State College Nel^s STATE ESTABLISHES

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State College Nel^s
N E W YORK S T A T E COLLEGE F O R TEACHERS
VOL.
X No. 18
ALBANY, N. Y., FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 12, 1926
Juniors Attend Class Luncheon at Colony Plaza;
STATE ESTABLISHES EightyReminiscences
of Early Experiences Feature Occasion FENCE FOR CAMPUS
TEACHERS' AGENCY
BACKED IN SURVEY
Cooperate With State College
and Normals In Placing
Graduates
FILLS
LONG
FELT
NEED
Establishment of a teachers' employment agency in connection with (he
twelve employment offices nf the slate
labor department has been announced by
Dr. James A. Hamilton, Industrial commissioner. Employment agencies of the
state now cover industrial, commercial,
domestic, agricultural, building and juvenile free placemen! service.
The eighty juniors who attended junior
'uuchcon tit Colony Plaza, last Saturday
<new the success of that most formal
of college affairs when it is transformed
into a jovial gathering by spontaneous
infortnaliiy.
The '27 banner wilh ils
mysterious secrets nf stolen journeys
looked down upon long tables bedecked
willi green and while carnations. Mariorie (irccutnnn arranged (he five-course
menu. T h e lapses between c mrscs were
filled with musical numbers by Ihc talent
of '27. Nettle Cilbcrt gave' two violin
selections, "Meditation from Thais" by
Massenet and "Song of ihc Pusfcha," by
Kelcr IVIcr. Ruth Moore sang two contralto solos, "1 Saw You Co By" and
"Morning."
Bertha Xajan, toastmlstrcss, announced
that this was a "speechless luncheon"
and by her own original remarks she
kept ail those of others within the realm
of "talks." Dean Pierce especially commended the class of '27 on the unusual
success of the Prom.
She warned
against
falling into the "post-exam
slump," a pit into which so many have
stumbled. Dean Mclzler turned into a
new trend nf though! when lie commended himself on the success of his lirsi
I task performed in ihc summer of 1923,
. when upon arriving at Stale College, lie
selected from numerous applications the
members of '27. lie gave advice concerning the respect, love, and fear for
lruth. Edwin Van Kleeek brought back
freshmen days. The best-learned course,
lie said, was thai of Ihc Strand, and immediately sat down In give opportunity
In those who wished to pursue the course
ili.it aflornoon. Melanie (Irani, speaking
of sophomnrc days, told wherein '27
failed, one way being the failure to let
I he freshmen win interclass rivalry,
ktllll I'Jlipie. class president, refused to
tell a story or a jnke because no point
could ever be found to them, and then
proceeded In tell several well-sharpened
..nes to her "family," 1027.
Marcella
Street peered into ihc crystal ball, and
saw in corning years: Miss Fulleier a
lead on Broadway, wilh Julia Fay as
understudy; Secretary of' State, h'ulh
I). Kinpi.-; Bcrlha Xajan and Mclanle
(Irani, stage partners, and lastly, Edwin
Van Kleeek, the phantom, in "The Phantom of the Opera " Tn leave junior
luncheon seemed Impossible so bound together in spirit was '27 after sliu'lng
college songs and "Auld Lang Syne."
Suggest That Future Classes
Give Memorial Gates
To College
WOULD PRESERVE
LAWNS
A survey conducted by ihc News this
week, indicates that student opinion is
.|r..ii"ly behind President A. R, Brtlbacher's plan tn surround the College
anipits with an ornamented six-foot iron
fence, One suggestion was that In the
future
College
classes
could,
give
memorial gales as their gifls to the College.
Muriel Wcnzcl, '2d, president: of the
-.Indent association, .said, "The suggestion
The new service will be operated in
is one of the best ever mentioned, and
cooperation with the stale normal schools
according to my idea is (he only thing
and teachers' training schools, including
thai will give State College a campus to
be proud of
There are so many outStale College, Under present conditions
siders who utterly 'ignore mir "Preserve
teachers seeking work are often obliged
the g r a s s " ' signs and wear ugly paths
to pay fees through privately controlled
across our lawns (ha! it seems as though
employment agencies. This method has
a fence were (be only means of keeping
not proven satisfactory either from ihc
tlie campus in such ;
idillon that the
students will lie proud to show it to their
viewpoint of the teachers, or thai of the
friends."
educational authorities, i| was said.
Xiles llaieht. '26 president of the
The fact no fee j« i,, he charired is
senior class, expressed his views as folexpected to bring nnpllcatlons from many
lows: "I think that Dr. Brubachcr'B
teachers wlio could not afford a fee, or
plan is an excellent one. II will not
would dislike to pay it.
Mr. and Mrs. Frank Wetiz.el, 78 North only keep out tln.se who i\n nol belong
Applications will be received not only
on
the grntinds, but it will give the ColAllen slreel, Albany, announce the enfrom teachers for primary and grammar
The varsity basketball team which won gagement of their daughter. Muriel lege an atmosphere of cxcluslveness,
grades but also from (hose for hirrh
Furthermore, it is the plan nf nther
schools and colleges.
In Albany the one game and lost one over vacation, will Louise Wenzel, to Donald Ellioii Mont colleges, such as Harvard and Union,
teachers' employment service will be play the Savage School of Physical Edu- of Philadelphia, son nf Mr. and Mrs. and enhances the beauty of the place.
bandied through the Albany ouVe of the cation tonight in New York.
Archibald T. Moat, nf Sll'ig-crlauds j Various classes could give gates as
employment bureau, 518 Broadway, of
Last night the varsity was to have Miss Wenzel is a senior and president nf memorials and new traditions could he
wh'eh n-mic-i A. T-Tnusmann is director.
played Brooklyn Polytechnic institute.
built up around Ihem,
it wnnld give
Establishment of the services will result The team left Albany Wednesday to the student body, a member of Myskauia thu College an et tirelv new field In
in more satisfactory conditions and more nlay New Paltz Normal in a return fou- and ,,f p.ln Phi sorority
which in w .r|< "
suitable placements, it was said.
The lest mi Its way to New York that night.
Mr. Moat is connected with I re Is and . Carlei ,ii Mouse. '2d. business manager
shift nf teachers, especially in rural
The varsity won, 46 to 22, from the
of the Quarterly, dc dared thai "Such a
lie!
schools and small towns, each year \llimni Saturday, and on the night of Northrup company, Philadc'phia.
fence as |)r, Brubaeher proposes would
mounts into hundreds. Tf is slated much Post Exam iubllcc lost to Si, Boua- was graduated from keiisselaer Poly- greally and m the attraetii eness nf the
of this can he avoided by proper placing v em.ire's. 23 to 25.
technic Institute in 192-1 will, the decree! place. It is the thing being d.,"c by all
of teachers in the first instance resulting
The two games brought the team's nf mechanical engineer, lie i- a mem- the larger c Tcge-, and would keep out
in satisfaction both to teachers and the record In six victories in nine contests.
ber nf the American S-.c:ciy ,0' Me j m-"snns wh., have formed t i e habit of
education boards.
The team is thirty-eight points ahead
osi'it 'lie mile e campus as a short cut
Dr. Hamilton termed the new service •if its nine opponents in scoring totals for chanical Engineers ami of ilic Ivi ineer'
club nf Philadelphia
"an advanced step in public employment :he season,
Kulh l-'.inpie, '27. i,:v i-l.- •! of the
activities of the department."
Several
Thy St. Bnnaventure game was clnse
junior class, said "I think tli.it il would
rules attend the service.
Apnllcations and exciting all the way and the result
be an ideal thing In have such a fence.
by school authorities for teachers should was in doubt almost to the final whistle
It would prevent the citizens of this city
be made early enough tn n-ivc t| l e e m _ In the Alumni game, the regulars outfrom enjoying privileges which are deplovment service officials time to select played and onts'-orod the veterans, who
nied to tiie siudouis themselves.
Wo
a filling applicant.
buttressed by the presence of Stanley
<a"iiot walls across the College campus,
Letters of invitation have been sent
"Big Fitz" Fitzgerald, star of the Coland the men cannot smoke while on the
lope's slate championship outfit of sev- mi by Dr. Bruhachcr ibis week to all I campus, so why should outsiders be
eral years ago, fought hard to come UP high schools, inviting teachers, principle • all-,wed to do these things. It would also
from behind all the way. Jucketi, cap- and superintendents in twenty-eight M I : I add tin air of dist!nctive"ess."
ain , f State two years ago, was In the les of eastern New York tn a see aid
Constance Caunianu, '27. secretary of
G. A. A- will have a mid-winter frolle Mlimni lineup and Hnwc and Casaolann
I he luiiiiir class, declared "The tradition
to"it'lit. Refreshments are in charge of ilsn played.
The Alumni also used annual round table conference The e-.u which wo are supposed to hold sacred,
Mildred I.oman with Roatrlcc Wright ^mllh and Riley. The varsity rushed foroitco will be held at College on Sa'.ur that of not walking op the campus except
and Carolyn Schlelch, asistnuts.
Ruth into ii scoring spree wilh the oponillp day. March 20,
I up-iii specified occasions, has never been
Maynard will take care of decorations. "hlstlc and kept up the work most of
f n | . I en forced or upheld, In that anyone may
There will he separate c m fere :
Katharine Blenls Is in charge of the pro- ihc fir i half. Nephew was the individual
, j cm across the lawn to save time, If
gram and. with the assistance of d e r - •tar of ihc game, scoring almost at will each high school department, al
utsldo people may do this, why not
t'-ntle Swnttmann. Gonrplnnnn Maar. and for H total of nineteen points,
school administration, junior hteli clno] w 0 who as students must reach eliiftiei
Mnrgret Stontnnbl"*0'h. pmmlsns a " v n L
("nrch nnl'or started his regular out and school supervision, A luncheon cop. on time. A fence would prevent thii
r"ii"e R"vun"
Puhy H e r m a " . Ruth
I with Ne'iliew at center. Harming
fereiKe to be held in (lie College cafeteria promiscuous uao of State College propMoore, Dorothy Terrell and Marjory
-r- ai forwards a"d F<iicr.y"»M n"d I will be addressed by a person of nail "'til I orly
Young arc a few of the surprise enter-! Crbnn at tniards. Later he used Herney 'irominp"ee, on "Education for Law 0!>
(Continued On P»g0 3)
taincrs on the pro r rram.
I and Kershaw.
' servance,"
I
STATE PLAYES SAVAGE MURIEL L WENZEL TO
WED RENSSELAER GRAD
PHYSICAL ED SCHOOL
TONIGHT IN NEW YORK
BRUBACHER INVITES
TEACHERS TO MEETING
MID-WINTER FROLIC OF
G.A.A. IN GYM TONIGHT
f'ngo Two
§iai*
STATIC COLLKaiO NKWS, KlOBRUARY 12. ff)2f1
GIRLS' ATHLETICS A T S T A T E COLLEGE
OliiUnje $ * u i a O K U TOO //£L/>£D
THE
NEWS' SICINED ARTICLE BY A FACULTY MEMBER IS CONTRIBUTED THIS WEEK
PLAN JUNIOR WEEK
ESTABLISHED BY THE CIAS6 OF 1916
Vol, X
Feli.l-', 192r.
No. ll
Published weekly during the college
year by the Student Body of the New
York State College for Teachers at
Albany, New York.
The subscription rate is three dollars
per year. Advertising rates may be had
on application to the business manager.
Editor-in-Chief
HARRY S. GODFREY, '26
Managing Editor
EDWIN VAN KLEECK, '27
Business Manager
HELEN E. ELLIOTT, '26
Subscription Manager
HELEN BARCLAY, '26
Copy Reader
MARGARET BENJAMIN, '26
Assistant Business Managers
MVRA 11 ART MAN, '27
HELEN ZI..I.\.ER.VIAN, '27
Assistant Subscription Manager
t iiEI..MA TEMPLE, '2/
Assistant Copy Reader
J ULIA FAY, '27
Associate Editors
Sara Berkley, '27
Louise Gunn, '27
Katharine Blenis,
Anna Kol'f '26
Joyce Persons. '26
Reporters
Leah Cohen
Elizabeth MacMullen
Thelma Brezec Lda Van Schaick
Virginia Higgins Kathcrine Saxton
Adelaide Holiister Dorothy Watts
Elnah Krieg
Bertha Zajan
FENCE FOR CAMPUS IS
FAVORED BY STUDENTS
'
MISS ISABELLE JOHNSTON
A discussion of girls' athletics at State might well begin with a list of
grievances. There tire two chief complaints to be made: the first with regard
to the faculty support of athletics, and the second concerning the altitude of
Stale College men toward girls' athletics. Faculty support is noticeably lacking, particularly at basketball games. The visiting teams at Stale, arc always
accompanied by loyal enthusiastic instructors It seems that basketball, the
"big game" here, is worthy of the attendance of State's faculty. The attitude
of the College men toward girls' athletics is one of amused tolerance. The
girls' games arc just as important as the men's. At the last alumni game the
lack of cooperation and enthusiasm on the part of the men was certainly an
obvious drawback to the maintenance of that very necessary thing called
"college spirit."
The Russell Sage game is coming soon. This big event ought to receive
the support of everyone at State. Personally,
I do not approve of intcrschool
athletics for girls. The Russell Sa r c games, however, arc more or less of an
institution here and were established long before my appointment to the Physical Education department, 1 believe that students in schools of a somewhat
professional nature have nut (he time or inclination to support intcrschool
games. Nevertheless, the Sage games will probably be permanent factors in
the girls' athletics schedule at State. As an institution, therefore, they are
worthy of the College's best efforts, in c including, it mi lit be of interest to
note that an added feature has been included in the schedule this year. A
faculty game will he played on March 6. Watch for the line-up!
QUEEN CARE REFUSES l FIVE HUNDRED ATTEND
TO DIE AT JUBILEE] ANNUAL JUNIOR PROM
Repeated burials must finally have put
King Care out of the running, for the
old fellow was not present at the Post
Exam Jubilee Thursday night, for his
annual funeral. Resolved, however, to
some member of the royal
•I"
committee in charge seized
family the use, and the funeral of Queen
upon his s| solemnly begun. Scarcely,
t 'are was id Dr. Harry W. Hastings,
lead
of the English department, comlowcvcr,
mented on the beauty and grace of the
paid mourners, and pronounced the usual
last sad words over the bier, when signs
if life were noticed in the corpse. Dr.
Croasdalc, after a brief examination,
called for oxygen, and, by the administration of this and by removing from
he unhappy Queen's chest bluebooks in
History 2, Physics and Calculus, revived
her completely. All of this, of course,
turned the mourning to rejoicing, and
very me danced merrily until 11:30.
Junior Prom proved to he the biggest
affair of the year. Over five hundred
pe iple attended the Prom held last Frilay in the Ten Eyck ballroom. Gowns
representing every hue along with palms
Hid a thousand pennants of the cosmos
made the ballroom a fitting reception
hall for the juniors and their guests.
Special cozy corners were arranged for
'he faculty.
Dr. and Mrs. Abram R. Briibachcr
were'unable to attend. Dean Anna E.
Pierce, Dean William H. Mctzlcr, Dr.
Marion Collins, Ruth Empie and Bertha
•'ajan received. Guests of honor were
Dr. and Mrs Robert R. Faust, Miss
Marion Flemmiiig, Professor and Mrs.
iuorgc M. York, and Professor and Mrs,
William Kennedy. The promenade was
led by Professor and Mrs. York.
Olgti Bcauman's toe dance was met
i'h special favor as was Elizabeth
\ e tluud's harp solos. Dancing ended at
-: 15.
Cnm-teny Alb. Bve. News
Continu.il from Pa v 1
Louise Gunn and Katharine Blenis,
William J. Clarke, '27, manager of the who served on committees for the
varsity basketball team, said, "A fence events of Junior Week
is a real necessity. It will be more necessary after the new buildings are comISABEL WINCH MARRIES
pleted. The grounds should not be used
for the purpose of a park playground
Beta Zeta announc the tnarria"c
by all the neighborhood children, who Isabel Winch, '25 ti Harold Vang
scale the upper campus rail, leap off the December .31, 1925.
steps, play hide and seek, roller skate
Beta Zeta welcome! Dorothy Dey and
on the walks, jump rone on the lawns, Jetty Dod c, '28, as pledge members.
MUSIC CLUB PRESENTS
and play all kinds of games on the
grounds."
FLONZALEY QUARTET ALUMNAE HAVE DINNER
Alpha Delia Omicron wcl'omi
Richard A. Jensen, '28, secretary of full membership Vivian Backu
The I'loiizalcy Quartet will be prcstudent association, said: "It would do
THEN WITNESS GAMES
away with a certain temptation 'to follow /'ranees Smith. Eleanor Smith, Alice ented by the Music Association in a o>u•ert at Chancellor's hall on February 16.
the crowd' and save time in a short cut. Reno and Dorothy Smith, '28.
There were about sixty guests present
fhe students will be admitted to the bal- at the alumnae dinner held in the cafeAnthony Kuczynski, '28, varsity basMice W'indccker, ex-'26, spent tin
ketball player, said, "ft would certainly vcek-eud at Alpha Delta Omicroi cony on student tax tickets and to the leria last Saturday eve ling. During the
main hall on the payment of twenty-five dinner, Professor Kinland read some
add to the attractiveness of the campus."
cents with their student tax tickets. verses which will appear in the little
Harriet Parkhurst, '28, thinks that the house.
Eleanor Gellrich spent the wee'; enc ' ickcls will be sold to the public at volume of Student Verse. Miss Pierce
plan is excellent. "When our new buildCluett's.
outlined the progress of the dormitory
ings are finished, we will he separated .vitli her si,tor Louise Gellrich, '27.
drive
Some delightful entertainment
from the outside world, thus making a
was furnished by Bertha Zaiau and
little world of our own, which will be
"Basic Principle in Child Training is Obedience" Writes
Molauio Grant who danced, and Marcclla
quite collegiate."
trcet who sang, and Ruth McNutt who
David Sniurl, president of '29, said
Mrs H. Chapman, '13, Now Teaching in District School I'd a gypsy dance. Alter the dinner,
"I think that the fence idea is one which
the guests attended the two alumnae
will solve a problem that has been pending for a long time, that is, how to
The latest Alumni Quarterly quotes a have concluded that present day educa- basketball games played in the gymkeep our campus for State College stu- letter from Mrs II. Chapman, formerly tion is made too easy for children. Too nasium with the varsity teams,
dents, and how to keep it in such a con- Laura Bristol, '13.
much i- done for them and they are not
dition that we will all be proud of it.
Mrs. Chapman taught for three m mths left t i figure things out for themselves
The athletic field will provide a play- after graduation when she became deeply I do not minimize the drawbacks of a EXAMS CONDUCTED IN
ground for the students
involved in the woman suffrage campaign rural school; for a backward child they
HONORABLE MANNER
Mildred Lansley, secretary of '29, de- both as a speaker and an organizer. are hopeless but for a normal child they
clares _ "I have always loved/ fences; Later she managed a farm and finally accomplish good results. The teacher
"The general atmosphere and sentithey give a place such a cosy atmosphere. married a neighbor farmer. They have can give but little time to the individual ment in regard to honor in evami unions
A fence like the one proposed would two children. Mrs. Chapman writes: "f child hut that vcv fact develops an is very different; examinations were conincrease College spirit a hundredfold, and have driven everything on a farm from independence and ingenuity that is an ducted as honorab'y as if we had an
the College would be very impressive." the children's goat to the tractor. For the asset Inter. I would like to add that I honor _ system," Dr. Brubacher state;]
Ruth Pember, '29, said: "The fence past year I have taken my children with believe the basic principal in child train- when interviewed in regard to cheating
should be erected as soon as possible."
ni the recent final tests.
me and taught the district school. 1 ing is implicit obedience."
STA-TK COLLKUB NEWS, FEBRUARY 12, 192(1
f)s
Page Three
GIRLS' VARSlTf WINS
FROM ALUMNAE TEAM
BY SCORE OF 22-19
The girls' varsity played llicir first
panic witli the alumnae Saturday night.
Due to many of the players on the
alumnae team being recent graduates
from '2-1, and ihe varsity for the evening
being a result of a try-out, the contest
was close. Margaret rlutchins, last
year's varsity captain, was star guard
for the alumnae. 'Hie Hoyl-Craddock
combination was back on the floor. Ethel
DtiBois, junior forward of renown, was
out due to a wrenched ankle but the
Tompkius-Swetlmau-Ncville trio from
the junior team piled up points for varsity. At the first half, varsity had
scored 1.3 to alumnae's '). The second
half was spurred along from a startling
field shot by Lorona Shaffer, to a final
tally of 22-19 with varsity on the long
end of the score. The alumnae: Holding, (I., '2-1; Hoyt, P., Craddock, P.,
Daly, F„ Taylor, G., Dietz. (,., Hutchins, (i., '25. Varsity players were:
Milmiue, ('•„ Raynor, ii., J. Wright, G-,
Shaffer, G„ Melrose P., '26; Neville, F.,
Sweltman, !•'., Tompkins, F„ Maar, G.,
Kmpie, G., h'lorio, G., '27; Lasher, ['.,
]'.. Wright, P., Secger, F„ Rowland, G-,
M. Doughty, G„ '28.
COLLEGE
NEWS!
AT A GLANCE | %
The dinner dance which was to be
held Saturday evening, February <>, by
the New York City Slate College :I
Alumni Association was cancelled
Political Science Club will meet, Tuesday, February K>, in room I'll. Members of the clnh will participate in a
program eommem irating the birthdays of
Washington and Lincoln.
Newman Club expresses deep regret
and extends sincere sympathy to l.cnore
Concaunou, '27, upon the reseent death
of her father.
The regular meeting of Newman Club
was held on Tuesday, February ') at
four o'clock in Room 211. Gertrude
Lynch, '26. presided in the absence of
Marion O'Connor, president. Announcement was made of the publication of the
Newman Quarterly, the federation magazine, and subscriptions were taken. The
club rums and certificates of member
ship decided upon at the Federation Conference last year, arc ready for distribution. Winifred Casey, '26, has been
elected treasurer of the club to succeed
Julia Fay, v h i re ugncd.
Members of Newman Club are cordially invited to attend a bridge-tea on
Saturday. February 1,1, at Newman ball
from 2:.in to 5. Josephine Donley, '27,
house president, is planning an interesting program.
Thin t'lnnt hydro-electric unit weight 7S0 ion* nntl ronn/sf.-i of a vertical shaft
hydraulic turhnw nttaclwd <» tm electric tlviivrator dclivcrim! 52,000 kilowatts
at 12,000 volts,
WW'
Bigger Generators—
Cheaper Electricity
A 70,000 horsepower hydro-electric unit recently installed at
Niagara Falls utilizes the same amount of water as seven
former 5,000-horsepower units, yet does the work of fourteen
such units. And it saves 700,000 tons of coal yearly for the
nation.
Gencrnl Electric Cornpony, cm of Decembers, lUlct,
hurl 37,71o stockholder!!, of
whom 45 per cent were
women. Tlie average number of common shares held
by btocklioldem wun 55. In
ownership, policies, past and
present activities, G-E In unselfishly dedicated to the
cause of electrical prosress,
A new scries of G-E nclvcrtlsemenls showing whnt clcctrl'iiy Is (loins I" muny
fields will be sent on request.
Ask for booklet GEK-1,
Commerce Club will have a dinner at
the end of this month.
Gamma Kappa Phi welcomes F.dna
Kempe, '28. and Helen Payne, '27, as
pledge members.
Psi Gamma welcomes Carolyn Pollock
into full membership.
Seniors
Will nil seniors desiring the help
of the Appointment Bureau in s e .
curing positions for next year,
please fill out schedule cards with
room number of their classes and
file these curds with Miss Thomp.
son at once.
As more and still more uses are found for electricity, larger
and more economical generators are installed. At the power
plant, as well as at the consumer's end, important changes and
startling developments have steadily reduced the cost of
electricity for light, power, and heat.
And wherever electricity has blazed its trail—in towns, cities,
industrial centers, and rural communities—comfort and progress
have come to stay.
Generating and distributing electricity concern the technical
student. But electricity's application in the betterment of
industry, the professions, and home life concerns every educated person. Cheap electricity means many startling achievements today, but countless and unbelievable possibilities
tomorrow.
GENERAL* ELECTRIC
GENERAL
ELECTRIC
REPORT AT Y. W,
At Y. \V. meeting Tuesday in Room II,
at three o'clock, Hliznbeth Bender ami
Dorothy Watts will give a report of the
Student Volunteer convention recently
'"•M at CoWate university, Hamilton,
N. Y., which they attended as delegates
of the State College Y. W.
COMPANY,
SCHENECTADY,
NEW
YORK
Your Printer
COTRELL & LEONARD
The Gateway Press
Albany, N, Y.
QUALITY PRINTERS
At your elbow—West 2037
336 Central Ave,
Caps—Gowns—Hoods
FOR ALL DEGREES
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, FEBRUARY 12. 1926
Pjiiro Four
SYDDUM HALL PLANS
PROCEEDS FROM THREE
CALENDAR
Today
SUPPER DANCE PARTY
PLAYS PAY EXPENSES 4:00 P. M. Chemistry
Club—Room
hall will hold a supper dance
AND LEAVE $50PROFIT 260.7:45 P. M. G. A. A. Frolic—Gym- at Sydduni
1 F.uglcu'ood Place from 6 :.10 until
For thu first time In the history of
nasium.
Tuesday, February 16
elementary dramatics class presentation
4:00 P. M. Menorah—-Room B.
the class lias been able to pay all ex4:00
P. M. Political Science Club
penses and has a surplus left from the sale
—Room 101.
of tickets for the three plays which were
Thursday February 18
presented at the Institute of the Historical
:00 P M. Y. W.—Room P..
4:00 P. M. Spanish Club—Room
and Art Society on January 14 and 15.
103.
The intensive advertising kept the event
Friday, February 19
in tlic minds of both students and public
8:00 P. M. Basketball—Cortland
and their financial support was most
Normal—Gym.
gratifying. The surplus of about fifty
dollars will probably be turned over to
POSTPONE PLAY
the Dramatics and Art Association to
The Advanced Dramatics Class play,
assist ill carrying out their spring under the direction of Alia Gocwcy, will
program.
be postponed until February 16, Marion
O'Connor will also present a play at
that. time.
TO ISSUE QUARTERLY
IN MIDDLE OF MONTH
Olga liampcl, editor-in-chief of the
Quarterly, announced that the second
"Quarterly" of the year will be out about
the middle of February. One or two
new writers arc to be Introduced but
their identity is not yet being revealed.
Attention is n,vain called to the fact that
the "Quarterly" belongs to the student
liidy t'Ye linien e •.'•ecial'y a«'0 ur"ctl to
get their copies of Ibis second number.
845 Maditcn Ave.
DRUGS and PHARMACEUTICALS
Telephone West 3462-3463
ECONOMY
DRESS G O O D S S T O R E
215 Central Ave.
Phona W-37J1-M
Silk - Woolen - Cotton
Hemstllchtnq and Trimming
OPEN EVENINGS
Get A Hair Bob At The
COLLEGE BARBER SHOP
CONRAD HEYES, Prop.
11:30 tomorrow evening'. The chairmen
of the various committees are: music,
\rmiiic Foster; refreshments, Anne Kaynor; decorations, Elma Bird. The
ehaperonos will be Dean Pierce, Dr,
Carolina Croasdale, Professor and Mrs.
Sayles and Miss Pcrinc. Out of town
guests will include: Mrs. Minnie D,
l.eary, Mary Lcary, and Mary Pierpont,
'25, a former Sydduni hall president. She
will he the guest of Abbie Crawford,
present house president.
The dance will be in the form of a
Valentine parly with appropriate refreshments and decorations, Music will be
furnished by Ray Horn's orchestra.
YOUNG WOMEN'S CHRISTIAN
ASSOCIATION
More for y o u r money
and the best Peppermint
Chewing Sweet for anymoney
Phone Main 4748 Appointments Made
State College
Cafeteria
Wanlituntim
fcriiMitifir iHrairtu, Jforlitru
136 Washington Ave.
Shampooing
Bleaching
Luncheon or dinner 1 1 : 1 5 — 1 : 3 0 Singeing
Facials
Curling
OUR PARK B R A N C H
Eye Arching
Dyeing
Scalp Treatment
Manicuring
Clipping
Katherine Smith
Jane Burgess
WELCOMES
the Accounts of State College
Students
PARK BRANCH
200 Washington Ave.
'Ideal Food"
"Ideal Service"
IDEAL
RESTAURANT
George F. Hamp, Prop.
208 WASHINGTON AVENUE
ALBANY, N. Y.
PHONE CONNECTION
Regular Dinner 40c
SPECIAL CHICKEN DINNER
Supper 40c
11 a. m. to 3 p. m.
SUNDAYS 60c
5 p. m. to 8 p m
Look for Wrigley's P. K. Handy Pack
gf on your Dealer*! Counter 07 fc
(DrteniaT and (Occidental
lieatanrant
44 STATE STREET
Dancing Every Evening
P. M.
until I A, M.
Albany Art Union
o
BARBER
Special attention to college students
Fits hand —
pocket and purse
82 ROBIN STREET
NATIONAL COMMERCIAL
J. W. W E Y R I C H
BANK and TRUST CO.
299 ONTARIO STREET
NEW HANDY PACK
5 Lodge Street
Swimming Pool
Cafeteria
Gymnasium
Rooms
Clubs
Classes
For all women and girls,
ITloclel College Shop
14 SoPcarl SI AllamjJll]. J
CLOTHES OF QUALITY
DISTINCTIVE P H O T O G R A P H Y
48
North
Pearl
Street
Albany, N. Y.
Authentically
Collegiate in Style
"Clothes that are Distinctive
But HO! Expensive"
MIKE'S BARBER SHOP
WE SPECIALIZE IN LADIES' HAIR BOBBING
MOST UP-TO-DATE APARTMENT ON THE HILL
PRIVATE ROOM FOR LADIES
362 CENTRAL AVE.
PHONE W, 60J»-J
PATRONIZE THE
American (CUanorra anft ©ijera
We Clean and Dye all kinds of Ladies' and Men's
Wearing Apparel
811 MADISON A.VENUE
Phone West 273
MILLS ART PRESS
ALBANY, N. Y.
394-396 BROADWAY
Printers of
State
College
News
Main 2287
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