State College News FAY, DRAMA STAR, TO PLAYJARCH 4

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State College News
N E W YORK S T A T E COLLEGE F O R T E A C H E R S
Voi.X
No. 19
ALBANY, N. Y., FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 1926
$3 00 per year
Art Association's Council Arranges
FAY, DRAMA STAR, DranaticForAndLecture
PRESIDENT SPEAKS
In Albany Next Month By Plowman
TO PLAYJARCH 4
ON AIM OF COLLEGE
Civil War Thriller And Comedy
Planned By Advanced
Drama Class
"Can Continually Link Pedagogy
Of Present To Teaching
MILNE MUSICIANS TO AID
TEACHING IS PROFESSION
Julia Pay, '27, whose remarkable
characterization of "Wattcau" In "The
Slides Thai Danced" for the elementary
dramatics class last month has been
called the best work done by a studentticlnr this year, will play the title role
in one of (he two one-act plays to be
presented by the advanced dramatics
class Thursday evening, March 4, in the
Jfe*w*f **4s/r H4#/e.FZ.*MI6AM rie»t/o/i M*rnb>v
college auditorium, Miss Fay has been
chosen to interpret a part which is said
to tax her talents even more greatly than
did thai of the French artist in the
January play. The drama is a tragedy
ill' the Civil War, and with the exception
( f Miss Fay's role, all the parts arc
played by men.
S Niles Haight, president of the
senior class, Alexander Cooper, Richard
A. Jensen, student association secretary,
II'KI' DeWitt C. 7,eh will support Miss
Fay. Hoth Mr. Haight and Mr. Cooper
played in "Fancy Free' this January and
b'llh have been seen in numerous other
plays, Jensen has also frequently appeared in plays this year and last. Zch
Iris to his credit the role of "Lord
Windermere" h "Lady Windermere's
Fan'/' the leading male role in "Iccb itind," and parts in almost a score of
ether plays. He will interpret the part
<?/V4#lorr£
played by Glenn Hunter in the original
pr iduction by the Washington Scpiare
players and in two revivals by that group.
The play has also been given by the
Harvard Dramatic Society and by the
Charlatans, the theatrical organization
at Hamilton Colle e. It will he directed
by Edwin Van Klecck.
T h e same eu;iing another one-act
play, a comedy will he presented under
direction of Helen Quackenbush, '26.
The cast of this is-being rehearsed also
this week.
The Milne High School orchestra,
under the direction of Mary Rhcin, will
furnish a musi al pro' ram preceding the
plays Committees for them were appintcd this week as follows: music,
Miss Rhcin; house and clean-up, Ethel
IH' land, chairman; Helen Elliott, Anne
IvilT; lighting and publicity, Marion
Ouackenhir-h; costumes, Olla Goewey,
Rena Relyea and Georgia DeMnckcr;
eoMce 4, fl&WE '** 0L£* A- MMPet- . 4*A/£?£.rurr££E%
make up, Vivian Hart; for Miss Quacke-'bush's play: stage set, Mary Flanigan,
Courtesy Alb. Eve. News
chairman; [sabel'e Plude. Alexander
Cooper; props, Mary Nolan Georgia
DeMnckcr, Edna Fitzgerald; for Van
George W. Plowman, well known is its secretary. Miss Lane, '28, is
K'ecc'-'s play: stacc set. Marion O'Connor, chairman; Anne Koff, Mary Flani- lecturer will be presented in Albany treasurer. Other class representatives
gan ; props, Rena Relyea, chairman, early next month by the Dramatic are:
Miss Hampel, '26, editor of the
Lucille Barber, Edna Fitzgerald.
and Art association, its Council an- Quarterly; Miss Harrison, '27, and
nounced today, in a lecture on art.
Miss Jones, '28.
CORTLAND HERE TONIGHT
Miss Flanigan, '26, is president of
The Council earlier in the year preThe varsity basketball team will
play at eight o'clock in the gym to- the. council this year and Miss Grant, sented Jean Gros' Marionettes. Other
night against Cortland Normal School. 127, student asociation vice-president, events will be arranged,
In a recent address to the (acuity,
President A. K. Drtibachor explained the
way in which Slate College attempts to
carry out ils aim, a professional Irniung education for High School teachers,
'New York Slate Education," in printing (he address, MVS, "ll is (he clearest
statement we ha\c ever seen of (he
peculiar function of a college for high
.iliool teachers. President Dntbachcr
has accomplished the impossible al the
•ilate College—a liberal arts course lead-'
ing fairly and honestly to the customary
bachelor's degree and al the same time
directly and adequately to the high school'
classroom." The President first justified the claim of leaching to the name
of a profession, and then explained Stale
College as a professional college, lie
said:
"The claim that leaching is a profession is based on the proposition that
there is a clearly defined body of knowledge and an accompanying body of special
skills which arc indispensable to the successful practitioner, We have irrevocably turned our backs on the old
belief that anyone who has a knowledge
of the subject mailer can, by that fact
alone, leach that subject matter.
"The State College for Teachers is
dedicated to the professional ideal for
high school teachers. Our college was
organized in its present form for (be
''xorcis purpose of professionalizing high
school leaching to the same extent that
the normal schools have professionalized
leaching in (he elementary schools,
liriefly slated, the Slate College for
Teachers is directed by the Board of
Regents to devote itself to the training
of high school teachers by providing a
liberal education together with a thorough
introduction to the science of education
and a careful training in the art of
leaching. In the effort to fulfill its
obligations under ibis specific mandate
from the Hoard of Regents, State College for Teachers selects its materials
of instruction in all courses, liberal a n i
professional, with a view to their immediate relation to high school teaching.
The ideal of the college is a subject
matter coulcnt that is saturated witli
professional purpose. It will clarify our
ideal and intensify our professional purpose to formulate the procedure by
which we strive to attain our ends, a
procedure that demands continual adjustment in the light of experience.
" The liberal arts content of our curriculum must be adequate as a basis for
high school teaching and must perform
its full part in giving the liberal education prescribed by the Regents resolution
of authorization. It is obvious that the
subject matter of the high school curriculum will in part point the way.
English, History Mathematics, Latin,
(P»«e Two, Column Two)
Of Future"
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, FEBRUARY I», I M
Pago Two
£tat* (toilet Nraia
ESTABLISHED »Y THE CLAW OF ! • ! •
Vol, X
Feb.19, 1926
Well Selected Content, Comprehensive and Sympathetic
DEFENDS PLEDGE TO
Knowledge Is Necessary, President Declares In Address REPORT INFRACTIONS
Continued from I'IIBO One
OF PROPOSED SYSTEM
No. 1» French, Spanish, German, Biology, Phy- teaching. Let the student know why you
sics, Chemistry,' Physiography, Govern- proceed as you do. The best teaching
Published weekly during the college ment, Commerce, Home Economics, is concrete. The best results can follow
year by the Student Body of the New Music, Art, all are treated from the only from a lesson that is related to the
York State College for Teachers at viewpoint of a high school subject. Such Undent's experience and attainments.
Albany, New York.
subjects as Psychology, Sociology, Eco- Vhcrc the student's future is so clearly
The subscription rate is three dollars nomics, Philosophy, must he added to defined as in our classrooms, it becomes
per year. Advertising rates may be had our curriculum to round out a libera a natural and even inevitable part of our
on application to the business manager.
education in the generally accepted teaching process to show at every step,
;euse. Their intimate relationships to how the material is articulated with
the
high school curriculum is of course the future work. While we teach a
Editor-in-Chief
poem or rate a theme, wc can with
obvious.
HARRY S. GOPFREY, '26
"The content of all non-professional propn'ety call attention to our method in
Managing Editor
courses should be selected with reference so far as it will be applicable to the
to its professional implications. They student's own work to come. In our
EDWIN VAN KLEECK, '27
are first of all of the same general sub- field work in botany or in our preparaBusiness Manager
stance as high school work in the same tion of specimens for the biological
HELEN E. ELLIOTT, '26
department. Thus 'English Literature' laboratory, we can with good purpose
Subscription Manager
•oiirses in college are properly compar- call attention to our pedagogical plan.
HELEN BARCLAY, '26
able to the high school assignments in That is, we can continually link the
literature; 'History of the U. S. since pedagogy of the present to the teaching
Copy Reader
1850' is similarly comparable to the process of the future.
MARGARET BENJAMIN, '26
"To state the matter succinctly, proAmerican history of the high school;
Assistant Business Managers
and
the same is true in foreign languages, fessional motives must motivate our
MYRA HARTMAN, '27
iclencc, mathematics. Hut the college work throughout. This is in accord with
HELEN ZIMMERMAN, '27
course goes deeper. It seeks to establish the modern spirit in education. The Stale
Assistant Subscription Manager
standards of judgment, to form canons College for Teachers has its motive
of taste, to make acquaintance with written in its name and no student may
THELMA TEMPLE, '27
scientific method, to fit the future for a moment forget that motive without
Assistant Copy Reader
teacher for his sphere of intellectual stultifying himself. And the teaching
JULIA FAY, '27
leadership in several lines. To accom- staff owes it to its own professional
Associate Editors
plish this, the college course goes as far integrity to give to the State of New
Sara Barkley, '27
Louise Gunn, '27 beyond the high school content as time, York a graduate that is professionally
Katharine Blenis,
Anna Kofi '26 and circumstance permit, But the con- fit and professionally alert; by using an
tent of these non-professional courses educating content that has distinct proJoyce Persons, '26
must nevertheless be selected with special fessional use; and by doing our daily
Reporters
Leah Cohen
Elizabeth MacMullen reference to its use by the future high work under the drive of professional
school teacher. Therefore, since the motive. Our professional character is
Thelma Brezce Lcla Van Schaick
high school teacher is not a specialist in especially indicated by the internship
Virginia liiggins Katherine Saxton
English or in mathematics or in physics, required of every senior student. Every
Adelaide Hollistcr Dorothy Watts
but a teacher, it becomes necessary to device of instruction, every form of
Elnah Kricg
Bertha Zajan
choose content wisely even within the class procedure, every bit of special
limited field of an accepted subject. In method is put to test, and the beginnings
the training of high school teachers we of professional skill becomes apparent.
"Our ideal is to place the young high
must give strong preference to that con"VALENTINE REVUE"
tent which has pedagogical significance school teacher in his first teaching position
well marked characterFEATURES GYM FROLIC because we aim at the expert teacher, istics,with(a)three
He must know his subject;
not at the specialist; our ideal is the
Judging by 'numbers, the mid-winter skilled teacher who is professionally keen (h) he must know the fundamentals of
gym frolic of last Friday evening was and alert, not the linguist, or critic, or the specialized knowledge which is the
science of education; and (c) he must
the most popular yet held. Since St. historian, or physicist, or scientist.
"The method of the college classroom I have proved his skill in instruction to
Valentine's Day was so near, the program
the
point where he has confidence in himbe pedagogically correct and should
was in the form of a skit, "Valentine must
reveal its form and purpose to the student self.
Revue," written and directed by Kathar- 30 clearly and forcefully that it becomes
"Wc develop each of these three
ine Blenis, The entertainers were Mar- part of the student's own professional characteristics by placing him in charge
cella Street, Leah Cohen, Violet Pierce, equipment. Our classroom procedure of a high school class where he is reRuby Merman, Dorothy Terrell, and must he animated by a distinctly profes- sponsible for the classroom atmosphere.
sional purpose. Given a well selected Supervision is friendly, ultimate, conMarjoric Young. Musical readings and content and a comprehensive and sym- structive, but the supervisor may not
novelty dances were interspersed with pathetic knowledge of high school prob- relieve the practice teacher of his full
puns on College folk: Why Kent Pease- lems, it still remains to develop a method responsibility, It is sometimes a heroic
wears a hair net; why Ruth Ettipie will that is so transparent and self-evident process, but the professional qualities
the student absorbs its form and ultimately assert themselves and the
catch the measles; why Ethel DuBois ihtit
spirit.
young teacher emerges triumphantly
walks in Washington Park; and Prom
"Our pedagogy may be positively with a keen sense of achievement. To
reminiscences which had not before leaked stated. Since the State College student that final victory, wc are nroud to beout. The players were accompanied at is an embryo teacher, it is our duty lieve wc have contributed the composite
the piano by Cornelia Williams. The to expose the details of our method of professional elements already described.''
gym was cleverly decorated in red and
white. Refreshments were soft drinks BOOK OF VERSE WILL
START CAMPAIGN FOR
and valentine cakes. Georgianna Maar,
PENCIL SHARPENER
assisted by Margaret Stoutcnburgh,
APPEAR ABOUT MAY 1 Miss Helen
Fay, manager of the Codirected games for the entertainment of
All material for the Book of Student Op, has started a campaign to secure
the guests, and Dorothy Kabie and
several pencil sharpeners for use of
Bertha Zaj-an played for dancing.
Verse will be in the hands of the printer the students. It is planned to place
by March IS, according to arrangements these sharpeners where they will be
convenient and accessible to all stumade public Monday by Sara Barkley, dents. There is a box in the Co-Op
MILNE ORCHESTRA TO
'27, the business chairman. Selection of and you are asked to drop in one cent
your contribution.
APPEAR AT TWO PLAYS material is progressing rapidly. The as The
management of the Co-Op will
The Milne High School orchestra will book is to be bound in limp imitation willingly send books from the erntal
shalvcs
to any student who is ill if the
appear before the College student body leather, ornamented with the College seal.
name of the student together with his
Thursday evening, March 4, when it will
address
and title of the book desired
give a short program in connection with It will be ready for distribution on or is left at the Co-Op. The regular
about
May
1,
a
month
earlier
than
the
price will be charged and the regular
the advanced dramatics class' program of
rules will apply to books sent out unplays.
date first planned.
der these conditions.
Editor of the News:
The question of an honor system .tug
jested itself a few years ago, li wafavorably discussed In the student a-
scmbly which appointed n committee i•>
co-operate with the faculty In the fm
mation of a satisfactory plan, This com
mittce formulated a plan which was in,I
considered acceptable by Dr. liruhneln r
because of the omission of an arrange
ment for a voluntary pledge to report
infractions. The committee then made
a revision removing this objection
Upon submission to the student body ii
overwhelmingly accepted the proposition
to adopt the superstructure of the lionoi
system, while the concrete foundati
n
which it must rest, the pledge to report,
was as overwhelmingly voted down.
This rejection seems to have been
based on a misguided application oi ,i
.supportable sentiment. In childhood v,<
have the nursery-rhyme inculcalioi
"tittle, tattle, tattle tale, shame on yon '
There exists also the natural histoid >
group solidarity, clan and clique loyalh
Later, in our study of history, we develop
a natrual antipathy to spies, paid n
formers, traitors-in-oiir-midst and tlieii
like.. In the troubled, facetious linn
of the past, communal protection ami
safety necessarily implied abhorrence to
the informer,
What is regrettable, however, i lb
retention of tin's sentiment in an
lightened democracy. It can cnticei
>e of value to a certain stratum o
clcty. In circles where the "squc
rs the social lener, he who has a
idea of the interdependence of th
corripopani units of society cannot
flourish.
Obviously, we have that idea, even
though it may he partially indistinct
Our institution should be a mutual
democracy of the highest order. That
term may be defined variously. Hui it
must be predicated on the conception that
the enforcement of salutary laws, legally
enacted by the majority is necessary to
the existence of a democracy. Likewise
must we feel that their infraction b not
an individual matter but a subject " !
•oeinl welfare. What Is for the good
or ill of one is for the good or ill of all
The individual who is willing to keep
the undoubted good of an honor system
from the student body is hardly wiilr.
'f protection] He aids in permitting a
possible reflection on the worth of die
•choid. He is directly responsible foi
She imposition on the great majority oi
an unnecessary restriction. He is a
mockery to the ideals of the leachini:
profession and I feel that his eliminaiio'i
would be for the good of the service
"Why should persons who are doing u-.
mischief be suffered to continue to do so."
This proposition unquestionably is debatable, It seems to me however, ttt.it
our ideals of democracy and our eon
rcption of the superior social service of
'he teaching profession are consideration
transcending in importance a perverted,
Underworld infiltration of ethics,
Joseph K. Salmon, '27.
ESTIMATE PROFIT ON
JUNIOR PROM IS $200
The Junior Prom was a financial success. Although a definite report is not
vet possible, it is estimated that the profit
will r.oar about the $2(10 mark. Tinsuccess of the Prom will probably help
in reducing the senior class duos of 1927.
STATE COLLEGE NKWH, F E B R U A R Y 10, 19VC5
DR. HOMER SPEAKS
OH L i C l l FAITH
Former Dean Recently Visited
Scenes Of Lincoln's Years
As Lawyer
LIFE HAD
FOUR
EPOCHS
Dr. Harlan II. Horner, former dean,
addressed b'Qtll sections of the assembly,
Friday, Dr. Horner's subject was "The
Growing Faith of Abraham Lincoln,
He divided Lincoln's life into periods,
as follows: The wonder of the child;
(he metal of the youth; the mind of the
man; the sold of the president, On each
of these periods, he elaborated, likening
the life of our ideal American to the
gradual ripening of a harvest. "The
wonder of the child, when a tot at his
mother's knee was taught and guided into
the paths of faith by her wisdom and
his feet firmly fixed on the right road.
The child was made a man when the
hand of death struck down her who had
been everything to him, and the first great
sorrow, in the life of sorrow which
followed, he witnessed at the grave of
bis mother."
The metal of the youth was proven
by bis upward struggle against fate, his
self-education, and the triumph over the
greatest sorrow of his life, the death of
Anne Rtltlcdgc, The faces of '29 beamed
joyously when Dr. Horner completed his
sketch of the youth by saying that from
the descriptions handed down to us by
foregoing generations, be was sure,
Lincoln, the ideal American, looked very
much like a freshman.
Dr. Horner said of his manhood,
"Although Lincoln was not a church
member, he was a firm believer in the
right, The sublime faith of the president
wajs shown in that he more often c
suited Cod, than his cabinet, in the trying
times through which (he Great Captain
piloted our Ship of State,, that Lincoln
was. a miniature Christ, a chosen earthly
messenger who lived in close companionship with God, and thai God and Lincoln
saved our nation in its greatest crisis
when destruction seemed inevitable."
Dr. Horner did not apologize for linking
the name of the Deity with that of Lincoln, because of the great faith of the
man (hat enabled him to be led by the
hand of God and to sec the right, to
gain strength to carry on.
Dr. Horner has recently visited several
places in Illinois, that figured importantly
in Lincoln's life and career. He had
lately stood on the spot where Lincoln
dismounted from his borrowed horse
with his license to practice law under
his arm and all his worldly possessions
in his saddlebags. He also visited the
place where Lincoln made bis farewell
speech, at his departure for Congress,
upon his election to the Senate. Dr.
Horner said, "Just twenty-eight years
later the whole country was plunged into
its greatest mourning when Lincoln was
slain by the hand of the assassin. During liis life such enemies as Seward,
Chase and Douglas showed their greatest
devotion and respect to the man who
pnwed himself 'A Man for the Ages.' "
Ethel DuBois led the assembly in a
cheer for Dr. Horner. Myskania attended both chapel sessions in honor of
Dr. Horner, and the first section sang
the College song comprised in his honor.
COLLEGE
NEWS AT A GLANCE
The Clean-up committee, at its meeting
.londay noon, declared that one week
if war against dirt had been only a
temporary victory, I Jlrt is secretly working its way back into the locker rooms
and corridors. A definite method of
attack has been planned by the committee.
The frosb will sweep and "pick up" the
locker rooms on Mondays, the sophomores on Tuesdays, the juniors on Wednesdays, and the seniors on Thursdays.
Iticz M, George and F'.dua Spikes of
Mew Paltz Normal School were weekend guests of Sara liarkley, '27.
Minnie Greeuaway, editor-in-chief of
the 1026 Pedagogue, and Caroline Coleman, the business manager, have announced that the work on this year's
production is practically completed except for the photography, The work is
very much further advanced than at this
time last year, and the distribution of
copies
of the Pedagogue Is assured for
The Biology Club held its sleighride
Saturday night. Miss Minnie II, Scot- Moving-tip Day.
land chaperoned the party while Dr.
Members of Stale College Alumnae
Gertrude E, Douglas stayed behind as
cook, ^ After a two-hour tour around who visited College over Lincoln's birthday
are: Etllitt Craig, '24, Mary F,
the city, the club returned uTtheHJioiogy
laboratory, where they bad the refresh- I'ierpout, '25, who teaches in Ossining,
Marie E. Burgin, '25, who also, leaches
ments prepared by Dr. Douglas.
in Ossining, Dot Hoyt, '25, who teaches
in Schenectady, and Helen F. Clohosy,
Mrs. Sailee Oaumann entertained
'17, who has been teaching for four years
Alpha Kpsilon I'hi al a luncheon recently.
in (he West New York, New Jersey
Miss Irene Herman of Ncwhurgh,
High School, also Peg Underwood
.pent the week-end at the Alpha Kpsilon
and Carol Traver,
I'hi house.
Alpha Kpsilon I'hi entertained the
Last Saturday, eight members of
sororities on campus al a bridge party
last Saturday afternoon in observance of G. A. A. tried the joys of mid-winter
hiking. Willi three pairs of skiis in the
Courtesy Day.
crowd to say nothing of hot dogs, rolls,
French Club will open its second seme- and the. requisite mustard, one may talk
ster with a program meeting, under Miss of fun without being sarcastic. Sincere
Maud Malcolm's direction, Wednesday, thanks were voted to the weather man
February 24, at four o'clock. Miss Mal- w(ho provided a mild day. Several likely
colm will speak on "A Trip Along looking slopes on upper Washington
Three Great Rivers of France and will Avenue were tried for their coasting
show lantern slides on a section of the possibilities but a hill out in the sand
Loire river, France, northern, central and regiop afforded the most sport.
southern France. There will be conMildred Lansley, '2'), led the hike.
trasts in landscape and in provincial life.
The rest of the program will not be Oilier members of the party were Mary
announced. Refreshments and a social ludith Langdon, Marion Palmer, Jean
time will he a part of the entertainment. Amos, llernice Van Sickle, Mcriam FarNon-members as well as members, are nell, Jennie Jenkins, Kathleen Doughty.
urged to attend.
On Saturday afternoon, February 13,
a tea was held under the auspices of
After an address by A. W. Risley, Newman Club at Newman ball, 741 Madihead of the history department, in which son avenue. The hours were from two
he described the campaign of 1778, re- lo five. The Newman hall girls headed
sulting in the defeat of IHirgoyue's army by Josephine Donley, '27, house president,
uid indirectly in the support of Franco were the hostesses on this occasion. The
for the American colonies, the Society lea was the last public social affair to
of Engineers of Eastern New York be given at the ball before the holy searecently adopted resolutions urging state son of Lent, which began Wednesday,
appropriation for the purchase of the February 17.
Saratoga battlefield/
The next event scheduled for Newman
Mr. Risley urged the engineers to use Club is a cake and candy sale. This salue
their influence in the campaign to pre- is an annual event and is as much a
serve historic places in the state.
part of State College activities as of
Newman traditions. The sale will take
Helen I'. Chase, '21, now a student place on March 17, Saint Patrick's Day,
at the New York State Library School, nd will be conducted in the lower hall
has been doing practice work in catalog- f the administration building.
111' at tlv <'.,||c»re lihrary this week.
MID-WINTER CONCERT
SENIORS AND JUNIORS
COMING FEBRUARY 24 TO DEBATE IN CHAPEL
The big mid-winter concert under the
auspices of the Music association will
be held February 24 in the College auditorium. It will feature the Women's
Chorus and the Mixed Chorus. Thyra
licVier, '26, and Professor T. Frederick
H. Candlyn will give a two-piano selection.
The next program of Music Club will
be held in March. Music Club has
ORCHESTRA REHEARSALS
scheduled Miss Myra I less, a noted pianOrchestra rehearsals will be held
'Hmrsday evening, February 17 and ist, for its spring concert to be held al
Tuesday, February 23 in the auditorium. Chancellor's hall.
Miss Susan Johnson, of the National
Red Cross, will address the student assembly in a week or two. Today, the
senior-junior debate will take place. The
subject will be "Resolved, That Congress
Should Accept the 'McNary-Hangor bill.
The affirmative will be upheld by the
seniors. Senior speakers include, Marguerite Leishman, Helen E. Elliott, Isa-,
belle Plude, and Hazel Benjamin, alternate; juniors, Constance Baumann, Julia
Fay, Marcclla Street, and Margaret Provost and Ruth Colburn, alternates.
There will be a mass assembly because
of the debating.
Pago Three
APPROPRIATIONS TO
BE COT ONE-TENTH
Finance Board Threatens To
Publish Names Of Those
Not Paying
S T I L L COLLECTING
TAX
According to later figures compiled by
the finance board, it is necessary at the
present lime to cut all appropriations
Ion per cent, Of the accepted budget
which totaled $11,8(13, only $10,712 has
been collected. On this basis, Cutting
the amounts allotted, the News will
receive only $2,250 of the $2,500. Music
Club and Dramatics and Art Council
will both he cut $95 of the $950 appropriation, and the basketball budget will
be cut to $1,250.
The finance board is siill collecting
(axes and an effort will be made to
colled one half of the lax from those
sludeiils who are entering for second
semester. More severe methods to enforce payment may have to be resorted
lo if an excuse for non-payment is not
given.
"We are pushing the mailer because we
feel that it is only fair lo those who
have paid, to collet lax from the others
of the student body," said Ruth McN'ult
of Ihe finance board. "We will do all we
can lo try lo colled Ihe lax before the
names are published," she declared.
RUSSELL SAGE PLAYS
VARSITY ON SATURDAY
Next Saturday, State's varsity will
meet thai of Russell Sage in ihe annual
game on the home court. Russell Sage
will travel to Albany one hundred per
cent strong. Whether they are greeted
by an adequate representation for Slate
depends upon you!
Russell Sage's
cheers will be peppy, spontaneous and
Urong. To compete, cheer and song practices are scheduled for the coming week.
The rumored Dul'iois-Tompkins-Swcltinann combination is surely sufficient inducement for attendance. The remainder
if the lineup can not yet he announced.
Another alumnae game is coming March
20.
HANDBOOKS AVAILABLE
All freshmen and entering students
who have not received a freshman handbook, are urged to inform Katharine
Wcnis, '27, editor.
CALENDAR
Today
8:00 P. M. State vs. Cortland
Normal—Gym.
Tuesday, February 23
3:00 P. M. Y. W. C. A. Meeting
—Room P.
Wednesday, February 24
4:00 P. M. French Club.
8:15 P. M. Mid-winter ConcertAuditorium.
Friday, February 26
3:00 P. M. Chemistry Club—Room
250.
8:00 P. M. State vs. Rochester
Optometry—Gym.
Saturday, February 27
2 :00 P. M. State vs. Russell Sage
—Gym.
8:00 P. M. State Frosb vs. Union
Frosb—-Gym,
Sunday, February 28
4:30 P. M. Y. W. C. A. Vespers
—Rotunda.
STATE COLLEGEtfJEWS,FEBRUARY 19, 1020
Page Four
Fifty- five Per-cent Of Alumni Answering Census Teaching;
EIGHT MORE SHORT Forty
or Fifty Per-cent of Teachers New to Positions Yearly
PLAYS ARE PLANNED
School teachers remain too brief a accurately how effective the College is as
time in the same position, for salary con- :i teacher training institute unless we can
ditions in the profession makes it easier :ount those who have made a career of
Advanced Dramatics Class Is to secure an advance in salary by changing positions frequently. President A, U. caching."
Asked To Furnish Farce
The President described a post-card
lirubachcr declares in a report to the
For Vaudeville
College trustees. Pointing out that the .•ensiis recently taken by the College of
within the teaching ranks has the 4,100 graduates who are still living.
MAY PLAY NOT SELECTED mobility
now reached a point where from forty
"Of the total number, fifty-seven per
The advanced dramatics class, which to fifty per cent of the teachers in the sent, or 2,420 persons, responded giving
last evening' presented two one-act plays ! .itate arc new in their positions each complete information about themselves,
in the auditorium, will sponsor about year, Dr. Brubaeher says that "the 'caving from twenty-five to thirty-five
eight more short dramas before April I, inexperienced teacher expects to remain jcr cent who are presumably living hut
only one or two years in the first assign- who arc submerged for some reason,
when rehearsals will be^in for the full- ments,"
whom we cannot coiml either as teachers
length play coming in May.
or non-teachers. Of those who responded,' fifty-five per cent arc now
"This
extreme
mobility/'
he
says,
j
Marion O'Connor and Olla Cioewey
directed last night's plays and those next "obtains chiefly in the rural school, The | leaching; twenty-six per cent arc homemakers
; and seventeen per cent are enweek are coached by Lucille Barber and length of professional service is at best
Mary Nolan. Thursday evening, March too short, it is estimated that the aver- gaged in other occupations.
4, plays will be presented by Helen age length of service for women teachers
Quackenbtish and Edwin Van Klecck, is less than five years for the citmtry
The Milne High School orchestra will at large; for men it is under ten years."
furnish music for these productions,
Dr. lirubachcr uses the figures regardFollowing that night, plays will he ing the shifting of teachers from position
directed by Marion Qiiackcnbnsh, Mary to position to illustrate the difficulty the
Rhein, Isabelle I'lude, DcVVIlt Xeh and College has in keeping in touch with
Edna Fitzgerald,
Is "raduales
"But an additional difficulty, though Luncheon or dinner 11:15—1:30
The class has also been asked to furnish a play for the G, A. A. vaudeville non-professional, is to be found in the
fac'
that the woman lea her who mnrrie«
performance Marcli 19. Marjory Hayless, '24, who is leaching nl Cobleskill, •iiid retires from die profession, at once
Get A Hair Bob At The
has also written asking if a play can be loses her identity and is often unwillln"
sent there. No decision on the May play to give the information about herself
'vh'cb the College needs for purpnfcs of
has been reached.
statistical studies. We cannot know
State College
Cafeteria
NEW HANDY PACK
Fits hand **
pocket and purse
More for y o u r money
and the b e s t Peppermint
Chewing Sweet for any money
COLLEGE BARBER SHOP
CHEM, CLUB TO MEET
The next Chemistry Club meeting will
he Friday aftenoon, February 2fi, at
three o'ek-ck The president, Florence
Glllett, will be in charge of the meeting,
and Dorothy Fennel!, '2d, will read a
paper.
YOUNB WOMEN'S CHRISTIAN
ASSOCIATION
GONRAD HEYES, Prop.
KOHN BROS.
82 ROBIN S T R E E T
"A Good Place to Buy"
SHOES
Phone Main 4748 Appointments Made
12S Central Ave. at Lexington
Open Evenings
COTRELL & LEONARD
5 Lodge Street
Swimming Pool
Cafetc
Rooms
•:"
:••»
r;,,,„,,.,cititn
('lasses
Gymnasium
For all women and girls
Clubs
Albany, N. Y.
Gaps—-Gowns—Hoods
FOR ALL DEGHF.KS
Your Printer
The Gateway Press
QUALITY PRINTERS
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ECONOMY
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Oriental mid Occidental
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STREET
Dancing Every Evening iSST^k
GUSTAVE LOREY
Phone W-3791-M
Silk - Woolen - Cotton
Hemstitching and Trimming
Photographer
OPEN EVENINGS
J. W. WEYRICH
BARBER
299 ONTARIO STREET
Special attention to college students
130 State St.
Albany, N. Y
360 Broadway
Saratoga Springs
Photographer of Pedagogue, 1025
"Ideal Service"
«Ideal Food"
IDEAL RESTAURANT
George F. Hamp, Prop.
208 WASHINGTON AVENUE
PHONE CONNECTION
Regular Dinner 40c
SPECIAL CHICKEN DINNER
11 a. m. to 3 p. m.
SUNDAYS 60c
ALBANY, N. Y
Supper 40c
5 p. m. to 8 p m
Look for Wrigley's P. K. Handy Pick
g> on your Dealer'i Counter o? fc
Vufihjngtmt
fcrirtitifir Sruutii JJarhiru
136 Washington Ave.
Shampooing
Bleaching
Singeing
Facials
Curling
ITlodel College Shop
14 SoPcarl S I A H a n y . n . l J . J
Eye Arching
Dyeing
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Katherine Smith
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CLOTHES OF QUALITY
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Hut not Expensive"
SMART CLOTHES
OUR PARK BRANCH
for
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YOUNG MEN and MISSES the Accounts of State College
CLOTHING. HATS,
Students
SHOES, HABERDASHERY NATIONAL COMMERCIAL
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BANK and TRUST CO.
Inc.
STATE STATE
PARK BRANCH
200 Washington Ave.
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Candies, Ice Cream, Soda, Cigars
307 CENTRAL JWE^ Albany N.J^
PhoM
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394-3% BROADWAY
Printers of State
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New8
Main 2287
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