State College Ne CAMPUS DAY EVENTS WILL BET0M0RR0W B%

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"OUR CHANGING COLLEGES"
Is T H E Tifi.E or TIIK FIRST OF A SKKIKS
OK StoNKii FACULTY AKTICI.KS, ON PAOE
Two.
I T IS WRITTEN TOR T H E N E W S .
%.
BY PRESIDENT B% BACHER
State College Ne
N E W YORK S T A T E COLLEGE F O R T E A C H E R S
VOL. X
NO. 5
ALBANY, N. Y., FRIDAY, OCTOBER 23, 1925
$3,00 fer W ^
Sophs Trailed, In Scholarship Last
BRUBACHER HITS '29 IS
CAMPUS DAY EVENTS Seniors Led,
Year, Registrar's Report On Term Honors Shows
FOR HAZING FRACAS
WILL BET0M0RR0W
The class of 1926 led in scholarship
last year, according to the announcement
of the honor standings for the year made
Queen's Identity Will Come today by Miss Elizabeth Van Denbergh.
registrar. Three and five-tenths of the
As Surprise, Is
seniors were on the high honor roll as
Rumor
contrasted with 3.3 per cent of the class
of 1027 and .07 per cent of the class of
G. A. A. TO HAVE PARADE 1028.
Campus Day tomorrow, will be one In tile honor roll, the seniors also led,
of the largest and the must colorful
events ever held at Slate, Myskania one of every seven seniors appearing
members announced yesterday. Marion on the list. Eight pur cent of the junior
( hcscbrotigh Is general chairman, ami class was on the honor list and 3.6 per
Lorcua Shaffer and Elizabeth Miim.ne, cent of the sophomores.
'I he complete list follows:
assistant chairmen. A parade with surprise athletics and the sale of "lollypops" by (i. A. A. will he new features.
"Who is the queen?" is (he question
in State today.
Myskania members
have been Hooded with queries but the
only satisfaction offered is a smile and,
"You'll see tomorrow night."
HIGH HONORS
Seniors
Bellows, Marjorie
Chesebroti h, Marion
Con-alvo, Adeline
DcMockcr, Georgia
Klinkhart, Hilda
l.cishman, Marguerite
Marcus, Rose
Snow, Miriam
Juniors
Baikley, Sara
Considine, Mary
Dean, Ruth
( P a g e T w o , Column T w o )
"Get Wise" Party W a s "Toial
Failure," Sophomore
Leader Says
EXPEL U N R U L 7 T S
THREAT
Freshmen men were "on the carpet '
before President A. R. Drubachei- yelerday afternoon, as a result of the
initiation fracasci last week.
The exact situation regarding further
initiations this year still hangs in doubt
today. The president's talk emphasized
the necessity for drawing a sharp di
liiuiion between college tradition and
sophomore rules.
"There is no news regarding the GetWise party," said President Bruhacher.
when asked what happened at college
Friday evening.
"I have heard that
-some of the boys bad a little ex itenieiit,
but I see nothing about it that makes
The choice of the students will be
crowned queen a I 8:15 in the audi- Well-Known Entertainers Are Student Leaders
Will Assist news. I think the i iris had a quiet,
Presented Bv Drama
lelightful parly." Asked why no pc laity
torium tomorrow night. Her attendants
In Enforcement Of
Association
party was held Saturday evening, h will be two seniors whose names are beTraditons
Jean Gros' Marionettes will he pre.aid, "I believe Myskania thought that
ing withheld; Evelyn Middle and Mary
Creation of t i e Campus council as an there was no need for penalties. No- e
Calvin, juniors; Carolyn Wheeler and sented twice today, by the college
Katharine Saxton, sophomores; and Dramatic a n d .Art association as ^the aid to the carrying out of college tra- of the other classes have ever needed
litions
and iulcr-cla s rivalry rules was penalizing."
opening
number
of
their
season.
T
h
e
Gertrude Schwcntlccr and Grace SeaMarionettes will give a performance announce:! today by Myskania. " T h e
man, freshmen.
Francis E. Griffin, president of the
need
for
some or. anized body repreCompetitive stunts, judged by the for children this afternoon at Chansophomore class, who was kidnapped bv
faculty, will follow.
Fact) class will cellor's hall a n d a n o t h e r this evening. senting the lower classes in the uphold- the freshmen, issued this statement Wedpresent one stunt. H a r r y S. Godfrey, Student tax tickets will he good for ing of traditions has long been felt and nesday :
it is for this reason thai the council
chairman of the senior stunt committee, admission to either entertainment.
"The 'Get-Wise' party was a ve-y sucOver one thousand strings are nec- has been or- anized so as to give repreis assisted by Marjorie T. Bellows, M.
sentation
to all classes," a member said cessful social function hut failed c mi
Hewitt Landon, Percy Brsggs and essary to produce the effects. Trained
oletcly
in the purpose its name implies,
The campus council will be composed
Muriel L, Wcnzcl. The junior stunt actors recite t h e lines of the play
there were no casualties and no dan;
committee consists of Thelma Temple while the puppets move about the if members of the student council and ige was done as the freshmen
vicc-prcside'its
classes. , .
chairman, and Mclanic Grant, Bertha stage in life-like fashion. T h e illus'on he
lie vice
lire.lUc-ii*. of
ol the
llie various
various clashes.
.
, , .
Zajan, Ruth II. McNutt and [-Tele 1 obtained is said t o he remarkable and M
Members of the Campus council w i n i their way through their stunts.
Tompkins. The sophomore committee to hold the audience in sinpcns-".
>o:
Muriel L. Wenzcl, president of
. ( l D r \ r B » l b ' ? c , , e r ' . , *ttar
consultation
is composed of Margaret Stoulenhuri h.
The bunny orchestra of eight rab- he sludc-,t associaliai; Melaine Grant, w l t b My.'kaiim f o " « off the penally
chairman, and Emily Williams, Joseph- bits with their leader is presented, •ice-president of the student association; meeting as he believed it would develop
ine Walker, Marjorie Youngs. Goldina I These rabbits play with vim, seldom Richard A. Ic-ien, secretary of the I into a hazing program which would end
| in the dismissal of a portion of the male
Hills, Harriet Parkhurst and Mary makin
a mistake with the music, student association; S. Miles Haight,
H e pointed out that
l.angdon. The freshman committee is They are t e m p e r a m e n t a l a n d when president of the senior class; Ruth Em- underclassmen.
David Smurl, chairman, and Bernard displeased, wiggle their cotton ta'ls. •>ie, president of the junior class; 'since all the men of the freshman class
were
penalized,
the
meeting would deAuerbach, Robert J. Sbillinglaw and
A complete miniature theatre is Francis P.. Griffin, president of the velop into a rough house.
Clinton Wallwork.
carried, including t h e proscenium cur- sophomore class; David Smurl, presi"The members of the first men's stunt
The athletics and surprise events, be- tain, bridges and platforms where the dent-elect
of the freshmen
class;
ginning at 2 o'clock tomorrow after- actors work, scenery, stage lighting Eleanor Callery, vice-president of the were to be penalized because of their
noon, will be conducted by G. A. A. equipment, all m a n n e r of properties senior class; Bertha Zajan, vice-president altitude of contempt and superiority
The field ball game between the senior- and thus a r e totally independent of of the junior class; Coldena Bills, vice- •wcr Myskania and the sophomore class;
the entire second group for cutting
sopliomore and junior-freshman teams, any auditorium in the country.
•iresident of the sophomore class, and camnus and showing disrespect for a
will replace the usual hockev game
T h e special matinee is aid to con- Evelyn Graves, vice-president of the Myskania member.
Action begins at 2 o'clock with Anne tain all the charm of Mr. Claris' hooks. freshmen class.
"The new council, which succeeds the
Raynor, captain of the senior-sophomore All the characters of the animal k'ngIt is to be the duty of the Campus
team, and Helen Tompkins, captain of cloin are to he present, including of council to watch over the enforcement board of censors, will relieve the burden
of enforcing the college traditions from
the opponents.
course the celebrated Uncle Wiggily if traditions and to report all violations
The races on the camnus after the and his Hollow S t u m p Bungalow or- of such rules to Myskania, who will the sophomore class. President flnibachcr stated that he believes a means
game consist of the obstacle race, threechestra
which has been enga; ed by take further action, It is also to be can be devised to punish exceptional
legged race, somersault race, backward"
the duty of the council to assist My- cases of freshness and contempt of trathe
circus
m
a
n
a
g
e
m
e
n
t
for
this
season.
race, and the croquet relay. These will
All the c h a r a c t e r s of the stories a r e skania in the enforcement of all inter- ditions."
be directed by the class managers, Elizahimself. class rivalry rules.
beth Milmine. Ethel DuBois, Dorothy to appear, Uncle Wiggily
Suppression of the penalty party came
In addition, other members will be
Roland and Dorothy Lasher, general Nurse Jane, Fuzzy Wussy. Uncle
partly as a result of the abduction Friday
Butter,
the
Coat,
M
r
s
.
T
w
'
s
l
v - T a i l . appointed to the council.
chairman. Numerous entries have alnight by freshmen of the sophomore
ready signed up on the G. A. A. bulletin the P i g Lady. M r s . Wihblc Wobble,
class president and a series of retalliathe Duck Lady, the Skoe/.icks. the
board.
tion measures by the sophomore class.
TO H E A R O F SILVER B A Y
The route of the parade has not bee" Terrible Pipscsewah, t h e SkuddlemaPresident Bruhacher and Myskania
A Silver Bay meeting will be held
Puss-in-Boots,
the African
revealed. The parade committee is T call goon,
declared annulled all plans for the penCohen, chairman. Constance Bauman strong-man, the Clown and t h e Par- •v Y. W . C. A., Tuesday afternoon, in alty parties which the sophomores had
Evelyn Bacilc, I.cola Sharklcy, Edna rot, the Clown and the Donkey, Uncle Room B. Margaret Pabst is in charge arranged for freshmen who did not beWiggily's famous Bunny (Orchestra of ind Caroli-e Coleman, Mary Swartz, have themselves at the "Get Wise" iniKempe and Bernard Auerbach.
An outside orchestra has been ob- eight rabbit musicians chosen from Un- md Mildred Melrose will tell of their tiation. Dr. Bruhacher ordered sophotained for dancing which will follow the loading rabbit conservatories of the • xiH-i'ic'i'cs ;it Silver Bay. All students
tre invited to attend.
(Page Three, Column Two)
animal kingdom.
evening program.
GROS' MARIONETTES MYSKANIA CREATES
PLAY TWICE TODAY NEW RULES COUNCIL
STATE COLLEOE NEWS, OGTODKIi 23, 1025
1'age Two
&Mt titollrgt Sfnua
ESTABLISHED BY T H E CLASS OF 1918
Vol. X
Oct. Zi
No. 5
1925
SENIOR CLASS FIRST
IN SCHOLARSHIP LAST
YEAR, HONORS SHOW
(Continued From Page 1)
Published weekly during the college
year by the Student Body of the New
York State College for Teachers at
Albany, New York.
T h e subscription rate is three dollars
per year. Advertising rates may be had
on application to the business manager.
Editor-in-Chief
HARRV
S.
GODFREY,
Managing
'26
Editor
E D W I N V A N KLEECK:,
'27
Business Manager
H E L E N E . ELLIOTT,
Subscription
'26
Manager
H E L E N BARCLAY,
'26
Copy Reader
MARGARET B E N J A M I N ,
'26
Assistant Business Managers
MYRA H A R T M A N , '27
H E L E N Z I M M E R M A N , '27
Assistant Subscription
TIIELMA
Manager
TEMPLE,
'27
Assistant Copy Reader
J UI.IA F A Y , '27
Associate Editors
Sara Barkley, '27
Loui.se G u n n , ' ' 2 7
K a t h a r i n e Blcnis, '27 Anna Koff, '26
Joyce P e r s o n s , '26
Reporters
Leah Cohen
M a c M u l l e n Elizabeth
Thelma Brezee Lela Van Schaick
Virginia H i g g i n s K a t h c r i n e Saxton
Adelaide Hollister D o r o t h y W a t t s
Elnah Krieg
Bertha Zajan
TRADITIONS
Fay, Julia
Fee, Ruth
Klepser, Josephine
Newins, Ethel
Slate, Paul
Vicls, Helen
Sophomores
Curtis, Chrissie
Hollister, Adelaide
HONORS
Seniors
Bacr, Virginia
Benjamin, Hazel
Brown, Charlotte
liushell, Frances
Cheney, Frances
Connor, Catherine
Dclehauty, William
Dicdrich, Edith
F.dclman, Irene
I'lanigan, Mary
Gooding, Alice
1
.mildrich, Hiram
(Ireeuaway, Minnie
Grecnberg, Rosaline
llagelberg, Margrid
Hitchcock, Mary
Hubert, Mildred
lansen, Esther
I.andon, Marion 1).
MacFarland, Kenneth
Moore, Gladys
Moose, Carletou
Osborne, Edith
Fierce, Faith
Plttde, fsabellc
Shaffer, Lorena
Smith, Daisy
Specht, Hertha
Stooks, Magdalena
Vecder, Olgareetia
Walker, Jerome
Wetherbee, fsabellc
Wright, Jcauctta
A college grows from year to year
in prestige, in ideals, in breadth of aim. |
as it grows in age. Each year a class |
goes out to look back noon its Alma
Mater and watch with pride the progress
she has made
We arc of a college which, in point !
of years is still young, but which in
ideals, aim, and prestige ranks with the
Juniors
oldest institutions of our laud. To us,
Ayers, Carrie
then comes a great opportunity, one
Baesslcr,
Laura
which calls for our best efforts, our
Baumauu, ('o: stance
greatest devotion, and an exercise of
Planar*au Ruth
our highest ideals
Gow,
Janet
To the lipperclassnien, State has been ,
Kaufman, Anna
a place where they have labored a :'i
Kimball, fcar.eite
won for themselves positions which make
Knapp, Margaret
them partsof thecollugeitself. They realist i
Kurtznacker. Arthur
more fully than do others, what State
Lockard, Ruth
really means to them. The sophomores
Macee
Eve'yn
have started well on the road toward '
Neville. Mary
their goal.
To them Slate holds unOrr,
[Jessie
limited opportunities for success, growth,
Packard, Esther
and development. They, too, have already
Palmer, Evelyn
come to realize the responsibility which I
Provost, Margaret
rests upon them, the responsibility of
upholding the honor of a college which j Sleidiuger, Anne
Van Kleeck, Edwin
has so much to offer.
'1 he freshmen'
Van Vranken, Florence
have only entered on the journey, and
Wood. Sara
before them lie four years of boundless
possibilities.
On them rests the task I Zajan, f'ertha
of carrying on the work which was be :
Sophomores
gun years ago by those already passed
Bcebe, Helen
beyond the college walls to give to the
Brooks, Luetic
world a part of what she gave them.
Cochrane, Calvin
One of the most sacred of their tasks i Craig, Mary
is the carrying on of the traditions
I'.rlich, Mollic
which have become a part of State, for
Foster, Armine
as the traditions are upheld and g i v e n
I ane, Ruth
over year after year stronger and more I
''oeller, Frances
revered than before, just so much will
Sauter, Holly
the college grow in strength and purposeSmith, Eleanor
fulness. To all of us then as sons and
daughters of State and to the freshmen
SELL BARNES TICKETS
in particular, comes the opportunity, and |
on us re-ts the duty of carrying on year j Tickets for lecture to be given next
after year the traditions, ideals,, and Friday by Harry Elmer Barnes on "The
hopes of those wh i realizing the need j Modern Conflict of Ideals—its History
of youth the world over, founded an
and Prospects" will be sold in the Co-op"
institution which should make for belter,
teachers, heller citizens, for belter men I all next week. Each student is entitled
and women better able to cope success- | to one ticket, through courtesy of
V. W. C. A.
fully with the problems of life.
OUR CHANGING COLLEGES
T H E N E W S ' SIGNED ARTICLE DY A F A C U L r v MEMHKK IS CONTRIBUTED T H I S
WEEK
BY
PRESIDENT A. R. BRUBACHER
College education was once a distinctive thing, adequately characterized by the
\ , B, degree, or less frequently, by the B. S. degree. Those who graduated could
be recognized by their knowldgc of literature and history and science and philosophy. They had developed tastes that set them apart from those who had not enjoyed privileges of college study.
A change has come. College education has become so varied in content and
purpose that no one degree can symbolize the result. The engineer has reduced
the study of literature and history to the vanishing point; the college of business,
the college of home economics, and the college of agriculture, have enlarged the
specialized, technical content to the virtual exclusion of purely liberal or cultural
matter; the college of liberal arts has vainly tried to include the new content in
science, economics and business, and has dissipated it's energies to an alarming
extent. The person of broad general culture has been replaced by the person of
exact, specialized knowledge,
In the field of education we are not yet sure of the directions to be taken.
W e recognize the value of general culture but the demands of the science of education arc becoming insistent and are displacing important elements of general
knowledge. And tlic art of teaching will demand more and more time in the
training of teachers.
We arc suffering from the pressure from above, produced by professional,
vocational, technical and specialized subject matter. As the cultural subjects are
crowded down, we shall make more and more demand on the high schools. Literature, history, pure science and philosophy will be taught in the senior high school
and in freshman and sophomore years of the college
It is even probable that the
present senior high school will assume the place of the old liberal arts college aittf
leave the colleges in ; to devote themselves unreservedly to vocational, professional
and technical matters. This tendency is even now quite evident in the state universities and technical colleges. There is European sanction for this development.
The senior high school seems to hold a strategic position in the American lulucation of the future.
It will come into position of great influence if it can
fill the place formerly occupied by the liberal arts college which has so largely
turned to other interests.
The junior high school movement seems to be
especially appropriate to this end because by its the trade and commercial interest
is seized early and especially fostered, while the cultural interests may be reserved,
for the senior school. The junior college is even now attempting this'very thing—
to maintain the best traditions of the old academy and the modern high school and
at the same time to absorb the liberal arts and sciences of the old college. Whatever this intervening school may be called, Senior High School or funior College,
n may yet become the custodian of American culture as distinct'from technical
education.
Every week on tin? pugo thetfoypswill publish nn artlolo by n well known fncnity member.
Nuxtiveeks, Dean Ann B, Plorco,
BOOK-ENDS
A Weekly Review of Current Fiction by the
Editor of the Ounrtarly.
THE OREEN HATbyMlchuil Aden.
"Michael Arleu says he ish an Armenian," writes an interviewer, "and so
he must be, of course, for no one would
say he was an Armenian if he were not."
The Green Hat. however, made me disponed to doubt Arlen's statement; for
I felt a growing certainty that he harks
from Main street, the Main street of
Sinclair Lewis fame. For Arleu seems
for all the world like one of those unlovable Main street boys, wise beyond
anyone's years, who exchanged whispered comments and significant looks
with his crowd as the Main street
portion of the feminine world passed
by.
The boy had left Main street, long
since, of course; he had learned much
if life, particularly the least lovely side
if certain persons, and hastens to tell the
rowd all about it. And no one can
'ell it better than he. The man is possessed of a style that inclines o r e toward
forgiving him all the ugly half-truths
he writes; for he lies so exquisitely; a
style magical, enchanting—. One dances
after him through the pages, wild with the
music of his piping, and only dimly
aware that one's ancient, dear convictions
of the worth of character are slipping
away.
And suddenly, one discovers that ho
has been intrigued into setting up Arlene's heroine as his own. One finds
himself lost in adoration of Iris of the
green hat, the most lovably wayward of
all wayward, tragic ladies. Tris was a
desolate, will-o'-the-wisp person
who
learned to love lightly, casually, because
she had found sincere loving a cruel
I '.Ling—and Iris haled pain.
Arlen has clothed his heroine with
glamour that is difficult to dispel. The
other characters among whom she moved,
her romantic, childish lover, Napier, the
ingenuous, sincere Venice, and the grim
Hilary all pale beside the vivid Iris, the
lady of the bright, green, hat, pour le
sport, in defiance of her violent tragic
end. continues to race through drab days
in her gallant Hispano—Suiza—and carries enchantment with her.
Olga A. Hampel,
'26
A BOOK A WEEK
Miss Mary E. Cobb in each issue wi'l recommend a book she believes students will
enjoy. This week;
THE
PROFESSOR'S
Willa Gather. (Knopf. )
HOUSE
by
Necessity for early action by seniors
to have their pictures taken for the
Pedagogue was stressed this week by
Minnie Greenaway, '26, editor-in-chief.
The pictures must he in the hand; of
the engravers on lime, in order to c triply with the senior class's contra.'t, Hie
slated.
CALENDAR
Today
8:30 P. M. Jean G r o s '
ettes—Chancellor's Hall.
Campus
Marion-
Tomorrow
Day.
M o n d a y , O c t o b e r 26
5:30*9:30 P. M.
Home
nomics Club Supper.
Eco-
W e d n e s d a y , O c t o b e r 28
7.30 P. M.
D r a m a t i c s C'las"
Play—Auditorium.
'rA
.A
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, OCTOBER 2.r!, 1026
Page Three
Have Been Enrolled As Residents
CAMPUS
VARIOUS ACTIVITIES College Students
Of Albany In Police Census, Newspaper Charges
PLANNED BY CLUBS
MISSING FROM TROT
Scores of State College students, non- dents at the house are actual residents
residents of Albany, were illegally listed of Albany.
"The names of nineteen students living
as Albanians in the census just taken by
Poli Sci Group To Hear Miss the Albany police to disprove the ac- at the Kappa Delta Rho fraternity house
curacy of the stale census taken by Mrs. on Macfisou avenue near Bake avenue,
Miner, Local Lawyer,
Florence E. S. Knapp, it was charged were placed on the census list by the poOne of the students said they
At Dinner
in a newspaper article published by the lice.
Albany Sunday Telegram, Republican merely gave the officer their names and
Political Science clnh will hear Miss paper.
age and thai he wrote them on his census
Catherine Pcltz on November .3. Miss
The newspaper's article declared that sheet.
Pc'.lz will speak on her recent European "thousands of non-residents were counted
"The house manager of the Newman
trip
by the census ordered by Mayor William club, No. 741 Madison avenue, said that
twenty-nine
persons living at the house
S.
[-racket!
to
substantiate
his
charge
that
The committee in charge of the
the official stale census of 117,000 in- were taken by the police census taker,
Thanksgiving dinner is making arrange"Fourteen names were added to the
habitants is inaccurate and his estimate
ments to have Miss Ruth Miner as (hat the population of Albany is at least census list at the Eta Phi sorority house
speaker at the dinner planned for Tues- UO.0O0."
at No. S.i South Lake avenue, it was
"in a survey of Albany colleges, in- staled. None of these girls live at Alday evening, November 24. Miss Miner
cluding sorority and fraternity houses bany.
is an Albany woman lawyer.
"Plie police census laker added fifteen
where the students live, the Sunday
Spanish clnh met October IS. P r o - Telegram learned that at least 1,600 more names to the 'alibi' list at the
fessor Jesse F . Stinard spoke on the names were taken by the police census Delia Omega sorority house at No. 55
Spaniards and the nature of the Spanish takers, none of whom actually reside in South Lake avenue, according to one of
the students,
people, "A better understanding of the Albany.
"Albany colleges report the following
"Evidence of the manner in which the
Spaniard, as he really is, will show him
'alibi' census- was taken and the total registrations: New York- State College
to be proud, and above all an individual- computed, is shown by the following in- for Teachers, 1.100; Albany College of
ist," Professor Stinard said.
stances in which patrolmen listed as i Pharmacy, 320; Albany Law school, .115;
among Albany residents the students at Albany Medical Colic c. 100. The
Before the talk- a short business meetre'istrar's office at Stale College estiAlbany colleges:
ing was held at which Gertrude Lynch,
"At' Sycldum hall. No. 1 Englcwood maleil that less than 200 sludct-: come
president, presided, The following com- place, a list of twenty-six students at . from Albany homes, while other colleges
mittees
were
appointed:
program, the New York Stale College for Teach- j said thai I lie greal majority of students
Blanche Merry, chairman, Tuanita Dev- ers, was given to the patrolman census j merely I, milled at Albany during the
school year."
lin; membership, Ruth McNutt, chair- laker, at his request. None of the stu- |
man, Beatrice Hodgkins.
COLLEGE NEWS
AT A GLANCE
Myskania Appropriates F f f t ^
Dollars To Purchase
f ,.|
New Costumes
%
Costumes for the Campus day events
have been' stolen.
Members of Myskania. who compose the committee of
arrangements, went to the trunk in
which (he costumes have always been
stored to consider any necessary repairs,
only lo find Ihc Iru ik cmply and all the
costumes missing. 'I he trunk' is kept in
the janitor's office,
The box was
marked "William I I " 'there seems to
be some element of mystery which has
not yet been probed, in Ihc disappearance of the materials.
Since Campus day was so near, no
lime could be lost and a committee, of
which Marion Cliesebrough is chairman, has been appointed to gel a new
set of costumes. Myskania has appropriated $50 for ihc purchase of materials. The pink satin gown of the
i|uecn and the robes of her eight attendants were taken. Miss Chescbrough,
Muriel Wenzel and Mildred Babcock
v.ill sew the new robes,
All students interested in the Spanish
customs and people are invited to become
The first one-act play of the semester's sociation, will speak ill holh assemblies
members of Spanish club.
program of the advanced dramatics ncxl Eriday
All iexl books which have nol been
The first meeting of Commerce club class will be presented Wednesday evenIntroduced by President A. R. Brucalled for ai the Co-op by October 30
was Tuesday, at four o'clock in room'B. ing at eight o'clock in the auditorium. will be returned to the nublishcrs
All bacher as the man largely responsible
The program for the following year, in- Georgia DcMockcr, '26. is the director. students arc therefore asked lo call for or construction of the foundations of
Ihc William J. Milne Science hall,
cluding the general line of activity and
Cards will be filled out in assembly their books al once.
The Psi Gamma Alumnae Association State Senator William J. Byrne, of
the social events which will lake place, today for the: student directory. At
Albany, spoke before holh sessions of
will
hold
iis
first
monthly
meeting
was arranged.
Men prominent in the noon the panorama picture of the stuSaturday, November 7, al the Psi assembly Friday, on "Citizenship,"
business world will be obtained to speak dent body will be taken.
America's experiment with democracy
Gamma house.
at future meetings. Bertha Zajau, vice
Alpha Epsilon Phi will be at home his a stable form of government is not
Miss Anna M. Coolcy, professor of
Having survived the birihpresident, has charge of the program for household arts, Education Teachers' col- lo faculty and upner classmen Sunday 'ended.
the year. At the meeting Tuesday. Pro- lege, Columbia, and president of the from three to five-thirty o'clock at 866 pains of 1776 and the dangers of disfessor George M. Yi
head
(he New York Slate Home Economics as- Lancaster street.
union of I860, the United Slates today
commerce department, spoke on "G
j faces a more subtle and greater danger
era! Observation on Commercial Teach
in the common disregard or Ihc neccsing."
• ily of keeping the ballot-box clean, of
The Biology club had a party in the
; hanging lo the old-fashioned ideals of
(<
"Lab." recently.
Laboratory
instruI the country's founders, he said.
Between
ments were used for eating.
i Pleading for America "to keep the
c purses the boys gave stunts and song?
I stale of mind which knows that success
(Continued i From Page 1)
with a ukelele accompaniment. Mildred
lean come only by work, the state of
Wilson acted as "lab" instructor and norcs to slop physical initiation or take ! was well tinder way in the auditorium, mind of our ancestors who crossed this
'lis appearance was the cause of a • country by covered wagons, not by
"lab"
assistants attended to the dishes heir chances at expulsion.
The announcement threw the sopho- ; burst of applause and cheering which automobile
Faculty members present w e r e :
Proand airplane."
Senator
i drowned out the noise of twenty fresh- 1 Byrne defined citizenship and pointed out
fessor and Mrs. C, A. Woodard, Dr. mores into turmoil.
A large group of male freshmen lay I man girls who were giving their part how the definition applies to the probGertrude E. Douglas and .Miss Minnie
B. Scotland. At the business meeting in wait for Francis E, Griffin, the sopho- jof the "entertainment'' on ihc platform. lems of today.
Friday evening, sophomore men are
which
followed, Professor
Woodard more president, as he went from the
spoke.
Plans for the Indian Ladder Kappa Delta Rho fraternity house to the said to have seized Edmund Koblenz of
NEWMAN HAS COMMUNION
Cuyler
avenue, Albany, a freshman, and
hike were discussed. A hike to the Peat 'ollegc Eriday night. Griffiin, however,
The first Quarterly Communion of
went much earlier than they had ex- carried him by automobile to a point
Bog is planned for ncxl week.
At the last meeting of Chemistry necled, so that he might guard the south of the city. Here it is said, he Newman club was Sunday at the 9:10
was
paddled
with
sticks,
and
part
of
his
Mass
at St. Vincent dc Paul's Church.
sophomore
refreshments
against
which
Club, Lois Clark gave a reading and
Herbert Hornung talked on the perfec- i freshman raid was anticipated, and hair cut off. A plan to throw him into A breakfast followed at the Academy of
tions of chemistry. Professor Bronson thus eluded the yearlings. When they the Normanskill creek was dropped. He the Holy Names.
The Rev. Father Joseph A. Dunney,
recommended some new books to the learned later of this they ambuscaded was left in the woods on the bank of the
class and it was decided that in the themselves just outside one of the doors stream. Koblenz also had luck in get- spiritual director of the club, Marion
ting
back
to
the
college,
and
reappeared
M.
O'Connor, '26, president, Miss Mary
When
future, certain persons would be as- of the administration building.
signed reading reports for each meeting. Griffin passed the door on his way about just as the dance following the "Get '1. McCormick, representative of the
Monica Walsh has been electerl presi- die building, one of the freshmen, said j Wise" party was ending. The initiation Newman Alumna Association, and Miss
dent of Classical chili, to replace Marion to be David Smurl, grabbed him and | this year bad been radically changed Agues K. Maxwell, social directress of
Chescbrough, who has resigned on ac- ihrew him outside. They overpowered from that of last fall by a joint agree- Newman hall, were sealed at the
him, put him in an automobile and raced ment between the faculty, sophomores and speakers' table. Miss O'Connor introcount of surplus honor points.
duced the speakers.
Father Dunney
The Indian Ladder hike was postponed j iff just as sophomore men arrived in Myskania.
Saturday. President Brubacher sum- welcomed the freshmen members who
Saturday became of the rain. However, time to see the automobile disappear
moned
some
of
the
sophomores
and
were
honor
guests
of
the
club, and exover
Robin
street
toward
Central
avenue.
a trip to the Girl Seoul camp at SchoGriffin, according lo the story his Pre lident Griffin and "laid down the pressed his appreciation of the large
dack Center was organized
instead,
attendance. Miss McCormick explained
seventeen girls leaving Albany at one classmates have told, was taken into the law "
"Ha/in*! plans for Ihc penalty parties ihc work of the alumna association and
o'clock on a special bus which took them country about ten miles and left untied.
pledged support of all undergraduate
direct to camp. Each girl prepared her He managed to get a ride in a passing are 'off,' " he declared.
Freshmen and sophomores who con- activities for the coming year.
own lunch, after which there were .automobile almost immediately after the
Piano selections by Agatha Flick, '27,
songs and games. The party returned freshmen had left him and was back in !tinue organized class hazing will be exconcluded the program.
Albany before the "Get Wise" program' pelled.
at six o'clock.
Dr. Brubacker Hits Freshmen For Hazing Fracas;
Get Wise" Party Was Total Failure, Griffin Says
BYRNE SAYS SUCCESS
COMES ONLY BY WORK
%
STATE COhlMiK
P»ge Four
NBWH, OCTOBER 2». 1025
G. i4. A. BEGINS SEASON Freshmen Hazers
Break State Laws
OF ENTERTAINMENT WITH
At a meeting of the government 2
HARVEST MASQUERADE
class recently Professor David HutchThe first of G. A. A.'s four yearly
frolics for its members will be a harvest masquerade in the gym next Friday night. Cider and doughnuts will be
served,
In an effort to discover an embryo
Leonardo dc Vinci, G. A. A. has announced its "Pumpkin-lantern contest."
All members are eligible to cuter.
Carved pumpkins with attached envelopes containing the name of competitor
must be given to Bertha Zajan or left
in the gym office before five o'clock Saturday, October 31. A valuable iprizc
will be given for the most original
pumpkin-lantern. Prizes will be awarded also for the prettiest and funniest
costumes.
The Virginia Reel, and square dance
will be danced, games and stunts will be
played. Jcancttn Wright, CI. A A. vicepresident and entertainment chairman
is assisted by the following chairmen:
Bertha Znjan, entertainment; Katharine
ISIcnis and Katheri"c Doubly assistant; Jcttncttc vY'albilli''-, decorations;
Ethel DuBois, refreshments; Cornelia
Williams and Mary WenctaWowicz,
music; Katheriuc DniHity. publicity.
The jurl"es will he Dr. Caroline
Croasdalc, Miss Minnie li. Scotland and
Miss Isabella Johnston.
The women's tennis tournament is
being played on the Washington park
courts with the second group of matches
under way. These must be played off
by the end of the week, weather permitting. The record of the second
scries is: Blenis from Palmer, 7-5.
6-4] Benjamin from Maar, 6-2, 6-2;
Pcrrcault from Florio, 6-2, 4-6, 6-2; Zimmerman from Skinner, 4-6, 6-4, 6-3;
Cohen from Empie, 6-4, 6-4; Stoddard
from Conboy, 6-1, 6-3.
State College
Cafeteria
Luncheon or dinner I 1:15— 1:30
YOUNG WOMENS CHRISTIAN
ASSOCIATION
5 Lodge Street
Swimming Pool
Cafeteria
Gymnasium
Rooms
Clubs
Classes
For all women and girls.
Your Printer
T h e Gateway Press
QUALITY PRINTERS
At your elbow—West 20.37
3.36 Central Ave.
inson read from the laws of the penal
code, that section which refers to the
fact that hazing of underclassmen is
prohibited by the laws of the state and
when practiced is a misdemeanor.
DAVID SMURL ELECTEDG. W. W E Y R I C H
FRESHMAN PRESIDENT BARBER
David Smurl of Albany, was, Monday,
299 ONTARIO STREET
elected president of the freshman class,
lefeatirig Robert J. Shilling-law of Albany Special attention to college students
'n a revotc. Evelyn Graves, of Albany,
defeated Alice Hills of Albany for the
vice-presidency and Reginald Stanhope
INFANTS' WEAR
won from Pauline Aruott for treasurer.
GIFTS
HOSIER Y
William French defeated Anne Stafford
for class reporter. Mildred Lansley is Distinctive Gifts for All Occasions
class secretary. Smurl is the son of Do Your Christmas Shopping Early at
David Smurl, assistant chief of the Al19
bany Police Department. Miss Graves is The Kraft Shop
Central Av,
;hc daughter of Mark Graves, state tax
commissioner.
West Lawrence
Cor. West Lawrence & Western Ave
L. A. BOOKHEIM
Reliable
Meats
846 Madison Ave. cor. Ontario St.
Phone West 1837
ECONOMY
DRESS GOODS STORE
215 Central Ave.
Cheerful Service Shop
JOS. A. WALSH, Prop.
OPEN EVENINGS
WHOEYS
AFTER
EVERY
MEAL
H^t
Ov^-^V
\
affords
JL^\^\>,
benefit as well
as pleasure.
Healthful exercise for the teeth
and a spur to digestion. A long*
lasting refreshment, soothing to
nerves and stomach.
The Great American
Sweetmeat, untouched
by hands, full of [
flavor.
Phone Main 4748-Appointments Made
IHaflljmrttnit
fcrirtttifir iBrantij $Jarlmn
136 Washington Ave.
Eye Arching
Dyeing
Scalp Treatment
Manicuring
Clipping
Shampooing
Bleaching
Singeing
Facials
Curling
Jane Burgess
Katherine Smith
Hosiery for People Who Care
LINGERIE—GENTS FuitmsiiiNus
Albany Art Union
5% T o College Students
Have you seen the new fancy
silk gloves, and the slipper
back hosiery, all shades.
Phone W-3791-M
Silk - Woolen - Cotton
Hemstitching and Trimming
)07 Central
Ave.
7 doors below
Lexington Ave.
o
DISTINCTIVE PHOTOGRAPHY
48 North Pearl Street
Albany, N. Y.
PATRONIZE THE
Get A Hair Bob At The
COLLEGE BARBER SHOP
CONRAD HEYES, Prop.
82 ROBIN STREET
DANKER
Roses
NATIONAL COMMERCIAL
40-42 MAIDEN LANE
PARK BRANCH
200 Washington Ave.
(Oriental and (Occidental
liestaurant
44 S T A T E S T R E E T
Shoe Repairing Shop
SHOE SHINE
Dancing Every Evening S I ^ M ,
MATTEO LAVENIA
OUR PARK BRANCH
WELCOMES
the Accounts of State College
Students
BANK and TRUST CO.
WILL READ DRAMA
Henry Lawrence Soutluvick, president
-if the lunerson Colic :c of Oratory at
Boston, will read "The Cardinal King,"
from Bttlwcr Lytton's drama, "Richelieu," Monday evening, Novcmher 2, at
8:15 o'clock in the college auditorium.
Mr. Southwick will he presented by the
Gausevoort Chapter, Daughters of the
American Revolution. Student tickets
will be fifty cents.
Albany, N . Y.
Amerfratt Clrattarrs anfr Btjera
We Clean and Dys all kinds of Ladies' and Men's
Wearing Apparel
811 MADISON AVENUE
Phone West 273
MIKE'S BARBER SHOP
WE SPECIALIZE IN LADIE'S HAIR BOBBING
MOST UP-TO-DATE APARTMENT ON I H E HILL
PRIVATE ROOMS FOR LADIES
PHONE W. 6K20-J
262 CENTRAL AVE.
MILLS ART PRESS
394-396 BROADWAY
ALBANY, N. Y.
SOCIETY PRINTING
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