doc" Sauers
Coach Sauers nas now been basketball coach for ten seasons compiling a cumulative 160-77 won-lost
record. Five of his teams have gone
to the NAIA small-college tournament as representatives from dlstrict thirty-one. In 1961, State
dropped out of its NAIA affiliation
and is now a member of the NCAA,
In 1999, a golfing program was
organized at State and "Doc" be-
can e head coa
»
ch. in the first two
year> the team was actually a
Golf Club and didn't compete with
other schools on a varsity level
until 1961. Since then Ms teams
•
have compiled a 27-9-1 record and
last year's team went to the NCAA
small-college match in Springfield,
Mo., placing ninth out of a field of
twenty-three.
"Doc" Sauers and his wife, the
former Elaine Sykes, one of the top
women golfers in the area, live at
15 Stonehenge Lane, Albany.
In liis free time, Coach Sauers
plays bridge, golf, and handball.
"Doc" shoots with a two handicap
in golf; last year he and Fred
Maurer were runners-up in the
Eastern New York Golf Association; together they have won the
Meclianlcville Invitational and the'
Plnehaven Member-Guest Tournament. "Doc" alone has won the
Glens Falls Invitational and several E.N.Y.G.A. Wednesday events.
In handball, Coach Is the city champ
of Albany and was runner-up In
Northeastern New York in 1962 and
1963.
Doc" (eels that his biggest thrill
in coaching was the 47-45 triple
overtime win against Siena in the
loci Christmas tournament. Hewas
quoted as sayings "I've enjoyed my
association with athletics at Albany
state. It has grown and will continue
to grow and I'm glad that I'm a part
of it. •
A RayView of Sports
by Ray McCleat
It would not be proper to brush off the past basketball
season without officially congratulating the Peds on a
truly outstanding year. The cagers gave State fans a lot
to be proud of, and did it in an admirable way.
Before citing individual players, let's look at the
season as a whole. The high point of the year was the
record-breaking winning streak, climaxed by an almost
unbelievable comeback win over powerful Plattsburgh.
The low point was the team's losses to the University
of Buffalo and Ithaca College, thus eliminating the
Staters from any chance for a post-season tournament
bid.
The team averaged 68.5 points per game, and allowed
61.6 to the opposition. Coach Sauers called the 196465 Peds "offensively, the best team I've ever had."
The " s i x " starters — Dick Crossett, Dan and Bob
Zeh, Jim O'Donovan, Mike Bloom, and Ray Weeks —
are a talented and dedicated group of players who have,
collectively, given 17 years of basketball-playing to
State.
Dick Crossett led the team in scoring (17.8) and was
third in the nation among small colleges in shooting
percentage (.660). Coach Sauers called Crossett the
" b e s t player I have ever coached."
Dan Zeh led the team in rebounding (205) and averaged 11.8 points per game. Dan set a Capital City
Tournament scoring record in a game with Marist
College, hitting for 38 points.
Jim O'Donovan was second on the team in rebounding
(201) and was also second in scoring (15.6). Jim was
the team's most consistent scorer throughout the season.
Bob Zeh and Ray Weeks teamed up in the first half
of the year to give State a formidable backcourt duo.
Weeks singlehandedly downed Cortland, hitting for 21
points in Albany's 69-68 victory. Zeh was the Ped
playmaker, averaging only 6,1 per game, but contributed many more with his timely assists.
Soph Mike Bloom took over Weeks' spot after intersession, and has averaged better than seven points
per game thereafter. Mike, too, was a valuable asset
a s a playmaker.
To Coach Sauers and Peds — our sincere congratulations.
VOL. LI N O . 8
hterim Government Assumes Shape
With Induction of Council Members
Saturday's Inauguration witnessed the selection of the new Student Ambassador,
the Activities Day chairmen, the newly-elected class officers, the members of
Provisional Council and MYSKANIA. The program began with Arthur Johnston,
master-of-ceremonies, noting the presence of three former MYSKANIA chairmen,
Dick Kelly, Fred Smith, and Buz Welker, in the audience. Johnston then proceeded
to call Mrs. Elizabeth Honnett Webre, last y e a r ' s student ambassador, to the
Psi Gamma Undefeated Volleyball Champ
ALBANY STATE and Ithaca College ready for action at opening tap in last week's meeting.
M A R C H 9, 1 9 6 5
Mrs. Webre announced
Sue Nichols as SUNYA's
1965 Ambassador abroad
CAROL DARBY SIVERS tops Maria Maniaci for seat number four
during the MYSKANIA inductions.
•—After the citing or the new ambassador, Johnston revealed the new
chairman for the AcUvlUes Day
Committees. The new heads of the
committees are Sharyn Teves, All
University Concert; Susan Wade and
Robert McOdare, President's Reception; Gall Magaliff and Deborah
Friedman, Activities Day; and Mike
Purdy and Eleanor Dlener, Campus
Chest.
Homecoming Chairmen Named
Bluejay Myskies Tapped
In Saturday Ceremonies
The Inauguration proceedings came to its climax
Saturday when Nancy Baumann, chairman of MYSKANIA,
began the ceremonial tapping of the 13 new members.
The ritual began when Frederick Genero left the stage
and marched through Page Hall stopping at the row in
which Joseph " P e p " Pizzillo was sitting and ended
with Edward Wolne.r tapping William Bate.
The ceremony took about behalf of the retiring MYSKANIA,
an hour to tap the new mem- I would like to extend to the new
the class officers, the
bers. As usual, it was filled MYSKANIA,
Provisional Council and the new
with dramatic impact that ambassador our congratulations....
has characterized it in the And to the New MYSKANIA and the
Provisional Council our slncerest
past.
wishes for a profitable working re-
The >.„i earns of joy and the tears lationship in the next weeks.
of happiness could be seen on many
"And for an excellent product, si
faces as Miss Baumann called out
the names of the new members. new student government that will
The new MYSKIES in order of reflect the leadership and the imagtheir seats are "Pep" Plzziloo, ination of these fine people who will
Maria Tucci, Joan Clark, Maria work for its Institution."
Manlaccl, Anne Dlgney, John Gleason, Ann Bourdon, Udo Guddat, WU,11am Laundry, Vera Komanowski,
Al Smith, William Slnnhold and BUI
Bate.
The new chairmen of Homecoming, All University Reception and
Parent's Day are Deborah Garland
and Don Oltman, Helen Stoll and
John Fotla, and Ruth Silverman and
Llnford White, respecUvely.
The results of the election for
class officers were then announced.
William Cleveland, president, Igor
Koroluk, vice president, Rosemary
Gadziala, Secretary, and Andrew
Mathias, Treasurer, were declared
the new leaders of the freshman
class. Denny Phillips will head the
sophomore class with Kathleen
Brown, vice president, Dianne Greg- MYSKANIA EX-CHAIRMAN Nancy Baumann pins the official blue
ory, secretary, and Joan G/esens, and gold ribbon on new inductee Joan Clark in Inaugural Ceretreasurer.
monies last Saturday.
The new officers of the Junior
Class are Pep Pizzillo, president,
Bob Gable, vice president, Joan
Clark, secretary and Jeff Chertok,
treasurer.
Provisional Council
The newly elected Provisional
Council members are Barbara
ChemUli, Charles Drexel, William
Greiner and MarkSumma, freshman
class, Deborah Friedman, Harold
(continued to page 3.)
Peace Corps Begins Recruitment
To Provide kifonnatwn, Administer Tests
Today, and for the next week,
Peace Corps representatives will
be on hand to distribute information and administer the Peace Corps
Placement Test.
An Information table has been set
up outside the Bookstore in Draper,
and will be open from 9-0 p.m.
dally. A similar table will be open
In Brubacher from 0-9 p.m.
Today and tomorrow only a Peace
Corps fllmstrip will be shown. It
is approximately 30 minutes long
and will be followed by a question
and answer period. The film will
be shown today at 7 p.m. In Brubacher Lower Lounge, and tomorrow at 12 noon In Page Hall.
The Peace Corps Placement Test,
a non-competitive hour long examination will be given four times
dally tomorrow through next Tuesday. The times and places appear
below. The test is used for placeMYSKANIA's New Role
ment purposes only, and does not
Its new role In the Interim gov- require a knowledge of a foreign
ernment will be to work actively language. Separate tesfs for French
with the Provisional Council in e s - and Spanish will be available.
tablishing the new student government. When the new government
Returned Corpimen
does into effect it will assist it in
The head recruiter for this camall policy-making activities.
pus will be James Kelly, Program
At the conclusion of the cere- Officer for the African Regional
mony, Miss Baumann said that "On Office. He spent 1961-03 in Ghana
Smith Elected Chairman
In their first meeting Sunday night
Al Smith was chosen as the new
chairman.
Upon being elected chairman,
Smith was quoted as saying: "It is
quite an honor, and I only hope that
I can live up to the expectations of
the people of MYSKANIA. Nancy
Baumann did a wonderful Job as
Chairman, and it's going to take
quite a bit to come even close to
her accomplishments.
The people chosen with me for
MYSKANIA are very deserving of
tile honor and are prepared to dedicate themselves to the Ideals of
MYSKANIA, the goals of the Provisional Council, and the alms of
the University."
MYSKANIA will continue to be
the guardians of the freshman class
and try all Impeachment cases,
where he taught both high school
and college classes. He Is a graduate of Boston College.
Assisting Kelly will be John Helwig, who recently returned from
two years in Costa Rica. He also
taught In a high school there. He
Is a graduate of American University
and plans to liegin graduate studies
in the fall.
PLACEMENT TEST SCHEDULE
Wednesday, Thursday, Friday:
9:00 a.m. — Lake Annex
12:30 p.m. — Lake Annex
4:30 p.m. — Lake Annex
7:00 p.m. - Draper 240
SUNYA to Send Ambassador
To Israel for Experiment'
SueTflchols, who has been chosen
to represent our university In the
Experiment in International in Israel this summer, greeted her selection by saying, "I'd have to have
a horribly split personality to represent all of you." She Is excited to
have such an opportunity to live in
Israel.
She recognizes Israel as a new
nation with a developing nationalism, and a different climate and new
ideas. Knowing this, she "wanted
to understand these ideas." Last
year, the students In Israel worked
on a kibbutz, which is a small,
fortified, self-supporting (arm community.
To Sue, her proposed summer In
Israel represents a great challenge,
and an opportunity to learn about
people. She hopes todo work similar
Saturday, March 13
9:00 a.m. — Draper
12:30 p.m. — Lake Annex
4:30 p.m. — Lake Annex
7:00 p.m. - Draper 240
Monday, March IS
9:00 a.m. - English Annex 09
12:30 p.m. - Lake Annex
4:30 p.m. — Lake Annex
7:00 p.m. - Draper 240
Tuesday, March 16
0:00 a.m. — Lake Annex
12:30 p.m. — Like Annex
4:30 p.m. — Lake Annex
7:00 p.m. - Draper 240
Sue Nlcholi
...Israeli Ambassador
to what last year's experimenters in
Israel have done. Although she lives
on a fruit farm near Niagara Falls,
a summer abroad is not a new experience for her.
In the summer of 1901, between
her Junior and Senior years In
Lewiston-Porter
S e n i o r High
School, Sue was the school's representative to Norway for the
American Field Service Student Exchange Program, •This program Is
similar to the Experiment, but on a
high school level.
Sue spent her summer in Norway
living with a Norwegian family.
Their home was on an Island above
the Arctic Circle, and It provided
Sue with an experience which she
will never forget.
Engliih Major
Sue Is an English major and a
Library Science minor and hopes to
teach after graduation. She is currently the Junior ISC representative
for Psi Gamma as well as the University Songleader for this year.
She also participated in the '64
S. U. Revue.
While she knows no particulars
about the program at the present,
Sue hopes to learn more soon. She
is filling out personal Information
forms now which will be used by
the Experiment to place Sue in a
family where she will be most at
ease.
Until arriving in Israel, Sue will
try to learn as much Hebrew as
possible. Just before she leaves
for Israel, she will have a group
orientation program. Then, she will
embark on what she (eels promises
to be a "very exciting and challenging summer,"
Tuesdoy, March 9. 1965
ALBANY STUDENT PUBIS
ppncgrt Review
Concert Bond Achieves New Artistic Peak
by 0. P. Minimus
"If I coll you collect this Spring vacation and ask you to write
me bail money, please don't turn me down...
News Takes Cooperation
The lack of consideration which has been shown 10
us by various supposedly responsible people in the
past few days has registered one emotion — that of
disgust.
In this case our complaint lies with Election Commission and ex-S.A. President Art Johnston. We had
been promised the election results for Thursday
evening, and were not told until Saturday afternoon
that complete tabulations were being withheld. This
all resulted in a great deal of extra work and needless inconvenience for our staff.
This is unfortunately not an isolated instance, however. All too often we have had to almost drag stories
out of people which should have been brought into the
News Office as a matter of course. A case-in-point
here was the recent story on "The Tiger's" being
selected to be presented at the Yale Drama Festival.
The Drama Department gave us no notification of
this significant achievement, and we came upon the
story almost entirely by chance.
The ASP exists to serve as a medium of communication for all facets of the University community. Unfortunately, we cannot infiltrate the entire campus with
reporters who can afford to "wait out" a story. We
need help in finding out where the current news is, and
what may make the headlines in the near future.
We attempt to cover the whole University situation,
but can only be truly successful when we are met with
cooperation.
/40m&\ Albany Student Press
mXW'JS)
ESTAfcLISHED MAY 1914
NQJajt-X
BY THE CLASS OF 1V1B
-fA°M
—iHWIX
The Albany Student Press is a semi-weekly newspaper published by the student
body of the State University of New York at Albany. The ASP may be reached
by dialing either 489-6481 or IV 2-3326. The ASP office, located ... Room 5 of
Brubacher Hall. 750 State Street, Is open from 7-1] p. m. Sunday through Thursday nights.
E D I T H S. HARDY - KAREN E. K E E F E R
Co-Edllors-in-Chlof
HAROLD L. LYNNE
Managing Editor
D E B O R A H I. FRIEDMAN
Feature Editor
RAYMOND A. MC C L O A T
Sports Editor
EARL C. SCHREIBER
Arts Editor
JOSEPH S. SILVERMAN
News Editor
W I L L I A M H. COLGAN
E«ocu!ivo Editor
C Y N T H I A A. GOODMAN
Associate Feature Editor
E I L E E N L. MANNING
Associola Editor
J U D I T H M. CONGER
Technical Supervisor
DOUGLAS G . U P H A M
Photography Editor
MONICA M. MC GAUGHEY
Advertising Manager
JOHN M. HUNTER
Consultant Advertising Manager
Desk Editor
S'art
DIANA M. MAREK
Buslnoss Manager
KLAUS S C H N I T Z E R
Associate Photography Editor
Varied Timbres
In any case, Mr. Hudson chose
three varied " P i c t u r e s , " and the
band demonstrated fine capabilities.
After the fine trumpet solo of the
"Promenade," the low brass of the
band lumbered through the "Bydlo"
(Polish ox-cart) in just the right
manner.
"The Hut of Baba Yaga" featured
tine sharp attacks that were characteristic of the playing throughout
the day, but were particularly fine
here. This piece could pose balance problems between the brass
and wood winds, but Mr, Hudson
kept all In good control.
The final selection of the excerpts was the "Great Gate of
Kiev," which was done with appropriate grandeur and power,
leading to a fine climax.
Kudos for " C o m o n a "
Last S. A, President's Address
It is traditional that by this point In the Inaugural Ceremonies the former S. A. President is sitting in the audience, out there with you. He has
delivered his Farewell Address and the new President has delivered his
Inaugural and taken over the program as his first official act.
But there is no new Student Association President. There Is no Inaugural Address, and what I have to say Is not designed as a Farewell
Address per se.
It seems that I may be the last of the species, but I ask of you — let
us not mourn too long over his passing. You see, the species has been
really a "dead duck" since long before today. This fact has been painted
for many of us In vivid colors of black and blue. However, it is not
merely the species which has passed, it is the whole system which the
old bird represented that has passed with him. And the funeral — rather,
today's celebration — has been held because one day some students stood
up full height for a change, looked into the red eyes of that old devil
Tradition and said, "DAMN YOU! YOU SHALL NO LONGER DAMN US!
WE REFUSE TO BE BOUND ANY LONGER TO AN OUTDATED SYSTEM
JUST BECAUSE IT IS TRADITIONAL!" And on that day, and Idea was
born.
TRADITION MUST BE TESTED! Because the welfare of every member of our community is concerned, we do not dare — you, the newly
elected officers and you out there, the foundation, you do not dare to
accept anything that Is simply because it is and always lias been. If .1
doesn't work anymore, If it lias no rationale, GET RID OF IT! But be
careful. Replace it with something meaningful, something with a rationale, something that works. And remember, we are all committed
to being able to defend our purpose, our reasoning, our action at any
time.
This process of meaningful change
Is not an easy one. I'll attest to that.
The commitment was ours; we are
gone. The commitment Is nowyuurs,
and I hope most sincerely, most
fervently that you can fulfill It.
THANK YOU ALL FOR A MOST
EXCITING YEAR!
Art Johnston
"Lost of Species'
Jfiiui[iryA>5
^m^^^Kijv^
My dear Foster Poronts:
' tV ntWIn 1
s^sp'"9RI
">wp
W• 6 p i $&f| t.
^^^^K
w^*tii
s^R'
GRACIELA GARCIA, ASP's foster child, helps
her mother peel potatoes in the Garcia kitchen.
Their home is located in a Bogota slum.
I thunk you very much for sending me
$105 pesos and the gifts that they guve
me; I am very hnppy.
Here we celebrated the Christmas with much enthusiasm and we made the
manger and we went to midnight mass,
we also assisted to muss for the New
Year and it was very beautiful In my
suburb Rlonegro, the small church is
named Nuestra Senora de Guadalupe,
all of my friends were very happy and
we asked for the good health of all
the people who are helping us.
Very grateful 1 say good-bye.
Graciela Garcia
P—»3
First Council Meeting Friday's Film 'Touch of Evil'
Selects New Chairman Combines Story with Welles' Style
Air Force Personnel
To Acquaint Students
With Wide Program
Tomorrow from 1U a.ui. - 3 p.m.
a team of Air Force personnel will
be on campus to give Information
to any interested students. They
will have a table in Lower Draper
-Hall.
The team includes First Lieutenant Robert A. Houck, Second Lieutenant Elanor Nanod, and Master
Sargeant Thomas Byrne.
Miss Nanod, a graduate of the
University of Honolulu, will have
information available on the Women's Air Force. She is presently
the Administrative Officer of the
4003rd Supply Squadron at Stewart
Air Force Base.
Houck, an Officer Selection Specialist, received his commission
from the Air Force Officer Training School after graduating from
Princeton In 1902. He Is prepared
to discuss Air Force commission
opportunities with both men and
women seniors.
Byrne has served in the Air Force
for 17 years. He is a proficient
parachutist and served for many
years as an inflight refueling technician. His assignments have carried him to 47 states and 30 countries from Europe lu the Far East.
He has accumulated over 3,000 hours
of flying time.
entrusted with the duty of "directing
the course of government planning
toward thjs conclusion that new and
totally revised Student Government
shall come into existence at the end
of their term of office, which shall
be on or before May 1, 19G5."
However, the sixteen elected
members of the Provisional Council,
by constitutional specification, must
appoint ten additional members to
the Council. These appointed members shall assume full responsibilities of Council membership, with the
exception that they will have no vote
on fiscal allocations.
The constitution provides that the
appointment of these additional
members shall be broken down as
follows:
Academic Interests-1;
Communicatlons-2; C o m m u n i t y
Programmlng-3; Living Areas-3;
and Religious Interests-1.
The Provisional Council also
voted to overrule ex-President
Johnston's decision to withhold publication of the results of last week's
school elections.
The next meeting of the Council
will be held this evening in Brubacher Hall Private Dining Room at
7:30 p.m.
NOTICES
Sorority R u s h e e s
r
Today are quiet hours all day
long. There will be no communication between sorority members
and rushees or vice versa. Quiet
hours extend until :.)0 p.m. tomorrow. Tomorrow bids may be
picked up in Brubacher Hall from
9 a.m. - fi p.m. Pledge services
will be held at 8:30 p.m., Wednesday. The sororities urge all rushees
to make their choices individually,
and wish them all good luck,
Koppn Delta E p s i l o n
Kappa Delta Epsilon, the Women's
'Times' Specialist Education
Honorary, will hold a
meeting on Thursday evening, March
11 at 7 p.m. in Bru. Mr. Schofield,
To JjteajMiiJPaje_ from
the Schenectady Home fur the
Now It Is time to think hard and to
work hard. You, the Provisional
Council and you, the new MYSKANIA
have much to accomplish before May
1. You with your student body are in
a unique position in this endeavor
for you have at your fingertips the
promise of a government for your
community that is, without exaggeration, unique in tile world, There Is
no other as deeply meaningful as
this one can lie.
Graciela Thanks Parents for Gift
SUSAN J , THOMSON
Public Rolallons Director
Ellen Zang
Joseph Mahay, James Ballin, Mike Forenell, Linda Freehan,
Linda Handolsman, Mike Gllmorlln, Kevin Magin, Carol Walling, Alice
„ ,
. „ „
Nudelmon, G. P, Mln.mus, Brenda Miller
Columnists
M. Gilbert Williams, Paul Jensen, Bruce Daniels, J . Roger Lee,
Gary Luciak
Photographers
, Walter Post, Steven Kling, Robert McOdare
Cartoonist
William Slnnhold
A l l communications must be addressed to the Editors and should be signed,
Names w i l l be withheld on request. Communications should be limited to 300
words and are subject to editing. The Albany Student Press assumes no responsibility for opinions expressed In Its columns or communications, as such expressions do not necessary reflect Its views.
THE CONCERT BAND rehearses for performance. They presented four selections in a varied program, which included
marches as well as excerpts from Moussorgsky's "Picturesat
at Exhibition."
Sharp A r t i c u l a t i o n
Peter Mennln's "Canzona" Is a
work that somewhat belies Its origins. The influence of Schuman,
Hoist, and especially the piquancy
associated with Walton are In evidence, but there Is enough of Mennln to make It exciting. The opening bars were particularly fine.
The concert ended with a rousing performance of Sousa's "El
Capltan" march. All In ail, a superior concert, especially when you
recall that none of the players are
music majors, Mr. Hudson and the
band deserve highest praise.
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
The sixteen elected members of
the University's Provisional Council met for the first time Sunday
night. The first two duties of the
Council, -as specified in the amended
Student Association Constitution,
were to elect a chairman and to appoint an Advisory Board.
Elected to the chairmanship was
Joseph Mahay, a sophomore, whose
powers will be to preside over all
Council meetings, call special meetings, and direct all Council activities.
The S. A. Constitution provides
for an Advisory Board "who shall
advise the Council on governmental
matters. The criterion for appointment to this Advisory Board, consisting of three to six members,
shall be experience In the Government Revision Project.
Appointed to the Advisory Board
were Nancy Baumann, ex-chalrman
of MYSKANIA, Arthur Johnston ,expresldent of Student Association,
and Joanne Soblk, President of the
Association of Women Students.
The Provisional Council has been
The University Concert Band, under the direction of William Hudson,
performed a concert In Page Hall on
Friday that established Its reputation as one of the superior music
making groups In the area.
The enthusiastic reception of the
concert by the small crowd was
clearly the result of careful planning and meticulous rehearsal. In
fact, the saddest aspect of the performance was the fact that so few
people were there to appreciate it.
The band revealed a clarity of
texture but a warmth of tone that
was just right for the literature,
which included works by Moussorgsky, Vaughan Williams, Mennln,
and Sousa.
The first selections were portions of Moussorgsky's "Pictures
at an Exhibition," transcribed for
band by E. Leidzen. On suspects
that the transcription Is taken from
the Ravel Orchestration rather than
from the original piano version because of similarities in the brass
writings in these transcriptions.
Next on the program was the
Vaughan Williams' "Folk Song
Suite."
Although a slighter work, the
band obviously enjoyed doing the
piece. Again the clear articulation and precise intonation was a
joy to hear.
In the first section particularly,
where a fast jig-time tune in the
clarinets Is played over a tune In
the bass, did the band sound e s pecially sharp. Mr. Hudson and the
section obviously worked very hard
on this.
The second section of the suite
Is an Intermezzo, scored for solo
wood winds and small groups of Instruments. Here some of the playing was a little ragged, but this
could very easily be attributed to
"performance j i t t e r s . "
Tuesday. Motch 9. 1965
Uavvy Schwartz, a specialist on
Soviet affairs from the "New York
Times," will speak at Page Hall at
l:2f, p.m. Ills topic will lie "The
New Triangle of World Politics:
Washington-Moscow-Peking." His
speech is sponsored by Forum of
Politics.
Schwartz, who will emphasize
changes in Sino-Soviet relations
since Khrushchev's ouster, has asserted that the current power struggle between Moscow and Pekiugcalls
for an entirely new evaluation of
the Communist threat.
Schwartz, a prominent journalist,
lias been a specialist on Communism
for the "Tillies" since 1951, Besides
his newspaper work, Schwartz has
become well-known through his
many lectures to civic organizations
unci college groups.
Prior to Joining the staff of (lie
" T i m e s , " Schwartz studied nt Coliunlilu University, where ho earned
his 13.A., M.A., unci Ph.D. degrees,
Mentally Retarded will speak. Plans
for visiting the home will tie discussed.
Elect! ons.
11 unltiiiwc/ jrtim fulfil- I i
Lyiine, Joseph Mahay and Bruce
Werner, sophomore class.
Irven Carpenter, Steven Curtl,
lidith Hardy and William Murphy
were named from the Junior Class
and Halpli Ueisler, Frank Crowley,
Gary Luczak ami Llugeno Tobey
from tile senior class.
Five seniors were elected to Hie
Alumni Board: Al Bador, Ralph
noisier, Harry Gardner, Eugene
Toliey and Mary Jano Gusberll who
were elected on the strength of
write-In votes.
After the numiugof Alumni Hoard,
Johnston turned the program over
lu Nancy Hauiuann, chairman »I
MYSKANIA, who conducted the tupping of MYSKANIA (for story, see
page 1, column 1).
WSUA
'Silver Dollar Radio'
6 4 0 on your radio dial
This Friday evening, the International Film Group .will present
"Touch of Evil," a film which is
one of the most effective Mendings
of Orson Welles' flamboyant style
with a suitable story.
Welles works best with plots of
a melodramatic or
otherwise
"black" nature, such as the nightmarish "The Trial." Friday's film
deals with crime and corruption,
and Is set In the depressing atmosphere of a small Mexican town.
Charlton Heston stars as "Mike"
Vargas, with Janet Leigh playing
his wife. These two become involved
with drug'smuggling and Hank Quintan who, played by Welles himself,
is a crooked policeman, an ugly,
decaying mountain of flesh in a corrupt world he created.
The title paraphrases that "one
dram of evil," which Hamlet says
causes the Infection and contamination of the whole, however noble
in other ways it may be.
Suspended Melodrama
Welles has produced a fearful,
suspenseful melodrama, and yet has
also managed to make his own personal comments on society. In fact,
the two elements are really Inseparable, for it is the dazzling craftsmanship and manipulation of effects
which embodies the theme that
Welles wishes to present.
In "The Lady from Shanghai,"
Welles dramatized the corruption
of a lawyer, and in "Touch of Evil"
(made in 1958) he extends that particular world.
"Hank Qulnlan Is the incarnation
of everything I fight against politically and morally," Welles has
said. " 'Touch of Evil1 Is not
critical of plutocracy but of the
state, because the state Is more
powerful than money."
Technically, this Is one of Welles
most advanced films. All the Innovations and experiments of twenty
years work reach a climax in this
picture.
Macabre Photography
The murder of Grandi (Akim Tamiroff) In the hotel room, with the
rapid cutting Intensified by the onand-off blinking of the neon light,
Is a terror triumph.
The macabre scenes at the motel
with the lnsance night watchman;
the sad decadence of the brothel
with its tinkling pianola and Its
dreams of lost youth; Hie final
sequence up and over the huge
construction project; all establish
"Touch of Evil" as a masterpiece,
a Goya-like vision of an infected
universe.
In addition to Heston, Leigh, and
Welles, tile film also features Akim
Tamiroff, Kay Collins, Joseph Calleia ami Dennis Weaver, Willi Marlene Dietrich and Xsu and /.saGabor
as "Guest Stars." The music is by
Henry Mancini. Showings will be in
Draper 34!), at 7:00 and 0:15 p.m.
THE SHADOWS
Three guitars, a drum,
a singer
T e l e p h o n e 274^-72l'
OF MICE AND MEN," John Steinbeck's famous novel, was
made into a movie in 1939. Here Betty Field, as May, speaks
with Burgess Meredith, who plays George Milton. Also featured
in the east are Lon Chaney, Jr., Charles Bickford, and Bob
Steele. This touching film is the story of a simple soul (Chaney)
who is protected by Milton, until he accidently kills May. Dr.
Paul Wheeler of the Sociology Department will speak after the
showing, which is at 7:30 p.m. in Draper 349.
English Evening Production Auditions
Require Performances in Theatre
Auditions for English Evening's
Chamber Theatre production will
be held tomorrow, from 3:30-4:45
p.m. and Thursday from l-3:30p.m.
In Richardson 289. Roles are available for 4-G men and 5-6 women.
Previous acting and/or reading experience is desirable, but not necessary.
Chamber Theatre is a new concept
of staging prose fiction using theatrical devices of the stage while r e taining the narrative element.
The two short stories will be
staged in April as English Evening's
spring program. They are "The
Jilting of Granny Weatherall" by
Katherine Anne Porter and "Two
Blue Birds" by D. H. Lawrence.
They will lie directed by Ross Stephen. Both stories are on reserve
ill!
,A
POINT
SHOES
Quality Shoes
For
Women,
Men, Children
203 Central Ave
and
Stuyvesant Plana
Open Evenings
•
OF THE
LANCE
by Sargent
Shriver
16 pais* of illustrations
At ell bookstores.
Cloth, N.B6. l'spsr, 11.46
In the library In their respective
collections.
_ 3
Devised by Dr. Robert Breen of "S:*
Northwestern University, chamber C~"
theatre Is only 8 years old. It e m j i j ^
ploys a narrator as well as the \
characters, thus keeping the
form •*_-.
le form
and author's purpose intact. English
English
Cy
Evening will be the premier
medium lu Albany
English Evening Committee p r e sents two programs annually, exploring various aspects of literature
and drama, and using various techniques of presentation.
A year ago, for example, the program featured a debate between two
State professors on the writings of
Jean Paul Sartre. Last fall Professor F. J. Hoffman of the University
of California at Riverside lectured
on the works of F. Scott Fitzgerald.
A stirring book
by the Director
of the
Peace Corps
and the War
on Poverty
"This book combine* the
v i s i o n and h a r d h e a d e d ,
practical touch of its author,
one of the ablest new figures
in public life of our .generation. It is a book to give
courage and hope to the
anxious and fearful, and to
confirm the faith of those
who aee what a great future
l i e s before mankind. If
Sargent Shriver's ringing
words could be read by millions - as I hope it will be —
it would advance the cause
of peace and tell Americans
more about their true selves
than any book I have seen
in many a year. It is a distinguished and thoughtful
book by a shining personality."
-
DAVID E. LOHNTHAL
"An extremely valuable raaource and contribution in
the War on Poverty around
the world and In our own
backyard." - P i o r a a i o *
PAnuciA SEXTON, New York
University
(%fap#1fo* N«w York, N.Y. 10016
:
tj.A*..llfot *••<* • • § • • • > • • • • • » • !
Hp4
*&mb •"'
Tussfcy, March », 1W5
AHANY STlHMfNT M M i
Smm
flgf
Matnen Post 4-7 Slate;
Monaco Top Individual
A F r e e Press,.|
A Free
Alba
•HI
T h e State Matmen opened up the
s e a s o n with a home victory over
Brooklyn Poly, 2-115. Newcomer
Dick Saymanskl scored a pin In h i s
first varsity match.
On D e c . 12 the grapplers won
their s e c o n d consecutive match, an
1 8 - 1 4 win o v e r Falrlelgh Dickinson
U n i v e r s i t y . Albany had three pins
In that contest.
T h e matmen then dropped their
next three m a t c h e s , bowing to Montd a l r 2 7 - 3 , Oneonta 1 9 - 1 1 , and
Plattsburgh, 16-13.
The P e d grapplers bounced back
t o s c o r e a 2 0 - 1 0 win over Hobart,
a s State captured s i x of the nine
divisions.
Bent Boston College
On F e b . 6, (State) toppled p o w e r ful Boston College, 2 2 - 8 . In that
match Albany rolled to a 19-0 lead
before BC s c o r e d a point. Monaco
and L e e Comeau s c o r e d pins for
Albany. The Staters won s i x of the
nine weight c l a s s e s .
Oswego State hosted the Ped g r a p p l e r s on Feb. 13, and gave the team
Its worst beating of the year. O s w e g o captured eight of the nine
c l a s s e s and drew In the other, en
route t o a 2 9 - 2 triumph. Only L e e
Comeau s c o r e d for Albany.
The matmen traveled to R.P.I,
on F e b . 24 and dropped a l 5 - 7 c o n t e s t . Monaco w a s the only winner
for State, a s Ron Smith and Howie
M e r r l a m both drew with their o p ponents.
In the last contest of the s e a s o n ,
the grapplers bowed to Brockport,
2 3 - 8 , in an away contest.
•
Albany State frosh cagers
T h e
closed out the season Thursday
night with a l o s s to Albany Junior
Collge, 7 6 - 7 2 , in an away. game.
The previous Tuesday the frosh
w e r e trounced by Williams C o l lege, 99-68.
The P e d s couldn't cope with Wil- THE 1964-65 VARSITY wrestling team: (left to right) D. Rcbelotto, L. Comeau, H. Merriam, R. Smith,
l i a m s ' height a s the winners had D. Szymanski, T. Kosnig, J. Smith, (kneeling) E. Monaco, B. Verrigni.
four s t a r t e r s taller than Albany's
tallest p l a y e r s .
Al-Opponent Team Frosh Bow to Cobleskill
To
End Season at 5 - 4
In Friday's match against Cobleskill College, the
The s c o r e at the half w a s 47-28
A s it d o e s e v e r y year after the
and William's increased i t s lead
by 12 points In the second half. final g a m e , the State basketball team
s e l e c t e d an all-opponent all-Star
In the Albany J r . College contest, t e a m . T h i s year the m e m b e r s of
the frosh were plagued by a weak, the team a r e Harvey P o e , Univerdefense. Mike Daggett tallied 27 s i t y of Buffalo, Steve Halen, Ithaca
points to pace the winners while C o l l e g e , T o m Chapin, Plattsburgh
Gordle Sutherland l e d State with State, Ralph Bucclnl, Southern Con25 points. T i m Jursak had a hot necticut University, Bob Gleason,
night from the floor, hitting on Montclair State, and Rich Kohler,
eight of 10 shots to s c o r e 16 points. Oswego State.
Tom Carey paced State with 17
P o e and Chapin w e r e unanimous
points and w a s followed by Larry s e l e c t i o n s . The c h o i c e s w e r e made
Marcus with 14 and Sutherland with by the p l a y e r s immediately after
13.
the Central Connecticut game from
The freshmen wound up the s e a - a l i s t .of p l a y e r s drawn up by coach
son with a 9-11 mark.
" D o c " Sauers.
ASP
* * * * *
* * * * *
Albany freshman wrestling team was defeated by a
score of 16-13. The match seemed to be an easy State
victory as the team won three of its first four bouts to
take an 11-3 lead. From then on, however, the Staters
were only able to score a tie.
Cobleskill
won
two d e -
decision to a more experienced
0b skl
e
cisions and a forfeit to , n5 'f " *"»««». %™!"* ^
,
, ,
.
,
177—Tim Ambroslno (A) tied Bpb
score loss
a comeback
triumph,
The
gave the_
frosh
grapplers a fine 5-4 r e c ord for the season.
The run-down on the individual
bouts i s a s follows;
123—Bill Clark (A) pinned Rick
Wright (C) In 7:15 of the third
period, after leading the bout 5-0.
1 3 0 - B U l Vroman (C) took 5-1 d e c i s i o n from T o m Guilfoyle (A).
137—George Gavagin (A)out-pointed
Doug Bellinger (C), 6 - 2 , scoring
three points in the final period.
•147—Paul Rosenstein (A) brought
the match s c o r e to 11-3 in a e l o s e
9 - 7 decision over Robert Woodward (C).
157—Don Allen (C) edged Tom Cunningham (A), 3 - 1 , a s Cunningham
fought 10 pounds over h i s normal
w r e s t l i n g weight.
1 6 7 - P e t e Nichols (A) l o s t a 5-0
scaieroin(c)
scoring
allTim
his
points
the3-3,
final
period.
was wrestling with an injured arm.
Unl. Andy Mathias (A) forfeited h i s
bout to Doug Center (C), due to a
sprained ankle.
Here i s a review of the frosh
wrestling s e a s o n :
State 8
Orange County 26
State 18
Falrlelgh Dick. 14
State 26
Rockland C.C. 6
State 17
Montclair 9
State 23
Cortland 9
State 10
Oswego 41
State 13
Union 21
State 19
R . P . L 15
State 13
Cobleskill 16
|
SUA Fencing
|
On Saturday, March 6, the SUA
fencing team held i t s annual intrasquad match, with Robert Tamm
copping first place and Tom Hladik
capturing second.
In one of his rare appearances
near campus, Dr. Evan Collins,
President of State University of
New York at Albany, will p a r t i c i pate in a discussion at the Golden
Eye tonight at 9:15 p.m.
The program will consist of a
panel discussion about the University. The topics will range from
the role of the president and h i s
duties as president to the functioning of the University in loco
parentis (playing the role of the
parent).
Questions of education
policy in the University will a l s o
be considered by the panel.
Other m e m b e r s of the panel a r e
Tim Atwell, M r s . Elizabeth Webre,
Alice Katz, moderator, Guy M c Bride, and Ton! Mestor. The panel
met with President Collins Wednesday and decided on what topics
would be discussed.
After the panel debates the topics
in question, the discussion will open
to the floor and students will be
able to ask any questions that are
relevant to the topic.
now a t
STATE UNIVERSITY BOOKSTORE
Sfc ***
Albany, N.Y.
Final Statistics on Varsity Hoopsters
FM
PCT
FTA
FM
PCT
KB
PTS
199
209
231
61
69
03
52
14
0
4
3
36
372
347
266
130
124
02
31
16
14
8
136
18.G
10.8
12.1
5.9
0.7
3.3
2.8
1.6
1.3
1.3
2.0
11.3
913 1643
70.9
20
Crossett
0'Donovan 22
22
D. Zen
22
B. Zeh
22
Bloom
16
Lange
Mannix
20
20
Eppner
Constantino 14
Hart
11
Perkins
4
Weeks
12
220
274
227
161)
118
54
58
21
14
11
2
100
147
129
101
67
52
20
21
7
7
7
1
60
.669
.470
.445
.341
.440
.370
.360
.333
.500
.427
.500
.660
103
100
98
29
31
26
21
19
5
11
8
26
78
89
64
16
20
12
13
17
4
8
6
16
.758
.890
.607
.553
.645
.463
.020
.890
.800
.723
.750
.615
22
1261
605
,480
476
347
.733
TOTAL
____
FA
BO
NO. 9
The Provisional Council, in its
second official meeting Tuesday
night, appointed. 10 people, the balance of its membership.
As provided In the S. A. Constitution, these appointees were chosen
as representatives of five areas of
university life.
Those appointed to the Provisional
Council from living areas were Ed
Brovarskl, Margery Pasko, and Judy
Riley. From community programming Robert Peterson, Diane Sommerville, and David Schenck were
appointed. Richard Thompson was
designated as the respresentatlve
for academic interests.
As representatives from communications, Ronald Campisi and
Gary Splelmann were appointed. Finally, Eleanor Diener was appointed
as the delegate from religious interests.
In its first meeting Sunday night,
the Provisional Council voted to
overrule
ex-President
Arthur
Johnston's decision to withhold the
results of last week's school elections. At Tuesday's meeting, Election Commissioner Roberta Joslln
explained why the tabulated results
have not been made public.
When it was pointed out to Miss
Joslln that the S. A. Constitution
gives the Council the power "to
provide for the election and tabulation of all Student Association and
class elections," she replied that
she still refused to turn over the
tabulations to the Provisional Council.
It was then moved and passed that
the Council refer this matter to
MYSKANIA.
In other business, Debby Friedman was appointed temporary chairman of finances, to handle the February budget reports and to deal
with any emergency allocations (with
the Council's approval) which might
be requested.
FROSH GRAPPLER Pete Nichols about to roll his opponent
over in his 167 pound match en route to an 8-6 triumph.
G
VOL.LI
Collins-Panel Dialogue
To Deal With Campus
In Ills speecli he will emphasize
the changes that have taken place
In regard to Slno-Soviet relations
s i n c e the d i s m i s s a l of Khrushchev,
The program Is sponsored by F o r um of politics.
Schwartz i s a member of the
PLAYER
12, 1 9 6 5
Council Appoints
10 New Members
Harry
Schwartz, the
'New York T i m e s " specialist on the Communist
Block, will speak today on
"The New Triangle of
World Politics: Washington-Moscow-Peking," in
Page Hall at 1:25 p.m.
ST. PATRICK'S DAY CARDS
MARCH
PEACE CORPS REPRESENTATIVE hands information on ope.ations to an interested student. They w i l l be in front of the bookstore until Tuesday.
Summer Planning Sessions Seek
Student Assistants to Orient Frosh
Applications
Summer
in D r a p e r
of
for
student
Planning Conference
Students
Conference
108.
Dr.
AVE
Harry Schwarti
....To Speak in Page
assistant
are
has
for
the
announced
1965
now b e i n g accepted
Robert B. M o r r i s , Associate
and C o o r d i n a t o r o f
the
Summer
Dean
Planning
that t h e r e a r e o p e n i n g s
for
at l e a s t 8 qualified students.
Under this new program, groups
The
Summer
P l a n n i n g ° ' WO-160 entering freshmen come
,-.
, ,.
to Albany during the summer for
c
C o n f e r e n c e i s t h e p r o g r a m t n r e e d a y s ot t e s U n g _ c o u n s e ] i n g i
w h i c h w a s i n s t i t u t e d l a s t and orientation.
Student a s s i s t a n t s would live with
y e a r to r e p l a c e t h e F r o s h
the freshmen in the residence h a l l s ,
W e e k e n d m e t h o d o f f r e s h - each assistant being responsible for
about 20 freshmen. They would p r o men orientation.
vide Informal counseling, a s well
as leading two formal group d i s •cussions.
Times9 Communist Expert
To Speak on Sino-Soviet
G R E E T O IK ORDEPLP
Draper Hall
135 Western Av*.
Press
ALBANY 3 , N E W YORK
Frosh Hoopsters
Drop 2 Contests
champion grappler Brian
Jones.
POSSIBLE
PARIETALS?
University
The,Albany State varsity wrestling team compiled a
4-7 record this past season in one of the toughest
schedules a State team has ever encountered, The
'team was hurt by lack of depth and experience, as only
three of the top nine wrestlers a r e seniors. The top
wrestler was again Gene Monaco who lost only one
match.
Monaco finished up with
a 1 0 r i slate and an overall record of 31-2, a new
mark for career wins. His _ _,
__,,
f
only loss came in a match
InoBOSOnFltUlle
With O s w e g o w h e r e M o n a c o
was
defeated
by
state
m
" T i m e s " Editorial Board and Is the
Editor of Soviet Affairs. He received
his B.A., M.A. and Ph.D. from C o lumbia University where he was
elected to Phi Beta Kappa.
State Department
Schwartz served the federal government In tlie State Department
Division of Soviet Intelligence of the
Strategic Service (O.S.S.), the f o r e runner of the Central Intelligence
Agency.
Schwartz a l s o was on the War
Production Board and In the D e partment of Agriculture.
He has written six books on Russian history, politics, and economics
with many of them published In foreign languages. Ills book, " l l u s s i a ' s
Soviet Economy," has been the d e finitive work on the subject and was
used for many y e a r s as the standard American University test on
that topic.
He i s an extensive traveler and
has been in the Soviet Union and
Eastern Europe a s well as through
Latin America.
Quoted Many Times
Schwartz has teen quoted many
t i m e s and was once denounced by
the
late Soviet leader, Nlkita
Khrushchev. After the incident b e tween him and Khrushchev In which
he was blasted, Khrushchev made
a, public statement confessing that
lie w a s wrong about him.
Bureaucratic Help
Among the other responsibilities
of the student a s s i s t a n t s a r e to
help with various bureaucratic d e t a i l s , such a s preparing packets,
a s s i s t i n g with registration, and
helping individual students to p r e pare their fall schedules.
A social program will a l s o be
planned for the frosh, In which the
student a s s i s t a n t s will lie involved
to a great d e g r e e . Informal d a n c e s ,
volleyball g a m e s on the quad, and
a bus tour of the New Campus and
the city of Albany marked the p r o grain last year.
Aside from their duties with the
prospective freshmen, the student
a s s i s t a n t s will evaluate various a s p e c t s of the program, as well a s
tabulate the evaluations which the
frosh will provide. The evaluations
last year showed a high degree of
satisfaction with the program, and
proved quite valuable In planning
this s u m m e r ' s activities.
Work Juno Through August
The students s e l e c t e d will lie e x pected to attend a training s e s s i o n
from June 21-20. They will then
work at the conferences from June
27 to August 15. All a s s i s t a n t s r e ceive room and board. In addition,
students working for the first year
will be paid $350 while students In
their second year will receive $400.
• Application should be made a s
soon a s possible to Dr. Itobert B.
Morris in Draper 10B. The letter of
application should include a listing
of university a c t i v i t i e s , community
a c t i v i t i e s , cumulative a v e r a g e s , a
description of the student's e x p e r -
Dr. Robert B. Morris
...Coordinates Conference.
ience in working with groups, and an
explanation of what the student f e e l s
he can contribute to the program.
Two university r e f e r e n c e s must
also be Included. Notification of a p pointment will be made on or about
April 15.
Program Changes
Although final plans have yet to
be formulated, Dr. Morris explained
several changes which will be made
in this year's orientation.
One major feature will be a c o l lection of "original c r e a t i o n s " of
(continued
tu [/age 1)
Tower Burns
Fire swept the eighth story of the
dormitory tower of the second d o r mitory complex on the New Campus
early Thursday morning, The fire
was preceded by explosions which
shook the area. Flames roared out
of control for hours, a s firemen
were unable to reach the source of
the fire. No one was reported hurt.
The entire quadrangle i s unoccupied, and was not scheduled for
completion for another year, The
eighth floor had teen poured on
Wednesday, Butane and kerosene
heaters were being used to keep the
concrete warm as temperatures
w e l U ^ j , ^ , , h e r,.eei,lng p o l n t i T t l e
heaters were blamed for tho e x p l o quickly,
slons
a n d l h B m . e wt,lc|,
through wooden forms and
spi.ead
covers.
The purpose of the discussion I s
to Increase understanding of the
various parts of the University r e garding powers, rights, r e s p o n s i bility and attitudes on the different controversial i s s u e s confronting the University.
The next program of the Golden
Eye will be Friday, April 2. The
program will feature m e m b e r s of
the IFG and p r o f e s s o r s who will
explore censorship of m o v i e s .
The panel will contain three m e m b e r s of the IFG, Paul Jensen, A r thur Loder, Ian Leet and Dave
Hughes, and three faculty m e m b e r s , Mr. Harry Staley, Dr. Robert
Donovan and Dr. Arthur Lennig.
Dr. Lennig i s a professor at Siena
College and founded IFG when he
was a student at State.
University Receives
Grant for Library
Summer Institute
Over $33,700 has been awarded
to Albany State by the United States
Office of Education under provisions
of the National Defense Education
Act. The funds will support a s i x week summer Institute for forty
school librarians currently e m ployed a s directors of l i b r a r i e s , or
preparing to enter such employment.
The institute i s one of three federally supported programs In New
York State and one of twenty-six in
the nation. The other two programs
in the state are at State University
College at Geneseo and at Queens
College.
Six-Week Session
Scheduled to be held at the New
Campus from July 5-August 13, the
institute Is designed to examine
current trends in education such a s
new teaching techniques and patterns
and to a s s e s s the implications for
school librarians and librarians.
During the s e s s i o n opportunity
will be provided for Investigation
of a wide variety of supervision and
administrative problems, to e x a m ine new media and equipment, and
to develop instruct-materials c e n ters.
The first three weeks of the p r o gram call for lecture-demonstration-discussion periods conducted
by a resident staff and a group of
visiting l e c t u r e r s who will relate
their own practical e x p e r i e n c e s .
New Materials Examined
The latter portion of the institute •
will be devoted to examination and
use of new materials a s well a s to
the development and preparation of
original materials suitable for use
in particular regional areas.
Participants are expected to hold
a Bachelor's Degree from an a c credited college or university and
to have engaged in professional study
in library s c i e n c e at the undergraduate and/or graduate l e v e l s , Prefe r e n c e will be given to those applicants who intend to work in or d e velop centers for curriculum and
instructional materials.
Both work and living areas will
be located in one of the dormitory
complexes on the university's new
$80 million campup development.
Grants to be Distributed
Grants will be given to p a r t i c i pants in the library institute; these
grants will provide for tuition and
fees. A stipend of $75 a week per
participant plus $15 for each d e pendent will be paid to participants
for a period of six weeks.
Susan S, Smith, professor of l i brary s c i e n c e at the university, will
be the director of the institute.
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