advertisement
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 1941
PAGE 4
Committees Give
Job-Aid Reports
Dr. Lanford, Former "Rat,"
Continues Chemical Research
It's a half-holiday for some
State Students when the State
College Symphony Orchestra presents a concert of special music
at the Albany Academy Thursday
morning, March 6.
Dr. John M. Sayles, acting president of the college, is thoroughly
in favor of this, as h e feels it will
enhance t h e prestige of S t a t e
College and promote good will.
Bernard Perlman, '42, w h o
wields t h e baton, claims t h a t if
t h e orchestra secures m a n y more
engagements like this it will soon
be self-supporting.
Presentations will be resumed on
Lanford attributes his discoveries in
the stage of Page Hall auditorium
Genial,
friendly,
competent
—
Stniort, Grads Alkcd to Leave
Tuesday night when Advanced Drathese adjectives aptly describe Dr. the field of science to nothing more
matics Class presents Its two initial
Second Semester Schedule*
Oscar E. Lanford, Jr., new head of or less than Lady Luck.
He Is particularly interested in
performances for the second semesthe Chemistry Department at State
A t SEB Office in Milne
Oscar E. Lanford, the third, who is
ter. T h e plays, one a tragedy, the
College.
other a farce, are being produced
Dr. Lanford's soft, southern a c - better known as "Ochie". Other
The student committee investigatby Marie Coarsey and Jane Real,
cent verifies the fact that he spent interests include gardening, riding,
ing "Personal Interviews and A p -his early life south of the Mason- and In taking photographs—espejuniors.
pearances" of job-seekers will pre- Dixon line. He attended the Vir- cially of "Ochie."
Miss Real's play, a translation of
Mrs. Lanford is also a n eminent
sent its report Thursday afternoon ginia Miliary Institute where he
a Hungarian tragedy, will present
several innovations in setting a n d
a t 4:30 P. M, in Room 20. This majored In chemistry and might scientist. She is the daughter of Dr.
lighting. T h e all-male cast includes
meeting will be for the benefit of easily have been a friend of Henry C. Sherman of Columbia UniVincent Miller and George Seifert,
seniors and grads, who are urged to "Brother Rat" or a "Rat" him- versity, probably t h e world's leading
food chemist. Mrs. Lanford a n d Dr.
juniors; Bert Kiley, Robert Loucks,
attend by Miss Irene Semanek, A s - self. As an army man, Lanford Is S h e r m a n have cooperated i n m a n y
Arthur Soderlind, and Jack Vose,
sistant Director of the Student E m - thoroughly in favor of conscription experiments, a n d a r e c o - a u t h o r s of
freshmen.
a t t h e present time for n a t i o n a l
ployment Bureau.
t h e recently published book, " T h e
defense.
T h e cast for Miss Coarsey's farce,
The committee is working under
After g r a d u a t i n g h e was employed Essentials of Nutrition." This book
which will delight all bachelors i n
the co-chairmanship of Miss Ruth in Indianapolis a s a "Shoe Polish" is now being used to supplement t h e
t h e audience, includes R u t h Keeler,
T o m George, a n d H a r r y J o r d a n , j u n Larson and Joseph Schwartz, sen- chemist for two years with t h e text book in Mr. S t u r m ' s course in
Mclllwaine
Judges
Best
Short
Story;
"2 in 1 Shoe Polish Company." L a n - Chemistry of Nutrition. I t Is also
iors.
iors.
Deadline Set (or First of May
ford t h e n enrolled in t h e G r a d u a t e being widely used as a text book
T h e schedule of plays for t h e rest
Mimeograph Report
In
Food
Chemistry
courses.
School of Columbia, where h e h a d
of t h e semester is a s follows: F e b Dr.
Shields
Mclllwaine,
Professor
T h e committee working on t h e obtained a t h r e e - y e a r teaching felDr. Lanford (Oscar) a n d Dr. L a n ruary 25, K a y Wilson a n d J o s e p h i n e
topic "Letters of Application" will lowship. After two years h e was a p - ford (Caroline) m e t a t Columbia of English, h a s a n n o u n c e d t h a t t h e T r u m b u l l ; M a r c h 4, Peter Fulvio
n
h a v e their report mimeographed i n - pointed a n instructor In chemistry, wr re she was assisting h e r father Leah Lovenheim Prize will be a w a r d - a n d F r a n c i s Cassidy; March 11,
in a long series of experiments i n - ed this year to t h e a u t h o r of t h e L a u r e t t a Servatius a n d T h o m a s V a s to a booklet which will be kept a t and t h e n came to Albany.
best short story submitted. T h i s sllllw.
Dr. Lanford's ascension In t h e volvlng vitamins, calcium, a n d r e the S t u d e n t Employment Bureau
prize of $25 for excellence In E n g offices in Milne, where t h e seniors Chemistry D e p a r t m e n t h a s carried lated subjects. Mr. Lanford was lish Composition is offered annually
then
working
towards
t
h
e
comple\
with
it
several
Innovations
a
n
d
m
a
n
y
a n d g r a d s m a y obtain copies.
by Jerome Lovenheim, In memory
improvements. T h e labs have been tion of his M.A. a n d P h . D . degrees.
Set Name Contest Deadline
T h e booklets will enable job-seekof his mother Leah Lovenheim, of
At
t
h
e
present
time
Mrs.
Lanford
renovated, a n d t h e stock rooms r e Amsterdam, N. Y. I n former years
ers to have t h e technical knowledge
juvenated with new cabinets. I n is devoting most of h e r spare time
February 18 h a s been set as t h e
of form a n d content of t h e letters several courses, Lanford, instead of to writing up experiments which she this prize was awarded to t h e a u t h o r deadline for t h e entries in t h e
always a t their disposal. Jack having h i s neophyte chemists write completed in Now York before com- of t h e best essay submitted, a n d last Statesman
mascot n a m e contest,
Gardephe, '41, Is c h a i r m a n of the up their experiments, quizzes t h e m ing to Albany. " T h e only c h a n c e I year was awarded to J o h n A. M u r - Editor B l a n c h e Kirshenblum, '41,
rary,
present
editor
of
t
h
e
STATU
committee.
have now for research Is with
on t h e material studied.
h a s a n n o u n c e d . A prize of $2 is to be
lias
Coi.i.Kon NKWH.
awarded t h e winning contestant.
Dr. L a n f o r d ' s work in c h e m i s t r y "Ochie," she sighed. "I hope we
Students planning to send letters
T h e short stories a r e to be of n o T h e winner of t h e contest will probto schools will be able to find t h e may be regarded as pure research. won't get t h e same results from our
nutritional theories as we did with specific length, b u t they must be ably be given his prize a t t h e F e b names and addresses of principals in He h a s discovered three new comour little spaniel. W e followed our
"Handbook 24." Copies of this hand- pounds of vanadium, which m a y theories faithfully, a n d h e grew | handed in before M a y 1, t h e final ruary 21 assembly. Miss K i r s h e n deadline. Dr. Mclllwaine will a c t a s blum also stated t h a t t h e contribubook may be found in the SEB of- have a potential practical value in I about twice as large a s normal."
sole judge of this contest, a n d all tions for t h e S p r i n g issue of t h e
fices i n Milne, and in the State Col- t h e steel i n d u s t r y . ' Modestly, D r . '
a r e now being received
s
h o r t stories to be entered should be Statesman
lege Library. Students are urged by
submitted to his office, room 36, by t h e Board. T h e deadline for this
Miss Semanek to use these handissue h a s n o t yet been a n n o u n c e d .
News Seeks
Typical
Richardson.
books to check on addresses and
Miss K i r s h e n b l u m added t h a t t h e
Last
year's
essay
contest
w
a
s
spelling.
Stale College Co-ed
Statesman
will accept contributions
judged
by
a
faculty
committee
To Fill Schedule Cards
chosen from t h e English d e p a r t m e n t . from a n y interested students.
The
STATU COU.KOB NKWH
is
Those seniors and grad students
Racial Discrimination in Unions,
who have not already done so are searching for t h e typical S t a t e
ASCAP-BMI Fight Studied
College
Co-ed.
The
search
will
asked to come to the office and fill
DIAL 5 - 1 9 1 3
GEORGE D. JEONEY. PROP.
be carried out through a quesout their schedule cards for the
F o r u m of Politics m e m b e r s this
tionnaire which all women in
second semester. Students are to
week Introduced resolutions calling
the college will be asked to fill
check the hours filled by classes and
for investigations of everything from
out in today's assembly.
Indicate the room number. It Is imlabor union discrimination to c a m I n addition to the foregoing, the
portant that the students indicate NEWS Board at its last meeting
paigns preventing exploitation of
where they may be located when not named the following to the Sophwild birds.
In classes. This Is to enable the B u TRY OUR BUSINESSMAN'S LUNCH
omore Business Staff: Carolyn
In order they were: "Investigation
reau to get in touch with a person
Burrows, Helen Leahy, Beverly
of t h e racial discrimination by labor
any time of the day, including weekPalatsky, M i c h a e l
Pcrretta,
unions In New York S t a t e , with
ends.
Jame Portley, and Bernadette
emphasis on Albany a n d New York
Sullivan.
City." This followed up t h e point
Next week's Issue of t h e STATU
raised a t Monday night's Albany
ALBANY, N. Y.
COLLBOB
NBWH will a p p e a r
on
198-200 CENTRAL AVENUE
Town Meeting broadcast from Page
Thursday morning instead of
Hall, when several Forum members
Friday.
ushered.
"Investigation of the ASCAP-BMI ,
radio controversey."
Egeliton, Students to Discuss
"A proposal supporting t h e drive
America's Role in World
for compulsory automobile Insurance
In New York S t a t e . "
"America's Peace Aims" is the
" T h e possibility of founding a UniProfessor Anton Phelps Stokes of
topic under discussion at tomorYale University will be t h e guest versity of New York."
row's round table debate. This d e "Adoption of t h e Audubon Society
speaker a t t h e 11 A. M. "College
bate, which will consider America's
S u n d a y " service a t S t . Andrew's appeal to prevent commercialization
role In t h e present crisis, is s p o n of bird feathers."
sored by Debate Council, a n d will C h u r c h on Sunday.
T h e above resolutions were intro"College
S
u
n
d
a
y
"
Is
sponsored
by
take place In t h e Lounge of R i c h ll your mid-year
If
miil-ycar examinations at State
Slate indicate that you're
the S t u d e n t Christian Association. duced a t t h e last meeting by Fred
a r d s o n Hall a t 3 P. M.
T h e entire college Is Invited to a t - Ferris, Leo Flax, Shirley Siogel, and
not
for a business
cut
out
to
be
a
teacher,
preparations
lor
The participants in t h e panel will tend.
Carl Morotto, c h a i r m a n of t h e roso-1
Include Mrs. M a r t h a Egleston, In- Robert. Ague a n d Ada Parshall, lutions committee,
I
career may be a wise alternative.
structor In history, Dorothy Peak seniors, will assist In t h e service.
Speaker J a n e t Shafts, '41, s a i d !
and Joseph Schwartz, .seniors, a n d Ushers will be Robert Combs, '44, later t h a t future meetings would be j I ,ct's look at the record : for the month of January, 1
i 941,
941,
Betty c u m m i n g s '42.
c h a i r m a n ; Hubert Moore, Ralph conducted on a different a r r a n g e - 1
there
were
ion
calls
from
I
nun
employers
employers
to
to
the
the
ABC
ABC'
I'.mployI'.mploySupplementing plans for t h e a n - Tlbbetts a n d Henry G o r m a n d , Jun- ment, Resolutions will bo posted on j
ment Department. This
meul
This would mean over 1200 employnual spring trip, varsity debaters in iors; Don Vanas and Bryant Taylor. the Forum bulletin board for consideration by members. Objections may
cooperation with members of t h e sophomores.
ment
opportunities
for
ABC graduates during 1941 . . .
Elizabeth Elson, '41, Alice Packer, then be broached In meeting, b u t no
F o r u m of Politics a r e planning a
when only
onlv about 400 young men and women will be
series of lectures to be given before '42, Mildred Matliee, '43, a n d Lucille a n n o u n c e m e n t of new resolutions can
various club groups In t h e vicinity Grant?,, '44, attired In caps a n d ol discussion,
graduated.
| gowns, will pas;; o u t programs a t the
of Albany.
T h e freshmen debaters will also service.
A shortage ol ol lice employees looms, will a I feet
led seriously
seriously
Following t h e service, there will
conduct a round table discussion,
C. P. LOWRV
the
national
defense
program.
Now
is
the
time
to
prepare
be
a
coffee
hour
in
t
h
e
parish
house
M a r c h 3, a t 3:30 P. M. In the Lounge.
WATCHMAKER
All s t u d e n t s a r e invited to partici- to which all .students in a t t e n d a n c e
for
patriotic,
productive
office
ol
lice
employment.
p a t e . Thi! subject will be announc- are invited.
AND J E W E L E R
T h e .Sunday service Is one of t h e
ed shortly,
New Junior Courses at ABC begin next Monday, Febmost popular features on S. (' A.'s
230 C ENTRAL AVE A L U A N Y , N Y
a n n u a l calendar.
\. The mid-winter opening date for
ruary 1 7, and March '.
Story Replaces Essay
In Lovenheim Contest
Forum Group Begins
Varied Investigations
BOULEVARD CAFETERIA
50c
Debaters to Engage
In Round Table Talk
College Sunday Service
To Introduce Dr. Stokes
Class of '43 Plans Party;
Appoints Tracy Chairman
DINNERS 2BC A N D U P
DELICIOUS SANDWICHES
AND SUNDAES
T h e sophomore class will feature
Us annual class party Friday, February 211, In the Commons of Hawley Hull from (1:30 'till 12 P. M.
Bryant Taylor, president of the
7 3 0 A. M . T O
1 1 : 0 O P. M ,
OPPOSITE THE HIGH SCHOOL
class of '43, announced that Jean
Tracy would be chairman of the
coming event. Don Kllllon's orchestra h a s been engaged, and entertainment Is being planned.
B e c a m e <)f HM fftCt *&•*' sophomore women outnumbered the men
In t h e class two to one, they will
be permitted to bring escorts from
other classes,
Business Seeks
Trained Employees —
Senior Courses is February 24.
EAT AT JOHN'S L U N C H
D I A L II !Jii J U
Telephone $-2
t<)<;
in I on nation, or
orcall
call for
for an
an interview
interview
W.J11
.1! for information,
at the College personnel offices, on Washington Avenue,
just above the State Office Building.
litisintiss needs trained employees.
A L B A N Y BUSINESS COLLEGE
ELSE'S HAIR D R E S S I N G
HAIR STYLIST
UCKNHKD ZOTOS SHOP
BOB
MADISON AVE. ALBANY, N.V,
State College Nefof\
Dramatics Class
Resumes Plays
Perlman'$
Orchestra
To Play at Academy
// School
Education
School of Higher
Higher Business
Business Education
25th
Year
Z-443
ALBANY, NEW YORK, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 1941
CQP» I
V"
^f>
r
VOL. XXV, NO. 16
< i iiMPii Juniors
1
n Tomorrow
Will11Dance
Leading Artist
To Speak Here
Wednesday
Grant W o o d , Painter of Soil,
To Review 'Regional Art'
With SCA As Sponsor
^.J.
W$W$':':~M
1 Wsspfyi^i^M
\f 'i^H
'"t
&•"{*
K ^B
^^Jw* fl
MM
To Kavelin's Cascading Chords
SEB /Announces
57 Placements
Killion to Play
For Tea Dance
In Ingle Room
Grant Wood, America's "Painter
of the Soil", will discuss the subject
"Regional Art" in his illustrated talk
Wednesday evening. Student ChrisAppointment Bureau Averages
tain Association is presenting this
50'f in Filling Vacancies
eminent mid-western artist in Page
Hall at 8:15 P. M.
For Teaching Positions
Dower W i l l Relinquish Sceptre
Mr. Wood is one of the famous
To Prom Queen at Midnight;
Reviewing the notification of varegional artists who has devoted
cancies received at the Student E m '42 W i l l Lunch at Jack's
himself to painting the American
ployment Bureau and t h e positions
scene during the past ten years. A
filled during t h e m o n t h s of October,
One of the most important social
number of his canvasses such as
Grant Wood, o u t s t a n d i n g artist November, December, a n d J a n u a r y ,
events of the year, Junior week-end,
Stone City, and Woman With Plants,
have been prepared on slides which a n d lecturer on regional a r t , whoMiss I r e n e S e m a n e k , Assistant D i will make its premiere tomorrow as
Mr. Wood will exhibit a n d discuss in will speak In Page Hall, Wednesday rector of t h e S t u d e n t E m p l o y m e n t
the Junior Prom unfolds to the mua t 8:15 P. M. under t h e auspices of Bureau a n n o u n c e d t h a t approxihis lecture.
sic of Al Kavelin and his Cascading
mately
o
n
e
person
was
given
a
Job
the S t u d e n t Christian Association.
Chords at the Auranla Club.
G r a n t Wood, born into an Iowa
for every two vacancies for which
Junior Prom, tomorrow night from
Quaker family, was determined to
the Bureau recommended students.
10 P. M. to 2 A. M., will highlight the
become a n artist despite his family's
social season for the class of '42.
This gives t h e Bureau a n average
objections. Consequently, a t eighteen
The climax of the evening will come
of 50%. Since some of t h e applihe enrolled in t h e Minneapolis H a n d cations a r e still being considered by
at the stroke of twelve, when Bea
icraft Guild. During t h e World W a r
the school boards, this ratio may
Dower, last year's Prom Queen,
he was assigned to do camouflage
be even higher.
crowns her successor. Voting for
work.
Prom Queen Tuesday resulted in an
Vacancies were for substitute a s
State, Colgate, St. Rose Squads
Al Kavelin—writer of t h e popular unprecedented tie between two of
Studied In Munich
well as regular positions. These
To Discuss PKD Question
substitute Jobs m a y be for a few tune / Give You My Word, and the candidates. As a result, revotes
For seven years after t h e war, h e
days, or t h e rest of t h e school year. leader of t h e nationally known on all five candidates will be held
spent his s u m m e r s in Paris a n d Italy
As long as t h e former teacher holds 'Cascading Chords" orchestra which today In t h e balcony of t h e Comwhere h e became associated with t h e
"Resolved: T h a t t h e nations of t h e a contract, t h e new teacher Is con- will play at t h e S t a t e College J u n - mons, from 9 A. M. to 4 P. M.
"neo-meditationalists." Asked by t h e
western hemisphere form a p e r m a - sidered a substitute. T h e financial ior Prom tomorrow n i g h t a t t h e To Feature Kavelin
American Legion of Cedar Rapids In
n e n t union for defense," Is t h e of- status varies in different c o m m u n - Auranla Club.
1928 to do a memorial stained glass
Prom will feature t h e music of
window, Mr. Wood went to Munich ficial Pi K a p p a Delta question which ities.
the Kavelin Cascading Chords—one
will be discussed a t t h e g a t h e r i n g of
Altogether t h e bureau answered
of America's favorite dance bands.
S t a t e , Colgate, a n d St. Rose debat'Distinctive! Different! Appealing I"
ers S a t u r d a y afternoon a t 2:30 P. M. 116 calls in t h e four m o n t h s , a n d
Announce Budget Cut
has already placed 57 of t h e recomSuch a r e t h e terms which have been
In t h e Lounge of Richardson Hall.
At its meeting yesterday noon,
mended candidates. Of these 57, 15
used to describe t h e music of Al
T h e panel for this round table d e - were substitute jobs, a n d 3 in otherFinance Board ordered a 12'^'/<
Kavelin. With h i s new band, ho
budget cut.. To meet t h e planned
bate will include two debaters from t h a n - t e a c h l n g fields.
crashed into prominence in a debut
$12,016,60
expenditures,
about
each of the three colleges. After each
at t h e Central P a r k Casino in New
Four of the 116 calls requested per$1,580 must still be collected. I n Bill G r a t t a n and his 15 piece o r - York, a n d was immediately booked
t)f t h e three delegations h a s spoken sons qualified to teach Home Ecasmuch 11s t h e board cannot 1111Tor ten minutes, Paul G r a t t a n , Presi- onomics a n d Industrial Arts, and the chestra 1.re scheduled lu a p . ear t o - for such o u t s t a n d i n g engagements
ticipatc complete collection, it
dent of Debate Council, will lead a Bureau was unable to recommend h'.'ht on the Page Hall sla";e in a as t h e Lexington a n d t h e Waldorfthought II best to notify organizageneral discussion in which t h e anyone for these jobs. This gives the w i n g concert which is being pres- Astoria Hotels.
tions ni this time.
ented under t h e sponsorship of Seraudience may participate.
Bureau t h e record of filling 57 out
T h a t ' s Kavelin t h e conductor—
vice Fraternity. T h e admission price
of
112
Jobs
for
which
it
had
eligible
T h e Freshmen a n d Sophomores
far t h e concert h a s been set at 25 but lie's a composer a s well, T h e
candidates.
where he studied stained glass pros o n g ? / Give You My Word, one of
cents.
are preparing for the traditional
cesses. Upon his return, some one
Individual calls during the four
the smash hits of today, as Hit Parrivalry
debate,
which
will
be
held
G r a t t a n , the leader a n d organizer
claimed t h e window was a n Insult to
months were as follows: October, 17
ade a n d popular polls have proved.
the American flag a n d to American Friday, March 28, In Assembly. E s - calls (2 n o n - t e a c h i n g 1; November, 1(1 of I lie bund, is t h e younger brother Blanket Hid Al $5.50
workmen, because It was made in ther Tein, Betty Barclen, I r a Freed- calls il n o n - t e a c h i n g ) ; December, 2(1 of Paul G r a t t a n , '41, Service F r a T h e r e you are—a distinctive band
G e r m a n y , T h e local Daughters of the jtin 11, a n d Owen Bombard will d e - culls; J a n u a r y , 56 calls i3 n o n - t e a c h - ternity president.
G r u t t a n and his boys have a r - and a smooth time, all for I he price
American Revolution were among bate for t h e Class of '4H. Debating ing 1.
ranged 11 program of 16 selections of $3.00 plus $.30 defense tax, or, if
the objectors. Wood obtained per- for the Freshmen will be Earle
for tonight's presentation. Included you wish, t h e entire Junior Weekm a n e n t revenge by painting Daiiyh- Snow. Miii'jorlc Breunig,
Rhonn
in 1 lie program a r e vocal selections end for the blanket bid of $5.50.
It is nj American
Hernlution.
Assembly
to
Hear
Aronowitz
Ryan, and Bernard Skolsky.
Gaylord, t h e General
by t h e band's two singers, Betty Marjorie
T h e freshmen debaters a r e also
Chairman, wants all juniors to r e Angered lnwans
In recognition of t h e state-wide Brooks a n d Paul Cliristman.
table cliscus- observance of Bill Of Rights Week,
Among I he selections which t h e member t h a t tickets for Prom, T e a
G r a n t Wood painted on -his work planning a round
showing his fine sensitivity to d e - ulso planning 11 round table discus- Hie main feature of t h e S l a t e Col- i)iuid will play a r e t h e following: Dunce, or Luncheon may be pursign. In Munich, he had been fas- sion on the lopie, " T h e Frosh Review lege assembly this morning will con- Miinni/lmr, the group's t h e m e song; chased separately.
For (hose penny-wise
Juniors,
This debate will lake sist of a speech by Samuel Arono- Southern
cinated by t h e detailed characteriza- Rushing."
Fried, new r h y t h m numtion of .simple folk by the early (ice- place March 3, in the Lounge al witss.
ber; t h e evci'-Hppculillg Niijlll unit Junior Tea Dance is on Saturday
man masters, He followed suit. As a 3:30 P. M. Verne Marshall, .Joseph
Aionowitz, a prominent Albany Day; J o e Mcfzger, the build's t r u m - afternoon In t h e Ingle Room of t h e
result hi' painted such works us The Hlgglns, Marian
Sovlk, Bernard lawyer and a former commander of pet player in u .starring part in Hoy Alumni Residence Mall, from 2:30
Uirlhylilei
nf Hi rherl lluurir uml Skol.sk>, and Vera Wlllurc
until 5 P. M. T h e music will be supWill be the Albany post of tile American Meets Horn; the Clean Miller a r - plied by one of Slate's favorite
Ann rii 1111 (inline, u print in harsh,
of Tu.nilii
Junction;
a m o n g tlio.se participating in 11 it- Legion, will speak on " T h e Bill of r a n g e m e n t
realistic lines which was exhibited a t
Rights,"
Prelude in O slimy Minor; a n d SI. bands, Don Killion. J e a n e t t e Ryerthe Chicago Art Institute In 1030.discussion.
son, chairman, h a s announced t h a t
Louis
Hints.
T h e stale of lowu rose In Inclignathe price for Tea Dance Is $1.50 plus
lion claiming t h a t he had slandered
$.15 defense tax.
iiinl ridiculed Its womanhood. DeJack's R e s t a u r a n t will see t h e
spite this protest, t h e public a c .Juniors meeting for t h e traditional
by Muriel Kcovoll
4
claim,', Wood.
Junior luncheon on Saturday at 111
"Should iillld acquaintance be lor-I '.students, she advises t h e members government, and campus leaders a r e noon. T h e price for I lie luncheon Is
(letiei'iil admission is one dollar.
ol
Hie
faculty
at
lids
luxurious
Student tickets may be purchased got a n d never brought to m l n d V i school. I'.'ven Willi Its many advan- al present working on a plan of $.115. Kuihrvn Wilson Is t h e chairAssembly last Friday morning: Why I
government similar to ours. Dean man for tills prelude to Ten Dance.
for fifty cents.
i.sn'i Unit yes! it's Dean Moreland! lages Miss Moreland believes that Moreland also believes Unit t h e
s
i
e
p
h
c
n
s
cannot
compare
with
State.
T h e Dorm la.sl S a t u r d a y : Why isn't
strict social regulations a r e partially
llllll yes! it's Miss Morion! No, "The difference," she explained, "lies responsible lor the general iniinulust weekend was not u lucidly r e - noi In Hie school Itself, bid In the tinil.v of Hie student
Dramatics Class to Stage
body al
union
llolh Miss Moreliuiil a n d attitude of tin' .students, mi', of S t e p h e n s . She stated : "St iidenls of
Two Productions Tuesc lay Miss Morion, on llielr way to t h e Stephens girls a r e married within college
age should be treated as
Deans' Convention in Aliunde City, a lew years alter graduation."
adults. Maturity comes through inTin two onc-ucl plays will be liad a r r a n g e d lo slop lu Albany and
Yel Ml.ss Moreland is thoroughly! dividual responsibility, a n d wide
A congressman a n d a conscientious
prescnh 'd Tuesday evening, Febru- parliikc ol the cup ol "Aiild Lang in favor ol i he progressive system of | latitude, which allows one to develop objector will tackle Hie problem of
S y n c " al Stale College, where I hi') education, Which Is being perfected] ills own judgment. and lo build up u conscription Monday, si P. M., In
11 ry 25. b.\ Advanced 1 Jriuuallcs.
lltld liiilh lieeii :,n active III lac'.illv ill Stephens College S h e feels that code ul sell -discipline. Of coursi Room 2ii, Richardson Hull, in t h e
M iv, Ti iiiubiiir.s presentation, l.s
mid student work
iiiiiciioiial education Is nol only | there must be rules, but they must bi third Albany Town Meeting broad"cull in::
Hum
Macbeth,
T h e , T h e find glimpse Stale students
eusl sponsored by t h e Albany Counpractical, hut also stimulating men liberal MI Hie Individual may grow
cast includes Marilyn (IrolT, II, Mind ol Miss Moreland, was when tally, Nn one. nol even Hie faculty
Slide's second visitor, Mls.s Mary cil of Aduh Education.
George Hcil'crl, 'i:i; Morris Gerber, I limy s a w her stalely, gnieioiut I'lguru knows what may happen nexl, lor if Morion, former social director of t h e William 'I'. Byrne of this city, reJunel
Wood, ami Shirley Helgel, on t h e stage of Page Auditorium, HUP - a policy doesn't work one Week, a Alumni Residence Halls, is now al presentative of t h e 2llth Congressophomores;
liuold
A.sliwurili. | rounded by black-robed Myskania different one Is tried Hie following Iowa S l a t e Teachers College, Her sional district will defend the afItlinnu Hy.iii and A r t h u r Sodcilind, members,
In a lew, simple, wcll- week.
advice to our prospective teachers l.s firmative viewpoint on t h e question,
freshmen.
clio.sen words s h e I old t h e assembly
Although S t e p h e n s is fur In a d - "Go West, young student, go West. "Is conscription of men and r e Tile .second play, a comedy pro- of s t u d e n t s iwho hud even slopped vance of S t a t e In Its system of pro- Approximately QB'/I ol' our g r a d u a t e s sources democratic?"
duced by Miss Wilson, delves Into the r e a d i n g till) NlDWH to lint en) now gressive education, Ml.ss Moreland are placed within a year after g r a d Challenger of conscription a s a n
the realms of psycho-analysis, In happy slie was lo be buck, a n d how believes t h a t S t e p h e n s Is t a r behind uation."
Instrument of democracy will be t h e
she h a d missed all of us.
In
social
liberality,
a
n
d
t
h
a
t
tills
is
" W h e n t h e students come hi a t 11 Rev, John Haul Jones of Union
winch F r a n k Evans, a n d hatircUa
Miss Moreland, our former Dean why the students arc so Immature in
Survulius, Juniors;
I llelly Bar ol Students, Is now Guidance Con- comparison with S t a t e students. o'clock," she sighed, "it usually takes Church, Bay Ridge, Brooklyn. The
mo t h r e e hours to quiet t h e d o r m i den, '43, as members of t h e cast, a r e s u l t a n t a t Stephens College in Mis- Stephens was amassed when told tory Just as many midnight bull Rev. Mr. Jones l.s a leader in metropolitan circles as an opponent of
vitally Interested.
souri. There, instead of advising about State's system of democratic sessions as a t 221 Ontario,"
selective service.
In
Collegiate Debaters
W i l l Convene Here
Grattan Swings
Concert Tonight
State Leads in Social Lihc ralitv—Moreland
Radio Town Meeting
Will Discuss Draft
AGE 2
Remorse, Resolve, Relapse
STATE COLLEGE NEWS JJJ
EiUbliihtd May, 1916
By the Clan of 1918
Vol.
State
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 80, 1941
Conning the Campus
XXV
T h u r s d a y , F e b r u a r y 20. 1SM1
No. 1 i
Member
Distributor
Assoelnted Collegiate P r e s s
Colleyiiue
Digest
'
The unilcriirnilunte n e w s p a p e r of t h e Now Vorfc Srnfo College for Timelier"* published every FrUlny of rIn* college
year by the X K W S Hoard for the S t u d e n t Association.
T e l e p h o n e s : Office, 5-9373; M u r r a y , 2-OSSS; Clark, 4-0373
Entered at second class matter Albany, N. Y.,
pnstnfjicc.
REPNBSENTED PON NATIONAL ADVERTISING BY
National Advertising Service, Inc.
College Publishers Representative
420
MADISON AVE.
CHICAGO
• BOSTON
N E W YORK, N. Y.
• LOI AHOILIS
• SAN FRANCISCO
The News Board
JOHN A. MURRAY
.
BEATRICE A. DOWER
STEPHEN A. KUSAK
RALPH CLARK
.
BETTY PARROTT
JAMES MALONEY
.
WILLIAM DORRANCE
EDWIN HOLSTEIN
HARRY PASSOW
-
.
.
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF
CO-MANAGING EDITOR
CO-MANAGING EDITOR
BUSINESS MANAGER
ADVERTISING MANAGER
SPORTS
ASSOCIATE
ASSOCIATE
ASSOCIATE
EDITOR
EDITOR
EDITOR
EDITOR
J U N I O R SPORTS S T A F F
PHIL KAUFMAN
CARL MAROTTO
VIRGINIA POLHEMUS
J U N I O R B U S I N E S S STAFF
HARRIET DEFOREST
MADELINE GRUNWALD
IRA HIRSH
HUBERT MOORE
ALLEN SIMMONS
Issue Editors
W. RICHARD DORRANCE
E. JOSEPH HOLSTEIN
A. HARRY PASSOW
All communication:! should lie a d d r e s s e d in the editor and
must be s i g n e d . Names will be withheld upon renuost.
The S T A T K COhhElilO N E W S a s s u m e s no responsibility
for opinions expressed in Its columns' or c o m m u n i c a t i o n s ,
as such e x p r e s s i o n s do not uocos'siu'lly rellect Its view.
College Community Chest?
Last Friday morning a collection was taken in
assembly. It was not the first this year. On the
contrary, it came close on the heels of several others.
Various other means were used at State last week
to collect money. March of Dimes boxes were
placed throughout the school. The "Second Floor
of Draper Drive" came and went. A dance was
held Friday afternoon. All this in the name of
charity.
It is easily seen that these causes are worthy ones.
T h a t fact needs no proof. It is also realized by the
discerning observer that the method of collecting
money now used not only contains much unnecessary
duplication of effort, but is also particularly inefficient.
-The CriticThe first plays of the second
semester did not raise the standard
cf the last term. There are many
improvements in the actual stage
production that are worthy of mention.
The set for Miss Real's rather
heavy, morbid drama was an asset
to the building of the mood. For
once the lighting coordinated with
the action. Sound effects gave a
weird, mystic touch to the play. The
clock with its uneven pendulum
played one of the leading roles, and
its acting compared favorably with
that of the other characters.
We feel that top honors should go
to Vince Miller for his negation of
his own personality. This is the
best of Mr. Miller's roles to date.
We believe that a proof of good acting is a complete submersion of an
individual to the requirements of his
role. Mr. Miller is maturing in his
ability. Joe Trumbull should be commended for the fine makeup work
on Mr. Miller.
We wish that Mr. Kiley had studied the manner and actions of a
doctor before attempting an interpretation. His portrayal was too
stagey.
Mr. Soderlind lent a touch of
melodrama near the end of the play.
With more experience, he will become a polished actor.
Mr. Seifert was well cast for the
part of Death's secretary and successor. His was the missed opportunity of stepping up the tempo
enough to keep the play from lagging. His stentorian tone became
pain-ful-ly e-nun-ci-a-to-ry.
Miss Real's direction was excellent, although the final speeches
were definitely oratorical.
Miss Coarsey's offering for the
evening challenges definition. Were
it produced on Campus Day, it
would undoubtedly take first prize.
It offered an excellent opportunity
for State students to play themselves, and met popular approval on
thi., ground. The confirmed bachelor, although subtly humorous in
well-delivered innunendoes, slowed
up what should have been a fastmoving comedy. His sense of pause
was good, but should not have caused him to retard the action.
Miss Keeler's aim may not be so
good, but her indignation proved the
high point in the play. Mr. George
saved his part from no mention in
this column, by his pantomime. The
actors cannot be blamed too much
for the faults of the "play."
We refer our readers to Miss
Hutchins' article on distortion in
art in the second Issue of the Statesman, as an introduction to the noted artist, Grant Wood, who will appear at State next week. It is seldom that we are privileged to see
and hear the artistes celebres. Mr.
Wood has interpreted his native
Iowan countryside in art that is becoming increasingly familiar to the
layman and is d finitely influencing
the modern schuol of American art.
Such an opportunity should not
be missed. These famous people add
as much to our college education as
the courses in the curriculum.
Talking about artistes, did you
know that Al Kavelin is a graduate
of the Royal Verdi Conservatory of
Music in Milan, Italy? Disdaining
a career in the classics, he has become a favorite sweet "swinger."
Betty Baker, a Myskania member of
the class of '39. reports that Kavelin is "good stuff" and produces extremely danceable music.
Explanations Are In Order
-CommunicationsTo the Editor of the STATU COLLKCIK To the Editor of the STATU OoLLBOE
NEWS :
NBWH :
— T h e Commentstttti
Last Monday, the marks for the three upper classes
were released. There is always something strange and
tense about the day when the marks come out, although there is no real reason for any commotion to
be caused. Most students have a very good idea of
what they are going to get. To those people to whom
it really should matter—those students who are flunking a subject, it makes no difference at all, for they
have long since been told of their failure.
We have it, though, every year—a day of intense
excitement, a day marked by pledges running back
and forth between group house and college building
with the mail, a day of excited groups of students,
all asking or answering the query, "What did you
get?", a day of general commotion.
The most intense effect of this day is not an outward one, however. Its greatest impression is made
on the people receiving the marks.
Students
Each and every individual opens his
Anticipate
envelope, takes out the familiar yellow
Grades
cards, and although he knows well
what is on each, looks eagerly at them.
There may be a surprise in one of the grades, but
usually everything is as it has been anticipated.
Unless he is one of that handful of people whose
every grade is an "A," the student is overwhelmed
with a wry sort of remorse and disgust. He looks
at his "C plusses" and thinks sadly of how pathetically little additional work would have been needed
to convert them into "B's"—one less lecture cut,
one special topic done more thoroughly, one more
hour of study on the right subject, one afternoon in the library instead of in the Commons.
Everyone decides that it is so easy to get better
marks, that it takes such a small quantity of additional work that it is foolish not to do it.
Everyone decides something else, too. Almost
everybody in the school decides that next semester is
going to be different. Of course, no
Aim For
one is going to forsake any extraSacrificclcss curricular activities, or miss any social
Improvement life, or not play any bridge games, but
just a little less time wasted will suffice to get better marks. Everyone decides to do just
a little better.
Making the decision is about all that anyone ev3r
does. The next clay, the Commons is just as full as it
ever was; the usual students are in the library; around
the school as much time as ever is being wasted.
It is surprising how soon the disappointment
caused by a set of mediocre marks ran disappear.
It is surprising how little stick-to-itiveness the college
as a whole has.
When grades were issued Monday, it is doubtful if
more than three or four people were satisfied with
the marks that they had received. It
Perseverance is even more doubtful if more than
three or four people are doing anything
Negative
about it now, or will be doing anyQuantity
thing two weeks from now. The amazing lack of perseverance displayed here should be
noticed and should be commented on.
Perhaps we should not be too severe in our
criticism, however, of these people who cannot seem
to get started. Next semester, maybe things will be
different. Perhaps someone will decide that he is
capable of getting better marks, and will really do
something to get them. Perhaps someone will resolve
to study harder, and will really study.
It Is not too likely, but it might happen. Some
day, someone might stick to it. Not this semester,
but maybe the next. Energy might somehow overcome
sloth.
We remain to be convinced.
When Do You Want It?
When the Pedagogue was first put
One week has passed since I proon the Student Association Budget, posed in assembly that business and
the editor had figures to prove that advertising managers of publications
If every one in the Student Associa- and all upperclass treasurers be
tion bought the Pedagogue, it could commerce majors. This has been my
be had at one dollar less. The usual first chance to explain publicly and
price was between $3.00 and $4.00
per copy. The motion was intended calmly the .surrounding circumto obtain the book for the Student stances Let me say at the outset
Association at $2.50 per copy. How that the "Hirsh resolution" was
ever, the motion was misread and not intended to be a resolution at
students believed that for an addl- all « m e r e ' y a n l d e a l o r discussion and
tlonal dollar in student tax, each amendment. As an idea I broachwould receive a Pedagogue, The mo- ed it to some students. I wondered
tion was passed in that form.
what their opinion on it would be.
A single copy of the Pedagogue That is where I made my mistake.
costs between $3.00 and $3.50 to pro- They considered, weighed and finduce. Each year, the Pedagogue ally badgered me into proposing it
budget estimate's Include approxi- as u resolution before the student
mately $1500 from organizations in body.
the school, and between $1100 and
This was not a finished idea, I
$1000 from the student tax. Adver- must confess. Business affairs of
tising brings it up to nearly $3000. the school organizations have been
b'or the past four yours, the Peda running along smoothly in general.
gogue has cost $3300 In order to , B u t
m U s t admit steady stilishickeep up the same quality book which J U o l l l a b o u m | t u p f t l ] I U U T U U m ( J
was put oul for these past four Progress cannot be static. This pro.
years, ll is necessary that at least posal simply struck mo as a possible
$3300 Income can be assured.
means for oiling the works of our
The, lO'lO Pedagogue .started out financial machinery.
with a surplus from 1930 of $139. At
According to the reception of the
the same time, a contract with the
photographer netted $215. This year, suggestion In assembly, it might
the photographer will pay only $125 seem as if it were doomed to certo tho Pedagogue bocauso last year's tain detent. On the contrary, I wel
,a
coined
t j
sales were greatly over estimated.
, " " ' , tho
, , move
, to,•'postpone
' ' u u o udiscus""8"
Today's experiment is tin experiment in the date
of publication. Tomorrow morning, upon entering
the auditorium of Page Hall for the weekly Friday
forenoon get-together, State students will be handed
still another questionnaire this time to determine
whether this experiment shall become a permanent
feature. The questionnaire will give student readers
an opportunity to show their preference as to which
day of the week the State College NKWS shall be
issued.
Today's experiment has convinced the staff that
the Thursday date is preferable from the point of
view of more adequate news coverage. In addition,
the earlier edition offers more advance notice of
the highlights of the weekend social affairs. However, the choice of the student body as indicated by
the tabulation of the questionnaires, will determine
the final decision.
_
.
. .
. . .
l l H ' P M before
in n i l ' the
i n student
,: I I I I ' l l
l\/»rlw
nnrl
body and
Pedagogue
a .budget
reduction
of.. I lplaced
$229. Furthermore, several organiza- In perhaps more memorable a fashtions discontinued their pages in the ion than if I had produced it in an
Pedagogue this year, or out tho orderly manner, accordlng-to-Robamount of the space which they had erts fashion. Let it rest in the minds
of our students' government. I am
formerly contracted for.
These above are tho reasons why, simply trying to increase efficiency,
after figuring the approximate cost not revolutionize the student govof your book and our income avail- ernmental system.
Since tho public announcement of
able to clato, tho Pedagogue board
decided it was necessary to ask an the proposal, I have been constantly
additional $.50 contribution from challenged for the reasons behind It.
each member of the Student Asso- If by "reasons" you hope to uncover
some dastardly machinations, some ei-i I,uiivar,
ciation receiving a Pedagogue,
Stephen H u l l ,
Tho Pedagogue also wishes to an- scandal of embezzlement whose
I'iilltor-iii-Olilor
nounce that every one who has not secret shall forever be mine, I must
BQ01AL C A I , I : M > , V K
yet paid their student tax in full Invite you to disillusionment. There
Ifob, 81—Debute: Stuto, Colshould do so by the first of March. is nothing behind the pseudo-reso- gate,
mill St. Hose, £,0Hugo,
The number of books which will be Itton but the desire of a school citi- 3:81) I'. M.
needed will be ordered at that time. zen to take an active part In his 1'Vb. 81—•Hunlfutuu.ili Htttlu
Stephen Bull, government.
vs.
HI. Michaels, Pitgu
Editor-in-Chief.
Ira J. Hirsh,
Hull (lyin, 8 1>. M.
It would seem that the time has come for State to
organize a college "Community Chest." It has
become desirable to substitute for these varied and
repeated collections throughout the year one concerted, intensive campaign to collect money to
establish a Charity Fund from which donations can
be made to organizations outside the school as their
need is brought to our attention.
The benefits of such a system are obvious. A
greater sum of money can be collected by one intensive drive early in October than by a large number of small campaigns throughout the year. Students will not be annoyed all year by repeated
requests to contribute to one thing or another.
Duplication of effort will be eliminated. Most important, students, since they will be appealed to
only once instead of meeting constant requests for
aid, will contribute more.
The Community Chest idea has proven itself
successful throughout the nation.
Is there any
reason why it cannot work at State?
Tlmt immediately gives the .94; ,sion Indofinltoly. Here was my idea
ews
LEFT
11*11 be a lucky fellow who receives a
call from this cute number MARION DUFFY
searches for the phone number of hear* throb
No I 'Snuff said' Marlon Is usually on the
receiving end of the line Duff hails from Troy
and State hails Duff A commerce major she
has commuted her way through two and a
half vears of State life For the benefit of the
male clement, Duffv may be found in Ml the
Publications Office 12) the Commons, or '3)
the Trnv bus P S She foes to classes, too
:
w
ROTOGRAVURE
SUPPLEMENT
FEBRUARY M. IMI
••
WmMsMsk
'••'..
-mm0j^y
1
I!
[REGAL ALL " the five popular and comely!
Icandidates for Junior Prom Queen support thel
[hallowed banner of the Class of 1942. Below,1
[reading from left to right
Marion Duffy 1
| Marjorle Gaylord June Haushalter
Kayl
| Peterson and Mildred Swain Tomorrow night!
|one of these State beauties will be crownedl
I Junior Prom Queen by last year's Queen!
[Beatrice Dower '41 The coronation ceremony!
lal the Aurania Club will climax the first and!
Iblggest event of Junior Weekend. Junior Prom.l
The music al the dance will be furnished by|
Al Kavelin. author of the popular tune. "1
Give Vou My Word" and originator of the
distinctive "Cascading Chords" style of dance
music
' -it
NO EXCUSES for not
liking this pretty State
miss. K A T H E R I N E
PETERSON corresponds
With the Dean v| a that
; little box in the hall In
Draper Pete a southern
tier belle from Flushing
L I., has won the hearts
of her fellow students
I with her flashing smile
and vivacious manner,
plus another merit. Kay
has been active in sports
and in the social life of
Alumni Residence Hall
No I Her artistic talent
has p r o d u c e d many
p o s t e r s which have
graced the halls of State
and have enticed many
Juniors Into paying their
class dues.
The W e e k l y Bulletin
BTI'HKNT IIMI'I.OYMIONT
HllItlCAl)
All seniors and grntl s , u "
deiilH arc i'i>(|nested in ho
In
Itooin
'Jim T h u r s d a y
1, l''ol)riini\y '.'7 hy Miss
Irene
Soma nek,
Assistant
I'll lor 11I' llin Student IO111pluyilletil llllt'cnu. A 0,1108llounilll'o mi the "ICtlilcH of
•lull H u n t i n g " Is In lie rilled nut, All iil'c In be tliei'e,
or come Inter to the HI01I
(il'flcos III Milne.
I It I)N( II ( I t It
Til ore will lie 11 llioullug of
the li'rcneli ('lull T h u r s d a y
evening, Kelininry '.'7 lit
7:15 l». M. In I lie l.iuiiigu.
CIIII-I'IH'C Olson, Tecs.
1'ICDAOOQUl!
The following people liuve
lieen elected to the Sophomore Bluffs' of the Pedagogue:
Phutugruphy :
It o l> o r t
l.eiinni'd, Carolyn l l u r r o w s ,
.lean Tracy.
Business - AdvortlslliBt
Marlon Adams, Slilrloy Utter, H o w a r d Lynch, Helen
(liulllii, Waller (Jrssywaois,
l.lloritry: May Whiting,
F r a n c e s Bourgeois, Kylvla
Tefl't, Kleanor Miipes, Hob-
fell. -'I
I'll ll In
t'eli J'J
Jlllllal' IT
Chili,
I',
All
M
J 1111 ]i,i' f.iiiielienn :u
.lack's
>
III
Hi'Hlaui'aut,
l-
ii.
fell. L"J J u n i o r Tea Dunce,
loicle It
Al
I lies]
douce Hull. 'j;:iti p. ,M.
t'eli. '."J Hiiskelluill: Still.'
I'Tusli vs. I'nlnii College
I'Tusli,
HI
Schenectady,
"7 :::<> I', M.
Feb. j:i Kitppu Heln Ten
for
IIouiii'iti'.v iinunln'1's,
House, •> I'. M,
I'Vli. 211 Aldl'lil Open House
In h o n o r of its leroshiniiii
pledges, House, ,H:,'lu I'. M
full.
-I Albany
Town
nicotine;, lloum 'JO ttl< Ii
u n i s o n , S ;;i(l I', M., ailinls
mjSStlifHISil:f:'
•
<( K|pf|
m
ill
If |P
1
t;
O'
.
• • • •
;
•
jpMM^toJ$
L.IJ
'
J
?'i*''
1
"'
' • " . • • • '
^fcfcflW
KIOII L'5C.
t'eh. 25 Koiuin of Politics
m o o t i n g ; itooin L'Otl, il:!lll
I'. M.
I'Vli, B(i Advanced Druiiiiitics I ' l a y : 1'nge Hall Aud i t o r i u m , H::i(l I'. M
fell. 811 Student (Ull'lNlllP..
Association
p r u s o ll t H
lli'iiiil Wood, I'ugu Hall
•m
Auditorium H;lfi I'. M.
I'Vli.
t>7 —Nuwiuun
Club
mooting,
Newman
hall,
7:110 I'. M.
fell, U7 Krciieh ('lull moot l u g : l.ouiigo, 7 15 1'. M
March I Itaslu'llitill: Statu
I'Tosh vs. Slunii li'rosh,
Wm. K. Hiiekett ,lr. H i g h
School, 7 v. M.
March \—Basketball
| Slate
Varsity vs. Sleiiu, Win. S.
Hnekell J r . , High School
8:30 v. M,
Photoi by Bull
•fMupmna
LEFT
- No need for •
"fountain of youth here."
M I L D R E D SWAIN refreshes herself at a fountain
in Draper. This Saranac
songstress hits just cause to
pause In her activities al
State. As president of Newman Hall and a member of
R e s i d e n c e Council, she
helps to enforce the curfew
laws for State women. Tall
a n d sophisticated, M i s s
Swain has brightened student assemblies with her
presence on the balcony
as class marshal. She
comes to us with royal
experience haying
served last year as
ABOVE - • Typical s t u d e n t
an attendant at
Interest Is shown by JUNE HAUfhe court of
KJlALTKR as she surveys the main
Queen Jane I.
bulletin board across front tbe Registrar's office In Draper Hall for official notices of Prom. Slim and athletic, Gtusie, M
she Is known to State, may often be found in tbe gym of Pago
Hall, engaged In one of her many favorite sports. When she la
not busy on the athletic front, she records and transerfbsa U M
varied activities of the Junior class In bar official capacity aa
secretary of tbe class of 1M2. State has borrowed I M M ftWB
Hamburg, N. V. Hamburg'* b** *or nlno menlb'i hi State's gab*
SAFE N O W IN THE JUNIOR CLASS
Sayles States
College to Aid
Those in Draft
Queries of Students Answered
A t Meeting of State Men
By Hale, Bulger, Semanek
-£*.
9$SS|§
SI ATE COLLEGE NEWS, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY SO, 1941
PAGE I
Leary First Senior
To Secure Position
Congratulations to Helen Leary
—the first member of the Class
of 1941 to obtain a teaching position ! Late last week, Irene Semanek, Assistant Director of the
Student Employment Bureau, announced that Miss Leary had been
awarded a contract to teach
English and
...
do library
work in the
M i 11 b r o o k
High School
near Poughkeepsie.
"W h e n I
was first told
about it, I
was surprise d . I s t i 11
haven't gotten
over it," Miss
Leary remarked, adding, "I haven't any idea why I was picked for
the position. They certainly didn't
look at my marks."
Miss Leary was given her contract after an interview in Albany
with the principal of the Millbrook High School.
Good luck, Helen!
Urging draftees to keep In touch
with the college, and declaring that
State would look out for their
best interests while away, John M.
Sayles, acting president of the college, spoke Friday at a meeting in
Room 20 of all students eligible for
the draft. Approximately seventy
men attended.
The benefits and requirements of
Flying Cadet training were outlined
by Dr. Clarence P. Hale, Professor of
Physics, who stated that the Physics department would cooperate in
every possible way to help students
meet the requirements, giving evening classes if necessary.
SEB To Ignore Draft
Paul G. Bulger, Director of the
Student Employment Bureau, stated
that
selective service
numbers
would be ignored and all eligibles
Who were not definitely drafted
would be recommended by the
bureau.
When questioned as to the advisibility of enlisting while still an undergraduate to complete the year of
service, Dr. Sayles expressed doubt. Fifteen pet cent <A the freshman
due to the fact that one now enlists (class. '.'/} in all. tamed places for
for the "duration of the emergency."1: themselves on the first freshman
and not merely a year. He went on mid-year Dean's list, Milton G.
to say that the drafted men would be |! Nelson, Dean of Students, announin the front line for jobs, Civil Ser-.I ecd today.
vice ratings, and general prestige.
"The class of '43, moreover, placed
The meeting disclosed the fact I only 21 students on the honor list
that any Juniors drafted during 1 last year, while its probationers were
their senior year would return under more than this year's. A third of the
the sway of the live year plan, and i group holds Stale scholarships. Sevwould have to finish two years of eral ol the honor students have, in
training before becoming eligible for I addition, lour or live A's."
jobs.
Dr. Nelson followed the statistics
In reply to a query concerning the Willi praise lor the faculty advisory
drafting of contract holders, Dr. system. Adopted with the class of
Sayles presumed that the holder '43, the system has worked more
would be given a leave of absence, smoothly in succeeding months.
and his job held for him. Five of the "Frosh," he claimed, "have come to
faculty are eligible for the draft, and treat their advisors with increasing
Sayles asserted that their jobs would frankness and subsequent success. It
be held for them in case they were would be interesting to consider the
latio of honor and flunking students
called.
to respective advisers."
Training Year's Intermission
"II is safe to say that this class is
Bulger explained further that the
well-adjusted to college
Student Employment Bureau would particularly
1
defer recommendation of draftees life . Consider that the two highest
officers are on the list, that
for the year they were in training. class
the
freshmen
are active in
but would recommend the men for other fields, andnamed
it must be admitted
jobs open after the training period they have a higher proportion of
was over. It will merely be a year's honors than we have seen in many
intermission.
a season.'"
Bulger added thai students hired
The freshmen list is the only one
to fill draft vacancies will have the
benefit of one year's experience and to be issued at mid-year.
The list of Freshmen honor stuwill be recommended by the bureau
as experienced teachers when they dents follows:
Edith T. Aney, Virginia C. Armare released from their substitute
positions by the return of the original brust, Edythe M. Baker, Paul Barselou, Edith F. Beard, Herman F.
contract holders.
Uhunel, Gertrude M. J. Bove, Adelia
Captain Lane, connected with the A. Bucei, Patricia Carroll, June
U. H. Ail' Force, was scheduled to ("lark. Gilbert Corbin, Madora E.
explain the requirements for admis- i .ailev, Josephine DeCoslatiiSO, Richsion to the Flying Cadets Corps, but ard W Dells, Dorothy G. Demarest,
was unable to be present. Dr. Hale llcli ii Ciovernski, Marion Harding,
spoke for him.
Kih'i Hclterline, Theodora M. Jay,
(i, Bertram Kiley, Patricia Latimer,
Adele Lewis, Doris M. Lichtwarf,
Newman Club Will See Evelyn M. McCSowan, Vivian Marion,
Ii. Murray, Beverly Preston,
Movies at Next Meeting William
Alice Sanded, Jealietle Shay, Earle
K. snow. Alan stone, Margaret Taub,
Three religious movies will be pre- Angela Wierzbowski, Nancy Wilcox,
sented to the Newmanltes b\ the Mareia Wilkinson, Harry S. Wurtz.
Reverend Brother Florinsus Fen/,1 and Mary K.. McKay.
at their bi-montliiy meeting at Newman Hall, According to President
Frederick Ferris, 42, the meeting
will begin at 7::i() I1. M. on Thursday, February 21 with benediction
administered by Father William Ctthill, chaplain.
The main feature will be "Life in
a Benedictine Monastery" which
was filmed in a French monastery.
37 Frosh Receive
Mid -year Honors
Attention Men—Typical State Co-ed Proves Existent;
She Prefers Individualism, Dating, Early Marriage
by Virginia Polhemus
Gather around, fellows, and read
"bout what State considers its typical co-ed is like and what she likes.
In the first place, only 128 of the
fairer sex admitted they were a
typical State College girl, but 155
of them emphatically denied the
description. Her existence was even
doubted by many of the girls answering the questionnaire in assembly. As one girl stated it, "What
is one?" We'll leave it to you to decide whether or not the typical State
College co-ed exists.
According to statistics (for which
we gratefully acknowledge our indebtedness to Messrs. Bob Patton
and Will Weyant), the typical State
College co-ed stands 5'4'/j", tips the
scales at 124 lbs, and wears size 14
clothes. Her medium coloring is set
off by deep brown eyes and brown
curly locks. Sounds quite alright,
don't you think?
With all this talk going around
about being individualistic, we wondered about invidualism at State. It
seems that 155 of the femmes would
prefer to be included in this category
while 113 of them wouldn't. A happy medium is sought by 35 of our
colleagues.
One girl declared that she did
want to be distinctive, that Is, "at
least enough to be interesting!" An- for her wardrobe because, as she
other said, "I think State College •stated it, "My father pays my bills
girls are quite individualistic." Lack and informs me about their excesof money prohibits one lassy from siveness." Quite an ideal state.
showing her individalism. Too bad I
Just what does the typical co-ed Now that we have the typical
do when she is not concentrating on State co-ed, what is her goal in her
teaching (which quite a few denied, chosen profession? An amazing peranyway)? In the sports line, despite son stated, "Sapienta non sua sed
the cold wintry winds outside, swim- causa locendl." For those who don't
ming was far ahead in the favor of know—that is the State College
the co-eds. Another summer sport, motto. More power to her! As was
tennis, sought recognition. Skating to be expected, numerous co-eds
— either roller or ice—also occupies openly declared "A Man!" One even
their time. It might be advantag- said, "Not Ma, but Mrs."
eous if it could be ascertained who
Undoubtedly, early marriage is
the two young ladies are who prefer
dating as their favorite occupation foremost among the intentions of
and the third one who frankly de- State femmes, as many of the coclared necking was her first choice. eds agreed with the sentiment of
one—"A good job for a couple of
Opinions about the newest style years; then—praise the Lord—martrends on our campus were obviously riage!"
influenced by the recent Hell Week
There she is—what do you think,
initiations, causing votes to be cast fellows?
for such things as pigtails, striped
shirts, boxing gloves and onion
necklaces. Heaven forbid a wideOTTO R. MENDE
spread adoption of the latter! In a
more serious vein, the newest trends
advocated were boots, knee socks,
"The College Jeweler"
p-j tops for blouses, suspenders,
earrings, Jerkins, Dickies and junk
Albany, N. T.
jewelry. One young sheltered soul 103 Central Ave.
could not reveal the prices she paid
BE SUM —BE SMOOTH
/k-fit
GIRDLES
from our new
YOUNG CONTOUR SHOP
MAIN FLOOR
*A new shop on the main door for our Junior Miss! It is
just brimming over with supple "two-way stretches" for
the Junior figure . . . Flexible "scanty-pants" girdles
that sculpture you into the figure you've been admiring in
your favorite fashion magazine.
. . . Soft molding girdles that give you that lithe, slimwaisted look you'll love under your skirts, sweaters and
dressy frocks.
your figure
with Per-Fit.
JOHN G. MYERS CO.
Home Made lee. Cream
ami Lunches
Photo* by Buli
*2
*1.39
Plan to come and perfect
•
WITH A SATISFIED EXPRESSION on his face .Larly
evidenced. Robert Meek, who Is everything but what hU
name sujieiits when It comes to collecting dues, write* a
receipt for the claw assessment of Elizabeth Simmon*. Bob
ha* a Job on his hand* for It it only by conitant effort and
MicceiMful collection of dues that such claw affairs as Junior
Weekend are made possible. Still not weary after three
years of handling the finances of the class of '42, Bob always
has a ready smile for lax-payers, tardy and otherwise.
,g
with
*1
MADISON
SWEET SHOP
I
39-41 N. Pearl St.
ALBANY
7K5 Madison Avenue
Phone 5-1401
3 Doors from Quail Street
2-9733
Wo Deliver
\
»«<RsBisS»aiBtas
MMteSKMBl
.. I
art,
ffl
LltJKAKY
-
STATE COLLEGE FOR TEACHERS
ALBANY. N Y
fTATE COLLEGE NEWS, THURSDAY FEBRUARY SO, 1941
PAGE 4
Maloney's
Baloney
Keep Your Shirt On!
Statesmen Face
St. Michael s In
Page Tomorrow
Z-443
In anti-climactic fashion, interferences, etc., etc., caused the "official" termination of men's intramural basketball this past week with
only the first round concluded, consequently, for the second year in a
row, College House whitewashed its
opponents to earn another inscription on the court trophy.
However, activity is by no means
over. Games are scheduled for all
clubs next week and three teams
will be fighting tooth and nail to
Purple and Gold Cagert Drop
Second Tilt to Plattsburg;
State's Defense Weak
The initials are different but the
delicatessen is the same. This week
State College's varsity cagers will
the Juniors hack the Baloney into trot out on the Page Hall surface tothree slices.
night a t 7:30 to meet a high-scoring
The legal proprietor of this col- St. Michael's College Ave from Winumn made reference last week to the ooskl Park, Vermont.
probable "collective" appearance of
Siena's quintet after the St. An- Coach Philip Ryan's Vermonter's
Final Standings
selm debacle. After said team Jour- have had an up and down season,
W o n IJOHC
having
beaten
Norwich
and
losing
to
neyed to the western hinterlands
Collcite I I O I I H O
H
O
last week, we strongly suspect that New Hampshire. Last week they
OriMln
II
2
K»K
5
3
the Loudonville team not only has took a 46-36 game from Middlebury
put the spectrum to shame, but is and were nosed out by Brooklyn
Potter Club
» »
probably frothing at the mouth. Can- Polytechnic Institute, 51-47.
(I'hoto by Kotler)
MAB
ft
3
Kiipini
llcla
4
4
Isius and St. Bonaventure only got 64 State fans came from Page last
JIM M A L O N E Y , Sports Editor, is caught taking Jim Chapell- KiimbhTN
2
0
and 60 points respectively against Friday with faces longer than old
H1;H
1 7
our neighbors, which coupled with Rip Winkle's beard; the reason being alias "Campbell"- for his shirt as a result of a recent bet on the outcome
Oopliern
0 8
the 43 points Brooklyn Poly made in
of the basketball game with Plattsburg Normal College.
its surprising win last Saturday adds the expected loss of another congain a spot in the State-Unionup to exactly 240 markers. What test to Plattsburg Normal College,
RPI intramural series. The teams
seems to be the trouble with "Al- 46-36.
battling for that place are KDR,
Club Seeks New Head
bany's contribution to big-time basThe Cardinals, led by top-scoring
Potter Club, and BAR.
ketball?" We know they weren't Ed Beyerle and De Laire, effectively
The aforementioned unusual sitFran Riani, who unfortunately
playing bums but after the recent broke through State's weak defense
broke her leg while skiing, is expect- uation was precipitated in the last
"conscription" which shoved Crum- to outscore them easily. Beyerle
ed to return soon. Craft Club, which game of the second round last
mey, Rehfuss et al, sans Tucker to gathered twelve points out of the
was formerly under her direction is Thursday when Kappa Beta startled
the sidelines, one—but not us—would fray for Plattsburg; and Ellerin
seeking a new head and will resume a "handful" of spectators by ekingr
have thought that the boys were on swished in five double-deckers and
its Tuesday evening meetings at out a one-point last minute win
Frosh Yellow Devils Seeking
their way to the "Writers Invitation." four complimentary throws to lead
over Potter.
Fer.imore Cooper House.
Season's First W i n After
Maybe the "class" of the Capital Dis- State with fourteen. The Statesmen
trict doesn't go to Siena or maybe were never closer than four points to
Seventh Straight Loss
the class of said district ain't, or
G E O R G E D. JEONEY, P R O P .
DIAL 5-1913
the
high-flying
Cardinals.
At
half
maybe something else. Well, Mr.
The luckless frosh Yellow Devils
Bunoski's team may be refuting my time the Normals had the advantage will be out for blood when they meet
words right now,—not today—against 14-23. At one time in the third up with the Union College Frosh on
an oft-beaten U. of Mexico club, but quarter they led by sixteen points. the latter's ccurt Saturday night
the score better be high.
Expressing an unconquerable will at 7:30.
to defeat the team whose members
The last defeat was witnessed on
P. K.
We wonder how many sports fans "receive a diploma," the invaders the Page Hall boards last Friday
TRY OUR BUSINESSMAN'S LUNCH
realize that it was exactly 50 years swept across the floor with whirl- night at the hands of Albany Busiago that Dr. Naismith hung up his wind swiftness to catch the home ness College with the chalk-up
historic peach baskets which were team completely unawares. Frank reading 27-25.
Nappi of Albany Business docked
the forerunner of today's modern Hansen scored State's lone field
five fielders to carry off the scoring
basket in the first quarter.
game of basketball.
It was not until the last quarter honors with ten points. Combs hit
At the beginning, the players had
ALBANY, N. Y.
193-200 CENTRAL AVENUE
the cords for 12 points to lead for the
the entire floor on which to roam or that the local boys began to show losers. Forrest and Evans were also
rest . . . it was decided that there any fight, but then it was too late. outstanding in this game, netting
was too much resting and not enough The Cardinals now began to employ counters at crucial moments.
roaming . . . particularly after a a different set of tactics. Neat setThe Washington Avenue boys
couple of Illinois high schools played ups and ceiling-high throws began sifted through to score repeatedly
to
find
their
mark.
The
visitors
then
a 1 to 0 game . , . and a Big Ten
and carried the lead at the half
conference game was won by Wis- coasted to the victory.
21-14. The second phase was an
consin by a score of approximately
entirely different story. The Yellow
12-9 . . . There is also a game on the
Devils had tightened their defense
Long Lasting Lounge
Pacific Coast where the players on
and the visitors were only able to
one side held the ball for 15 minutes
Laziness
Culminates
score one fielder until the last 44
while their opponents read newsseconds of play.
papers and the crowd jeered!
With the score at 25-23 in State's
Girls,
attention!
Don't
forget!
A feud once raged between Doc There's American folk-dancing— favor, the '44ers tried to score but lost
Meanwell of Wisconsin and Ward square dancing to you—in the the ball in a floor scramble. ABC
Lambert of Purdue . . . each col- Lounge on Wednesdays at 3:30 came down the court with the ball
lected royalties on a certain type of
M. Ginny Lay, who has studied and Bailey pocketed a set shot lo
ball and there was always a squabble P.
this
art with great tie the count at 25-all. Once more
as to which was to be used when relish homespun
(or something) promises the Businessmen broke through with
they met . . . Once before a game that you
will like it. But you Nappi peddling Ihe pill In a neat layMeanwell wired Lambert: "What
up shot, and the game ended before
know this, if you have
kind of a ball are we going to use already
further action.
tried it before.
Friday night?"
So take your partners, and come
The answer came back:
out now, folks, for the season is
DIAL 6 - 9 0 3 8
"A nice, big round one!"
short, and we want to get our
"sets" in full swing!
C. M.
Else's Hair Dressing
WAA seems to have run Into many
snags which have hindered the proHAIR S T Y L I S T
gress of midwinter season. First in
Page Gym Open For Women
LICENSED Z O T O S SHOP
the snarl stands the conflict between
8 0 5 MADISON AVE. ALBANY. N Y .
State and Milne over the use of the
An announcement has been made
Page gym. Milne has scheduled by WAA that Pag(; Hall gym will be
basketball for 3:30; therefore the open for those girls who wish to play
State girls must wait until 4:30 to badminton and ping pong on MonMADISON
take over. This eliminates the work- days and Wednesday at 11:00 A. M.
ers and commuters who must leave and 1:35 P. M., and again on Fridays
SHOE REBUILDERS
by that hour. On top of this, two i from 9:00 to 11:00 A. M.
807 Madison Avenue
weeks ago ithe day the midwinter
You Pick Up Your Phone
season was scheduled to open), the I Miss Johnston requests all candiWe Pick Up Your Shoes
gym was not available for State dates for the official basketball ref8-2230
Students because Milne was decor- erees' exam lo see her immediately, 8-223!)
ating for a dance to be conducted
that evening. Last Friday Milne
,'hadn't finished their game and I E M I L J , N A G E N G A S T
didn't relinquish the floor until
5:00 o'clock.
YOUR COLLEGE FLORIST
It seems unfair that Slate girls j
should be so inconvenienced and
Currier Ontario at Benson St.
play second fiddle to Milne,
Here's a drink that is unique. It
VISIT
V. P.
never loses the freshness of
Freshmen Meet
Union Saturday
BOULEVARD CAFETERIA
SOc
Its part of the game
...to pause and
Good Food in A Friendly,
Comfortable Atmosphere
Whitney's For Your
appeal that first charmed you.
EVENING MAGIC
You drink it and enjoy an after-
GLISTKNING,
YOUR Matt!
GLAMOROUS GQWNa IN
HtCOMINlj COLOR.
GAY
sense of complete refreshment.
A N D r i m D A N C E Qi)B866§ I N Y O U R
FAVORITE STYI.K. LUXURIOUSLY LONCS
VKLVET ANO WOOL EVENING COATS
T H A I NOT ONLY MAKE YOU LOOK L I K E
A '.I'll I II UUT K i l l ' YOU WARM AS A
So when you pause throughout
MUFFIN.
COME I N NOW A N O SELECT
YOUR MAGIC FOR JUNIOR PHOM
Wi tttrstrrn at Quail
State College News
CH Takes Title
In Court League
Whitney's Kusiiiim Center
S e c o n d Floor
the day, make it the pause thai
refres/ies with ice-cold Coca-Cola. YOU TASTE ITS QUALITY
Jlimltii under militarily of The CoVS-CoIll Couipiiny by
ALBANY CUCA-COLA BOTTLING CO.
220 N. AI.M3N STKKI'T
ALBANY, N. T.
College to Equip
Room in Memory
O f Dr. Brubacher
Faculty, Alumni, Students Unite
In Fund-Raising Attempt;
Shakespeare on Program
ALBANY, NEW YORK, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY SI, 1941
Sayles Names Brauner
Freshman Camp Chief
Henry Brauner, '42, varsity
basketball player, was named
this week as director of Men's
Freshman Camp, Dr. Ralph G.
Clausen, faculty chairman, announced yesterday.
The appointment, made by
President John M. Sayles, coincided with selection of four
student assistants. Nucleus of
the camp program, all sophomores, are Owen Bombard, finance; Tom Feeney, athletics;
Arthur Flax, general; George
Kunz, program.
Plans for the 1941 weekend are
still in a general condition,
Brauner reported. Faculty counselors and their underclass assistants will be chosen in the near
future.
Debaters Lead
Sage Discussions
Squad Participates in Forum,
Considers Economic Problems
Of National Importance
25th
Year
VOL. XXV, NO. 17
Tax Non-Payments Cause
Lower Budget Allotments
•
Cooper Reveals
Reasons For Cut
State College's varsity debaters
journeyed to Russell Sage College
yesterday afternoon to participate
in the "Current Issues Forum", a
Student Board of Finance Sets
regular feature of the Sage curriculum. This meeting of the Forum
Activities Budget Estimate
was the fifteenth of a series, and
Deadline Date March 19
the first in which State has participated.
A last minute statement issued
The features of yesterday's forum
by the Student Board of Finance
included a brief afternoon meeting,
has announced the fact that all orfollowed by a banquet at which Dr.
ganization budget estimates for the
Raymond H. Lounsbury, Professor
next year are due by March 19. The
of economics at Russell Sage, debudget will be submitted to Student
livered an address.
Association earlier than in past
Discuss in Groups
years.
At the conclusion of Dr. LounsStudent Association Gives $200.
At the same time, organization
bury's address, the assembly was
heads were asked to keep budgets at
At its last meeting the Student
divided into 17 small discussion
a minimum since the registration
Association voted to transfer the
groups of approximately 30 Sage
at State will again be decreased next
$200 appropriagirls each. The various groups, unyear.
ted last year to , „.,.„,,,
..
I The American folk-lore class un- der the leadership of one Sage stufurnish a memder Liouis C. Jones of the Eng- dent and a State debater, discussed
The announcement last week by
orial 1 o u n g e ,
lish department, and Newman Club Dr. Lounsbury's topic and others
which was to be
are joining hands to present to the of current interest.
EDWARD L. COOPER, Treasurer, Edward L. Cooper, treasurer of
part of a buildstudent body a series of weekly conThe Debate Squad is continuing of Finance Board—who this week the Student Board of Finance, of a
ing project in
certs of American lolk-ballads and Its series of lectures before various attributed the general 12V4% budg- 12'/i!% cut in the budget of the
Huested Hall, to
symphonic music. Although the con- club groups in the vicinity of Al- et cut to insufficient tax collections State College Student Association
the new fund.
certs feature two distinct types of bany. Four State debaters will pre- and a considerable decrease in en- has inspired a storm of comment
and discussion that may lead to
music, these two organizations are sent a model debate on the subject rollment from that of past years.
Since the proan eventual revision of the method
cooperating to bring this music to of housing before the youth group
posed
Huested
of financing student activities at
the college.
project did not
of the Jewish Community Center
State College.
materialize beon
Sunday,
March
16.
Audience Will Sing
Debaters W i l l Clash
At the time that he announced
cause of t h e • I I I I I I I A . M i i r i i i . v
The debate schedule also includes
The class in American folk-lore several additional debates with
the cut, Cooper made the following
lack of skilled
ay s Assem
statement;
labor, the Brubacher Memorial com- is conducting a group of folk-song neighboring colleges, a continuation
mittee, composed of Stanley Smith, record recitals on Thursday after- of intramural "heckle" debates, and
"It has become necessary to de'41, Hazel Roberts, and A. Harry noons. In the Milne Little Theatre, a southern trip which has been Two and One-Half Rivalry Points crease by WA% the funds allotted
at
3:30.
The
schedule
of
concerts
planned for March 14.
Passow, juniors, asked Dr. John M.
to each organization drawing money
W i l l Go to Victor Class
Sayles, acting-president, if a room features a variety of folk-music.
from the Student Association.
Freshmen
Active
The audience at the recitals will
in the new men's dorm could be
"This action is necessitated by two
The Freshmen debaters are also The attention of the State student
secured and furnished as a memorial be invited to sing at least one folkfp:tors: first, that at the present
and
lounge. Dr. Sayles approved the plan song each week. Students will each planning several intra-mural
, , , , . , body will be focused on Freshman- there are not enough undergraduand suggested that all the organiza- contribute five cents for a fund S i e L l 0 . ! % , t l d ^ e S i ? . i e S ! ? . ! ^ I Sophomore rivalry h^ Assembly this fates in attendance at State College
the
near
future.
"The
Frosh
Review morning as representatives of the
which
will
be
used
to
buy
folk-song
tions planning a tribute to the late
possibly to pay enough money to
records for the college library. These Rushing" will be discussed at a two lower classes meet in an inter- cover
president pool their resources.
the appropriations in the budround
table
debate
which
will
take
records will be made available for
class debate.
Shakespeare Night to Aid
get.
place
March
3,
at
3:30,
in
the
The Advanced Dramatics Alumni the .student body, who may borrow
Debating for the freshmen will
them as they do books. As new al- Lounge. Those participating will be
Marjorie Breunig, Rhona Ryan,
who have long felt that Shakespeare I bums of records are purchased for Joseph Higgins, Verne Marshall, be
State Budgets 1925-'41
and Bernard Skolsky, while the sowas being neglected on the campus the library, they will be played at Vera Wlllard, and Marian Sovik.
Vear
Budget
Cut Tax
phomores
to
speak
are
Lois
Hafley,
and had made plans for "A Night the recitals.
The Frosh debaters will meet
1925-26 ....
16% $11.
with Bill Shake
Cobleskill on March 25, on a sub- Frank Hansen, and Esther Tein. The 1926-27 ....
12,758.50
11.
7%
ject to be decided shortly. Two of subject of the debate will be, "Re- 1927-28 ....
speare,"
con- Newman Carries on
5%
12,628.49
solved: That women's hours should
11.
the
neophyte
debaters
will
journey
Newman Club will continue its
sented to pre1928-29 ....
14,452.26
bo on the honor system."
8%
13.
sent their per- cycle of recorded classical music to Cornell March 31 to take part In
1929-30 ....
15,751.42
0%
14.
The
Freshmen
debaters
will
upformance for the concerts, which will become a week- a round table discussion, while Lois
1930-31 ....
16,101.65 10%
14.
benefit of the ly Tuesday feature, starting next Hampel and Earlc Snow will repre- hold the affirmative side of the 1931-32 ....
16,668.23 25%
14.
memorial fund. week at 3:30 P. M. in the Lounge. sent State in a debate with New question, while the Sophomores 1932-33 ....
15,905.23 46%
13.
The following Eacli concert will offer selections Paltz Normal School, to be held tackle the negative.
1933-34
15,516.94 45%
13.
Since the class winning the debate 1934-35
a r e committee from opera light classics, and sym- April 4.
12,292.00 40";,
10.
is to be awarded two and a half 1935-36
chairmen for the phonic works.
13,113.87
0%
10.
points toward its rivalry score, to- 1936-37
p e r f o r mance:
NEWS to Appear Fridays
13,203.00 10%
10.
Anthony
Ingoglla,
'42,
chairman,
day's contest assumes particular im- 1937-38
Jane Curtis, '43,
13,247.00
0%
10.
costumes; John has scheduled the weekly program
The Nisws Board announces portance for the disputants.
1938-39
13,156.00 10%
10.
I
featuring
the
music
of
such
comGardephe,
'41,
.lllM'llll
Willll'.V
This will be the first time In two 1939-40
until further notice that STATU
15,264.00 20%
12.
l i g h t s ; Carol I posers as Tschaikowsky, Rimsky- OOI.I.IMMS NutWfl will continue to ap- years that this feature of the rivalry 1940-41
12,987.00 12%% 12.
Golden '41. sets. Agnes Futterer, j Korsakoff,
program will be presented at a
Dvorak,
and Cesar pear on Friday morning.
Student Association meeting.
Marion Chesebrough, and William Franck.
The second is that 100% collecHardy of the English department
tions have not been effected, nor is
are the faculty advisors.
there any possibility of all the outstanding money's being collected."
Pierce Started liiiilding Plan
The Alumni Residence Hall No. 2,
James Portley, '43, Finance Board
which is now under construction, Is
member, added in explanation that
by
Andrew
Tukas
<
$
part of the long-range housing plan
last year when the budget was
begun by former Dean Anna E.
Whenever any budget Is cut as funds, will suffer a reduction of propriation, the STATU COI.I.UUU NUWH passed, provision was not made for
Pierce. The Brubacher Mcmorinl much as 12Mi%, the organizations more than $280. The effect of faces the possibility of being forced the fact that due to a smaller freshLounge will be on the second floor drawing their funds from that the cut will be to make necessary to omit some issues the second man class, less money could be colof the new building, at the head of budget are bound to suffer.
the curtailment of aid to students semester. Said John A. Murray, lected than in previous years. Conthe main stairway. The room will
NiowK Editor, "Only Increased ad- sequently, the $12,987.60 budget
The budget of the State College
be 19 feet by 48 feet and will bo two Student Association was cut by that
vertising and a policy of the strict- which was passed by the Student
M
A
N
BITES
DOG
stories high. The furnishings will amount last week.
est economy will enable the NEWS Association called for the expendiprovide maximum comfort for readto follow its original schedule of ture of more money than payment
Witness the organizations:
ing, social gatherings, and the enissues. Omission of some may be- of the $12 tax by everyone attendOf nil the activities at the college
tertainment of guests.
come necessary."
ing college would provide. Under
to whom the cut applies, perhaps
Although the Pedayuyiw Is pro- the budget passed last year, a defithe hardest hit is MAA. When the
tected In the one dollar that Is paid cit of $627 dollars was inevitable.
State Women to Attend appropriations for the various
to It for every student tax purSince this September, more than
sports at the college were cut 20';<
chased, still the 12 'u'i cut means 50 students have withdrawn from
Student Christian Dinner last year, MAA officials cut their
"dropping something extra," Editor the college. If every student at Slate
expenses to the bone, figuring where
Sieve Hull declared.
Four State students will attend I heir money would go to tho last
(Continued on page 3, column 3)
Mary Miller, DA: A president, disthe Intercollegiate Student Chris- penny. Now, with basketball and
closed tho fact thai the cut puts!
tian Movement Dinner to be held in baseball contracts for the year sign-j
Miller State-Wide Secretary
the Council In a precarious position
Troy tonight, Those who will attend eel, MAA finds itself without enough!
arc: Ada Parshall, '41, Alice Packer, monej to pay for the contracts thai
since it leaves insufficient funds
Mary Miller, '41, President of
Hazel Roberts, and Ruth Vincent, have already been drawn up. "The
With which to pay the DeGraff Balresult," president
Bill
juniors; and Miss Helen Curtis,| probabli
let which Is to appear here In two Dramatics and Arts Association, was
Student Christian Association ad- Haller declares, "is that this will
weeks. The contract has been sign- elected Secretary of the State Christian youth Council at a meeting
cause a severe curtailment of our
visor.
ed, Miss Miller stated.
held this past weekend in Utica. Tho
Al tills annual dinner, college baseball season. Wo must take the who would ordinarily receive it unHit, too, Is the Statesman, "We Council, composed of members of all
students in the capital district and money that would ordinarily be der the infirmary fund benefits, hud planned to print one issue with Protestant faiths, is a nationwide
faculty members will have an op- spent for baseball, and use It to Also possible is Uio decreasing ol an especially large number of pages organization with county, state and
portunity to renew their acquaint- cover our basketball expenses."
the limit of aid which one student and extrn features," Blanche Klrsh- regional subdivisions. Tho Utica
ance with student religious life in
The Infirmary fund, the biggest may receive.
enblum, its editor, said. "These meeting also discussed the refugee
the colleges of the state,
drawer
of Student
Association
Through the cut in its $2,302 ap- Plans will have to be dropped now." problem in Europe.
Student Association, faculty, and
alumni are this week bending every
effort to raise the $1640 necessary
to furnish completely the lounge of
the Alumni Residence Hall No. 2 as
a memorial to the late president,
Dr. Abram Royer Brubacher.
It is expected that $300 will be
obtained next Friday night when
the Advanced Dramatics Alumni
present "A Night With Bill Shakespeare" at 8:15 P. M. in Page Hall
auditorium. John Murray, '41, is
in charge of presentation and Joseph
Withey, '41, is producing director.
Student Groups
Plan Vic Series
In Tod
bly
College Activities Suffer From Budget Slash
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