State College ews st. College Representatives Protest

advertisement
Va**"-*
st. / \ASA
State College
VOL.
XX, No. 16
STATE COLLEGE FOR TEACHERS, ALBANY, N. Y., FRIDAY, MARCH 6,
College Representatives Protest
Passage of Student Oath Bill
Students
Register
Objections
T o C o m p u l s o r y Allegiance
At Senate H e a r i n g
Over two hundred students, repreBontntivcs of New York state colleges
and student organizations, crowded
the Senate chambers on Tuesday
afternoon at the open hearing to pro
test the Nunnn student oath bill.
This bill, introduced by Senator
Joseph D. Nunnn Inst year, passed
the Senate, but was not reported out
of committee in the Assembly, largely
due to a public hearing in which more
than thirty colleges and high schools,
student and teachers' organisations,
protested its passage. Thus, although
the bill passed the Senate, it never
came to a vote in the .Assembly, but
lias been reintroduced this year.
During the hearing, students from
over twelve colleges spoke, expressing
the view taken by their student body.
Representatives of the American Student union and of the National Student Federation of America, representing twenty-five colleges, came out
in opposition to the bill.
Among
other speakers were communist and
socialist representatives, high school
and college instructors, and a speaker
for the American association of University Professors.
One of the strongest arguments
against the bill was t h a t it would
either prevent foreign students and
students of other states from attending our colleges, or it would require
them to declare their loyalty to a
system of government winch might be
directly opposed to their native systorn. This, however, could be taken
care of by an amendment to the
existing bill.
Other reasons presented by the opponents of the bill were the fact that
those who could not take the oath
because they did nol believe in it
would be deprived of n ehnnco to
learn, in college or university, to understand and believe in it. Others
stated that they feared the bill might
become the first step in tho acquisition
of dictatorial power by the state,
reading into the bill a desire to control education as in Fascist states in
Europe. Another remarked that the
legislators themselves must doubt the
soundness of American institutions if
they folt it necessary to enact a law
forcing students to pledge their loyalty to these institutions.
State college itself went on record
in Inst F r i d a y ' s 11:10 o'clock assembly, as definitely opposed to the passage of the Nunnn student oath bill.
Intramural and
Rivalry Debates
Will Be Combined
NUNAN PLEDGE ACT
The bill introduced by Senator
Joseph Nunan reads, in part, as
follows: It is an " o a t h to support federal and state constitutions to be taken by students in
universities, colleges and normal
schools".
After September 1,
1936, every student admitted to
a " u n i v e r s i t y , college, normal
school, or other institution of
higher education supported in
whole or in part by public funds
shall take and subscribe the following oath or affirmation: ' I
do solemnly swear (or affirm)
that I will support the constitution of the United States of
America and the constitution of
the s t a t e of New York as a
student of (here insert the name
or designation of university, college, normal school or other
institution).' "
This week-end the men of State
will once more assume the upper
hand, and will entertain tho co-eds
of their (dunce at several parties at
their group houses. These will be a
direct sequel to the Leap year parties
which were tendered by the co-eds
lasl week-end.
College
House at 13-1 Centnil
avenue, wdth Edmund Erwin, '37, in
charge of managements, plans to
have what they term a ' b ( r ) n l ' wdth
all the fixings, and music by Decca
(25 cent discs).
At (lamina chapter of
Kappa
Delta Bho, 117 South Lake avenue,
the men plaa to entertain their
guests at an old fashioned " B o i l e r
Maker's R a i l . " Arrangements will
be completed by the newly initiated
members wdth Thomas Cunningham,
','17, acting as chairman.
At the Edward Eldred Potter Club
house, 203 Ontario street, the theme
of the evening will be a "Sportfl
n a n c e , " with John Cullon, '37, completing arrangements,
Included on
the program for the evening wdll be
renditions by the Potter Podunks
with Cullon, Harold MacGrogor, and
James Vnnderpool, juniors, and Leslor Dryden, '30, administering.
Students to Have
Forum Discussion
mittee for its initial step in revising
tho point system will present tho following resolution in the 11:10 student assembly this morning:
Resolved: That the following
be added to the by-laws of the
Constitution of the Student association to be known as section
0 of said by-laws:
a. The election of officers to all
positions covered by the point system shall take place before the
last, school day in April with the
exception of student association
officers previously provided for.
b. Reports of nil such elections
shall bo placed in the Mysknaia
mail-box addressed to Mysknaia
by noon of the following school
day.
c. All elections shall be provisional until certified by Myskanin.
d. No person shall be certified
to office by Mysknaia when such
cert ideal ion shall result in that
person's holding offices totaling
more points than tho maximum
number set by the point system.
e. The results of all elections
shall not be the subject of public
announcement until after certification by Mysknaia,
f. Certification of all officers
shall be completed by Myskania
lit least three days before Moving-up Day.
A number of students have nut returned the questionnaires sent thorn
by the committee,
In CIIHO any
who
have received lliem do not hold nn
office, they arc requested lo return
the questionnaire stating thai no office
is held.
Lutherans to Meet
Wednesday Night
1936
$2.25 Per Year, 32 Weekly Issues
Senior Drive for Dormitory Fund
Begins With New Goal in View
NAMES SOLICITORS
Frank Hardmeyer, '3(1, president of the senior class and
member of Myskania, who is
chairman of the annual dormitory fund drive now under way.
Dramatics Class
To Present Two
Plays on Thursday
An original State-written play and
a selection from " H a m l e t " will constitute Hie Inst evening one-act productions of the Advanced Dramatics
class on Thursday night at 8:30
o'clock in the auditorium of Pago
hall.
Vincent Donehue, '30, will direct
" E x c o m m u n i c a t i o n , " a play dealing
wdth the life of Spinoza in seventeenth
century Holland, written by Doris
Stone, ',')(i. Hen LaGrtlfl, '37, will
direct a scene from " H a m l e t " .
The cast of Donehue's play includes: John Hills, ' 3 5 ; Cecil Walker,
'30; Donald Do Serin, John Edwards,
and Irwin Stinger, juniors; and Herbert Drooz and Florence Zubros,
sophomores.
The cnsl for " H a m l e t " includes:
Hugh Norton, '30, Thomas Kelly,
ami Kloise Shearer, juniors.
Committees for Donehue's piny
are: sets, Ralph Van Horn, ' 3 7 ;
props, Agnes Torrens, '37; costumes,
Lula
I hi Hoy and Alma
Snyder,
juniors. Committees for Miss Lnfi run's play include: props and sets,
Harry (luinaer, '37; costumes and
make-up, Mary Lam, '37.
Commit lees for Ihe evening also include:
advertising, Elizabeth Meury, '37;
and house, Ah e A Hard, '37. '
Second Alumni Project Will Be
Men's Dormitory, Sayles States
" T h e nexl step in the Alumni llous
lug project will be the construction
ni' a men's dormitory on the side of
Ihe field opposite Hie present hall,' 1
Professor John M. Sayles, principal
of Milne High school and chairman
uf the building committee of the
AI u in it i association, told a NEWH reporter this week,
Kouiois, now being asked lo pledge
In Ihe housing fund, have been asking
I In' question of the what and when of
Lutheran club wdll conduct its regu
llir dinner meeting Wednesday at 5:30
o'clock in the Friendship House, 040
Siale street, according to Glenn
Ungeier, '3d, president.
INTERVIEWS
CONTINUE
Miiijoric Dorrlnium, '3D, will conMuch interviews will be conducted duel the devotional discussion. The
committee
includes
Elsie
today, Monday and Tuesday at 3:110 dinner
o'clock in room U'l, Milne, if ten or Siiiiiy, '30, Hoary .Inked, '37, and
Franklin Kohrig, '30,
more seniors sign up for each,
allei'iinli'.
As the " B e s t Bet of 193G"
Jnmos Campbell,
'30, carried
away top honors at the Leap Year
party at Dolta Omega sorority
Saturday night.
Winning his
title by popular vote, Campbell
was crowned by the runner-up in
the contest, Paul Bulger, '30,
amidst considerable pomp and ceremony. Elizabeth Matthews, '3S
and Doris Palmer, '30, were attendants.
As the " B e s t
B e t " was
crowned, the tally of votes was
announced, showing Campbell had
won the title wdth a score of
1.51% points to the 150 points
of his closet rival, Bulger. His
biggest score can be attributed
to his ability to say ' n o ' netting
him 100 points. Some doubt was
expressed as to the reliability of
this, when Campbell stated that
he had received only one proposal.
Other points which he received
wore 25 for not being able to
siag, o 1 /, for looking well under a
crown, and 10>/i for beauty.
Committee to Ask
Men to Entertain
Election Reform,
Co-eds at Variety
on Activities
Week-end Parties The Data
Point System Bevisiou com-
The 11:10 o'clock assembly today
will feature nn open forum for the
discussion of student business, according to Paul liulger, '38, president of
After tho disThe
freshman-sophomore
rivalry Student association.
debate will be combined with tho cussion, it is expected that some new
playoff intni-murul debate in the as- resolutions wdll be proposed, among
sembly of March 20, according to which will be the resolution printed
Paul ' Bulger, ','16, president of the elsewhere in this issue of the NlCtt'H
student association and member of regarding the revision of Ilia point
Myskania, senior honorary society, system. Members of student nssocin
The winning team will secure not only lion are requested lo acquaint themllii! possession of I he intrn-innriil de- selves wilh lids before assembly.
Tlir need for a meeting of this type
bate cup with tin1 "lass numerals inscribed nn it, bul lui> mid one half has long been felt in Hie college, In
: tin- post, Ibe assembly programs have
points in rivalry,
I featured speakers who have left little
The fp'shmoii defeated the juniors ni' mi lime I'm' discussion, However,
in nn assembly debute Inst Friday. ludny i In'
iiibiTs of Student assoTin1 sophomore class was credited with ciation "ill have an opportunity to
a victory over the sciiiur? when the voice llieir opinions mi all student
hitter withdrew from lb' iutrii-inui'iil ' i.iisi(!<••->. including the point system
competition luii week* ago in protest 1
••• -nun
--I
mil i he National Student
o\
In Ilebate council V declaring lbe do
bull' iil' January IV no cuntcst, The I'Vilcrnl imi I' America conference in
dobale of March _o will be Hie con Ihe spring.
eluding debute in I lie series,
Tin' freshman team will consist of
Jeanne C'lirisler, Hetty llayford, Ruth
Hiuovoy, with John Edge as allernnlo,
The sophomore Iciun will in.dude William llradt, Ohnrlotte Llbinnn, Jeanne
Lichenstrin, wilh Herbert Drooz lis
King James of Leap Year
Rules D.O. As 'Best Bet'
ews
lllie next project. Mr. Sayles' replies
lo these questions were at tho same
li
indicative of hope for the near
future and of the seriousness with
which the drive for funds must be
conducted.
" W h e n ? " said Mr. Sayles to that
question regarding the next building.
" A s soon as we get $100,00(1,"
In line willi the drive to secure this
amount, Mr. Sayles staled, the Alumni
association is conducting a thorough
campaign lo secure tho payment of
back pledges. Lust week tho associa-
tion authorized the employment of a
special secretary lo lake charge of
I his campaign.
In addition, the drive among the
members of each senior class that
Inn i's State college will be conducted
in I In- lines along which it has been
done since Ihe housing project wns
Ktnrled eleven years ago. Each senior
is aski'd In pledge ten dollars a year
for ten years to the fund. The ullimali' goal uf Ihe alumni i* tho inclusion of inn' men's ami Iwo women's
diii'iniliirics and an athletic field house
mi I hi' campus between Ontario and
Partridge slreols.
When asked about Ihe current
rumor of a moil's athletic field house
as the second slop in the housing
project, Mr, Snyles said he knew nothing about this.
The future funds to be received by
tho association will not bo used to
Com plot 0 payments on Ihe present hull.
"The present hull wdll lake care of
itself," Mr. Sayles said,
Hardmeyer, '36, Leads Campaign
for Men's Residence Hall
and Field House
The plans for the financial drive
for the building of a. dormitory for
men and nn athletic field house, both
to be erected on a site opposite the
Alumni Residence halls for women,
have now been completed, according
to Frank Hardmeyer, '36, president
of the senior class and chairman of
the dormitory drive.
Thirty-nine captains have been
chosen from the senior class. Each
captain wdll interview seven seniors
assigned to him, with the express
purpose of securing hundred dollar
pledges from each one he interviews.
These pledges are to be paid over a
period of ten years, ten dollars.each
year.
The drive for the men's dormitory
and field house will be conducted in
much the same manner as the drive
for tho Alumni Residence hall for
women.
Pledges will be solicited
during definite drives from the members of the graduating class each
yoar until enough money has been
jdedged to insure the complete financing of the venture.
The captains for the drive are as
follows: Doris Baird, Elaine Baird,
Jnyne Buckley, Loretta
Buckley,
Phillip Carlson, Jeanne Cerrito, Ruth
Duffy, Karl Ebors, Ruth Edmunds,
Virginia Flora, Jeanne Giroux, Elizabeth Griffin, M'ldred Grover, Hardmayor, Helen Bobbie, Doris Humph ley, Helen Jones, Marjoric Kalaidjinn, Rita Kane, La Voanc Kelsey, Edward Kramer, Frances Lewandrowski, Emma Mead, Julia Merchant, Evelyn O'Brien, Joseph Ouellette, Evan Pritchard, David Rogers,
William
Shahen, Maria
Sharkey,
Augusta Shoor, Carolyn
Simonct,
Mildred Schneider, Frances Studebaker,
Norma
Taylor,
Marjorie
Wheaton, Dorothy Wh.vle, Margaret
Woodruff, and Glenn lingerer.
Jones Announces
New Eligible List
In Varsity Debate
As a result of the recent try-outs
for varsity debate team, the number
of members on ihe squad includes
fourteen, excluding the Debate council, according to an announcement
made today by Mr, Louis C, Jones,
instructor in English and debate
conch.
The members on Debute council
who are nlso eligible for varsity debating include Ralph Altaian, Jnyne
Buckley, and Jeanne Lesnick, seniors;
Robert Benedict, John Murphy, and
Lester Rubin, juniors.
T h o ' other
members on S t a t e ' s forensic team
ore:
Aubrey
Kalbaugh,
Edward
Kramer, Evan Pritchard, seniors;
Evelyn llaiiiuun and Irwin Stinger,
juniors;
William
Bradt,
Warren
Deasniore, Herbert Drooz, Charlos
finylord,
Charlotte Libman, Jeanne
Lichenslein, Lizette Parshall, Sarah
Whelnn, and Florence Zubres, sopllO-
Seniors to Have
Second Banquet
The seniors will conduct
their
Second baiKpiel of (his year oil
Tliui'sihiy, in the Cafeteria of Dusted
ball at 5:30 o'clock, according to
Vera thinners, general chairman,
Two members of I ho faculty will
bo guest speakers.
They are Dr,
William French, instructor of education, and Miss Edna Loworreo, secretary uf the Appointment Bureau.
A Sain! Patrick's day theme will
be featured by the committee, Tickets
for I lie banquet are priced at $.50.
Seniors who are planning to attend may sign up and buy their
tickets in room X, Monday, Tuesday,
and Wednesday.
The committee chairmen who aro
assisting Miss Shiunors a r e : entertuinment, Cecil Wulker; decorations,
Julia
Merchant;
programs, Wilholmlnn
l'ulkovic;
food,
Loretta
Buckley] waitresses. Norma Taylor;
advertising, Augusta lvntz; speakers,
Edward K r a m e r ; and door, Knthryn
MeCormnrk.
giLsarti msmmm MEW$. saaasioa «, ©SB
iPage •£,
State College News
'JEav item: i i « 1 u « t (ilili sBMii a n prrwai: ir. rttte snalssrt
boiiy ut Ihisiiwtmrtioc .if one ijbssiT* the millmg OBMH
IB the iutroT "Oimirrijr of ;I>raiwr:isdli ^a-initusiBt. or a : tte•.iwimswE ii; ass-rat (Hfcss -«*Sfc 3?riliay mtrniiug. " \ g i t
a c
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UOVfhfin in s; huriy is aTitrentty iiK only arm ie;iiK o r ' ^
i o u > y m r dav tmnie ami wont, j m ^ N
' " u b 1 * , , e Ji -' Ht ^
uuyi>Tity of Students.
a d
W ^ i * still unattached. h n w : T"esuu;v >v«6 Mr. bdvvurdn H e BU}»ilstv y,m i<v the -niail b o x ' ' uuuottiratMv i s t l t e m«st r a jwu- -.-our:
And aittrr a TCTT ! ] ! U e t i ? , e ' ± e e fwe- atmosphere, and
MJaa. £>. i.u«86.
.,..,...,..,........... jEdtiQr-b&Vkitif
quoted aJiotemeat in S t a t e s s i i sissy. S p a c e I ^ B B M • a a j taojiysugL scanning of tin marriage the only genuine negro dialect that
we known t o - its ctwtjfrtlfuna. t a t in arowaruar, to t ^ t a g n a i r a , ami a cieeek up on t h e was insistent. H e had t h e Hlacluiess
K a p j * DeJte Roc. 21? £ Lait Avenue. 2-43U
ui
t h e peculiar pitch and
Btuu A. SOBBW...
.... J?«w Editor ,8pa---e it bas no gTsat fear, tresr «trr OTTE afOBK. ,3» I reefers in t t e .Alburn urea, we a r e ; D Utnovuuieut,
Beta &•;£. Oft HadiaOE Avenue ,S*Wf.
umiisioc it is almost impwssiek tn; WBJHtafiH smrr •TuieaiaiasosT about to eowiniHe tiun either ! , e . ''•? " t l , t i u e g « 1 . a i l i i f wluob were
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inekinc
in
tUe
irther p i n w r s .
'CMW-Jf M. FtfomasE. .......................... .Associate £&itw M £entiemairiy conduct a s oaae l i t e r a l ^ "Jstaks isss tray tfc fotUUflfe of t h e niah
Mist*
Jdtiuri'
was. ujifurtiniiitelr,
JSdtwrti ;E. h o t t e r C5nb, SC6 Oniaac -Sweev. S-CMS=
Jhrou^r! B wall trf haaaaji i i e s t . ' ' T i e seaiO• aasubsr OLT -n-as uv t< its nsuai 7!ar. and infused , , 8 w
«asua"Jti« .is reaHv a n m i B p . B a t . all i s a l l . if a * w rto i m i k e c . or t u e " i u s t i u ] i e n m l w : • " " f ^ r & r t e i s brittle comedr.
nf tte mwtiniR -roaid take jiitee in tte- wreacaaa. Com- ir^re nat as fjaniincingiT iustfu! m •. lma B l l t ' B " U H j u . -nwer airuui p e n
GapAB Helm Ebo, £tT 6. i40w Aveeue, £-(31-4
ifimifi. <rr lJouie-vand, it wetiidtsefiaw tiw- srrjriag jssci at kttejy were.tsnteked ui' tto foe. Chic of | a f M » y *C to matmaag ante « i >
XhU star.
; tfe- usaie eieiaenT iwasK that he was; (ieseript attiie t h a t HIK p a t i e u t l r
Ctiward E. f o w r Ciufc, 2w£ Outarip S".'.«: •,-i»li=
H e r ruiue was mit
weekiv rusli frost assemblies i a s anraTi Iteffl s a n i a u witii seveB irroiioaais. but wore i'j tbie pier.
(ittf£ £ffiior rot>re d6ifiyec bv ajjii^tx o r ^ r tfttrar f^r .secosds tiaaii tfeaf^ a s : i a r as^it went . . . foroaj suited to t h e rede, l»er nMrnemearts
Aiumn: Besifieoee Ball. 221 Ontario Stteet. S-iflST
-11V ^ o^irt. i, a f j ij^* a iadv or gaatttoma nffl Bis oat to reminiue etement iiitowise we utiiiul t h e utage were nmialir uiiuleHfi and ,ieri;v. M r . BeaJe wat Btiff
C*«OUVK 8 a i O K « r . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
i i w m ^ * Maoager
in urderK fashioti. JiKre iass ixsee tin toe paSt a Trad; " i n v t ieeaTfi m n t t e i m p - of diajrust unc
and nueonriueing a s E character.
''Gamma Cajijw (Pol, 38C QnaU fltieet, S-£1.4S
; tivin that <.*iasses leave in order of senioTirv bat this, ^itagriri BB their iuuincia! eondttioii
The ucture iac.ked bufiineBB from be*«» Xmn...„„
...„,Am*iaie
Mfrnu
MaMU»
®# «•*»? "* t l * other S t a t e tradiiioas. l i « mmluteriafi Eriltomng their wesk-end sprees as- S ^ S t t o S t e
to
E a p j * lieita Mho. l i t 6. ^ a k e A«eone.
»enoe. £-4814
£^814 ^ ^
b- t h e dust of vast years. Aiiii. a t tiaws, we ua-re sornw a e i n r a d aspefil . . .. a : * £ " . * S . : , : t ; T
. V 1 JA7l UU l
t
feared S M a S j for the wetfare of the class niarshak wire i«halieupe t c tiie men! D P not tolerate j ^ ^ , ^ ^ „ j ^ f ^ 5
''1 ^ , n '
£rianBtx& SattiP................ .vlwociair Susinett
Xonnper
u a w atteittpted to preserve somt semiijauw or onter.
oipirette irnmnririg rroni these TO- I
MC ffetecc Avenue, 4-5867
I t was hard for the audienee t o
But for serious e-cmaiaeratioL on the part of the v.-orihy vitrtinis. and fmstrute uvy
their p u n ""to i Becafe whether tiie " t w e l v e o^tdoc&"
atudeut body, and for appearance 's s a t e to our visitors. a m ' - •*" tittenniti; or
was noon or midnight.
The bright
we ask the students t o cousider & st*v rules of a t i q a s t b Hkb even those much sought iienuiet light outside t h e window and the
froni you . . . and now it if nigl.
.for sotija! and phyakal eeeurity.
XSPOBTS Hiimi&s
onto t i m e .we got a tittle pateonal interior lighting indiuat*d t h e former.
"ETanl; 5. i5animt».ver. v.unriK.- .ISeCiinrjik, seniort
Miine higi: acquired two but She whole idea of tiie play
S0PfiC'iI0B£ J'BSE EDKPOBS
ttoadhee over tiie v.eei;-uud. liut re seemed to need tiie '•'wiJebing h o u r . "
.letted is eoupk- elinginc bits irf the "Whatever the time, it seems to us
mm YOVH BENEFIT
Warreo iDensmore. Muriel Goidberg. D a r i d Smith,
that the stage should have been
Any interest in world peaee is gratifying in thest- weaker sex und left them out in the
Bamona fewSBSfc 8ooUie Waiaok
more dimly illuminated.
The elare
cold,
farrej
my
fnend&.
there's
nottime*. 3!he forum diseussit>ns eauducted recently ny
of lirht and the red devil were—
BePOBTBBS
tin£r;.hun:
|
in
sueii
bizuess
•State student* have proxStted the oppoatunity and means
• a m< whe-' -iie fliirni I'blitl!
That t h e play went over
iic^olic AK«stiue, Phyllis JBo»wor;h. I/ore:ui Buckie.v. BIBE by wjii.jb those really iuterwsted bu lias iiumaue issue
C a l k i n , BoJos t r * ^ u . Bo-b £ ^ ^ ^
"'•"«" ^ ' - ^ a i i w w i i w m xius uumane rssue
;
'
,,
, i * due to one person, and he .done
.Euui tSUiettjiife, JSarie tiwisier, Siarv Hudson, Auiirev <«W opewy iu»a wrt>p«rat;vejy 0 l , uiuen t o r tuis eause.
i ,*, -K"If w .m. m. uT " ~ranurale
" l ™ , n i i t , , should
eongratuiated—Gran p i p .
Kalhaiwb, iSarear.ii WpodrmT. seniors: Aliee X-arrows.
i f we, a s school teachers, have auv opportunitv ieft
"
««»astcnonH i
fe**en CLv-o*. l6ui*i> J>avid«e. £liEai>e-.b Goodinic. Eitcieda •: ^ n » * „ „ » !,»!»(.,*«», i i ^ m m r i m u i ;- V;tf '..™« - . ' •» en «o^age* . .
ana h o w s about a t e your bow.'
Mr. Korton *s play was an
Harit.jm£$x*b
iierr. ,lxmt Kafllau. Bchel i e a h n e r . Sary , : m . . . l n , m C ^ ^ * * ! ^ ^ lu-erruptaons. a. wzll come to m *0 ^
^,
,^
.-ulkn,c down
• i H M W w £ ttr the Q H C <K SHBS
• » e Gatfamauaate Hewawme -a* New £ « t i State
Coliec* Hoc Itartoett
THE MEWS ©OAftD
THE NEWS STAFF
I
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tr
lmm
SM1 v
Ella UirToto. MurriHUi troiiiti Atarjurie .lobsoa. Po.vUis thest panel diaausftinBS, tlrttn to ascsne amont in:urseives the evening
and tiien there ! Bmoothest-running
play
U<a1 Uiit
Jiiosv'G. P.os* h-UEklxli;. CharAiiMr i,.iiuiiui. .te»tn Liehensteit. H„ »., ,\lf. .i„«.r..iW.ji!l nntntHns «* *r,m.. iinternutmnai
r,.
^
^ wins of tiie insti-I .v<!rir b elass has produeed.
u t„,v ^
Ue
v H8
fosepointHelen
JGauriee.
ilar.v
BSmSanog,
LiUie-o
MoSOWT,
8 n ) $ uwtlent.
*
"beu-tJOiil
m.eri.
Mr. Walker turned m another
Muliec.
Otaki.
Therese
Paiiuer.
Mnt
l:useut/«;k
. . . ltirtoumt
.
.Hf . some
.
tution who piaved tht wrong kind of
Adeiaioe Sthenic, ^ e a t S&ater. .U«r!:iifi Stieeb;. Sturie:
gttod pieee of work, and <rar Artimr
Nevertheless, tne aSaauammw i-y tins group deserve: B Eamt
g n t l l U E lntsaiJt^
fui
unci
Stewart. ilxK'u 3"'homiM«oii. Mar.v 'iohin eojaiotntirea.
. eovumeut bseauw they a r e sruueut oigauiaec. Toe fittte slS^,T e )uxaill}£
j j , , - i t . w n i , sunie ao- ;uid Tom Kelly st.ood out in minor
i
-of
tShis
iisas
iieeo
e»tiue»t
=ai
S
t
a
t
e
Shis
jrear.
i
t
provides
„
;
ting
jmiiuded. argued roles. Mr. Arthur showed an easy
TOllt
J(
a
f
l
B
D
U
H
1955
Memtwy 1936
; an opportunity tg> say whet one reul.'y Suittls wirhout u l I [ ) U . w i 1 { , ghnnld earrr-She other UP manner that was most welwime. Mr.
Ptesocried Gateeioie Press
tin ti'.reat \\s eritiejam of some tliassnnim inatructur f o: j fttate street
" tasif enn cv I'onehue did a very wavincing j>-..r(
s
tiolief
outiiitie
iiis
ouneeptinn
«f
t
h
e
continuity
erf
i
n.
t
e
n
nanutes.
e^'et up traynl of the eonsninptive t i r o n g h
u
mi£ w i n
JQistnbutor of
i!is-.orieul evair.s.
., E 2 j , 1)U't zlim-f
,,'hnt I eali being the middle of t h e play, then he
showed his usual tendency to t r y to
.History und soewfl suiunoe atudents would (a v.el: te Jag; j , , t'nt img. no: with it
make each word count. Instead of
_T
pi;rr.n-4pe,te actively m any .suture torumt ui ttus ty}ie. (-he rovinr rfijmrtorf Beemed to like building u p one or two spet'ches. he
Published ewery J r i d e y in the eoliege year by t h e Xe.\t yeur in some seimoJ in tSue stale, i t may be tot lute t h e atmosphere despise tiie I>0 . . . plaeed his emphasis on all of them,
£drttirifei S o a t d representing t h e Student Assoe.itst.itm. J to ae^iuce auiih information to nrganiae and ieud suet ' KU(l u'mug tais same line. 1 guess the with the result that his tempo was
• iiesr b e t ' can staB its found at
Subscriptions, mS$ p e r y e a r ; single copies, t e n saots.!group* as wii; aynug BJJ through student interest
SCT . . .
or nmybe t'njun or universally slow and reeasurrd- OcD«liKe£«d Acywhet* w t h e United Stsies. Hutered as selrooJ reijuireuuein,.
BP1
dim'j
"nave
a chatter of S I ' B casionally lie approached too closely
•e«oud eiaas m a t t e r a t poat-uffit*, Albany. K. ¥.
. nist- th«r< n a ,ieriu on Cmui] to 1:he editor with his gun—a man
Tm SKVS
d*e* not n«*8a&riSy endorse sentiments
(.-••••*': that uiif goiK in for etciujig in danger of his life would have
eipcessed ir. «ajtrabutk«it. K o evimmutieations will be
. t we're been "tola".tried, we are sure, ( a n d no doubt
printed Bniees t b e writers-' namee are left vitL tbeHuitorand at ta« same tame we beard that successfully 1 to seiie t h e revoirer.
A Cit-fcBit of tke See
in-Oltief of t w Sfewa. Ajiocyjcity will be preserved if st
ther funnt th«ir banner with three ; The scene was much more effecti-re
-fieeif^d. T i e JN*V8 does n o t g u c r a u t w tt> print tiny or
men wm'ppec up as it
and w u ™ ' b e IWO were separated by two
(Me6*cfe Cfeest
BOOKS:
«i «tnnuittuit«tJon*.
ftestratp *y Sprc Pt&wnxn <JO., IKC.
^'tii. X3f„ SSfc 16
Mfesttb fi, ivbf
A i ^ A - x , , i»". y .
Aliauiy.. S . 1'.
PJLEJX3E!
Tb* *an>*j dor.«atW7' fund drive is ag&w under viny
1* mw$VM
mkm
« e «mu-ibutv.« toward t h e seotmd
gv*j Mi the aSuaani asstotisaakin—« dormitory fttr tnen.
tte a i s s s «f 1ZM is t h e .tli-st ty see « tangiftie result
G.MLU.
{Fw St&e *n 1ks Vt-<'p
Men Agfcmst the S e t . by e n t r i e s -\ordhofT and .liuuee
JSurumn H a S . U53 puges. iiostoi. : JLfflth
ov i: n. 11c
oiupany. Si'..li!'.
WittitheJ or not you l » " t seen tiie merit '^Mutauy
o» the Jbluuuty.
r.ius butts, of .nn.rratjte ay> en" vrt.
<»«* « ! « * « * *-=; todnty ^ o n lu- tutet stdid U.ur« a
l
(«* di-atna.
irjEisio ax coders
tmt
, v y M vi:i:
u
'
^ i l ^ ' ' ' ^-nn.ge nn-: fort.tuQt una
vf the m*fo «tf piwtt m*t* '••• H*eh its Jestitf gwstl;:"^L***"& y'"" * 0"»f»d « J'« »J«w wum
t'ne news stt.ff goes out w&lking OJI <,T three feet.
a suturfii-T afternoon jaunt, just
&**$* fr(,m , l l f l ' - everyil.irg went
-rmoiun aronnd ionkang for goodies well—lights, set. placemen- of won.
nhev SI;T rue "gooses were dove-taihng of cues, s m c e n t y and
SnKter seems delineation.
It was clear that the
jruuu L-O'.
6011 i. LrBtk holibio around din-ctor had a dennite idea in mind
'!lat,«f.i bow "s tbta. v v imdw . . . when he began the play—he knew
big v.{*k-end what effect he wanted, and he must
vt bet? rumors of
.-.,1!..ir v,
we b a n our date. ,have been satisfied with results on
Whether the
but fellow* take i TJJ and grt yours Tneisday
evening.
nhi-':* vidit ttit picking if poo s n u d i e n e e understood FSrsnd<-l!o "s
subtleties or not, it wss intertistt-d
H"*ilL ' i ' X t d y o t desire u y insnd
Rravo!
dotie or T.h* aft^rtmiantioned. 1 se .IT.MI alert
PLAYCH~ir R
Mi! '.l. M:LI'.. tU -.lit "tiff of Mllfr!
•11
!
,rf
iittsutg pre
in *te MiiiAkw .vf tit.e irtmsit;^
problem at S t a t e , m * stwnei
* * ? 'to
•4#»**
« , Btvmst%
« « sewuid
, 1,. 1
U^-.-iiy ' vi ^
".i.:
>t 1.m.r-nrnt
stort \ t Oat>tait
building beswee* Oio4arj« «i*d fa,rt.ridge sweets is a Kligt t!i(l tin- ••ijiutettr hrpd men win -.n tine uum
T H I MAN ; ' ' F ^T <\Tr
f t t i n g 4MsuuuK*ft t v Tiinise wirti i(6vt n*Ot it possible.
ing ».<:!' Co* itMit.nn »*>? e sea adrift In Tin attiunetf>
i'fcSt «WM«( b*s totd every wunritoutor pledge tttte in T,I,V ' - i i o u i n y V ' ' •t.v.ntn <.i open boat bw tweist.i<b««d«id ^<.d'*rs U' tsbe ,IUV««BJ fund- U'o s senittf wtbt- ! 1 ' ' H let", ittag. '»'t iliivita t - f t t n i . t 1..I1C v : u n n . t 1,
f&wijs ^ * ^ u » t i o t i *S tlos t.«t«e, }'\-ut-:>} with t i t jn*!tiot : ' , ti>> ^;* j .1.1;. i.,o: [:,• -iui. : in-i u«f« irft ti.>;« .>t m
TO ISSUE ECHO
&f yrt,, s«<d s deA"t fvr .to*. ts*&sg« ewwer, it (wary be * . : 1 ' , . • « , ! . * e i .
i tiie .I r*. tin
lit KJ •ring jsrn ..
Fvtrt J - n e t « l
UtM t
I - ' > " » 1 • !.•
i •- i I
;'.
"f
• '"*^g"W*»g BBB^ b«t it stwtsld W ^bsenwd tSwt t i n ;*,> SS^JJt in Mi i ! luc . m i l U-tii ' ' t t i •••' w n n t ' t f i o--t -.• e
v LU
X< -•: i.e-ii ;- m a g a r .:.iit
• tiiwhuu w«y A* aj*e»d «ff«r * pesrA>d «f $*"* \-r t t * >**rt. U ' H.li'Ui.v llfivw* '..llf >.F..i-.>.l'.l ' . ' ' 1 Mli'." M I I '
: v i tles
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:
lit
at
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t
s
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<.••-.',
f S :•-:; i ' - , ' - i y v
^u*ii4-g it itwesssfy to j * y twiy *, nawSl svui. jwwrff
aces udiJtg to
,«Bie t HI l>r>.;iv- in.'.
ilia;: j . n t , « « ;.<>.i, n ,e n « m ^
U w y jjwikM- i * s ea;(.vyvfl * ovilege ed*cbti».* here witt
J"il« ' l . , - t C V - ' l . ' l «-.iU!"» 'A ti'.t* titntu 1» ' • •• • •.. ' . . . i t ;-:•:•• •:•' ••: r . ' 1!. ' 1 -i
*rt! (iwdb «jgi«aj*.!!i'.* Jies »*: M «^tttj*< by *.<ttjw i!%bw brief !<..te» ".•' 9'. *.;i'„i-..tt &tegi. 't ' , • » • w ;
I ' m c,h:pta.u
^ntfiatu,Tk«iS.. fib*** txuvej *xmwx v.- AH* t;t** t * e tiiv-v »tt» « «it:.A n i r , m-i»-< !«.•• i. v:..-,:,f;.1 '.:i;;..-••:. i ; . i-^.n
5
*m4 4via*irs tm *• foasr pans*' worse,. On* hv&$J#i 6« ' 4rtftwnuitu«it*.tti
':lit.ii>':: Lu» Wtw* '.« l e t - iei*/* m * SA**» vf * p p w ; a & j v * £w tAu* *dw*ti.w. is la«fe w , iB1Wj i , ^ , , i , ^ 1 ;-,.;; ; .„';."" V l , / ' . u , i j - , : . , ::
« w p f t to a^P*. A »*****'* % , i t ^A*f ww4t., s 4 * t i ; ^ * «u>*»s.i tA« p t ^ u t «» u « b i w s n . .NwtJu^ i..-..
TMr pt% *tt.*M *.'4 liM^e <M. wibetow tfct « w w IJ^JI t>M ,.„.,,. ,,,r:.,.. ,.,..,., ^i.r,,,....,..; ,..
COMMUNICATIONS
« * » # « ? « «**«.*M« frtt®Ti«B j * WlrfiWtYWt* tV KHM V««W
,,;,,,;,„.; , 4 ^ . l v . w . .»..,;.„,,•,,.,, •.,,., ,,-,., . . , , * . t , , t , v ,
.,,•...•.„;:
fo*d « | $ * « ; . » ; toWJtiw s t o v i ^ Jt <,ej.rt*4 «* c « « i « * j c , . , , . j , , ^ ^ , ,.< ,>,-• ..-:*. " r L IVT*** .i ;.. •• - -.,-:
* j ^ * * « * * / v ^ t SA* A ^ w * s * w s »v/**«.. A teaBdf^I^n, r w ^ ^ v i r t ^ ,^.. )ft . 0 j f t , ,;..-, ; ) < ., s .-. ••-,,•,•.,..
jit-f ««*! « * * * J* eitirtv j * i«!j*,it»'j)bfl*. f l # fflja4a»ie«l*i' J^IK % f l £_ a«(t«« t,vw?«ww «<4 t.*..e " t t * « M * " m , —
tlbtHf i* 5**t **<,ii fc** **«itvv*tf « lmti«*t
*4m#t}m te SU»»SA<*2 k&vwS^JBI *-.,; »4^«* « | * r > w * t is " t ' *
lib* « ^ A Sfee*4<w»>* »'«y y.imi2iitx.
-.•„.-.> ,..f, i..<./.» >..,-.,,•; <im*SHi fcaa >.» ». ... • - • . •
A feiwfc *^yf*Kri*ti',* it * gMiat tfcitffr
JMw'! 5n»*ej. k i ,^ , » ^ , U * '/*>»«>«
T*» w/^-: * t o ; » M i b H
' - •
»A* «c4kMfi** U*i m it tk*1 K M * »**.•*!! W «Si»*H*H»* s * j - ( i ( i „ %g, ifa, i,tm. th* kq f! lib* '*&.-«*« i • "
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GRECIAN GAMBOLS
Trom the looks of things, '.he s,r ri
tie.s hit the top over the « w i f v . i new pled^vs ai',i no« a i n u l t r s A'.: ' »
KI.M vit'loomod into full meml-ership
.l.tne Crawford, J a n e t UtiAseli. aiol
Kie.tiioi Wis,, ires) •.men
At IVia
'. -... Mm j Markham. ';?:. teok the
i
'
i ..»•*,
KI'iMbeth
r h i l j - e t t , '.t>.
• i t"' .tri< Umnp, '.".Si, lire we-irmir
!"•.>•'.u IVtn I'lti p'ed«e puis, .inj
SlteTle lloldstoiu 1 . '.bi, is the newest
1'i Alpha Twu ple.itfe. At Phi IVlts,
1'H riuce lumber!,ui :iu,l Hetty Al'en.
freshmen, were welcomed into r'ic.ige
loembcrsliip, no,I lletn Zela has ^ Vt.o
siitr new ph'il^e, llilali rVole, '.';>. .is
lias IVIlit Oiitejjn rtnh Kmil\ \V r...
>t u
Heiiiiiiicc willi the cottnoi; of spriuj;
•.,..,»•,»»-'. -f • ,sif iHi•! mul 1'hi Helta mmouiici's the eiiyagt
THH
yiiiiVt
HTKP
\'J ¥f*t*i#i
I • >: n. *m
Mltmir* f**{*f»ttr* prrparato.n for mem of Vera Hums, 'SS.\ to William
A ontuiAm*** »«** >* «-vi*-tv s i * lAttt »r»s*«k aill ' ' " * T * y 5 i * s l ! & , & **' £ * l ; - 1 " v : > > ' **** « " * " * « ' ^ »^«»-. »»d <j*uie.. ear*of^g>-» ueither Anderson. Svlviit SiUbv, MT, of Hots
** i X T S £ ? ^ . « i v ' * . H ^ f t ^ a - ^ L ! ™ » i « . " ' , * I M * » f c ^ * «**y k ' * « r f " * " R ** ' • ' "
*••*««•? » » » I M « a w aviabititi
The li Zfta, hoard « lnu.ltr r«.l aa.l marrird
-.- U i * * Ifev* .v,--,//..^ ,fc *«*«,<.;/ »!«*,(** i , / ^ 6 J i * ^ ;
;MM
t r a r r i t * twnndor*. t 1 - A.-tntP.es llarrv S. Mo.tthonv, ,1 v
Tkw
nfeiii-* af» tJsi* „<.*<*•-V( M M * * ^ M * U «* «4* * / r ^ » » '/r Ilk*
, r i „ aauiliojvt
, M t W , ,ift
. „unrriliag
^ I > M , wwe»,fe
„ k ( <*d-«t
. , ;+ . i a J l f e s s^lwt r«.M..i rvt„.,„,
He'rtha Natlmil, * 'SI, ami MarK-aret
M 4 . , W i „ „ lfct
**»««ifn of t^*i/ rtn/rf, fcasr* tK-ftnnti'J easmji& tma^taattoa *• pb**» f«r pawing ' M . time. Jacobs, Mft, louowinl old fiietiiships
'f%* mw •n¥t\tHUm, if j»*«*4, *<Jf owSw «e**r!tf/ftjt to S?i»* it *f. *4.<bt*j i«t*»tr«t, y*8 *4*rrv j^.v* .*,«*«> Tfc*»*- ptaeea fear,- thrii nurt«M*«, but Hi I'l Alpha Tail. Alpha Kite's weeki-ii,y.nii
'.r.*,>. watii *JI r«*«it« tovt tea* fc**/t*4 t« <t»Mnrrar* </1 truth *nA airtual bafifn-atejfSWtorilb** l W ; a/«r b ' n>. iaean» in agrtH' tiitl guo«t« wurv Mumaiel WaUworth,
My«#**Mi. TiS« I W I / wiM l a b i a t e * i * (*v»»«« r*<r*i**«i kfin iff »il(*i>< Klijfb it * B ««H*iaa<tu>« tgtit* <>t «*»« »•*•> ' * * ••**•»** " ' »«•' «ho '35, V.iuinit Toiibuhl, ' ; i j , and Hetty
r.7 «*«fe )/j)iuJ-^ti, a-'.iity.b^ iktm »fc* »SM* /««iy« f/cf mslittm*
'huinty
*r*t K«/r<IW/* *rni H*li tr*v* «ft»s»>J »»£t» «'; !>a.** hi* time .loing noth Slawson, 'HO, Ittltll I'ltitehley, '.>J.
j , ' , * * * * * ! * ^ t/^< ;,'.A;./ '/<&«*», TJ>* a m «*« <»J* VW Cfii
U i f**». i« «f>^Uwiabl«r m*Ht<*t At feth atittef* s r e s»». aod eajortng it.
came back lt> tloai' t>M Kta I'iil, and
ift»u » * / 4*l*f J* *'.is.'.if * » tbarti/zfti U-f'iit tfc* tfr*/J '/I w*i! *p^uiittt»4 with tfe* Kr/ttth .*»»* the f*»»i*f n w r j W f i T r r , B ' ' •** Lcaage ayain be Minuio McNicklo, '34, Cooilia Hislmp,
'..-.'•. tuAUfp yt»f. Until wttitU'i by M;«.-.-.-..n »// «•. :• • M I* **<f(?*4 that h* i* Mlrmifix
* tal* »* aathsyntiit j ofi*a*«J for itutk-nt*f
Surely, the '34, ami KUIOIIH Lloyd, ',U. guttnltM)
will >«* (,«»(.'.it'.i'i to .'••.•'•i »'•/ '-ft---if, i»4 W*\ »,U,t ** it U in hbtorfe fa*t. Kr*n tfemigh j ('r*»|*r attitade and behavior would at I'lti Holla,
f^*«iaf tku a«ti//« •'• tiJ- ba«4* ><r M/«*;i.'..;,. will j. -> thm :-..':.4».i' 4»ti^tm *iA lh*t.*n*** ui p*(h*tie hnm*n[l# e*hil»it&l b r thoae using it. It is Tl„, alums of KpitiUm Hola t'hi
Mm %,;'^iiutii,lt
I'I'.IK
» iil.it'ittti
t/4t4y, t h « t u , » ?r. .;. M t « r « WtuM efc»Ik*ft *'»y *«tb»r »« t»v*rw»ite t b * «»' a* u«* w'«h ««» «*»>'* l«#kwl, but tvt v .,| the iiftlvos at a bridge partv
',.' ««.-,i//»» *.'* UfUgtlf ifc'.•/««»«*! ift t,-»kti>X ' . f t ' e» ».-.*?/. *u,ty, in tbi» r^rttrl firtin/n i* ffr»//it*»J to in * rwtfatwtd | i* ean b# put to a use which will IK> ; „ m | i( graiul tlum was hit,! bv all, lit
wl'<M. ( t a l t l * ! * / (./',»!'!* t k * ll,'•A...li. tdt ,*.• t- , Of *iui <H^/iifi*4 »trl«r AttA |anj(Ui»ift U, 'ftnwfe' tb« suU*n- JlMW»Bitollil* beneficial and appro j fn,,(, |( VVoultl auipiUo us v'orv mucli
tuf*.
Th# *Uiry umUrnHmily
will tank with the Hated—opening it to students.
; if nil tlio sotors illiln'l luivo «' ^raiul
V"',t* to i-*»« tki* MMtaaar* u*n U.-.IU.I.J
wmW* i-hmk «*a *tori*»,
T W O .TUXIORS
I time over the weekoml.
j/kiijf* v&UMtHvnmitf,
7 1 * «s*«l«»4iftj x^a*s* '.f ifeu jr»*at tfiir-.</? <.,/ ..<-.i
| *4hritwltWtr, " /".*"»*/•* 't lti/t*4"
.'*„i?*-t •.?..* e r t > - ' . - -
-
<jie*».* ' . '
t. - • •
.i..*
Tin
' OlllItHtllS,
«v
voiumeiv
'NATIONAL
COLLEGE NEWS
r H E PAINKILLER REALLY WORKS, Newspaperman Ed. Johnson
*• reported after he made the above trial of the new solution compounded
by Columbia University's Or, LeRoy Hartman. The solution (ethyl
alcohol, sulphuric ether and thymol) kills the pain in the dentine and is
effective for an hour. However, the University of Michigan's Dentistry
Prof. Paul jeaerich says it works effectively in only five cases out of a
IOO. Further details in Th* Spotlights, page a.
IN
PICTURE
AND
PARAGRAPH
luue M
(CRASHING GLASS looks like this when it is shattered by a revolver bullet, This unusual
y photo was made by Profs. H. E. Edgerton and K. J, Germeshausen, Massachusetts Institute
of Technology engineers, with a camera working at an exposure of I /ioo,ooo of a second.
Page 2
FOR
THERE** AN
. -
OLD
fts*;
. • : : • • : -
> * ^
*,
>
smoke Camels
Smoking Camel Cigarettes Aids in Assuring
Natural Digestive Action
ing. Camels stimulate digestive action
—promote the feeling of well-being
so necessary to proper assimilation.
Camels set you right! In smoking Camels for digestion's sake, you
may enter a whole new world of
smoking pleasure.
• T«h. c«., wtmn m—, N. e.
7*. '*f
MAIL DOES THROUO.H!
It's often a struggle for F. B.
Fowler on Star Route No.
1392, Maine. "It's eat-andrun with me," he says, "but
I always top off with Camels.
Camels are good for digestion—help along the
natural processes—and certainly have a great flavor!"
A I R P L A N E M E C H A N I C T U R N S P R O F E S S O R - > G e o r g e C . Haffley leaves
^ h i s airport t o accept the appointment as instructor at the Sacramento (Calif.)
Junior College. H e will teach aeronautical engineering.
Kith Dental Pain
Publish*
Editorial;
Subscript!
Delivered;
second elf
PKINTKB )
Vol. XX,-
St
A LICE G R I F F I N is the first Loyola University (Chicago) woman student to be a member of a committee
*'* to plan an all-university event. A recent ruling of the Loyola Union rescinded a law which said, in effect,
"woman's place is in the classroom."
l -pa.!'l
A
7
0
y 8
Student
of their Young Men's Democratic club
^ ,
""*•* "^»»s«
T TeAchZS C o , f e 8 e W *
Washington politic* when he addressed a meeting
Kfns a S ' ? ' " ° V *™
ir
>r
i6
.1•,s
d
•d
'ii
n
•n
.e
.1•r,
CO
^» S«»«
dental s c E " ffT ,? ut f stand 'ng contributions to
Which Dr
S
E wrestling,
S U B has
h / f been
i i S a° fpersistent
' W i wordy
" t o r , wman.
ho
ua-es
and
V. I V - ! • « • "
•
.(1
ts
)r
•i«
a
ts
or
f> Xh
®& ~*
as
Jr'-'l«f Wf
4
Mr
HAKO HITTER. Jane Sharp,
tennis champion, plays a
smashing game that carries
her to the limits of exhaustion—often makes digestion
a real problem. "Smoking
Camels," she says, "makes
food taste better—helps me
to digest my meal. And
Camels taste grand I"
i
" i P i G /f ?d r g e B" W i n t e r of Washing'
°k ^ . s t r y , St. Lou.s. Like h,s
S . n t c t r T i f c X ? r d WUhoUt the usual d a " 8 e r and
w " s h ? s 3 i J ^ fr" f ° r a I"**' » revolutionary
d e n t oi
K n S f e W h e 3" dT WWn
P r e s ihe
&6
Ne American
c
§
ir
3-
-
i m n a S h A " W ? 1 e i S h t e e n years has been the
impacted third molar. No cruel chiseling of the tooth
is Dr. Winter's method.
~
From X-rays he builds a
painstaking campaign of removal.
But Dr. Winter remained long a prophet
without honor in the profession. He lectured on the
one tooth in America and
England.
He wrote a
83fpage volume and made
sound movies to show how
the offending wisdom tooth
—
——
N A T O R Joseph T. Robinson, democratic floor IrarW t n U u Z I
SEadelphia,
Ark-) ttldsntialj a « t B l l 2 w i f f i S f e a n f t S f i ! ^
X
|
x'
d
rk
J-
A lifi
the soli*;
demandj
pledge | |
h
d
•ll
desensituer will be made available to the unmomed
through patent control by Columbia Un.versity. In
S f J L ? benefactors of humankind, North westS JSk ^ W * s Pi-' t h r u m ' s portrait will look
t W , n k l e t h a t fo
XT>"wf
r once does not give
the dentist s false assurance.
ton B f h i S
S W 0
1
.'S
Now r e a d f o r eneral use hls
Third-molar
:
a«.
/•
d
n
^
JN | HOWLING school lad and burly truck driver
alike there exists a common fear, that of the dentist's
drill rasping through dentine in seeming horrible
search for the nerve No lean scholar is Dr. LeRoy L
Hartman of Columbia's dental school, yet from his
laboratory he has come forth with a discovery that
"" "
" '
entailed twenty years of
research.
As a consequence, the dental bogey
man, pain, is now gone,
and dentists everywhere
are polishing tools for
emergence out of the depression. Dr. Hartman has
developed
a chemical
which, applied to the tooth,
almost instantly kills its
entire capacity for feeling.
P.. . ,
, .: ,
^ 'eaves no after-effects.
Graduate of Northwestern University's dental
I S ? '" o 9 I \ D r - H a r t m a n interrupted private
g £
! n ^ ^ to go to war. On his return he
The N i
expressed
printed ur
in-Chief o.
desired. '
all commt
\
d.
*
*
"Hurry—hurry—hurry" seems to be
the order of the day. People get
caught in the lockstep of modern
life. Tensionfindsthe weak spot, so
often—digestion. Smoking Camels
improves digestion... wards off the
consequences of hurried, nervous liv-
|*l
The anto enroll
goal of '•
The Claai
of the e>
in the so
building
fitting m<
Past e'
hundred ?,
faces gra
as yet, af
staggerin.
ments ma
making if
Every t
no such '
institutio
sand doll
lars as a
enough t<
The g
secures f
kind of I
a positio
per oenl
thing i s |
tho most
e
'S SAKE
COLLESE SAVINtt
that ifs a great life if
you don't weaken! The
demands on time and
strength are endless.
Digestive upset* are
a frequent result! So
smoke Camels for the
sakeofgood digestion.
Rosella J
Calkins, Hr
Ruth Gillc
Kalbaugb,
Helen Clytf
Hartt, Blit
Lam, Rober
Vermllye, 1
Mildred Bo
Kathryn <j
Don Vito, I
Ella Giffoi
Jobson, Ro
Josephine ,
Mullen, H
Adelaide I
Stewart, R
Page 3
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, MARCH 6, 1936
HERE DELICIOUS FOODS TEMPT APPETITE
—the famous Gold Coast Dining Room (*•#*#) at
the Drake Hotel in Chicago, where the art of presenting luxurious foods with deft service is developed to the heights of perfection. Here—as a fitting
accent to the scene —the fragrant, delicate smoke
of Camels rises, while Erik, famous muiire d'buttl,
watches alertly over all to see that no wish goes
unsatisfied. "So many of our guests smoke Camels,"
Erik says, "for they have found that choice tobaccos add to the pleasure of the meat Camels are
tremendously popular — a leading favorite here."
TUNE INI
.ES&.
HV
Camel Caravan with
Waiter O'tUefe, Dean.
Jaoia, Ted Hiuioa, GUo
Gray aad ow Cau loma
Oreheatta
Tuaadar aad Thurtday9p.m.*.S.T.,a|Mn.C.S.T.,
9: JO p . a . M.S.T., 8:30
p.m. P.ST.-ovw WABCCofauafcwNarwofk.
COSTLIER
TOBACCOS!
I
» I* I N M
V I
I U tl A (
*
Page 2
Page 3
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, MARCH 6, 1936
tiomore
I played
, inquet,
t Page
shmitie,
;• team.
I three
, comchmitz,
Vasser)n and'
Tom
ituting
denrys,
a, and
Frosh
in and
guard;
Doran,
olunan,
x> subRoland
ci PorFrank
LAVKITA
reau
night,
up for
•u, for
to tho
Eosella
Calkins. 1
Bulb GiKalbaus*
Helen Cfc
Hurt, »
Lam,Bot'
Vermilye,'
Mildred f
KAthryn*
Don Vito,
Ella GIST
JobsOD, I
Josephint
Mullen, *
Adelaide
Stewart,
•eh
ctor in
of the
ns fol•ngoror,
'irginia
;iisnioro
l>ubli*.
Editoria
Snbscrip
Delivers
•eeond r
^oop
SOIlloTS
'•iiimii'iil
VctlllOH-
ry over
ros rosocond
points
The §
express e»
printed |
in-Chiet
desired,
all coma
dliindur
er iimo
by a
points
12 for
PRINTO
Vol. X3
The I
to enrol'
goal of
The C l
of the:'
in the I
building
fitting I
Pail
hundred
faces gi
as yet^p
staggeii
less
men: i D
making
Even
no suet
institill
sand dp
lars af
tnougt
T!:6
seeurej
kind iff
a posflg
per c f
thingf
the
A
the
dema
pledg
Uon
be tag*
of a |
regubfl
The:
terapof
Myikaj
by eaf
pos*e«f
inut«; I
the eof
1818
MIS
Will 1)8
Pl»ct
the nut
of sen!
Helve*.
eleetior
Vote
in-
!go, its
• would
J would
e town
;inction
ACCESSION of Edward
r * VIII to the throne of
England recalls the visit of
the filmed bachelor king to
the University of Chicago
campus in ioia wh-n he was
the Prince of Wales. He is
shown tourimj the campus
with Chicago's former Pres.
WMHHH
B A S K E T SHOOTING reached new neudita in the Pacific rv*>*»
^ «**«««* this year when Hank Utmtu, Sunford w3w«»e
Burton.
,-. , . j ,
.
.
_
f. Y.
OiutAiiu I>AU« NJWI. Vumtt
..
•
ii'
H HVii^ff-ynVii
> I
MM
Page 2
STATE.CPXiLBaE.JiiF-.wa-MA.p.m.T- » •><
—•
i .n
Page 3
ill—mwmmmmmm~~m
Money-Back offer helps college men
find their ideal pipe smoke!
ill Teams
et March 18
Annual Game
'! freshman-sophomore
me will be played
he sophomore banquet,
ircli 18, on the Page
''ding to Paul Schmitz,
the sophomore team.
class receives three
slass rivalry.
>re varsity is com'owing: Paul Schmitz,
>rward, Abe WasserAlfred Trehanon and
guards; and Tom
Those substituting
ivton, Peter liodenrys,
Paul Dittman, and
1 SWITCHED
TOfWINCI
HSlRtWHCN
|R£A0TH€
iOAdNCy-BACK
OFFER
m
mk
ine-up for the Frosh
Bosley, captain and
[ershkowitz, guard;
and Kenneth Doran,
Carroll Lehman,
.owing will be subsi Wolko, Roland
1 Hard, Santi Pormyot, and Prank
Joe Robwtm 'M-"aau» in the bowl nieeiy. «*>.
William Lanahan, '38, says: "Smoothest, swelleat taatinc tobacco any one can pack into a pipe"
—meaning Prince Albert. Get acquainted with
P. A. Sac below our you-rnuat-be-pleased offer.
> Have
ress Bureau
on Monday night,
ere drawn up for
Press bureau, for
inding out to the
e state sucli inag the college, its
nts, as they would
irinting. It would
their home town
attain distinction
pling* daya were over, aaya w««»*
, W . U . I « * « ^
PRECISION HARMONOGRAPH, believed to be the only
* A one of its kind in the United States, has been designed and built
by Milan Fiske, Beloit (Wis.) College junior. The instrument demon'
strates compounds of harmonic motions. He has made 10,000,000
different curves with it.
N dances for the
ANCY
HOLMES
Spooks and Spokes
charity carnival at
the University of
Southern California
tteh, instructor in
,y adviser of the
bers are as folic! Glenn lingerer,
;er and Virginia
Warren Densmoro
Dphoniores.
Lead
ball Loop
ind the seniors
I the intramural
/ed lust Wednos-31 victory over
sophomores ron in the second
>red 10 points
tnd Friodlandor
mblc over time
juniors by a
spred 10 points
Byrnes, 12 for
"TWENTIETH CENTURY GOTHIC, by John G.
* Roberts of the University of Chicago, is this
week's winner of the PICTURE OF THE WEEK contest
with this unusual view of tower of the Chicago
Theological Seminary on the University of Chicago
campus. Five dollars is paid to each week's winner.
1885
en's Dress
MJNDRY,
r IR ArrPPTS NO SALARY - • Ohio We*
given L »l»ry back w . . » « * £
„ , , „ because a modest income
S e e s provtdes for his necessit.es of hfe.
DARENTS of Drcxel Institute
students learn about the college work of their
sons and daughters at the annual open house.
This is a class in design.
S
NOX COLLEGE students bid goodbye to David
*^* M. Molthrop, who is taking a leave of absence
from college to campaign for the democratic nomina'
tion for state representative from his home district
near Chicago. Although he's not old enough to vote
for himself, he'll be ai before he takes office—if he's
elected.
bone 5-2241
m
TE'J
*o*hod
5-1913
6-8818
r0 UNT
Larrabee.
S T P N foreum tours have 40 It**** in univefsitic and COUMM throughout the middle w*»t
. ^ a * * JNMWW - ^ " * * ' " r t * * "
s^g|i«fHft»»*
Coach Everett Dean.
M
'«PlHll!KlisllPS£
t
'*S*^*,W
CARLO WORZA «.) . g ; g S £ t S ' .
K. Y.
YES, IT S LEAP YEAR, but that doesn't
*• make it any easier for Neil Meagher and
Carl Nydegger, University of Portland
freshmen, to answer the deluge of letters
that swept down upon them when a prank'
ster submitted their names to a matrimonial
bureau.
D ASKETBALL'S INVENTOR, Dr. James Nais*-* smith of the University of Kansas, will be honored by the nation with a trip to the 1936 Olympic
games at which basketball will be played for the first
time. One cent from each admission to basketball
games played during a week in Februaryfinancedthe
gift.
\A
ARY FISHBACK and Thelma Allen played leading roles
1V1
in the University of Louisville Playhouse's presentation
of Sir James M. Bar lie's AlktSttbythcFnc.
"THE UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA, originator of the movement to place student unions
*• on college campuses, has introduced a new custom of "coffee hours" to promote better feeling
between faculty and students.
Discover New Bacteria Forms in Ocean Bottom
"THROUGH the analysis of long cores of
*• marine sediments taken from oceanic basins
over a mile deep, Dr. Claude E. ZoBell and his
associates on the staff of theJJniversity of Cali'
forntas Scripps Institution of Oceanography
have found living bacteria unlike any described
species on land and which probably represent
one of the most primitive forms of life on the
earth. The bacteria, long-buried by falling
sediments and held in a state of suspended
animation for thousands of years, have been
revived by Dr. ZoBell and made to live in the air
at room temperatures. The boat Scripps, the
unique floating laboratory from which the
samples were collected, is shown at the right.
r - - ; j . «,
A N interesting candid camera view 0/ the behind-the-scenes work
*» in the Westminster College (New Wilmington, Pa.) Little Theater
-,'.-
Mud cores taken from the
ocean's bottom are transferred to sterile bottle* for
safe-keeping until ready to Dr. ZoBell, who has had charge
of the revolutionary discoveries.
Hauling a three-toot mud core
aboard the Scriftpt. It often took
more than two hours to hoist
the pipe and its precious sample
of ocean bottom from the one'
mile depth to which it had been
towered
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, MARCH 6, 1936
State Team Will
Meet St. Michael
State Vanquishes
Poly Squad 38-31
SPORT SHOTS
Page 3
IN PAST YEARS
Basketball Teams
To Meet March 18
In Annual Game
The annual
freshman-sophomore
Fresh from our triumphant choice
One Year Ago: State-R. P. I. battle
basketball game will be played
of State over Brooklyn Polytechnic,
is final tomorrow. . . . Senate directly after the sophomore banquet,
Erratic
Playing
Features
Second
we make t h e following report on
passes the student oath bill ignoring Wednesday, March 18, on the Pago
Victory Over Brooklyn Five
tomorrow's game. First, let us look
For Series Sweep
recent Vassar opposition. . . . Dr. hall court, according to Paul Schmita,
a t the dope (we are not referring
George Painter, professor of phi- '38, captain of the sophomore team.
to the editor-in-chief' of this staid
The State college basketball team bulletin.)
The State college basketball team losophy, receives injuries in fighting The winning class receives three
is home tomorrow night to an old yet
accomplished a feat Friday, t h a t of
points in inter-class rivalry.
State plays St. Michael's to- sweeping the Brooklyn Polytechnic lire. . . . " Lead B e l l y ' ' to present
new opponent, St. Michael from
The sophomore varsity is comprogram
of
negro
spirituals.
.
.
.
morrow.
Niagara
defeated
State
institute home and home series, which
Winooski Park, Vermont.
St. Mipose- of the following: Pa'ul Schmita,
chael did not appear on the State 48-38. Niagara defeated Syracuse has eluded State basketeers for many Finance Board urges investigation captain, and forward, Abe WasserThat makes Syracuse ex- a year. The Page hall court was the for compulsory student t a x plan.
schedule last year, but they had in 34-30.
man, forward; Alfred Trehanon and
actly 14 points better than State. scene of the coup that saw State down
the years preceding this short break (Let's forget all about the Syracuse
Five Years Ago: Faculty bans John O'Brien, guards; and Tom
the
Brooklyn
Poly
team
38
to
31.
in relationships.
Those substituting
club dances. . . . Dean Pierce Ryan, center.
game, if you don't mind.)
After exploring all local sources of
After Brooklyn had missed many heads committee limiting dancing will b e : Lyle Lawton, Peter Rodenrys,
Now, are you listening?
St. shots and follow-ups, George Bancroft activities in State. . . . Team to Patsy Miranda, Paul Dittman, and
information, tho advance information
on St. Michael is woefully lacking as Lawrence beat Syracuse 38-31. So started the scoring with a foul shot finish season with game against Charles Gaylord.
The starting line-up for the Frosh
to the men to watch on the offense. far, t h e y ' r e three points better than which was soon followed by his field Newark Law School. . . . Men's
St. Lawrence also took basket from the side court. Len varsity debate team will meet Union will b e : Joseph Bosley, captain and
They use a man-to-man defense and Niagara.
Then St. Welter put State ahead, 5-4, on a college in a broadcast debate Mon- guard, Duke Ilershkowitz, guard;
a fast breaking weave offense. State St. Michael's 51-33.
Bancroft tied day night. . . . Chemistry club, William Torrcns and Kenneth Doran,
will have to be ever alert in order to Lawrence bent Niagara (or Niagara long overhead shot.
and Carroll
Lehman,
get possession of the ball once the beat St. Lawrence—I'm not sure, the score a t 11 with one of his five oldest departmental club of State forwards;
but it was one or the other) 35-34 successful foul shots in this half. college, will celebrate
nineteenth center. The following will be subweave begins.
Since St. Michael
in an overtime period.
Wolko, Roland
State again dropped behind, but anniversary. . . . Women debaters stitutes: Michael
plays such teams as Massachusetts
By simple addition, we find that Duke Ilershkowitz sank a basket from will meet Keuka varsity on March Waterman, Merril Hard, Santi PorInstitute of Technology, Middlebury,
Editorial written on cine, George Amyot, and Frank
and St. Lawrence, the conqueror of Syracuse is 14 points better than side mid-court t h a t again knotted the 19.
Being 14 points count a t 15. With four minutes to large number of second offenders Qualtrochi.
Syracuse, who downed St. Michael St. Michael's.
last Saturday, 51 to 32, they will better than St. Michael's, and 14 go in this half, the hip and elbow against college tradition as given
better than us, this conclusively boys from Brooklyn garnered six out by Myskauia.
be out there tomorrow niglit with the
proves that Syracuse could trounce points while Dick Margison earned
Ten Years Ago: State women's
hope of returning to the path of vic- either of us.
S t a t e ' s three. Brooklyn Poly had a basketball team loses to Russell
tory.
Therefore we pick Notre Dame to slim lead, 21-18, a t half time.
Sage, 39 to 42. . . . Team to play
On the other hand, the Purple and
The second half opened with Mar- Buffalo Normal college tonight. . . .
At a meeting on Monday night,
Gold, fresh from a victory over beat Ohio State, the Red Sox to
Brooklyn Polytechnic institute, cher- win the World Series, and an over- gison sinking a corner shot. Then, Concert is success. . . . Dean tentative plans were drawn up for
time
period
tomorrow
night.
when Captain Bancroft tapped in a Pierce favors modern girl in .stating, a State College Press bureau, for
ish the idea of a three game winning
If you c a n ' t stand these nerve- follow-up shot, State had a momentary " L e t college girls wear short dresses the purpose of sending out to the
streak to conclude this season. In
addition to the starters of the Brook- wracking close games, s t a y home lead, b u t a successful foul t r y by and rouge a little if they want t o . " newspapers of the state such inlyn Poly game, Coach Goewey will and wait for the whole thing to Villantl wiped out the State advan- . . . State college to be asked to formation concerning the college, its
use Johnny Ryan. Ryan's ankle is blow over. Some one will tell you tage. The State machine fortunately join N.S.F.A. . . . G.A.A. has activities and students, as they would
lost the " b i i t t e r f i n g e r s " that had purchased eight pairs of anowshoes, be interested in reprinting. I t would
a t last responding to treatment and all about it Monday morning.
been evident most of the evening. which may be rented for an after- give recognition in their home town
he will be able to play for a few minMargison's bucket a minute later noon or evening for twenty-five cents. to students who attain distinction
utes when State needs points in a
created
the last tie in the game, 27
here at State.
rally. Captain Bancroft is the only
all. Paul Bulger let fly one of his
Dr. William French, instructor in
man left on the squad who faced St.
underhand specialty shots that put
education, is faculty adviser of the
Michael when ' they were here two
the Purple and Gold on the victory
bureau.
The members nre as folyears ago. The State basketeers will
trail. The last three Teachers' points
lows: Karl Ebers and Glenn Ungerer,
have to be in " t o p ' ' form to get the
were earned on the foul line, bringing
seniors; Fred Dexter and Virginia
nod of victory from tliis fast moving
the State points from this source up to
Stoel, juniors; and Warren Densmoro
team.
The scoreboard's
final
and Richard Cox, sophomores.
William E. Van Buskirk, educa- eighteen.
The preliminary game at 7:30
tional director of the Civilian Con- reading showed State with 38 to
brings the strong VVatervliet High servation Corps camp situated at Brooklyn Polytechnic institute's 31.
The capital district typewriting
school team from Watervliet as oppo- Tannersville, New \ r ork, requests
contest being sponsored by the STATE
Captain Bancroft returned to form
nents to the State freshmen.
help, through the student council of to lead his team to victory with fif- COLLEGE N E W S and Commerce club on
the college, in the establishment of teen points. Dilg was high for Poly Friday night, March 27, will be open
his educational program in the camp. with seven points, all of which were
to State college students with typeThe sophomores and the seniors
The director asks for speakers, scored in the first half. As an exam- writing
experience,
according to emerged victorious in the intramural
debaters, or lecturers on any sub- ple of the number of fouls committed
basketball games played last Wednesject which he considers would bo of by Poly, the State forwards earned Samuel Silverman, '36, president of day.
interest and benefit to the enrollees. ten of their twenty-six points on the Commerce club,
By virtue of a L'9-31 victory over
Students interested in entering the the freshmen, the sophomores relie also asks for the contribution by foul line.
contest
are
requested
to
see
Silverstudents
of
old
text-books,
pamphlets,
The sophomore class will conduct a
main the leading team in the second
These points were the difference
man or : ly member of the committee round.
banquet on Monday niglit, March 1(1, discarded typewriters, or any material between defeat or victory.
Miranda scored 10 points
at 0:00 o'clock in the Cafeteria of which might be used to advantage in
In the best preliminary game of for the rules and regulations. Class for the sophomores, and Friedlander
ilusted hall, according to Herbert his work.
this season, the Rensselaer High D, in which State students may enter, 8 for the freshmen.
The camps, located in states all school was given the nod over the is for contestants who are graduates
Drooz, president.
The seniors in a double over time
Speakers at the banquet will be over the nation, are attempting, in freshmen by the score of 25 to 22. or undergraduates of a business col- period conquered the juniors by a
Mr. William (1. Hardy mid Mr. Louis this way, through the National Stu- The score was tied at half time, 12 lege or any other college offering 3(5-36 score. Baker scored 10 points
C. Jones, instructors in English, dent Federation of America, to all, and at the end of the third quar- typewriting in its curriculum, but who for the victors, and Byrnes, 12 for
losers.
who will address the sophomores on establish relations between the col- ter, 18 all, but Thompson came have had no experience,
the subject, " H o w Not to Write a lege students and the enrollees of through for Rensselaer in the closing
Invitations have been extended to
the civilian camps.
The contacts minute. George Ainyot was high man high schools in the capital district.
College Research P a p e r . "
Guests of (lie sophomores include formed will be of value to both. The for the frosh with six points, ami Included in the list are Albany High
Dr. A. R. Brubaeher, president; Dr. men in the camps will derive enjoy- Thompson was credited with
Established 1885
ten school, Philip Schuyler, Philip LivMilton (I. Nelson, dean; Mis> Helen ment and instruction, and the col- points for Rensselaer High.
ingston, Iluckett, Milne, Nott TerHall Morehiiul, dean of women; lege students, practice in speaking.
race, Mont Pleasant, Bethlehem CenCollege men and members of the
Klailie Bnird and <!li
Ungoror,
We Specialize in Men's Dress
tral school, Castleton High school,
STATIC COLI.KCIO
m e in h e I' s nl' Myskauia, senior faculty who would be interested in
Koessleville Union school, Troy High
I'll
in
Shirts
speaking
at
the
camps
should
sign
honorary society, mid guiii'diuns nl'
:;
Mai'gisoii, r. I'.
school, Watervliet High school, Rensii
up on the main bulletin board ill the T, Itviui. r. f.
the class.
selaer
High
school,
Coeymans
High
,*
1. I'.
The chairman of the event is rotunda of Draper hall, listing the SHancriil'l,
school, Ravelin High school, Cohoes
n
i • 11111iI /., I. I
i
Clarence Van Ktten.
He will lie subject on which they would like to Welter, c.
High school, and East Nassau Central
n
assisted liv Helen Callenius, Mercy speak. Mr. Van Huskirk will decide Ill l i s , c,
school.
I
IrlHllknwIlZ,
I'
Forman, Charles finylord, and Ur- whether or nut the sc'tjoel holds
II
WATERVILLE LAUNDRY,
Knvln, r. f[.
Members of the contest committee
interest for his camp.
sula Tetrault.
i
HllllttT. I. If.
are Silverman, Aubrey Kalbaugh,
II
AllM'IM'llt. I. If,
INC.
Karl Kbers, Edward Kramer, seniors;
Vi
TOTALS
:J8 Mary Sulamey, John Pcno, and Fred
289 Central Ave.
Phone 5-2241
Dexter, juniors.
Weave Offense T o Aid Opponents
Noted For Fast Playing;
Ryan Rejoins Squad
Students to Have
New Press Bureau
C.C.C. Director
Asks Student Aid
In Camp Program
State Students
Eligible to Enter
Typewriting Meet
Sophomores Lead
Basketball Loop
Sophomores Will
Conduct Banquet
Monday, March 16
Inquiry Into Secrets of Make-up
Reveals Problems of Thespians
"Individuality
is expressed in
every character make-up, and personal
experience to find one's medium is
the best teacher ill preparing for this
complex s t u d y , " stated Miss Agues
E. Futterer, assistant professor of
English, in an interview with your
inquiring reporter,
Most of the students at State attend the productions of the Advanced
Dramatics class, which Miss Eutterer
teaches, without realizing the vast
amount of work and minute details
involved in the preparation of the
players for their individual roles. A
simple I'nce make-up will include not
onlv the barest application of necessary colors, but a character study
typifying a definite role involves careful consideration of ninny factors in
order to secure desired effects.
The first step in making up a mem
ber of the cast, Miss Puttorer maintains, is a study of the face to see
what definite type it is and to discern
tho proper location for shadows to
portray the character part. For oxamplo, u young girl with full cheeks
is difficult to make up into an emaciated, old woman, but, with the proper
lining of shadows, she could be cast
very well us a ruddycomplexionod,
round, old woman.
The application of cold cream precedes I lie use of a combination of
grease paints which form the bases to
cover the entire facial tissues, When
blocking in shadows, the expert must
lilend tlie dominant shadows under the
cheek belies, temples, eye sockets, or
under the chin, with the basic coloring.
The iiiuke up of a character study
is as essential to the part as the
memorization of the lines of the play,
fur the features of a young-looking
actor may have to he changed radically in suit his role of an old man.
Tricks exist in nil professions, and
the ail of m a k e u p is no exception,
since it must employ all the technical
aids at its command. If a person has
a nose too thin to look like a negro
with broad nostrils, a line across his
nnse will give it the proper degree of
width. In old age parts, the player
must have his hands properly lined in
the knuckles und on the buck of the
hand to show his age. On the forehead, brown grease paint is used to
give old age lines,
Aside from the learning gleaned
from books, Miss Eutterer added that
her study of character in the paintings of the great musters, such us
Rembrandt, proves as valuable in her
preparation for u difficult character
make-up us the actual past experience.
UKOOKl.YN I ' O I . Y T K C I I N i r
INKTITI'TK
Waller, r. I'.
Itiililn. I. I.
Itviin. I. f.
I'll inn II. I. f.
1
I
I
I
llelizer.
-'
c.
I Ml it, r. ir.
Vlllnntl, r. «.
T h a w , I. if.
J o h n s o n , I. K
I'll
il
o
Hi
FRANK H.
II
0
I
-
TOTAL
L'i
Score in hull' l i m e : It in 11 k I v 11
leclmtc Instil lite '-'1 : Slnle is.
d e f o r c e : t'olkel.
(i
7
I
•1
i
HI
d.v-
EVORY &CO.
General Printers
OPTICIANS;
36-38 BEAVER STREET
Milne to Conduct
Speaking Contest
Milne High school will conduct
its annual prize s p e l l i n g contest in
the auditorium of Page hull on
March :i!i at 8:00 o'clock. Tho contestants are couched by juniors und
seniors of State college.
College students und the pupils
whom they are couching ure as
follows: Augusta Bhoor, '36, coaching Ralph Norvell; Norma Taylor,
'3(1, Lillian Walk; Marjorio Whoutoii,
'36, Ethel Gillespie; .Tayno Buckley,
'36, Cora Randies; Elizabeth Studobaker, '37, Emory Bauer; Mary
Lam, '37, Alfred Wheeler; Lillian
Olson, '37, Edmund Huskinsj and
Alice AUard, '37, Elizabeth Boyd.
jtion.
•
01 Steps East of Pearl Street
FREDETTE'J
OMfUTfc OPTICAL
Geo. D. Jeoney, Prop.
Boulevard
and
198-200 CENTRAL AVENUE
5fcRVlCfj
Dial 8-1918
"
i-Hlt
Cafeteria
Qrill
ALBANY, N. Y.
,,,*«•!&'
Page 4
^JjSsfe
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, MARCH 6, 1936
Renowned Lecturer
Will Speak Here
THREE OF DORMITORY FUND CAPTAINS IN ANNUAL DRIVE
G.A.A. FLASHES
: State students will have an opportunity on March 26 to hear a lecture
by Miss Eunice Avery, who comes to
State with a reputation of being an
' ' Interpreter of World Affairs.'' The
topic of her lecture will be "Washington News on the Home Front."
The lecture will be in the Page hall
auditorium at 8:30 o'clock, and all
students will be admitted free.
Miss Avery is a lecturer of wide
repute, this season being her fourteenth aa a lecturer. She is a Vassar
graduate, and has lectured in Albany
several times previously under the
auspices of the Vassar club.
The freshmen started the wagon
rolling, and pushed over the Milno
high team by a score of 41-18. The
massacre took place on the Page hall
court last Friday. I t was a beautiful
exhibition of sloppy playing by both
teams.
Camp Johnston week-end has been
"postponed because of conditions at
camp." Said "conditions" being
the lack of those essential elements—
wood, water and fire. Better luck
next time.
The Alums will be trooping back
soon to take on our best basketball
players. There'll be plenty of oil
around for the old ladies' joints, but,
nevertheless, beware . . .
G.A.A. Alumnae
To Have Reunion
The Girls' Athletic association will
entertain its alumnae on Saturday,
March 28. Elizabeth Hobbie, '36, is
general chairman for the week-end
assisted by Elsa Smith, '37.
The program will feature two
basketball games in the afternoon, a
preliminary inter-class game at 3:00
o'clock, and a game between the
alumnae and tlic undergraduates at
4:00 o'clock. A banquet in the
cafeteria at 6:00 o'clock will climax
the day's activities. It is expected
that many of the alumnae will return
for the week-end festivities.
Frances Studebaker, Jayne Buckley, and Elaine Baird, seniors and members of Myskania, senior
honorary society, who are three of the thirty-nine captains in the annual dormitory fund drive now
under way.
TO PRESENT OPERETTA
The State College Music association will present the Gilbert and Sullivan operetta " P i n a f o r e " in the
auditorium of Page hall on Tuesday
and Wednesday, March 17 and 18,
according to Frances Studebaker,
'36, president.
TO ATTEND CONVENTION
Sixteen Milne High school students
under the supervision of Miss Mary
Elizabeth Conklin, supervisor of English, will attend the sessions of the
Columbia Scholastic Press association on March 12, 13, arid 14 in
New York City.
WRITES ON BARRIE
A magazine article, " A Scot in
America", written by Israel ('Babe')
Kaplan, '30, appeared in winter
issue, number three, of " T h e Colophon", a quarterly for bookmen.
Kaplan wrote the discourse, a study
of James Barrio, while attending a
State College summer school course
under Mr. Bradbury.
WELCOMES MEMBERS
Gamma chapter of Kappa Delta
Bho welcomes the following into full
membership: Thomas Cunningham,
37, Robert Agone, Joseph Bosley,
Cornelius Fogarty, Robert Hertwig,
Charles Kelley, Carroll Lehman, Donald Loomis, Cecil Marino, Joseph
Muggleton, Gerard Murphy, Arnold
Paladin, Santi Porcino, and Frank
Quattrocchi, freshmen.
...and Chesterfields are usually there
...its a corking good
cigarette
(Q^iL at*.—
WEDNESDAY
SATURDAY
KOSA
I'ONhELI.E
NINO
MAHTINI
KOSTELA.NfclZ OBCHESTKA AND CHOBUS
9 P . M. <E. S. T.)-COLUMBIA NETWOBK
© m6, LJGGITT Si lixtu TOBACCO CO.
estertie
.. for mildness
.. for better taste
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