S t a t e College News Y.M.C.A.TOGIVE FRESHMAN DINNER

advertisement
State College News
VOL.
XVI. No. 4
Y.M.C.A.TOGIVE
FRESHMAN DINNER
STATE COLLEGE FOR TEACHERS, ALBANY, N. Y., FRIDAY, OCTOBER 16,
Banquet Speakers
Kirby Page, Nationally Known
Disarmament Authority,
To Be Speaker
The
annual
students
Young
M e n ' s Christian association dinner
for freshmen will be c o n d u c t e d this
y e a r in the College house at 134
C e n t r a l avenue on T h u r s d a y at 5:30
o'clock, Robert Robinson, '34, chairman, a n n o u n c e d today. T h i s is the
first time that a dinner of this nat u r e h a s been conducted at t h e College house. T h e house can accomm o d a t e about seventy at a dinner,
he said.
Mr. Kirby Page, w h o will be
guest speaker at the dinner, has
travelled extensively and has talked
with m a n y prominent leaders in
world affairs. A m o n g the interesting p e r s o n s with whom Mr. I'age
has talked a r e M a h a t m a ('.audi,
President Hiiidenburg of G e r m a n y ,
R a m s a y MaeDonald of England,
President
Chiang
Kai-Shek of
China, Lord C e i l , Bernard Shaw,
Lady Astor, L l o y d - G e o r g e and
others.
Mr. Page is editor of T h e W o r l d
T o m o r r o w and a u t h o r of eleven
volumes nil international, social and
religious questions. Several of his
w o r k s have been t r a n s l a t e d into
French, German, Greek, S p a n i s h ,
Chinese, and J a p a n e s e . T h e titles
of his books a r e : National Defense;
A S t u d y of the Origins, Results ami
P r e v e n t i o n of W a r ; J e s u s or Chrisl u m t v Dollars md \ \ old Pi tet
M a k e r s of f r e e d o m ; An American
Peace Policy; Imperialism and Nationalism; T h e Abolition of W a r ;
W a r : I t s Causes, Continences and
C u r e ; Christianity and E c o n o m i c
P r o b l e m s ; T h e Sword or the C r o s s ;
S o m e t h i n g More, l i e also edited
Recent Gains in American Civilizalon and A New E c o n o m i c O r d e r .
Mr. P a g e is one of the w o r l d ' s lead
ing a u t h o r i t i e s on d i s a r m a m e n t
questions.
Largest Student Budget to Be
Discussed in Assembly
At 11:10 Today
Kirby I'ligo
A d d r e s s e d 200 Colleges
Mr. P a g e is speaking c o n s t a n t l y
before influential audiences in all
s e c t i o n , of the c o u n t r v .
Among
the 2(10 colleges at which lie has
Kirby P a g e , above, intern
spoken a r e : *> ale, Princeton, I lar- tioiially known lecturer, and
viird, Columbia, A m h e r s t , Cornell,
A n d r e w A. Hritz, '32, president
D a r t m o u t h , University of Chicago,
of Ihe V.M.C.A., who will be
University of Wisconsin, N o r t h main speakers al annual d i n n e r
western, Stanford, and University
T h u r s d a y night in College house.
of California.
I k- was b o m in T e x a s . Refore
entering college he was for three
years a secretary of the V.M.C.A.
in I luiistoii, Texas, l i e is a graduate of I 'rake university and look
g r a d u a t e work at the University of
Chicagc >, I 'olumbia ttuiversil v. I le
was elected to Phi beta Kappa, lbwas intercollegiate tennis champion
of Iowa and a varsity basketball
plaver.
Educational Fraternity To
From NIG to 1918 he travelled
Have Entertainment Towith Sherwood Eddy in his evangelistic work with soldiers in the
night in Lounge
war zone and will s t u d e n t s in the
Far East. In 1926 lie b e c a m e editor of the World T o m o r r o w .
Kappa Phi Kappa, national lion
Aiming the other s p e a k e r s sched- orary educational fraternity, will
uled a r e A n d r e w A. l i n t / , '32, pres- conduct an informal parly for men
ident of the student Y.M C.A.; Ken- of the College in the L o u n g e of
neth l o h n s o n , '35, m e m b e r of the Richardson hall tonight al 7:30
cabinet; and Dr. Dounal V. Smith, o'clock. This is Ihe first event of
faculty advisor of ihe V.M.C.A.
ils kind to he conducted by this
T h e r e is no charge for freshmen fraternity.
to a t t e n d the dinner. UpperclassThe 'purpose of the parly is to
inen are requested to pay a nominal interest all male m e m b e r s of the
sum. T h o s e desiring to a t t e n d the College in education and to pardinner must sign up on the bulletin ticipate in the informal p r o g r a m .
hoard in the men's locker room be- T h e r e a r e no speakers scheduled,
fore W e d n e s d a y , Robinson said.
according to Kenneth A. Miller, '32,
chairman of ihe p r o g r a m commit
lee.
Many of the alumni, who are al
tending ('oiivocalion serv ices In \ l
hany this week end are expected lo
visii ihe parly
Part of the in
formal p r o g r a m will be to talk of
actual teat lung situations, Audi evv
Alpha Phi Gumma conducted a A. I l r i t / , '32, president, stated.
All the male m e m b e r s of the fac
pledge service Tuesday altcniooii at
-1:15 in the publications office, accord- nlty have been invited to a t t e n d .
ing to Samuel Durranre, '32, presiRECENT GUESTS
dent.
T h e pledges were Michael
Frohlieh, Bessie l.eviue, and Vera
Emilia Ackley, '29, Annabelle
Hums, seniors,
Mr. Sherrill Leonard, secretary of McConnell, '31, Alice Bennett, '31,
the national council of Alpha Phi Lucia Stephens, '31, Edith H u n t ,
Gumma, attended a meeting of the '.il and Ruth Hughes, '31, were rechapter Wednesday night, according cent visitors al Ihe Psi G a m m a
sorority house.
lo Doriancc.
KAPPA PHI KAPPA
TO HAVE SMOKER
ALPHA PHI GAMMA
CONDUCTS PLEDGE
SERVICE TUESDAY
BALLOT WILL BE
ON $14 TAX TODAY
The student tax will remain at
$14. if the students accept the $16,668.23 budget submitted by the student board of finance when it is presented in assembly today. This is
the largest budget ever to be submitted to the student association, Mr.
Clarence A. Ilidlev, treasurer, said.
It is $566.58 larger than last year
when the total budget for the year of
1930-31 amounted to $16,101.65 and
provided for a $1 1.00 tax.
The student enrollment is placed at
1183 by the finance; hoard, and thus
tin tax remains at $14., Mr. Ridley
explained.
The student association rejected
the three recommendations made b\
the student hoard of finance last F, i
day. The hoard recommended that
the Lion he dropped from Ihe budget,
that increases he disallowed, and the
tax he $13. l!y opposing these recommendations, the students rejected
a possible $13 lax. The tax has
been $14. every year since 1928
when the total budget for that year
amounted to $14,652.20 and the lax
was only $13.
The following dates have been des
ignaied by the student board of li
nance for tax collections. Wednesday and Thursday, October 21 and
22, for freshmen; Wednesday and
Thursday, October 28 and 29, for
sophomores; Wednesday and T h i n s
day. November-I and 5, for j u n i o r s ;
Wednesday and Thursday, November
11 and 12, for seniors.
Tax collection will take place in
room 201 of I Iraper hall, Mr. Ilidl
announced,
II be collected
from all liar
ring to pay I
'.he above schedule dales, Mr. II
concluded.
19.31
$2.25 Per Year, 32 Weekly Issues
Graduate Student Wins Fame
As Amateur Telescope Maker
Mrs. T h o m a s J e n k i n s a graduate student, has successfully constructed a six foot telescope.
This i n s t r u m e n t w a s an outstanding figure at the convention
id A m a t e u r T e l e s c o p e M a k e r s at
"Stellafane", near
Springfield,
Mass., this past July. Willi the
aid of her h u s b a n d , she devoted
130 hours lo t h e m i r r o r p a r t of
the work. She is the third woman
who has successfully completed a
m i r r o r as an a m a t e u r .
1932 SETS DATE
OF ANNUAL DANCE
FOR OCTOBER 30
QUEEN TO RECEIVE
CROWN TOMORROW
All
Candidates to Rehearse
In Unison to Preserve
Utmost Secrecy
CLASSES TO GIVE STUNTS
C a t h e r i n e Norris, Last Year's
C a m p u s Queen, T o Crown
H e r Successor
The campus queen will he crowned
tomorrow evening in Page hall. H e r
identity will he unknown until she apThe annual senior hop will he con- pears in the auditorium. T o insure
ducted by Ihe class of 1932 Friday, secrecy all the candidates, Florence
Mildred
(Ictoher 30, in the Page hall gymna- Freidman, Isabel Peard,
Smith, I lorothy Hall, and Elizabeth
sium.
Jackson, will practise together, and
Robert 'Rankins, '32, vice-president none ol them will appear in the audiof Ihe class, is general chairman for torium before the queen is chosen.
Ihe dance. Mis committees include: The queen will he attended by two
Duane Maker, music; lulia bister, women from each of the four classes.
fids; Harold I laswell, floor; Leah 'I'hr senior attendants will he the rtmI'organ, decorations; Kathryn Belk- ners-up to the queen, the sophomore
nap, favors; Frances Keller, arrange- and junior attendants will be chosen
ments; Helen
Burgher,
refresh- by the class presidents, and the atments ; Carl Tarho.x, publicity.
tendants for the freshman class will
I f il is necessary to limit the at- be appointed by Myskania.
Last
tendance, seniors, class officers, and year's queen, Catherine Norris, will
student association officers will be crown the new qui en.
After the
given preference. If any other fids coronation each class will present a
are available they will 'he given to stunt for her approval.
the juniors, sophomores, and freshMiss K r o n m a n , '32, D i r e c t s
men, in that order, who may wish to
purchase them.
The senior class stun! under the di'file orchestra has not vet been de- rection of Ruth Kronman will have
cided upon by the committee. Plans Ihe following cast :—Frances Gaynor,
are expected lo he completed very Leah I'organ, Helen Kohel, Judith
bister. Robert Rankins, George Rice,
soon according to Rankins.
Carl Tarho.x, Michael Frohlieh, and
Kenneth Miller. Nile Clemens will
be in charge of props, Asenath Van
liurcn of music, Andrew Hritz of
lighting, and Helen Silver will he
assistant director.
The fust issue of the Echo will I
The junior class stunt, directed by
published the first week of Nov eml
Ming lo .Samuel S Dorrauce '32, I '"'"""' - S| - vn . will have the following
ir. As yet no definite features I members ol the class as a cast:
Ilihna Bergstrom, Alice Vaughn,
been completed.
Bertha Buhl. Mae Gilmore, Frances
Root, Marcia Gold, Marie
fudd,
Mary Dohcrty, Jean Watkins, Helen
Cadieu.x, Margaret Morton. Mary
Gardiner. Margaret Rausch, Mac
Smith, Margaret
Kurlicz, Alvina
Lewis, Raymond Harris, Ormond
Miss Edith Wynne
Matthison, sue mail appearan
Guyer, Benjamin Ingraham, Frank
world-famed interpreter of Shakcs- and eng: d in the I ' l l •matum
Young, Bernard Kerhcl, William
percan characters, whom the Alumni Greek pi
Reagan, Clayton Stewart, Charles
associali
u' Slate college will preJuckctt, Frances McMahon, KathcrIn
1927
Miss
Matthison
received
a
ine Moore, and Gilbert DeLaura.
senl in the auditorium of Page hall,
i the Frances McMahon will direct coson ( Ictoher 28, has a wide and varied gold medal for g, , „ | dictio
stage experience which she began at I s age from the American Academy tumes; Katherine bong, music; and
Ihe age of ten, in 1897.
| [' f Arts and Letters. In lune of that Bruce h'ilby, properties and sets.
year Mount I lolyoke college conS o p h o m o r e s N a m e Cast
She started her professional ca- ferred upon her the degree of master
reer in Birmingham, England, where if arts.
'I'he sophomore stunt, directed by
she was bom, in the chorus of "'fhe
Helen Mahar, will have the followS, | I Cirl." Her first public aping cast: Ahnira Riiss. Don,thy
pearance as a Shakcspcrean actress
Klose, Emma Pantaloiie, Shirley
was with the Ben Grccl players, who
Diamond, Ruth Crutchlev.
Beltv
appeared at Stale college two years
Arnold. Hannah Parker, Dorothy
ago, in ihe year 1898. Since then she
Griffm,
Mice
Fitzputrick,
Mary
has appeared in ivvenlv three ShakcMoore. Minnie
McNickle,
Alice
spcrean leading parts. I ler success in
Owen. Helen Dohcrly, Helen Danthe title part of "Everyman" in 1902
ally, Thelma Smith, Eleanor Waterwas followed by an extensive Ameribury. Ellen Noon, Letitia Connolly,
can lour, and on her return she took
Anna McKee. Marion Mlee/.ck. Tom
Ihe part of Porlia in the "Merchant
Garrett.
Stewart
(lay,
George
of Venice." She acted with Sir
Ketcham, Robert Robinson, William
Henry Irving on ihe very night of
Nelson, Philip Kiccardi Sylvia Sar.dT
his death iii this play.
will be in charge of costumes assisted
by
Hilda
Bookheiin
and
Ruth
Her return to America In 1908
France, Mav belle Matthews in charge
forshadowed her success in two plays
of make-up, and Donald Benedict of
which were written by her husband,
lighting.
Mr. Charles Baiiu Kennedy, famous
play producer and actor.
\fter
'fhe freshman stunt under the supplaying a number of important roles
ervision of Janet Norris will have
on Broadway including parts in
the following members of ihe class as
a cast: Peggy 'fen Fvck, John II.
"Sister Beatrice,
File Piper," and
Ilawes, Katherine Stuart, William
the "Xecissarv
Evil," she plaved
loiies, Kenneth Christian, William
the part of Queen Catherine in "King
Torpey, John McThaguc, Ruth Sage,
Henry V I I I " with Sir Robert Tree,
In New York during the year of
|91(i.
In May of that year she
plaved the pari of Miranda in "t ali
ban by the Velloc Sands" at the
Shakcspcrean Tercenlenarv celebration, in the New York Cilv college
stadium.
baler Miss Matthison retired from
the active professional theatre to
I'.i ta A la si inn ity a
unci's ihe
conduct with her husband the Benmarriages of Marjorie D u n h a m '31
nett School lor liberal and Applied
and Malcolm F. Smith al Pittsarts at Millbrook, New York There
burgh, Pennsylvania, Ethel M h u she received demands from her adman, '31, and llerford A. Smith of
Edith Wynne M a t t h i s o n ,
mirers lo make public appearances.
Nassau; \ l y c e II. Barber, '30, and
famed S h a k e s p e a r e a n actress,
She therefore appeared in ihe play,
Charles l l a i g h l of Albany; Beatrice
who
will
appear
in
Page
hall
"The Chastening' by her husband
A. Clapper, '27, and Donald E. T e r under ihe auspices of the alumni
with such success that she made other
huiic of Albany; and D o r o t h y \l.
association
on O c t o b e r 28.
appearances in "The Admiral," " T h e
Severns, Ml, and Fred A. W o o d Tickets for the p r e s e n t a t i o n will
Salutation," and "Old Nobody," also
inansee of Silver Lake.
he sold next week in D r a p e r hall.
by her husband. At Millbrook also
Echo To Be Published
First Of Next Month
Miss Matthison, Famed Shakespearean
Actress, Has Varied Stage Experience
SORORITY REPORTS
MARRIAGE OF FIVE
FORMER MEMBERS
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 16, 1931
State College News
Established by the Class of 1918
The Undergraduate Newspaper of New YorkState College for Teaehers
T H E NEWS BOARD
GEORGE P . R I C E
Editor-in-Chief
455 Elk Street
AUDREY FLOWERS
Advertising
Manager
Page Hall, 131 South Lake Avenue, 6-6482
ANDREW A. H R I T Z
Managing
Editor
201 North Lake Avenue, 5-1611
HELEN
ROIIEI
Finance
Manager
Chi Sigma Theta, 215 Partridge Slreet, 6-6456
ALVINA R. L E W I S
Associate Managing
206 Western Avenue, 4-1839
Editor
BERNARD S. KERBEI
Editor
Associate
57 Elberon Place
Managing
SENIOR ASSOCIATE EDITORS: Ruth Brezee, Vera Hums, Frances
Keller, and Bessie Levine. JUNIOR ASSOCIATE EDITORS: Ablne
Dinneen, Harriet Dunn, Laura Stvn, and Maruaret Servjee.
DESK EDITOR: Crenfell Rand, '34. REPORTERS: l.uisa Iglesia.s,
Rose Kantor, Carolyn Kramers, Ruth Putnam, Violet Putnam,
ISessie Simmons, Hilda Smith, and Edith Teppcr, juniors; Virginia Abajian, Celia liishop, Diane liochuer, Hilda liunkheim,
Eleanor Contain, Katherine Cunueen, Helen Doherly, Jane
Doocey, Prances Higgins, Marion Howard, Marion Mleczek,
Mary Moore, Hannah Parked, Marilyn Roscnheck, A uiiia
Russ, Betty Salese, Katherine Simmons, Thelina Smith, llessie
Stetkar, Dolores Van Scott, Mary Lou Waltber, Katherine
Wilkins, and Elizabeth Zuend, sophomores. Cmrui.ATi.i.N MANAGER:
Frances
Mazar,
'32.
ASSISTANT
BUSINESS
MANAGERS :
Mary Doherty and Jean Watkins, juniors
BUSINESS STAFF:
Jean Craigmlle, Marguerite Crulchley, and Katberine Il.iug,
sophomores.
Published every Friday in the college year by the Editorial
Board representing the Student Association. Subscriptions, $2.25
per year, single copies, ten cents. Delivered anywhere in tic
postoffice
United States. Entered as second class --•••- at
••• •Albany, N. Y.
The News does not necessarily endorse sentiments cxp
in contributions. No communications will be printed utile
writers' names are left with the Editor-in-Chief of the
Anonymity will be preserved if so desired. I be NEWS do
guarantee to print any or all communications.
PRINTED IIY HAMILTON PRINTING COMPANY, ALIIANY, NEW YORK
Vol. X V I . No. 4
Oct. 16, 1931
Albany, N. Y.
AN O P E N
T o M r . Alfred
LETTER
Basch;
T h e e d i t o r of this n e w s p a p e r feels that be cannot
allow your rather lengthy harangue upon its integrity to go unanswered,
l i e believes, however, that
it would be unethical to use the c o l u m n s of this publication for that purpose.
T h i s m o r n i n g be will endeavor to obtain t h e floor
in s t u d e n t a s s e m b l y for the purpose of defending his
editorial policy against the Lion and give support to
the reasons why he feels that publication should be
r e m o v e d from t h e budget.
H e will a n s w e r in detail each of the a r g u m e n t s you
used last week and will slick to facts and r e a s o n i n g
to the best of bis ability, lie will not use any rumors
or offer personal opinion as evidence during the course
of the discussion.
G e o r g e I'. Rice
Editor-in-chief
STATE COLI.EOE
COUNCIL
NEWS
KEEPS
BUSY
T h e energetic action of
if lb
the student council in nik
ing office-grabbers " d i s g o r g e " is c o m m e n d a b l e . It
is a policy that will meet wit 11 the approval of every
m e m b e r of t h e student association.
O n l y too often some students lake m o r e than their
s h a r e of e x t r a - c l a s s honors in J u n e when I hey enter
the lists to strive for the titles being left by d e p a r t ing seniors o r up-going juniors.
E v e r y s t u d e n t ought to have the chance to d o
something in the nature of extra class activities. It
is his right a n d should not he withheld from him because some people are too willing to capitalize oil their
p o p u l a r i t y a n d ability.
T h e a r g u m e n t that the work should he accomplished by t h o s e of greatest ability does not always
hold, for e v e r y o n e here is looked upon a s ;i potential
t e a c h e r - - a p e r s o n ill wl i are to be cultivated the
qualities of l e a d e r s h i p and guidance.
T h e r e arc si,me u n d e r g r a d u a t e s here w h o a r e really
motivated by a desire to be of service to the organi z a t i o n s to whic h they belong. T h e s e people should
not allow their zeal to carry them loo far. T h e r e is
e n o u g h for all and eai h -hotild have' a share. T h e y
should be willing to - l i p bai k lor o t h e r s .
It i- better, ton, In aei omplish one ir t w o things
s u r p a s s i n g l y well than to alii nipt n
medioi re piei e oi u ..rk mi each.
AN
INTELLIGENT
'ROGRAM
-mi adnnui
A r t e . i i of III
.1 K a p | i I'ln
K a p p a , profes;
a I fiat. i nit \,
seems lo p ' o w
c h i l e ! It
In office for 111
An encrgetii mil p m g i e
ha- b. i n
p l a n n e d fo, tin ear Mi ml
,1 i b e - t a t
die .ilmn
b r i l l
sellel
d e p a r t m e n t ha
el ore lh<
CollegV• faculty
g r o u p a- well , m e m b e r - ,
li
n.ber of oi
uei lings ifor the |.ui
has planned a
p o s e of f o s t e r i n g uiicb i landing aand
dvv ill a m o n g
t h e m e n It lias clei Ided In throw
a n u m b e r of
its m e e t i n g s in o r d e r in permit
I ITS In profit
by i b e s p e a k e r s il has sponsored.
T h i s action should meet with the approval of il
faculty as well a s men of the student body. 'I I
f r a t e r n i t y is p m v ing that il has a eluly to p e r f o r m at.
is a b o u t it
University Of Michigan Educators
Cancel Subscriptions To Newspaper
FOUR—NOT O N E
T h e N E W S board regrets the statement of last week
in which E t a P h i s o r o r i t y w a s credited with one
c a m p u s queen of nine chosen. T h e s o r o r i t y should
really have been credited with four, members informed
the editor.
Ann Arbor, Mich.—(IP)—Despite cliided professors for obtaining rethe withdrawal by the University of prints of college textbooks.
H e hopes that this u n i n t e n t i o n a l slight will not be 900 subscriptions from the Michigan
The loss to the paper by the withlaid to ill intentions and p r o m i s e s t o spank t h e r e - Daily, apparently as a protest against drawal of the subscriptions will
p o r t e r w h o w r o t e t h e story.
the student paper's editorial policy, amount to $3,600 annually, although
the University of Michigan publica- the editors have estimated that a
tion will continue, the student man- large number of the faculty will now
purchase their own papers.
agers have declared.
In a recent issue the paper said:
OtiPU I s STORY OF ' R U S S I A ;
The University authorities annually
" T h e editors of the Daily wish tn
• SLIEIUVIN WRITES OF ARNOLD—
had taken the 900 subscriptions for
state
at this time that they never
VVARSHOW EXTOLS HAMILTON
distribution among the faculty. Sev- have, and never will, permit the paper
eral recent issues of the paper have to be guilty of sensationalism. The
Ogpu, the Russian Secret Terror. Bv Georges Aga- been branded by Dr. Alexander G. Daily has the best interests of tin
bevok. Brcntano's New York City. 277 pages. $3.50. Ruthvcn, president of the University, University of Michigan tit heart, but
Comparing favorably with the Czarist Ochrana in as "tasteless and objectionable." They does not believe that such interestssubtlety and ruthless cruelty, the Ogpu, Soviet secret contained criticism of the conduct of can be fostered bv stipressinii of
service, is today covering the world with a line net- the American Legion members at its facts."
work of espionage which opens to the Bolshevist offi- recent national convention in Detroit,
T h e Daily will continue to print
cials the confidential cabinets of every country on the denounced the dean for statements news of interest to .students, the edglobe.
concerning student government and itorial said.
Its operations extend throughout Russia and into
China, Persia, India, Europe, Afghanistan, and America itself. T h e operations of this machine are related by a man who had a hand in their planning, if
not in their direction. He tells of the mass executions
of "while" Russians, peasants, and priests who were
considered a threat to the security of the present
regime.
H e l e n C r o m i e , \i.], will la in
(Continued from fai/e 1, column 5)
Inside operations are revealed by a man who has
c h a r g e of t h e " L o s t a n d P o u n d "
literally "jumped the fence." For him to return to Robert Rafferty, Carlcton Coulter, box for this year, J u d i t h bister, ,f_',
Russia would mean certain death for revealing secrets William Davigee, Betty Hartman, c h a i r m a n of t h e c a m p u s coniinis
of the Ogpu. He relates how the machine instigated Pearl Whipple, Inez Sloothoff, Ruth sion, litis a n n o u n c e d . The box will
Ball,
Dorothy be opened every F r i d a y morning
violence, how it put it down, and gives a detailed tic- Crutchley, Evelyn
count of the murder of Enver Pasha, the Bukharau Minst, Marion Htnaman, Betty Prc- after the a s s e m b l y a n d every T i n mcr, and Anne Koreti. Betty Hart- day noon for a n y o n e w h o desire- in
leader.
man, Peggy Ten Eyck, and Anne
Members of the men's debate team which will meet Korcn are assisting Miss Norris. look for lost articles, Miss b'i-ter
said.
the Englishmen on this question have found the hook John Bills has charge of props.
All " L o s t and F o u n d " noticeof exceeding value. T h e talk of President A. R.
Directly after the entertainment
Brubacher has done much to arouse the interest of there will be dancing in the gymna- must be placed on e i t h e r of the t w o
the student body in this story. It revea' a side of sium. Absolutely no one except State " L o s t and F o u n d " bulletin boards,
Russia not open to the view of the tourist—yet one college students will be admitted, tic- one o p p o s i t e t h e C o - o p by the jam
that is necessary for an understanding of the manner cording to Dorothy Hall, '32, general tor's office, a n d t h e o t h e r next in
the N e w m a n club bulletin bnanl in
in which Russia is governed today.
chairman of Campus day. .All day
the lower c o r r i d o r of D r a p e r hall.
today guest cards will be distributed
T h e main bulletin b o a r d in the
to students in Room X of Draper
hall. No student will be admitted r o t u n d a of D r a p e r hall is under t h e
supervision
of D o r o t h y Griffin, '31
Benedict Arnold, Patriot and Traitor. By Oscar Sher- without a card. Refreshments will
win. T h e Century Company. New York City. 395 be served during the course of the A n y o n e w h o desires to post any
notices
or
p
l
a c a r d s will have to get
evening. Vera Burns. '^2, is chairpages. $4.00.
man of the refreshments
com- permission front Miss Griffin befnri
This book is the tale of a man whose blood was shed mittee iml will be assisted bv Robert d o i n g so, a c c o r d i n g to Miss Lister
for the liberty of his country—who was rewarded Floody, \]2. Alvina Lewis, '.». and After notices a r e out -of date, the v
with ingratitude for his priceless efforts—and who Theodore Kckart, '3-1. Pel New- must be removed front t h e bulb tin
turned traitor when soured by lack of preference and combe's orchestra will furnish the board.
honor.
J o h n Detlcfsem, \li is in c h a r g e
music for the dancing,
The story of Arnold is an intriguing one. Wild,
lit (he afternoon a program of ath- of the student mail-box in tin lowei
c
o
r r i d o r of D r a p e r hall. All not, reckless, and brilliant, he was one of the best loved letics will be conducted bv Elizabeth
of Washington's military family. It was he who had Jackson, 'M, president of the Girls' which a r e placed in the bn.x 11111-1 be
at
least four inches by four im hefought the British in northern New York. It was he Athlelie association.
T h e feature
who volunteered for the perilous task of h a d i n g the event will be a hockey game between ll' tiny n o t e s do not cuiifnrui in
American invasion to Canada. There before the walls
teams, one of which will In these m e a s u r e n n tits, they will be
of Quebec he received a leg wound which almost cost chosen from the freshman and junior ! removed. All not
him his life.
Returning, he served under Gales at classes, the other from the sopho taken from t h e box after li
Saratoga, supplying the personal magnetism and valor more and senior classes. There will will be d e s t r o y e d by t h e c
needed to carry that till important battle.
Here he alsn be. obstacle races and tin inter
The
constantly conflicted with Gales who had come to the' class archery tournament.
iiiiiuission request
Mar
command through political pressure. Deprived of bis
n the Incker r o o m
Mi
command, Arnold threatened to light a m officer who
54, w i l l be i i i c h a r t e ..I lb
d Ix'i-i
w o m e n ' s bicker r o o m s ,
attempted to direct his wing. His reckless and headchare
long valor drove' the British into their redoubts when
nelli Miller, \U, will be
it seemed that they might succeed in their attacks on
of t h e n u n ' s Incker m
the besieging army. Near the close of the war Arnold
that this ruling is ettfor
received the command of West Point from the trustT h e class of 1035 c o m p l e t e d its
ing Washington. This he schemed to surrender to n o m i n a t i o n s hist W e d n e s d a y under
the British. Discovered, he lied to the British ami the supervision of Elizabeth lackled their troops against the land he had so valianllv son, and \11drew l l r i l x , seniors,
His life in England at the d a s , g u a r d i a n s .
defended in the past.
close of the war was unhappy, for he was scorned by
T h e Humiliations we're: for s o n g
I he British as a traitor,
Three
more
leader, Susan Smith, and liuv Slootgroup houses
i m p l e t e d t h e .'lection of their
hoff; for cheer leader, Evelyn Ball,
Once, having captured an American prisoner, he Kenneth Christian, Alta Esson, and
asked what would be done to him if he fell into the Janet N o r r i s .
Muriel Stewart, '32. will be pn
hands of the Americans. "W'e would bury the leg
For men's athletic manager, E n d (lent of Wren hall; Louise Osgo
wounded before (jucl.ee with all the- honors of War
special student, will be scerelarv
Markinan,
I
I
a
m
b
i
Naehinis.m,
and treat the rest of your body as thai of a traitor,"
Christine
I loekenberger, '31,
Julius Supcra, and William T o r p e y
was the reply.
of Alden
ball;
la
mated
A. A n v s , B. Gold' ! president
J
w
i
5
Wells,
clary
Alone and dying in a foreign hind, Arnold came to
R. k'ci
l a n d \ I . r r i s , Lima . !'.'" "' ''
regret deeply his III considered treachery, ( a i l i n g for Xcsti
Hi, Ruth Sage, E. S t a r r y , '3-1, treasurer.
The following officers were' elected
the epaulets given him by Washington, he passed ttn.l I Wallace w e n - named for
for A valon ball: Esther Gianni-.
away, to go down in history as one of the most tragic girls' athletic- manager
figures in American history.
Elections will be- conducted Wed- '31, president; Martha I ' n g . r . '34,
nesday in room 2X tit noon, the vice-president; Earisa MeNaughloii,
'31,
clary;
Nellie
W.
guardians announced.
BOOKS:
QUEEN TO RECEIVE HELEN CROMIE, '33
TO TAKE CHARGE
CROWN TOMORROW
OF LOST ARTICLES
AT ANNUAL AFFAIR
Freshmen Will Elect
Leaders On Wednesday
Group Houses Choose
Officers For] This Year
.Alexander Hamilton, hirst Wnericau Business Man Bv
Robert Irving Warshovv. Grccuhcrg. New York City
2-11 pages. $150.
MAKES
RECOMMENDATION
Lake- Placid, \ . Y. ( I P ) T h e
("emiH il of School Superintendents of
Alexander Hamilton, first American business man,
was the master spirit of the voting American republic.
Il was he who tone lied and restored "the Corpse of
public credit" when it was lifeless. Il was through his
financial genius ihat Mnencnn credit was established
HI.) al.n.ad
at h o m e ai
the S t a t e o f N e w Y o r k
backward
llamiltoi w,
in in the West hull. - of poor par
milage II
it. nihil King's college, later Columbia
tend while then
-I. d biiusi II in lln pad ml cause
It vva- necessar V Ini him to ovi IToliic the disadvantageof
fnl'ric
lli, povi itv, MO\ ill, g
1.iev b, lure h,
7 .Hi
nil..11 .,- a brilliant -I.,I, -man,
mill ..in slinhes in history, Ian
lb 1 ,,i Ibis book lo nil, 1-1.1
fascinating persunulil v
This
book b a - taken a d i f i e r e inl
i i tack than those win, h II.IVI j
emphasize .1 the p o l i t i c a l c a n , r ,,
oi llamill. n
II pn
in Mm m a n iu.ltislri.il
leader 11 -how- I l.iiuiliuii's'part
lallstii -v-l,ni ami llis originalio
p..lie) al home and abroad,
llc Slur) ol Wall
lecognitiuii as tin
-Indies m finance
holarlv II,allium
standpoint of ,,n,-
DEFENDS NEWS
in.
Today
1 III
ol
Mr. War-how is the author ol
Street." a book which ha- aclu, v,
standard work on that subject. I
have' therefore made possible hint the life of Hamilton from il
financier , v .dealing an. thcr.
COMMUNICATIONS
CALENDAR
-.i,M a l l .
Ml
I,
w e n t o n r, c
\ M
I'age
I'M
\ - . iul.lv
Widiioi
ball.
Kan..,
I'h,
Kappa
hall.
Tomorrow
2 .in
1' \ l
lulenlass
bncke-v
W e s t e r , , .,cainpuX 3d P M
( a m p i i s I1.1v
VII« 1 i
1 n i lin, I'age b a l l
\ t , - - I-,,/,.,.it.i
Tuesday
X |.i P \ l
class pl.t)
1-11
\dvauce.l dramatics
Wiiht, i l i u m , Pag,
Thursday
1
IT'S FRIENDLY ENMITY
,i,.u
5 .111
1' M .
Y \l 1 \.
annual
an.in b a t i q u c l c o l l e g e house.
II, III, 1
,o.,l
1.
II
II.an V 1 , ' M I
l l l - s i . l I1
k m 11.11 hot .a, „ l
U..11
a, l . i l 1 1
., ,1,11, 1,-1,,- III., |ll
S,„,,o
y
S T A T E COLLEGE N E W S , FRIDAY, OCTOBER 16, 1931
EDUCATORBROUGHT
SCHOOL TO STATE
RICE AND MILLER
TO OPEN DEBATES
Will Debate
Veteran Debaters to Oppose
Each Other in English
Meet November 16
Dr. James Sullivan, Founder
of Library School Here,
Dies October 8
The Library school of Stale college was one of the results of the
work for New York state accomplished by Dr. James Sullivan who
died October 8. ' W h i l e be was Commissioner of Secondary Education in
192d the New York State Library
School was merged with the Library
School of the New York Public Library and moved to Columbia. The
state polit) ;:l ilw-:iys olLrm_ in its
system of state education (mining
for all positions required by law, demanded that school librarians should
be given opportunity for training at
one of the state schools.
When I >r. Sullivan was principal
of the Boys' High school in Brooklyn some years earlier, he bad observed with much interest and approval the work of Miss Mary !•'..
K e n n e t h A. Miller, veterai
Hall, librarian of the Girls' High
m e m b e r of the varsity debate
school which was a neighbor of the
squad, w h o with George P. Rice
Boys' High school. He therefore adwill meet the British univervocated the establishment of a school
sities' team on N o v e m b e r 16
which could "give Mary Halls to the
schools of New York State."
I >r. Sullivan was active in bringing
about the support needed to launch
the new enterprise and through his
influence State college was selected
as the home of the new school. He
Dorothy King, '3.1, will be chairalways indicated his interest in the
school and had several times been a man of the junior class ring committee. J. Bruce I'ilby, junior presiwelcome guest.
By a co-incidence it was through dent, announced today. T h e commitMiss
Hall's influence that Miss tee will meet with representatives of
l'ritchard became a school librarian the various jewelry and insignia comand the ideal set by Dr. Sullivan is panies and select samples of class
further supported by the annual rings which will then lie presented to
spring visit the Library School stu- the class for approval. T h e samples
dents make to New York. They al- must also be approved by Myskania
ways visit Miss Hall HI the tiirls' before the class votes on them. JunHigh school library where she has iors will not be allowed to wear their
won the title. "Dean of School Li- rings until Moving-up day in May,
brarians" of the country by her ac- according to the class tradition.
The members of the committee
tive fruitful work over a period of
who will assist Miss King a r e : Marthirty years.
jorie
Haas, Kllcn Murphy. Esther
T h e Library School is fortunate t
have a line photograph of Dr. Sulli- I Woodburne, Gilbert He Laura and
van which Mrs. Sullivan sent in re- Frank Macl'arland.
spouse to a request included in a
A member of the sophomore class
note of appreciation sent to Dr. S u b ; will also he appointed to serve on the
livan at the time id the first five- committee, and gain experience for
year reunion of the School last June. | the next year's work.
PRESIDENT NAMES
CLASS COMMITTEE
TO CHOOSE RINGS
T w o State college men will o p pose each other in international debate for the first time in Slate college debating when Kenneth A.
Miller and George P. Rice, seniors,
uphold opposite sides in the debate
i,.. mi t ih: I mji.di untversitic s in
Page ball on Monday, N o v e m b e r
P..
Miller and Rice were chosen for
the international debate al I r y o u t s
conducted under the supervision of
Dr. Harold W. T h o m p s o n , e a c h
of debate, last week. T w e l v e men
competed for places on the t w o
teams named.
Both Miller and Rice will be first
speakers in the debate, o n e speaking for the affirmative, teamed with
one Englishman, while the o t h e r
will uphold the negative with the
o t h e r Englishman.
The Englishmen
will
deliver
the second
speeches and the rebuttals.
T h e debate will be on the issue
of whether or not Fascism constitutes a greater menace to world
peace than does Bolshevism. Constructive speeches will be t w e n t y
m i n u t e s long while rebuttals will
be live minutes each. T h e r e will
be no decision.
T h e second team named eonsisis
of Samuel D o r r a n c e and Charles
Swick, seniors, who will meet
Union college in a decision debate.
T h e date for this contest has not
yet been settled.
A l t e r n a t e s named were Rcnwiek
A r n o t l , '34, and H o w a r d Mann, '32.
Swick a n d Kite will be captains.
T h e Slate college team for the
British debate h a s already begun
research work in order to p r e p a r e
its brief.
7s Whistler A Morcn?" Will Be Topic
Of Collegiate Debate During This Year
New Y o r k — ( I P ) — T h e college de- textbooks, H e went further and sughate squad that wants to draw a gested Dr. Shaw might be moronic
crowd this year has only one subject himself.
A woman wrote the professor sayto pick from.
It i s : "Resolved:
T h a t he who whistles is a moron." ing she had whistled all her life, but
T h e nation is all agog about it would never again do so until she
since Professor Charles Gray Shaw was assured she was not feebleof New York university's department minded.
T h e Cleveland Plain Dealer, along
of philosophy said just that last
week. It is his own testimony that with scores of other papers, thought
it was just a harmless little remark, it was a swell ielea.
Students walked up and down in
but the protests he' has been receiving indicate that folks took him very, front of Professor Shaw's office,
whistling in relays.
very seriously indeed.
The doctor himself was led a couSaid Senator Borah: "I whistle
when I feel like it, and any man who ple' of days later to relent a bit in
says whistlers are morons is a moron self defense, and to admit that perhaps not all who whistled were
himself."
It was pointed out that Mussolini morons, but that perhaps it w;is,
nevertheless,
the act of a person bent
is a great whistler.
Friends reported on the Bible that in that direction.
T h e newsrecls made the professor
Albert Einstein, no other, is a whispose and tell all about it, and then, no
ll.-r.
A lawyer replied that all attorneys doubt, went out and got a chorus of
follies girls to whistle for the talkies,
whistle in the bath tub.
lleyvvood Broun suggested that in who knows?
Prime yourself, college debaters,
his younger years as a teacher Professor Shaw must have been annoyed for the problem of the year 1931-32.
by students whistling from behind
GRADUATE'S POEM
TO BE PUBLISHED
Helen B. Otis, '31, Was Editor
of State College Echo;
Won Poetry Prize
11 v CiKKN'i-'i-.i.i. N. RAND, '34
'DISK KI.IT
Tin, NKVVS
COMMERCE CLUB
HAS 100 STUDENTS
AT RECENT PARTY
One hundred students were entertained at the reception of the Commerce club in the Lounge of Richardson hall, Saturday night. T h e
faculty of the commerce department
wdio were present as guests were
Professor George M. York, head of
the commerce department, and M r s .
Y o r k ; Mr. Chester T. Terrill, assistant professor of commerce, and Mrs.
T e r r i l l ; Mr. Harrison M. Terwilliger,
assistant professor of commerce, and
Mrs.
Terwilliger;
Miss
Blanche
Avery, instructor of commerce, and
Mr. E d w a r d Cooper, assistant professor of commerce.
Lucy Ostrosky, '32, president, was
general chairman, and Rose Rosenbeck, '34, was her assistant.
'Recognition of the literary talent
present in State college is indicated
in the acceptance of a poem written
by Helen B. Otis. '31, by the editors
of a new anthology of student verse.
T h e poem, to be' published this
fall in the Book of Student Verse, is
entitled "Consolation," and was published in the Echo in the February,
\9Z') issue. The anthology, now in
process of compilation, is published
by
Harrison Company in New York.
"Beta" Worries PresidentlAs
Students from all colleges in the
Initiation Time Approaches country have submitted poetry to the
editors who, as a result, have' found
Marjorie Lockwood, '32, presiil necessary to discriminate highly in
Sixteen m e m b e r s of the class of
dent of Beta Zi'ta sorority, was
their selections.
'31 conducted a reunion luncheon at
seen walking up Western avenue
Miss
Otis
has
given
the
NKWS
perthe
New Kenuiore hotel S u n d a y
late Monday afternoon with a
mission lo reprint her poem :
afternoon.
Problems e n c o u n t e r e d
look of consternation and worried
in
the
leaching field, c o m m o n lo all,
Consolation
concern written on her face. Upon
were discusssed by the group a s
liven tlioiitih yuur love is dead,
investigating the cause of such a
well as college history. T h e followI awn betid* of yto-win,) red,
dire catastrophe, il was learned
\liin h'reneh dulls ;eilh shiiiint) hair ing attended : Anne Savercool, West
that she was faced with the' probW i.ili, Id; E d y l h c Cairns, S t r a t f o r d ;
. I ml <; small, blue laequeird ehair.
lem of conducting a pledge' servWinifred I'rimeau, W i n d h a m ; M a r y
II I etiiiiint hear your call,
ice I bat evening for a transfer
Morganslern,
Hudson;
Gertrude
I have i osmas in the hull,
from Long Island who bad arW
estern, Newport; Catherine Brol'a/>er villi H/V iiiiiiim/rain,
rived only the day before. She
derick, West Leyden; M a r t h a Nord,
Kows of amher-eolored j ,
was bewildered by the- informa/ nuisl 'not ,/rieve tlial you are ,/oue, \ Albany; Ruth Doyle, Albany; Rustion supplied by residents of the
.lidluni, W'alden; Lavvrenc
boils,; vviio had announced to hi r II, re is a /•/, lure uj Hie da,en!
that the new member was acting
Miss Olis said thai copies of the N e w o m i b , East N a s s a u ; Carolyn
Kelle-v
Sunt lohmvilh
\rtliur
frightened and lonesome while sit
anthology will be available in the Coling quietly on the arm of a
op immediately following the publica- limes", G r e e n p o r l ; W a l l e r Driscoll,
M a d i s o n ; Alfred Basel), Albany.
chair.
tion.
Miss ( His was generally acknowlIl was discovered llial, in tin ir
WELCOMES
MEMBER
edged
one
of
the
foremost
of
Stale
basic lo inform Miss Loekvv I
Delta Omega sorority welcomes
college poets while she was a student
of the "blessed evenl", members
Elizabeth Kasinusseii, '34, into full
here. She was awarded the Echo
of ibe' sorority had forgotten to
membership.
poetry prize when a freshman, was
mention thai the "new member"
an associate' editor of the Echo dinwas a kitten, aged only a few
ing her sophomore and junior years,
months, who lias been adopted as
and was edilor-ill-chief last year. She
mascot by the sorority. Mildred
was also literary editor of the PedaMyers, 'S2. brought "Be-In", as the
gogue and a member of Myskania,
kitten is known, to Albany ii|
senior honorary society.
Members Of 1931 Have
First Reunion Sunday
Paternalism In Classrooms Will Cease,
University Of Chicago President Says
Chicago—(11') — Paternalism
in \ tinted. Of others the instructor will
know
the college classroom appear- to be simply Hole: ^ " W e don't
about to breathe iis last at the I ni- enough about him to comment." Stuversily of Chicago, under the direc- dents who fall into the hitler clas-d
lion of President Robert M. I lulch- licatioii will be barred from interThai will h<
ins, who explained :l l l l « system of collegiate competition
higher education to the 775 incoming | tin
.Indent
aboii
Other
than
thai
the
slink
freshmen ibis year.
whom tin instructor doesn't
T h e Chicago student is now '
| u , | comment can go right on doing as
tally
n Ins
:nV ! he p h a s e - for al least two years.
whatever scholastic progress his a|
At the t ml of Uie two-year period
plication and ability will permit. II
can cut classes when lie wants to with- '!'' I : i t r s ;l compr
iects he h
out receiving a slip from the dean, 'inn, embracing
If be lbpasses be goes ,
lie will not be called "on the carpel" | piir.sulb,- Uniwrsilv.
If 1 fails IK
when be fails to make the same' |
probable will be advised I qllil.
ress in his course as the other
In the mi anliine the cxci phonal I
denls.
student has gone on - probable long
The- classes, the leachers, the libra- before the Ivvo year period is up
iii s and the main oilier resources of passed bis comprehensive examina i her r e t u r n f r o m a w e e k - e n d o n
Hie University will be there for his lion and is in the upper div ision of
use if In- wants to use ihcin. The the university. A genius inigbl I'm
education will he there, and the stu ish the Ill's! two-year course in Ihrt
deiil can lake- il or leave it.
months. Then, after Inking a Iwi
TO HAVE RECEPTION
Al the end of each course the in year course in one i if the upper div
slructor will make one of two com- sioiis be would gvt Ins degree.
Spanish club reception will be ion
ments. Those who have made- satisducted Tuesday, October 27, accord
factory progress will be so designig lo Eugenia Millard, 'XV general
WELCOME PLEDGES
chairman. Those in charge' of com
Alpha chapter of Phi Delia We
initlr,s include: Stella Pulnani, \'<2,
comes Nunc McKee and Minnie M,
refreshments; Mane Redmond, '33,
N'ickle, sophomores, into pledge mi n entertainment; Evelyn Estnav, 'XV
bet-ship
Seniors To Wear Caps
And Gowns For Picture
The senior group picture for the
Pedagogue will he taken this year in
cap and gown, Vera Burns. 'S2, cdilor in-chief of the I 'cdagoguc announced.
G. A. A. President Names
Committees For Hike
Katherine Moore. \VV is general
chairman of the Indian Ladder hike
scheduled lor Saturday, October 21,
according lo Lli/abclh E. Jackson, I j
l
l
!n!n"'Tb."l'ollo vv ,m.lumSlliVXm-
*
win. b will
b. ai
uiii.-d
bit, i
It has .dwav - be, n lb, , iislom |,,i
iiianv ol tin alumnae, ,sp,,i.,|lv llios,
active m I, \ \ lo n l u i n foi Ibe
Week end
A RIO K EC E N T
VISITORS
Anne Cruikshauk, '31, and blot
cure l.iiundoll, '31, are week end visi
tors at the Phi I), ha sorority Lais,
Ibis week end. Miss Criiikshaul, Ileaching al Brushiou, and Miss I.in
in,loll at Windham.
ALBANY, N. Y.
Eyes"
Sehenectudy •'•
Patronize the
AMERICAN
*»»T»«i«»»«^»#»«-, CLEANERS
w u H n n c . , , , & «DYERS
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*
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be.n appointed; food, \uueti, p..wis, j S U A MADISON A V .
I'ip.'gr.ini. bslhri M,ad, '32; chapel
on, s, |,,s, plum II,ill. '32, puUicilv,
M.ov Moor. , '31 , ,|, .HI up. I lorothv
Klos, \ l |
\ pi, ...•!.,n, has 1,,-en .,,
r a n c d hv lh, pioeiam c minillee,
"We Understand
Troy
Hamilton Printing
Company
m
»
rin
<
A
"l
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EYHGLASStiS
,arcl
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PIIO.NI. 8-0273
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S O N . I ' . a i l S t . A l b a i i v , X. Y.
OPTICIAN
-
Smart
Con ts 1 l*a Is Dresses
Geo. D. h o t
/«»•
III
Togs 1 losiery
sn:i :FH L
BROS., INC.
,rc£ ^.»
jjjmthnmrfr (jjafrtmtt
( J i l l s tnid Misses
(J)
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198 Central Avenue—at Robin
Albany, N. Y.
(Pu u u q 0, u a P y 8 o o o o () g o u u u u u u u o o u u u u o u o o u u u u u u u u u u u o Q"3
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 16, 1931
TO BRING
HONORARY SOCIETY
62 WILL TRY OUT COUNCIL
FAMOUS ESSAYIST
FOR PUBUCAION HERE NOVEMBER 5INDUCTS MEMBERS
Editorial "Cubs" Will Work
Under Vera Burns, '32,
Editor of Pedagogue
T h e dramatic and art council will
sponsor the appearance of Christopher Morley, American novelist and
essayist, in Page ball auditorium on
Thursday, November 5, at 8:30,
Helen Mead, '32, president of the
council, announced today. Mr. Morley's topic will be "Escape into
Print".
Students who wish to come must
exchange their student tax tickets for
student tickets sometime during October 26, 27, or 28 at the dramatic and
art table which will be in the rotunda. Tickets will be available to
outsiders and orders should be sent
to Frances Root, '33.
Sixty-two juniors and sophomores
have signed up for "cub" work on
the Pedagogue, senior year book, under the supervision of Vera Burns,
editor in chief, and Michael Frolich,
business manager.
T h e try-outs for the editorial start
a r e : Josephine Ryan, Edith Tepper,
Margaret Kurilecz, Evelyn Lowenberg, Clara Allen, Dorothy Hamra,
Florence
Smith, Josephine
Ball,
Carolyn Kramers, Elizabeth MacCombs, Bernard
Kerbel,
Marcia
Gold, Hilma Bergstrom, Betty Simmons, Laura Styn, Edna Epstein,
Alvina Lewis, Doris Kilts, Edna
Becker, Harriet Dunn, India Newton,
Abbic Dinnccn, Vera Bergen, and
Evelyn Greenbury, juniors.
T i c k e t s for t h e Edith W y n n e
Eleanor Watcrbtiry, Kose Roscnheck, Shirley Diamond, Margaret M a t t b i s o n p e r f o r m a n c e on O c t o b e r
28
will be sold in the r o t u n d a on
H a r t , Elizabeth Zuend, Katherinc
Lubking, Pauline Jones, Frcida Lun- M o n d a y , T u e s d a y , and W e d n e s d a y
of
next
week.
dell, Mary Noonan, 'Rita BrownT h e ticket c o m m i t t e e consists of:
hardt, Mary Williams, Myrtle StoHelen
C
r o m i e , '33, and Helen Ma
well, June Carey, Hilda Bookheim,
Eleanor Coutant, Celia Bishop, Nel- bar and T h e l m a Smith, s o p h o m o r e s .
lie Wood, Marie Mutt, Diane Bochner, Alice Fitzpatrlck, Helen Doherty, Catherine Fitzpatrick, and Melburnc Vroman, sophomores.
The business staff try-outs a r c :
Bertha Buhl, Hilda Smith, Ruth
S e n o r class clues will be collected
Reynolds, Frances Root, Florence
Dorn, Dorothy Rutcsliouser, Jose- next W e d n e s d a y , T h u r s d a y , and
phine Ball, and Marie Judd, j u n i o r s ; Friday, O c t o b e r 21, 22, and 23, by
and Almira Russ, Emma Pantalone, the class t r e a s u r e r , Harold Haswell.
T h e d u e s will be collected at a
Helen Danahy, Marion Pike, and
table in the r o t u n d a . All seniors
Virginia Abajian, sophomores.
Individual pictures and some of the are urged to pay their dues as soo
group pictures have been taken dur- as possible, Haswell said.
ing this week, and more will be taken
next week, Miss Burns said.
SALE OF TICKETS
TO BE CONDUCTED
FOR THREE DAYS
Seniors Will Pay Dues
Next Week In Rotunda
TWO TO COMPETE
FOR CHAMPIONSHIP
IN MEN'S FINALS
By KENNICTH MILLER, '32,
SPORTS EDITOR, THE NEWS
T h e skillful serve, the clever placement of the ball, and the tennis experience of Sanford Levinstein, 'M.
the defending champion, enabled him
to vanquish "Al" Kronk, a special
student, in the semifinals of the annual men's tennis tournament. Kronk
fought courageously, but Levinstein
playing with his usual calmness proceeded to win the match in straight
sets 6-1, 6-1.
Carl Tarbox, State's tennis captain, earned the right to oppose
Levinstein in the finals when he
turned back Gordon Hughes, '32, veteran tennis player, in a fast moving
match. T h e scores were 0-1, 6-2.
The finals will be played shortly,
.and either captain Tarbox, or former
captain Levinstein will soon be th
possessor of the championship tenni
cup.
Assembly Will Decide
Theme Of Conference
A joint meeting id the Young
Women's and Young Men's Christian
Association cabinets was conducted
Sunday afternoon in the Lounge of
Richardson hall. The main topic of
discussion was the Stale college conference which will probably be December 4 and 5. The theme of the
conference will be chosen by means
of a qucstiouairc to be distributed in
assembly this morning. All students
are invited to attend this conference.
VISIT
SORORITY
HOUSE
Recent visitors at the Alpha Kpsilon Phi house were Frances Levinson, '31, who was dean of the soror
ity last year; Mollie Kaufman, '29;
Dorothy Seaman, '29; Dorothy Rubins, '3D; and Beatrice Samuels, '31
Signum Laudis Will Have
Dinner at Keeler's Next
Saturday, Secretary Says
FRANK II.
President Brubacher Tells Art Class
Of Use Of Campaign Posters In Russia
T h e propaganda arned on by the
Soviet government y means of poslers has a far-reaching inllucnc
pecially on the Russian youth, President A. R. Brubacher told the art
appreciation class in a talk be gave
recently on Russian art.
_ In explaining the import of the various posters which be showed the
class, Dr. Brubacher said that in general they are of two types, those attaching the church and capitalism,
and those advertising the advantages
ol collective farming, soviet schools,
how to use library books, and similar
subjects. The last named are especially directed toward the children.
One important phase ol" the poster
campaign is the inspirational effect
on the young people of habits of in-
dustry, of perseverance, and of selfsacrifice, aims which Dr. Brubacher
finds are being realized.
Miss Eunice I'critic, assistant professor of art, discussed the artistic
qualities of the posters, pointing out
the effective way in which action
rather than words is depicted, to get
a r m s s an idea to a people still largely
illiterate in many sections of the
country. T h e actual artistic merit
of the posters is fairly high in some
of them, Miss I'erine said. The posl;r showing priests snatching c: ins
falling from a winged top hat, suggests Andrea del Sarto in the richness of the coloring and the excellent
composition. Soviet Russia is producing no great art al present, sheadded.
Andrew Hritz, \i2 was elected the
senior representative on the finance
board at the class meeting Tuesday,
according to Leah Dorgan, secretary.
Mary Kant, \\2 was nominated
girbs' athletic manager.
The contract for caps and gowns
was given to Cottrell and Leonard.
The measurements for the caps and
gowns will be taken the last three
days of next week.
Meadville,
Pa.—(IP)—Allegheny
college has inaugurated the youngest
college president in the country, Dr.
William Pearson Tolley. Many distinguished educators attended the
ceremonies.
Miss Wheeling, assistant professor
of English and supervisor in Milne
High' school is a graduate of Allegheny college.
Women Play Matches
In Tennis Tournament Seniors Elect Hritz
Allegheny Inaugurates
Seven tennis matches have been
To '32 Finance Board
Dr. Tolley President
played in the Girls' Athletic association tournament, according to Jean
W'atkins, '.U, who is conducting' the
tournament.
The participants who
have met their competitors and won
their matches a r e : Libel Myckman
and Edna Becker, j u n i o r s ; Esther
Uavies and Doris Hell, sophomores;
Dorothy Munyer, Kathleen Kavanaugh, and Rose Dabrisin, freshmen.
R O O F S C O S T $12,000
New roofs are being placed
Draper and Hues ted halls by the J o seph San.lers Company ol Buffalo,
ln
::i™„,7f
? w ° r k will cost
$12,000 Clarence J. Deyo, secretarytreasurer, of the college, announced.
ARE RECENT
VISITORS
M a r g a r e t M e t ' l i n e , '2<>,
S m y l h e , '29, Mary M o r g a n s l c r n , '31
and G e r t r u d e W e s t e r n , '31, w
week-end visitors at Ga
a
' S i e m a s o r o r i t y bouse n
Aged Stanford University Chancellor
Mourned For Valiance Of Peace Efforts
Stanford University, Cal.— ( I P ) —
Dr. David Starr Jordon, HO, chancellor emeritus of Stanford I'uiversity,
scientist and leader for world peace,
died here recently.
Said the New York Nation of bis
death :
"A brave, farsighted and noble citizen, a great college president was
David Starr Jordon, whose death in
the fullness of years has been reported. The cause of peace in the
United Slates hail no more devoted
advocate in season and out of season.
When the folly and the madness of
the war lust wire upon us in 191b-17.
Dr. Jordon faced calumny and abuse
with calmness and unfailing courage.
He was tried but not found wanting,
and unlike the many pre-war pacifists
of the type of Nicholas Murray Butler, he refused to compromise or to
recede in any way from his position
that war was the crime of crimes.
Indeed, il is heartening to record that
ibis admirable patriot and great
scientist and educator declared in bis
last utterance that 'all war is inur
robbery, trickery, and no nation ever
escaped great losses of men, prosP'-rity m l virility. W ir kie.vvs no
v iclor.' I le was the author of many
volumes, seven of which were given
to the cause of peace. His autobiography of his well-lived years he called
'The I lays of a Man.' I le was one
ol the ureal group of college presidents, including such men as Eliot of
Harvard, Angell of Michigan
Van Ilise of Wisconsin, who not only
advanced education and educational
methods, but were inspiring citizens
and leaders of public opinion as well."
Beautiful at Palladino's
lluir Bobbing
Permanent Waving Finger uml Marcel Wuving
at Papular Prices
H
"West End's Nai'rst Eating
E V O R Y & CO.
Meeting
Open Day and Night
N. PIUKI. S
Dial 3-3M2
Ware"
Jack Jin
(general Printers
Central Ave, ut Lexington
36 & 38 Beaver Struct
Albany, N. Y.
II Steps
liust iij Pearl
T h e members of the Girls' Athletic association council will now
be able to conduct their meetings
with all the comforts of home.
T h e y have adopted for an office
and recreation room the room oil
the balcony in the gymnasium of
P a g e hall, and arc now decorating the room with college banners, colorful cushions, pictures,
and comfortable chairs.
It is planned to have a complete
sports library, containing books of
directions, rules, and games, in
this new office. There will be
places to read and write; and the
ping-pong set will be in the gymnasium near-by for any who need
divertisement.
Ten seniors will be inducted into
membership in Signum Laudis, scholastic honorary society, at a dinner
at Keeler's restaurant next Saturday.
Irma Van Laer, '31, secretary of the
organization, has not yet made
known the complete list of new members.
Signum Laudis was organized in
1930 under the direction of Emanuel
Green, '30. Membership in the society is on a purely scholastic basis,
A L U M N A E ARE GUESTS
and no student with an average of
less than 2:00 is eligible. T h e highEdythe Cairns, '31, Doris Markest four per cent of the senior class ham, '31, and Marilla Smith, '30,
is selected in the fall and the next were guests at the Kappa Delta
highest six per cent in the spring.
bouse last week-end. ^ Miss Cairns
President Abratii R. Hrubacher and | i now teaching in Stratford high
Dean William H. Metzler are the school, Miss Markhain, in Prattsfaeulty members of the organization. | burg, and Miss Smith, in Stillwater.
133 N. Plum. Si.
Uial 3-4231
T"
C. A. A. Council Obtains Room
For Meetings And Recreation
Street
Quality Food
-•
M O D F R A I T ; PRICKS
Courteous Service
HAZING
PARTY
FATAL
Lloyd Anne, freshman at Stout In
slitute, Menominee, Wis., died of in
juries received in a hazing partv
y the coroners j
which investigated the death
QUINTET TO OPEN
AGAINST HARTW1CK
Basketball Team To Play First
Game Here on December 4,
Manager Miller Says
By K E N N E T H MILLER, '32,
SPORTS EIIITOR, T H E NEWS
The State college quintet will open
its 1931-1932 season when it opposes
Hartwick college in the gymnasium
of Page hall on Friday, December 4.
The State basketccrs will begin
practice October 26, and a large number of candidates for each position
will display their wares in the practice sessions. "The competition will
be keen," according to Coach Rutherford Baker, who points out that all
of last year's squad with the exception of the two stars of the class of
'31, Charles Lyons and Frank Ott,
will try out for places on this year's
five.
T h e freshmen have shown great interest in basketball and a number of
them have signed up for the freshman team which will probably play
most of its contests during the second semester.
T h e following have signed for the
freshman t e a m : Alexander ladick,
William Jones, John Bills, ' Louis
Blumbcrg, Kenneth Drake, David
Kronman,
Charles
(love,
Zaven
Mahdisian, Clifford Rail. Wilfred Allan!, and Samuel Speetor.
DRAMATICS CLASS
TO PRESENT PLAY
TUESDAY AT 8:15
The first play of the advanced
dramatics class will be presented
Tuesday night, in the auditorium of
Page hall, at 8:15 o'clock, according
to Nile Clemens, 'M, who is directing the play.
The cast includes Mildred Quick,
'33,
the frivolous
wife;
Donald
Eddy, '34, the long suffering husband; and Bertram McNary, '34, the
brother.
Committees appointed by Miss
Clemens are as follows:
Ascnath
Wan Buren, '32, bouse; Marcia Gold,
'.':.':. lights and setting; Isabel Hewitt,
'.'I.'I, properties; Katherinc Traver, '32,
costumes and m a k e - u p ;
Dorothy
Bruse. '.<,2, publicity; and Helen Silver, '32, clean-up.
Economics Professor
Speaks Before Kiwanis
Mr. Adam A. Walker, professor of
economies, was the guest speaker at
,i luncheon of the Kiwanis i
I lis subject was,
Abandonment of th<
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