I SPECIAL BAN ROUGH-HOUSE AT

advertisement
State College I
SPECIAL
VOL.
X No. 2
NEW YORK STATE COLLEGE FOR TEACHERS
ESTAULIMIED DY THE CLASS OP 1918
ALBANY, N. Y., TUESDAY, OCTOBER 6,
A . Rice, Sailing Round the World to Marry,
BAN ROUGH-HOUSE AT EuniceCrosses
the Pacific on Last Lap of Voyage to Australia STUDENT TAX S A l f e
"GET-WIST MEETING
BUDGET JUMPS $738 if
Sophomores, Dean Pierce and
Myskania Agree On
Program
TO PENALIZE VIOLATORS
All "rough-house''1 stunts will be
eliminated from this year's "Gel-Wise"
initiation of (he freshman class, as a
result of a triple agreement reached
by the sophomore class, Myskania and
the college authorities, it was announced yesterday.
A program embodying sweeping
changes from that given last year by
the class of '27 for the class of '28 is
being worked out by a sophomore
committee.
The "(let Wise" meeting will he October 16 and all freshmen will be required
to attend, The freshmen will he divided
into fifteen groups of twenty each, Each
group will have a freshman captain
chosen by the sophomores. Each group
will be ropuirccl to present a stunt and
all stunts will be judged by the sophomore initiation committee. All stunts
must be suitable to the committee.
Any freshmen who do not participate,
or who in any other way do not enter
into the spirit of the program, will be
required to attend one of a scries of
special "penalty" meetings to he held at
later dales. At these they will be required lo perform stunts which will he
more in accordance with the initiation
of previous years.
The final program was determined
upon by the sophomore committee appointed by President Francis E. Griffiin
after several meetings, in which Dean
Anna E. Pierce, oilier college authorities
and the members of Myskania took part.
The "Get Wise" meeting last year was
the subject of much discussion, various
views having been offered as to the propriety and safety of sonic of the performances enforced on last year's freshmen.
Reports were current at the time that
several of (he freshmen fainted.
"We believe thai we have arrived at
a. satisfactory solution of the initiation
problem in Ibis plan," President Griffin
said. "Our idea is to conduct an initiation which will serve best the purpose
of giving the freshmen the proper attitude without going to extremes.
Miss Eunice Rice, for three years
instructress in the English department, and supervisor 01 English in
Milne M.gh school, is sailing toward
Australia today. She left her bom.
.11 .Schenectady August 21 on lici
10,000 mile journey to wed Keili
Santo Messant. Miss Kice was accompanied by her mother and a class
mate, Miss Helen Van Aken of tin
English department of Aiusterdan
High school. Miss Van Aken (raveled with the party as far as San
Francisco. From there she sailed for
Japan where she will leach in an
American college.
Eurotlle (o southern California, the
trio stopped off at the Grand Canyon
After Miss Van Aken sailed. Mis
Rice and her mother spent llirci
weeks in Kedlands, Pasadena, and
Long Beach, the vicinity of the recent earthquakes. They sailed from
Vancouver September 21, and expect
lo stop at some of Ihc main islands,
including Honolulu, New Zealand,
and the Fiji Isles.
Miss Rice's letter lo a friend said
that she expects to arrive in Australia
about November 10. The wedding
ceremony will be performed within a
week after.
Mr. Messant is an electrical engineer in ihc Adelaide Electrical Supply Company. He Spent several
•"o"H's at (be General Electric Works
in Schenectady about two years ago,
for research work.
Miss Kice was graduated from
Schenectady High school in 1918 and
News, Sports, G. A. A. Given
Bigger Quotas By
Assembly
JADOPT BUDGET AS WHOLE
The studeiii
association,
Friday,
adopted a budget of $11,80.1 for (hi.
year, which will make the lax eleven
dollars.
'I be action came after presentation in
chapel by Muriel I.. Wcuzcl, student
| association president, of (he report of (he
' finance hoard. The items in their report
totalled $11,80,3 in contrast with last
(year's $10,915, bul Ihc lax will not increase clue to the larger enrollment, The
; budget was adopted as a whole without
J opposition.
(Courtesy Albany I5venlii|
Cards instead of books are lo be
| issued for payment of the tax ibis year.
EUNICE KICE
The budget as presented, embodied
from Stale in 1922. She began work- these changes:
The College News' allotment request
in the English department here and
remained until last fall, Before the was increased from $1,950 lo $2,500, in
closing of school, Psi Gamma sorority accordance with the plan to publish ihc
News twice a week in ten of the thirty
gave her a variety shower, followed weeks of publication In Ihc colic e year.
by another soon after in Schenectady
'I he allotment for Myskania was inby classmates and friends.
creased from $180 to $215. The Girl-,'
Athletic
association's rcqt'csl was for a
Miss Kice is not al all daunted by
the prospect of her journey. "It will sixly per cent increase, from $500 of
lasl
year
lo $800. The musiv association
be a great experience," she said, "and
asked an increase from $000 lo $050 and
then, mother will be with me."
ihe Quarterly an incrca'c from $800 in
$850. The Dramatic and Art association
quota
remained al $850.
JUNIORS AND FROSH
FLANIGAN ELECTED AS
Men's basketball was recommended an
increase
from $1 .300 lo $1,400 and minor
ARE GUESTS 0F"Y. W." DRAMA COUNCIL LEADER shirts, which
last, year got nothing,
Mary
E.
Flannigan,
'26,
was,
Thursasked $-400. Men's baseball remained al
AT ANNUAL RECEPTION day, elected president of the Dramatic $650.
'flic contingent athletic fund was
Y. W. C. A.'s annual reception to ind Art association, succeeding Olga A. increased from $150 lo $200.
junior and freshman students, conducted I lampel, resigned, Miss iiampcl had
Secretarial allotments again totalled
<;
Friday night in the college gymnasium
200, while the nfirmarv money moved
was well attended by many from each also been elected editor-in-chief if the from $2 00 to $2 201). 'The handbook
class. The program was informal, and Quarterly, and according lo the point '•bowed an increased expenditure from
system of holding offices could not retain $.385 to $>I1.3. The student directory rcduring the evening there was dancing.
Helen
Tompkins, introduced
as ')olh these major positions, •
I niained at $100
"Professor Thomas Tompkins," with
The Dramatic council Ibis year is com$850 was eliminated from the budget
"assistants" interpreted "Modern Poetry prised of President Brubacher as honor-I by ll, • dropping of football. Elimination
in the Greek." A fantasy, "Pierrot's ary member, Miss Eunice A. Perinc, of the tax book plan made a saving of
Mother," was presented by Melauie instructor in Fine Arts, and Miss Agues . $75.
Grant as Pierrot and Ruth H. McNutt, E. Futlcrer, Dramatics director, as i The budget represented the result ol
as Piercttc. Refreshments were served. faculty members and these students: two weeks work by the finance board,
The committee was Ruth McNutt, '27. Mis I lampel and Miss Flannigan, | which has given careful consideration
entertainment; Josephine Walker, '28, cniors; Melauie Grant and Eleanor j to the various requests of organizations,
stage manager; Dorothy Rabie, '28, ! farrison, juniors, Jtith Lane and Char-1 publications and sports. Jn its effort to
music. Marjorie T. Mellows, '26, chair- lolte
keep the tax down to at least last year
nics, sophomores.
Twenty-seven Mary's
man of the Y. W. C. A. social commitlevel of eleven dollars, different requests
tee, was general chairman and Mary
were pared somewhat,
In Freshmen Class Deck was in charge of refreshments. THREATEN EXPULSION
C. A. Hidley, treasurer of the student
If you're a freshman woman, the
Bertha Zajau, '27, and Mclanie Grant,
association, who is out of town at a
FOR SMOKERS CAUGHT convention, expressed approval of the
chances arc your name is Mary. '27, staved a stunt entitled "Ivollegiatc
Statistic h muds who have compiled Kapers," portraying the efforts of two
Expulsion of sd lents delected budget before his departure last Thursthe (Wires on this year's .100 freshmen hick freshman men trying to learn the smoking in college buildings was day.
announce there are no less than collegiate dignity and nonchalance of threatened this wee by President
"We find we can eliminate the item
twenty-seven who bear "the grand old their junior brother of college days. Brubacher, following discovery that of tax book costs by using instead cards
name" in the ranks of '20. And be- Dialogue, singing, dancing were included men students have Deen smoking in like those used two years ago," he said.
sides there arc some Marions and
the act. Bertha Zajan, one of the some parts of the building. Coach "These will be numbered for each event
Maries. Margaret comes second with | trick performers of Stale, took the part R. R. Baker, men's athletic director, to which the tax ticket is good for adeighteen owners and some Marguer- of the first freshman, and Melauie Grant, posted this notice:
mission. Cards will be punched at the
itcs and Marjories; while Dorothy ; that of the second freshman. Hilda
"Students found smoking in college door. A card will be void if presented
runs a good third with thirteen bear- I Sarr, '27, took the pari of the "ollcnatc buildings or on campus arc subject to by student other than he whose name
crs The-e are eight Ruths and five I ""dor brother." and Cornelia Williams, dismissal, by order of A. R. Bru- apnears on it."
1
Gladyses.
; '27, accompanied on the piano.
achcr."
Collection of the tax is to begin soon.
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, OCTOBER (i, 11)20
I'nge Two
dtafr (EtfUwje Nrw0
Vol. X
Oct. fo!, 1925
WHEN '25 WENT INTO THE WORLD
IF"
No. 2
Published weekly during the college
year by the Student Body of the New
York State College for Teachers at
Albany, New York.
The subscription rate is three dollars
per year, Advertising rates may be had
on application to the business manager.
Editor-in-Chief
HARRY S.
GODFREY,
'26
Managing Editor
Enww VAN KLEECK, '27
Btisiricsii Manager
HELEN E. ELLIOTT,
'26
Subscription Manager
HELEN BARCLAY, '26
Copy Reader
MARGARET BENJAMIN,
'26
Assistant Business Managers
MYRA HARTMAN, '27
HELEN ZIMMERMAN, '27
Assistant Subscription Manager
TIIELMA
TEMPLE,
'27
Assistant Copy Reader
JULIA FAY, '27
Associate Editors
SARA BARKLEY, '27 LOUISE GUNN,
KATHARINE BLENIS, '27 ANNA KOIT,
'27
'26
Reporters
TIIELMA BREZEK, KATIIERINE SAXTON,
LEAH COHEN, ELIZABETH MACMULLEN,
VIRGINIA HIGGINS,
DOROTHY WATTS,
ADELAIDE HOLI.ISTER, BERTHA ZAJAN,
LELA VAN SCIIAICK,
ELNAII KRIEO,
TIME TO ADVANCE
Today the News presents to the student
body the first scini-weekly publication
that State College has produced. Wc
present it as a sample—an humble
sample of what may be accomplished in
a semi-weekly, with the backing of the
student body, financially and morally.
Ten extra issues of the News—that
is semi-weekly publication during ten
of the thirty regular weeks of publication—will entail much additional labor
for the staff. It will also mean a larger
cost to the student body.
But the aim should justify both the
effort and the expense. Some day Stale
should have a semi-weekly. Seven years
ago there were those who freely prophesied that the "Stale College News"
would not live out its first month. With
ups and downs, it has survived to disprove
them.
The editors feel with President Brubacher that the time has come for experimentation with another innovation—a
semi-weekly.
There is always true cause for sorrow
when a teacher dies. When the teacher is one like Miss Cora Anne Steele
of the home economics faculty, that
sorrow may well become grief. A
scholar who knew her subject, a teacher who had caught the difficult art of
imparting her knowledge to others, a
friend to her students and to her colleagues, Miss Steele is one whom State
College will deeply miss.
Service in another field, but service
which was as valuable to State College, was rendered by Judge James
F. Tracey, the prominent jurist and
statesman,
whom death has removed
from s the board of trustees. Judge
Tracey accomplished much in a life
of service. Perhaps nothing he did
brought a benefit more lasting than
his work to further the project of new
buildings for State College,
(Courtesy Albany Evening NOWP)
SCENES at Stale College's commencement last June, when 197 students were awarded degrees, At
top, the academic procession passing across the college to the chapel for formal commenceine.il exercises.
Below, President Hrubachcr with Dr. Albert Edward VVinslu'p, editor of the Journal of Education, who was
speaker at the program; and Florence Greenblalli, '25, and Ella T. Wheeler, hi. h honor graduate of the class
.. c 1925
itnr
of
COLLEGE N E W S
A panorama picture of the entire student body will be taken Friday, following student assembly. A full attendance
of 1,100 students has been asked.
Menorab society will meet this afternoon to begin its year's program.
Kappa Delta Rho entertained a group
of freshman men at a smoker Thursday
night.
The News club will have a picnic
Saturday, they decided at a meeting
following chapel Friday.
Kathcrine
Saxton, '28, president, presided. Helen
Zimmerman, '27, assistant business manager of the News, was appointed to obtain pins for members. All clubs and
business department tryouts are invited
to the picnic.
Insignia for the freshmen class will be
distributed at the "Get Wise" party
October 16. Men at that time will receive their caps and the girls will be
given buttons.
A. Herbert Campbell, '26, and Edwin
Van Kleeck, '27, represented Gamma
chapter of Kappa Delta Rho fraternity
recently at the national convention held
at Alpha chapter at Middlebury college.
The Biology club will include in its
program ibis year picnics and hikes
AT A GLANCE
There will be a trip to the Indian Ladder
soon.
The first appeal for subscriptions to
the 1926 Pedagogue was made in chapel
Friday, by Isabelle M. Pintle, '26. Ruth
H. McNutt, '27, invited freshmen and
junior men and women to the freshmenjunior patch-quilt party Friday night.
Helen E. Elliott, '26, of Myskaiu'a, read
I he rules regarding iuterclass rivalry and
also the explanation of the office point
system. Louise Gunn, '27, announced
the Political Science club's tour of the
Saratoga battlefields. Busses, she said,
will leave the college Saturday morning
at 10 o'clock, returning about six o'clock.
All students are invited. Ruth Lcmmle,
'26, led singing.
Following the assembly, a group picture of the freshman class was taken
for the Pedagogue.
Mildred A. Wilson, '27, was recently
graduated from the department of physical education of Cortland Normal
School's summer session.
Pauline George, '23, was recently at
I the Kappa Delta house.
The College News acknowledges
, with gratitude the generous loan by
! the Albany Evening News of the engraving appearing in this issue.
EDUCATORS GET HONOR
DEGREES FROM STATE
At the annual commencement in June
the honorary degree of doctor of pedagogy was conferred upon Islay Francis
McCormick, headmaster of the Albany
Boys Academy, Arvie Eldred, superintendent of schools of Troy, and Albert
Edward VVinship, editor of the Journal
of Education..
In presenting the candidates for honorary degrees, President Brubachcr said :
"Islay Francis McCormick, A.B, and
I'hi lictta Kappa, Headmaster Albany
Academy: We see in you great qualities as teacher and guide of youth; we
recognize your distinguished leadership
in your profession, and we honor you'
for the high example of industry and
scholarship set by your school for the
schools and academies of the country."
"Arvie Eldred, A. 13. and Phi Beta
Kappa, Superintendent of Troy schools:
For your professional leadership among,
the public school men and women of.
our state; for your civic virtues which
have given you a place of honor and
great usefulness in your city and in the
state; for your wisdom in council, your
devotion to duty, and professional integrity, we dclicht to honor ynu,"
' "Albert Edward VVinship, Litt D.,
LL.D., teacher of teachers, preacher of
professional righteousness, educational
nhiloscpher; defender of your country
in the Civil War; prophet of the new
day when education which is the
knowledge of the glory of the Lord,
'•hall fill our republic as the waters
"oyer the sea; for your forward look and
yiur message of hope, we honor yiu."
«5\
ST AT 10 COLl/KOK NEWS, OCTOBERS, 1920
SAYS SCHOOLS HOLD
FUTUREjOFABlERICA
1'iigo Three
JX
Faculty Members Visit European Theater Centers;
THIRTY FRESHEN TftY
Mountains, Lakes, Seashore Call Many for Summer
OUT FOR POSltW&M
COLLEGE / v M M f F
European IhcatHca centers were iug only shorl trips to S a r a t o g a
visited by p i s * A... nc i I',. Fiittcrcr, Springs and (he Adirondack foothills.
Dr. H a r r y W, Hastings, new chairDr. Brubacher Says Hygiene i n s t n t c t r r in English who has rc- man
of the English department, fished
turned from a trip abroad.
In the h.r (rout and painted at his .summer
Teaching BrougHt Atiaut
she
j
camp
at Lake Dim more, Vt:
seven
weeks
spent
in
Europe
Prohibition
'rofessor George M. York, of the
visited Part's, L o n d o n , and old E n g c o m m e r c e department, taught at the
lish towns. W h i l e in Paris she atrummer
session, and m o t o r e d
to
Public schools of America arc mak- tended many theaters.
In London Rochester and Ithaca.
ing' public opinion, President A. R. Miss Ftttlcrcr says, "I saw s o m e very
Professor
Clifford
A.
Woodard.
Brubacher told the T r o y Rotary club excellent performances.
'Iris,' writ- professor of biology, (aught at (be
recently, declaring that hygiene as ten by Pinero, witnessed the longest Slimmer session and made trips in
taught in the schools brought about run it ever had. ' T h e Man Willi the New York, New Jersey and Pennsylvania.
prohibition.
Load of Mischief/ by Ashely D u k
Professor Barnard S. Bronson of
"Most of the b a n d i t s of this coun- which will be produced in N e w Y o r k , ; the chemistry department, made
iological survey of the
Kentucky
try are less than twenty-live years of is remarkable for its stage selling.
age," Dr, B r u b a c h e r said, pointing Galsworthy's new play, 'The Show,' in knobs with a group of Cornell bioloe'sis,
Processor Bronson said he
out that the W o r l d war resulted in my estimation does not equal his other found primitive conditions a m o n g the
y o u n g folk looking with forbearance plays."
mountaineers, " T h e law reaches thai
on violence.
In Stratford-on-Avon, Miss F u t - region only occasionally," he said.
" T h e future of the country is large- terer saw two Shakespearean plays in
Mronson Kidi-H Mtilehsick
ly wrapped up in what the schools are the Shakespearean Memorial theater.
going to do for tis," be continued.
Many foreign places of interest "The appellation of 'our contemporary
Conrtesy Albany Evening NOWB
" T h e solution of world problems will were visited by Miss Florence E. ancestors,' as the president of Berea
'. M
be determined by what (lie school' VVinchell, professor of H o m e Econcollege refers to these people, seems
are now teaching and will (each dur- omics.
to be apnrouriate." he declared.
One
ing the next twenty-live years.
" W e landed hi Cherbourg, then I of I, appropriate," In
A record number of freshmen Irvtraveling eigli"Representative
government
i: went to Paris for two weeks.
From teen •i adventures wa.'
Mils are enrolled in both editorial
miles on mule I
changing,
F o r m e r l y we elected the Paris I went to Italy, visiting Naples.
Di (.'. I''. Hale, professor of physics, 'msl'icss departments of the Ciollegc
men we thought were of the soundest Rome, Florence, Venice, Milan, and
'n Adirondack's News.
j u d g m e n t and best lit to represent us, Belagio on Lake Commo. T h e n I was at Indian ' '
during
July, and did cep sea fishing
but now we elect the man we can con- went to England where I traveled in
Thus far thirty freshmen have
trol with our votes. He is not our Loudon. Cambridge and many of the in Maine in August.
Miss Maud Malcolm, instructor in •'.'Med In the staff, twenty as "en!
representative but our hired man and old town. 'I'he trip was interesting
French, took a Great Lakes trip, porters, and eight as try-outs fo the
we cannot get men with a great and I enjoyed it greatly."
visiting Chicago, Minneapolis
and advertising department.
quality of j u d g m e n t to assume a poMiss Anna Randolph Keini, assissition where this quality cannot be tant professor of home economics, Dili ut b.
Harry S. Godfrey, '26, editor-in-chief,
T.
F,
H
.
Candlyn,
music
instructor,
exercised.
attended
the s u m m e r session
for
yesterday announced there is still oppor"Representative
government
will teachers at
Columbia.
Then
she was director of music at St. T h o m a s '
Episcopal church, New York, d u r i n g tunity for freshmen and sophomores,
n o t last until we can teach through visited h r mother in Virginia.
J u l y and A u g u s t . Later he m o t o r e d while Helen E. Elliott, '26, business
the schools and otherwise just what
I
to
Myacinthc, Quebec, and Essex on
Goes
to
Adirondack*
freedom
is; that
freedom
begins
manager, urged more freshmen to regisLake Chaniplaiii.
where the other fellow's rights end.
Miss Mary Elizabeth Cobb, assisDr.
Gertrude E. Douglas, instructor ter.
It is the business of the school to
Dr. Harry W. Hastings, new chairteach the next generation bow to in- tant professor of library science, en- in biology, spent her s u m m e r at A m i joyed s u m m e r sports at
Bcrnap'.; over. Mass.
terpret freedom."
eacnip on Fourth Lake in the A d i r o n - _ Miss Alice T. Hill, i n s t r u c t o r in man of the English department, has acI (lacks.
French and Spanish, spent tlie s u m - cepted the position of faculty advisor.
Miss Elizabeth F. Shaver suni- mer at W e s t Bolton. Vt.
Additions to the staff so far a r c :
SENIORS NOMINATE
I mered at Lake George.
Miss Helen M. Phillips, i n s t r u c t o r
Reporters : Thehna Brczcc, '27; ElThe senior class Friday nominated
S u m m e r courses were taken by in English, spent the s u m m e r travel•tali Krieg, '26; and Bertha Zajan. '27.
Thyra BcVicr and Mary Rhein as can- Miss Eunice A. Ferine, instructor in
ing
in
England
and
France.
didates for class song leader, to succeed fi'ic arts, at Columbia. Part of her i
Miss Minnie B. Scotland, i n s t r u c t o r "Cubs," Mildred Gabel, '28, Mcriam
Mary Flannigan, resigned. Miss Flan- sunimer was spent in the country.
in biology, was a member of the Slate '•"arncll, '28, Jeanette Eiscnberg, '28,
nigan resigned because she has too many
Dr
Caroline
Croasdale,
college College delegation to Silver Bay con- Margaret Provost, '27, and these freshpoints due to her election as president physician, visited friends in St. PetersJoseph Iferney, Laverne Carr,
of the Dramatic and Art association. burg, Fin., early in July. Then she ference in J u n e . She spent the re- nen:
mainder of her vacation in New EngRuth Eddy and Marion Landou were camped in tbc Adirondacks.
William French, Hetlina Azzarito, Mary
land.
nominated as senior representatives on
!
"I would not have enjoyed my v a Miss Laura F. T h o m p s o n and Miss Vficcucci, Wallace Strcvcll, Mollic Kaufthe student finance board. The seniors cation MI much if it were not for the j
defeated a motion to wear caps and c a m p i n g . A vacation is not a vaca- May Fillingham, of the home econom- li'in, Robert J. Shillinglaw, Marion E.
ics
faculty, spent most of the vaca- 'onklin, Ruth Walts, Evelyn Van Dengowns to chapel.
S. Niles Haight, tion unless I have spent some of it in
tion period at their homes.
president, presided.
the o u t d o o r s , " she said.
Miss Hazel Rowley, of the physics ;en, Florence Gortnley, Louise MathewState College received most of Miss d e p a r t m e n t , remained at her h o m e lon, Vera Belle Wellott, Pauline Arnott,
Charlotte
Loch's
summer.
M i s s ! near Saratoga Springs.
CALENDAR
X'ellic Smith, Elizabeth Pulver, Gertrude
Locb, who is the professor of F r e n c h ,
Miss Edith O. Wallace. Latin in- Braslow, Alice Hills, Betty Eaton.
Today
then went to N e w York.
structor, attended the Silver Bay con3:00 P. M. Y. VV. C. A.—Room B.
Members
of
all
college
classes
President A. R. Brubacher spent j ference, and spent her vacation at
4:00 P. M. Political Science C l u b - 'be summer in Albany, except
for Lake George.
arc trying out for staff positions in the
trios into Canada, to the Jersey Coast j
During the last two m o n t h s , P r o - business department.
Room 101.
These include:
and Cape Cod. A m o n g the historic cessor J e s s e F. Stinard, of the Spanish
4:45 P. M. Menorab—Room B.
snots he visited were Provincclown, d e p a r t m e n t , with bis family m o t o r e d Carolyn Josslin, '28, William J. CornTomorrow
P l v m o u t h , Falmouth.
to M a l z e m , Iowa, where they visited stock, '28, Dorothy Hanlon, '27, MarDean William H . Mctzlcr spent his Mrs. Stinard's family.
Then
Mr. jorie Edwards, '27, Mildred Laucsley,
4:00 P. M. Classical club. ....
vacation in Canada.
Stinard with his son Charles m a d e a '20, David Smurl, '20, Thomas Fallon,
Thursday, October 8
Prof. John M. Sayles, operated the c a m p i n g trip which included Yellow'20,
Herman
Koerner,
'29,
Erwin
4:00 P. M. Mathematics club—Room Star Lake Inn. at Star Lake, and stone
National
Park,
Colorado
fished.
Springs, Pike's Peak, and N e b r a s k a . Baker, '27.
201.
Anne
Stanhope,
'29,
is
trying
out
in
Prof. Winfrcd C. Decker, head of T h e y returned by way of the Lincoln
Friday, October 9
the German d e p a r t m e n t , was director Highway and Pennsylvania.
M r s . the subscription department.
8:00-11:00 P. M,
Junior-Freshman of the sumincr session at State.
Stinard is still in Iowa.
Dr. George M. Con well divided his
Party—Gym.
Rislcy Tours West
NEWMAN HAS PARTY
time between teaching in s u m m e r
Saturday, October 10
Besides teaching at the s u m m e r ses- school and resting in Albany.
Newman
club entertained a large
Political Science club trip to Saratoga. sion,
Dr. Carlcton E. Power, of the number of freshmen and upper classmen
Professor
Adna
VV. Rislcy
lysics department, stayed at Lake
visited Yellowstone National
Park,
News club picnic.
at its annual pledge party Saturday
T h e reSalt Lake City, and Denver, via the George for two weeks.
evening at Newman hall, in Madison
Tuesday, October 13
passed in
G r e a t Lakes. After the summer scs- maindcr of the summer
avenue. Entertainment and a program
3:00 P. M, Y. VV. C. A.—Room B. sion, with Mrs. Rislcy he went to the •Vlbany.
Dr. A r t h u r K. Beik. of the cduca- uerc given during tbc evening. Marion
N e w England states.
Friday, October 16
family M. O'Connor, '26, is president of the
Dr. George A. S. Painter, professor ion department, with his
8:00 : 11:00 P, M. Get-Wise Party— •f philosophy, devoted nearly all bis "lircd O b i o , Illinois, and Iowa, fre- club this year and Gertrude Lynch is
'ce-president. Julia Fay is secretary.
Gym.
I !::ic to literary work in Albany, tak- mently camping along the road,
< I
1
• 1
PTATE (X)ILfOJ«: NI.WS, OOTOI Kit it, 1020
Page Four
THOMPSON WRITING
BOOK ON NOVELIST
State College Professor Is One
Of Fifteen Americans
Honored
Author
REFERENCE BOOKS ON
Cheerful Service Shop
HISTORY AND BUSINESS
JOS. A. WALSH, Prop.
ACQUIRED BY LIBRARY
(diss Mary E. Cobb, college librarian, Hosiery for Pcoplo Who Caro
I'lnoiinced Ihese additions to the library:
deck's "The Constitution of the U. S.," LTXOKKIE—-GKNTH FuitmsfilJfdS,
Bradley's "For Luncheon and Supper
5% To College Students
Guests" Conrad's "Lord Jim," "Business
Cycles and Unemployment," Deficit's
"Making the Movies," Frost's "Clog Have you seen the new fancy
Dance Book," Galsworthy's "The Patri- silk gloves, and the slipper
cloiij" Geary's "Folk Dances of Czechoslovakia," Gehrkens' "Fundamentals of back hosiery, all shades.
Music," Gerstcnherg's "Four Plays for
Women," Grabau's "Geology," Hamil7 doers lielovv
ton's "Music Appreciation," Hellman's 107 Central
"Washington Trying, Escp," Huntington
Ave.
Lexington
Ave.
and Williams' "Business Geography,"
lacobs' "Study of Color," "LincolnDouglas Political Debate," Lowell's
".fohn Keats," McDotigall's "Introduction In Social Psychology," M.ri'onigle's
"History of Art," Morison's "Sources and
Documents Relating to the American
Revolution," Morley's "Oliver Cromwell," Paxsoit's "History of the American Frontiers," Ricciardi's "The Boy and Luncheon or dinner 11:15—1:30
His Future," Rittcnhotise's "The Welldressed Woman," Robinson's "Domestic
The Rose Dry Good Store
Architecture," Spaulding's "Music an
Art and a Language," Stanford and For10% Discount to College Students
syth's "History of Music," Stern's "My
Mother and 1," Wendell's "Literary Gotham Gold Stripe Hosiery
History of America," Wharton's "Ethan
Frome," Wiggin's "My Garden of
327 Central Ave. Phone W. 2763-J
Memory."
Dr, Harold W, Thompson, professor
of English, and one of the fifteen American educators to he awarded fellowships
for European study by the Guggenheim
foundation, will write a hook during
his year abroad.
He is spending the present academic
year abroad under the provisions of the
John Simon Guggenheim Foundation.
This foundation was established by Senator and Mrs. Guggenheim by an injjial
gift of three million dollars as a memorial to their son. Tt is intended for
assistance of scholars who have already
shown distinction in research and artists
who have already done distinguished
creative work. The minimum age limit
is twenty-five years. The scholarship
Coiittey All)my Evening News
system established by the foundation
DR. HAROLD W. THOMPSON
differs from the Rhodes scholarship plan
in sending over mature men and women
with a definite scholarly task or creative EIGHTY NEW STUDENTS
plan. It is the hope of the donors that
EXEMPT FROM ENGLISH
this foundation will not only foster
H. B. SMITH
L A . BOOKHEIM
American scholarship and art, but will
Dr. Harry \V. Hastings, chairman ol
MA SQUE BADE COST IJM ER
the
English
department,
announces
the
also give foreign universities a better
Meats
idea of our progress along these lines following eighty freshmen as exempt Masks - Wigs - Beards - etc. R e l i a b l e
from freshman English under the new Costumes made to order at short notice 846 Madison Ave. cor. Ontario St.
and foster international good will.
WEST 40-J
system: II. Azzareto, S. Bescmcr, C. 122 QUAIL ST.
Fifteen fellowships of twenty-five hun- Bailey, T. Blake, I'. Benedict, M. Brown- Opposite Car Bnrns
Phone West 1837
Albany, N . Y .
dred dollars have been awarded for next liardt, D. Billinghain, E. V. Boxlcr, A.
year, the candidates being selected from H. Brownell, G. E. Braslow, A. BuyPATRONIZE THE
many applicants. One musician was ham, M. E. Conk, A. S. Carpenter, S.
chosen, Aaron Copland, the composer, Cooper, M. C. Cozero, M. M. Craven,
Amrrtratt Cleansers attit Btjers
of New York. The other fellows arc L. Casey, E. Campbell, N. Cole, E. CashWe Clean, and Dya all kinds of Lidiej' and Man's
profesors in State College, Harvard, man, M. C. Duffy, M. L. Dorn, D. DaduWearing Apparel
Vassar, University of Chicago, Univer- mun„ D. D.ninley, H, Eddy, A. Elauigaii,
sity of Illinois, Pennsylvania university, M. E, Fortune, S. Eerber, l«\ B. Ford, 811 MADISON AVENUE
Phone West 6850-J
M.
French,
S.
Frank,
M.
R.
FitzVV.
Fisk university, Stanford university, and
patrick, M. Fox, arc! H. Francois.
VVheaton college.
F, Gormlcy, M. C. Cain, II. CastDr. Thompson's partcular field of worth, E. S. Hutchison, R. S. Ihrtman.
research is concerned with British litera- M. Ilerliky, A. Hills, F. Kellogg, E.
ture of the eighteenth century. He will Kesslcr, M. Elvvin, F. Koen, I. Kni'j, I),
be engaged in writing a book about Lundy, B. Lapedes, F. Moore, M. C
ALBANY, N. Y.
Henry Mackenzie of Edinburgh, novelist Martin, M. VV. McCaffrey, L. B. Math- 394-396 BROADWAY
and essayist, friend ut Burns and Scott.
L. McAvoy, M
To Mackenzie, Scott dedicated his first worn, I-, h. McLaurc,
F. Mullen, M. E, McSOCIETY PRINTING
novel. Dr. Thompson's book will de- P. Mincier,
Mack-y, L. Marctis, A
scribe literary Scotland of Mackenzie's Ntilty. K I
Pulvcr, A.
Palmer,
E.
Pcarsc,
M.
day. That period of Scottish literature
F. E. Ri-.kard, I.
is not well known except for the great Rony, F. SA.Vukr.
E. Smith, J . Sutliff, H.
MIKE'S BARBER SHOP
:
figures of Hume, Adam Smith, Burns Silverman,
ulh'van,
D
Travis,
M.
A. Vaudenhurgh
and Scott.
IN LADIES HAIR BOBBING
WE
SPECIALIZE
C. Westland, R. Watts, V. B. Willett,
Dr. Thompson did his undergraduate E. G. Welch, H. I. Walsh, M. H.
MOST
UP-TO-DATE
APARTMENT ON THE HILL
work with honor at Hamilton College Walker, and A. Walkins.
and earned the degree of doctor of phiThc-;e students gained the Irishes)
PRIVATE ROOMS FOR LADIES
losophy at Harvard. He is interested marks in the entrance examination in 262 CENTRAL AVE.
PHONE W. 6H20-J
in music, as an organist, composer and English held September 21, Dr. Hasting.'
musical editor, and has done special said. The examination was compulsory
work at State College in addition to the for all entering students. The students
HAUSEN'S MENS SHOP
teaching of literature in developing '•ho have the hiphe I regents marks in
courses in public speaking.
English for the four high school years,
F
U
R
N
I
S
HING
TOPCOATS
OVERCOATS
The fifteen educators selected, includ- usually about one hundred and fifty, arc
ing one woman, will pass the academic selected from the applicants for admisEXCLUSIVE
BUT
NOT
E
X
P
E
N
S
I
VE
year of 1925-26 on a wide range of sub- sion, the eighty haviin the hi best mark
jects, including science, mathematics, in the examination, from the group of
music, history and archeology. Their freshmen, are exempt from freshman 1 3 3 CENTRAL AVE.
OPEN EVENINGS
studies will take them far afield to English.
Mesopotamia, India, the Far East,
Africa, France, Germany and Mexico.
H. E. STAHLER'S RESTAURANT
CANTERBURY ELECTS
Letters from Dr. Thompson describe
a week in London. Dr. Thompson atCanterbury club's new efficers ar.-:
" T H E BEST IS NONE TO GOOD"
tended services in Westminister Abbey, president, Helen ICIIiotl '26: \ic
Lincoln cathedral, and York Minster. president Helen Yicts, '27; secretary
Mr. T. Frederick H. Candlyn said Dr. Elizabeth I'luin, '26; treasurer JeanCandies, Ice Cream, Soda, Cigars
Thompson and his party spent a few ctte Kimball, '28; re torlcr Marv
days in France and Germany visiting Langd-m, '28; faculty alv's-r :,[.'.•- 207 CENTRAL cAVE. Albany, 9£ ) \
Phone Wist 6-148
the battlefields.
Elizabeth Van Dcnhurgh.
State College
Cafeteria
MILLS ART PRESS
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