S t a t e College News CONCERT TO BE TONIGHT

advertisement
State College News
NEW YORK ATATE COLLEGE FOR TEACHERS
ESTABLISHED BY THE CLASS OF 1918
VOL. IX No. 15
ALBANY, N. Y. FEBRUARY 6, 1925
$3.00 per year
Junior Prom Leaves TEAM WON
CONCERT TO Byrne Bill To Be
Doubt Of Success THIRD GAME
On La'er No
BE TONIGHT The fate Acted
i he night of January 30 marked the
of the Byrne bill appropriBig Musical Event
Of Season At Hall
Many talented State College follows
its recent dramatic success by a musical treat tonight at 8:30, when the
Music Association in its mid-winter
concert will present at Chancellor's
Hall, the Women's Chorus, a Mixed
Chorus, and the College Orchestra,
under the direct ion of Professor T.
Frederick IT. Candlyn. The Hungarian violinist, Zoltan Szekely, will
be the assisting artist in connection
with the college organization!!, Zoltan Szekely is famed for his technique
and tone quality. He is at present
guest soloist with the Detroit Symphony Orcbstra, In addition, Szekely
is a noted composer who has traveled
in England, Italy, Holland. Germany,
and Hungary. He is returning in the
near future to his native country for
a concert tour.
ft has been arranged that the balcony at the hall be reserved for Slate
College students who will be admitted
on presentation of student tax tickets.
Fi.ty cents will reserve a seat on the
main (loor.
Previous concerts given by the State
College musical organizations have
been highly praised for their excellence. Be a committee of one and
see that you are present.
The following numbers are included
in the program for the evening:
Marche Militaire
Schubert
Gavotte
Gluch
Orchestra
Non Nobis Domino
Bynl
Wake Miss Lindy
Warner
The Dairy Maids
LaForge
.Women's Chorus
Largo and Allegro
Veracini
Concerto in E Flat
Mozart
Zoltan Szekely
Deep River
Negro Spiritual
Viking Song
Coleridge-Taylor
Mixed Chorus
Minuet
Handel
Valse (Sylina Ballet)
Delibes
Orchestra
Song of the Volga Boatmen
Russian Folk Song
The Little Dustman
German Folk Song
Listen, Gianetta
Italian Folk Song
Women's Chorus
Caprice (Violin alone)
Saint-Lubin
Serenade Espagnole
Chaminade-Kreisler
Csardascene in G Minor
Hubay
Zoltan Szekely
The Blue Danube
Strauss
Women's Chorus
ating $250,000 to begin work on the
proposed three building addition to
State College hangs in doubt, State
Senator William T. Byrne, of Albany,
who introduced the bill three weeks
ago, told the State College News this
week that he docs not know whether
,t will be passed. Its chances, he declared, are no better than last year.
" T h e bill will probably fall into the
so-called 'thirty-day class,'" he said.
•• It will he one of those bills which
are acted upon just before the legis'atlire closes its session so that the
governor can pass upon them within
the thirty day limit." "At
present,"
Senator Byrne said, " I do not know
if the bill will he passed. The needs
of the college are appreciated, hut the
question is whether the state can
afford the money this year. The
failure of the bill to pass last year has
been generally attributed to a jam of
business in the last few days in which
it lost out. I believe, however, that
the chief reason it failed of passage.
along with a number of other measures, is because of the question of
ways and means."
" The measure," he said, " will probably not be acted upon by the Senate
Finance and the Assembly Ways ami
Means Committees until just before
the close of the session, prob'ib'y
sometime between March 15 am.
April 1.
" With the approval of those two
committees and the support of Governor Smith," Mr. Byrne said, " passage of the bill by the Assembly and
Senate would be virtually assured."
Editorial support of the bill has
been given in Albany by these papers:
The Evening News, the Knickerbocker Press, and the Times-Union.
The Famous Farrar
To Deliver Talk Here
John Farrar, playwrite, poet, and
editor of '' The Bookman," will give
an informal talk Saturday evening in
the college auditorium upon the subject of the modern play and modern
play production. Mr. Farrar has the
advantage of persona! acquaintance
with the famous and illustrious of the
day, which in itself promises a delightful inside glimpse of the character and
lives of outstanding contemporaries.
Very likely be will touch upon his own
recent experiences in New York play
production. Whatever he presents,
one may feel assured that his talk will
have a wide appeal, whether or not
one is up to date in theatre-going,
passing of Junior Prom, the crowning
jvent of the career of 1926. It ful,i|lul the keenest anticipations of the
most enthusiastic supporter.
The
attests were received by the ex-officio faculty members of the class,
President and Mrs. Ahram K. Brttbncher Dean Anna E. Pierce; the
'acuity members of the class. Miss J.
Frabelle Johnrton. Miss Maud Malcolm, and Miss Margaret Bet/.; the
lass officer.", Hilda Kliukhart, Mary
:•" aunigan, and .Margaret Benjamin
Due ID the illness of the president.
Muriel VVen/el the grand march was
r,\ by Hilda Klinkl art. Selling a
'elighlful precedent the patronesses
wore ci rsages of lea roses, tokens of
•he regard of '26.
Tin' music, inruislied by McGuire's
re-be tra was truly a jazzy, provoking
'nutation
while the organization
'tanners ably lent themselves to the
'ecoralor's WIFII. A post mortem
ivveals that Maine and pastel lints
were the predominating colors ami
f at Mi;l-Vict< rian bouffant style in
ill its charming modes, was deservedly
LUNCHEON ALSO BEST EVER
It was rather surprising and pleasant, as President Briibaeher remarked,
'o see so many young ladies appear
with rosy cheeks after the affair of
be night before, or as Dean Horner
aid, rose their cheeks and appear so
rcsh and charming,
The junior luncheon was held in the
attractive old Dutch atmosphere of the
Colony Pta<a. and opened with the
" Alma Mater." led by Mary Rhcin.
iiuging followed each course, and after
the delicious luncheon was over, Mary
F anigan, as toastmistress, presented
"resident Brubacher who spoke on
he value of friendship at college. He
idded that it was highly essential for
.•very girl to be able to address every
tber girl in her class by her first
•tame, and then told an anecdote of
'he unsociability at Harvard. Dean
Horner caught the latter up in his
pecch, and spoke rather disparagingly
if the attitude of Yale men toward
Harvard men. He went on to speak
if the junior class as the nameless
class since it was the clas-,, and read
the ideas of Professor Butler of
Columbia University about the college
'Indent and his reading. Dean Horner certainly painted a bright future
'or the college student, and did not
seem to agree with Professor Butler
Everyone certainly agreed with Mary
Plamgan when she spoke of State's
former dean, and of the fact that
while he was at State College she
found out that " a man's a man for a'
that."
Miss Pierce, introduced as having
her name in " Who's Who." spoke of
•he '' daily dozen," as " think a good
thought," and " do a kind deed.''
Miss Pierce then spoke of the dormitory, and as the speech lasted more
':han two minutes, she won a wager
or it from both Dean Horner and
President Brubacher Dean Mctzler
elaborated on the subject of friendship
and closed with the motto, 'Do Unto
Others As You Would They Would
Two Home Games
Scheduled Next Week
i he varsity basketball team won its
bird straight home victory Saturday
•light, defeating the alumni, 25 to 16,
in the college gymnasium.
The varsity will not play this week
Silt next week it has two home games
eheduled. A week from to-night
'Irooklyn Pharmacy will be met here
•nd the following night Oswego Nor'1ft! will he played. Coach Baker has
kept up practice this week and will
push it until the games. The Pharmacy tilt is expected to be a stilT
triiggle.
In last week's game, the alumni,
laying a galaxy of former Purple and
iohl -Uars, failed to keep up with the
regulars' team play and played poorer
'tall during almost the entire game.
I'iarly in the second half, spurred up
by the addition of Stanley Fitzgerald,
'orwanl on the college's stale Inter*
•ollegiate championship outfit of 1917,
he alumni had a brief run of scoring,
Kuczyiiiski. State forward, broke it up
with a basket.
Kticzynski was the individual star.
l*'or the alumni. Cassavant was high
mm with live points, but Fitzgerald
r< red fniir ill one half.
The game started off speedily with
both teams playing tightly for five
minutes before Kticzynski scored on a
ass from Gaiuor. Cassavant missed
i foul and Kticzynski tallied one.
'lormuig came through with an easy
'askel and then Ifathorn scored from
•intler the basket, After that the
Purple and Gold scored frequently.
The half which started fast lagged in
'he closing minutes. Griffin went in
at left guard for Gilchrist as the
icriod ended with the regulars leaclng._ 11 to 6.
Fitzgerald was played in place of
l.inck in the second half at left forward. Cassavant tallied a foul, Horiiuug came back with one for State
and Fitzgerald made one. The alumni
•purted, then slowed up and the varsity hung up several baskets.
Coach Baker's lineup saw Gilchrist
and Griffin in Nephew's place at left
guard. For the alumni, Cassavant,
and Hathorn were regulars on the '21
team, Linck was manager and a sub'tiutute that year. Davies was a
regular on last season's squad and
Shcrley was captain two years ago.
Fitzgerald played the year the varsity
lefcatcd Cornell and Syracuse for the
*tatc championship. By its win the
team brought its home record to three
victories in live games, the best in two
years.
SUMMARY
Score at half time—State 11;
Alumni 6.
Fouls committed—By
State, 8; by Alumni, 12, Referee—
Humphries,
Timekeeper— Fcnner.
rime of periods—Twenty minutes.
Uo Unto You."
Georgia DcMocker related experiences of '26 as freshmen, and Bcrnice
Quinn, those as sophomores. The
'uncheon ended with the last strain
of " Auld Lang Syne."
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, FEBRUARY 6, 1925
PageiTwo
fctate (&allt#t Sfoiira
Vol. IX
h\b
6. 1925
No. M
Published weekly during (he college
year by the Student liody of the New
York State College for Teachers at
Albany, New York.
The subscription rate is three dollars
per year. Advertising rates may be had
on application to the business manager,
(Articles, manuscripts, etc., must be
in the hands of the editors before Mou'day of the week of publication.)
Editor-in-Chief
KATHLEEN E. FUR MAN, '25
Managing Editor
HARRY S, GOPI-REY, '26
,.
Business Manager
RUTH BARTON, '25
Subscription Manager
CwENiioi.VN JONES, '25
Assistant Business Managers
Lots MOORE, '25
ELISE BOWER, '25
Assistant Subscription Manager
HELEN BARCLAY, '26
Associate Editors
FLORENCE PI.ATNER. '25
HELEN ELLIOTT, '26
JOYCE PERSONS, '26
MARGARET BENJAMIN, '26
Reporters
SARA BARKLEY, '27
JULIA FAY, '27
KATIIRVN BLENIS, '27
ANNA KOFF, '26
EDWIN VAN KLEECK, '27
LOUISE GIINN, '27
DIPLOMAS A N D EDUCATION
Now that final examinations are
past and a new semester is opening',
such remarks as these arc heard In
college corridors: " I s Professor X
a good marker? Can you get by with
much in his courses? I registered for
this class because [ hear you can pull
a passing grade without the slightest
effort." Of course we take such remarks with a.grain of salt, for they
arc largely hyperbolic, but the fact remains that most of us, who are striving to secure a college education, seem
to be more interested in the hours
easily secured than the general information gained. If securing an education is reduced to a game of chance
where the student risks nothing, and
reaps a piece of paper known as a
diploma, then an education is worthless. Cramming a lot of useless and
desultory knowledge in our craniums,
and then expelling it hurriedly into
examination booklets, is futile effort
and wasted time. Unless we aim to
broaden our intellectual horizons, unless wc take those courses which will
better develop us to meet and solve
the problems of life, our degree is not
worth the letters that compose it.
And so, in making out this semester's
schedule, let us choose those courses
from which wc shall derive the most
benefit, regardless of the work involved.
ANOTHER QUARTERLY SOON
The Quarterly Board is already
busy making plans for the appearand"
of another literary production, Its
members urge that all material for the
next issue be in the bands of some
member of the board by the middle
of February. Attention is likewise
called to the twenty-five dollar prizes
.given in June for the best prose and
the best poetry productions.
POINT SYSTEM EXPLAINED
Due to the fact that.there sccnis to
be misunderstanding as to the counting OJ a D toward graduation, the following explanation is offered:
The number of credit points in the
major or minor must be equal to or
greater, than the number of credit
hours.
The giving of credit points is as
follows:
A—3 points for each hour.
B—2 points for each hour.
C—1 point for each hour.
Thus a student receiving a D in his
major or minor must receive an A or
li in a course giving the same mini-;
her of hours in the same department
to offset the D.
A I.) received in any course other
I ban a major or miliar may be offset
by an A or B in any other course
offering the same number of hours,
provided that at the time of graduation
the number of credit points equals the
number of credit hours.
3ALARY INCREASE POSSIBLE
Increased pay for the faculty of
State College is provided ill a bill in.roduccd last week in the legislature,
by Senator Ernest Cole, Republican,
of Steuben county, amending the education law in regard to compensation
lo teachers in State College and the
normal schools of the state.
The following increases for the
acuity would be provided by the proposed law:
President, $7 000 to $7 500. maximum; dean. $4,500 to $5,000 minimum.
5,000 to $6,000 maximum; director of
training (new provision) $4,000 minimint, $5,500 maximum, $250 annual
increase; dean of women, $2 000 to
J3.U00 minimum, $.3,200 to $4,000 maximum; professor, $.3,000 to $4,000 minimum, $4,500 to $5,000 maximum i
assistant professor, $2 000 lo $.3,000
minimum, $.3,000 to $4,000 maximum,
•'200 to $250 annual increase; instructor, $1,800 to $2,000 minimum, $2 600
lo $2 800 maximum; assistant instructor, $j 200 to $1,500 minimum, $1,500
to $1,800 maximum.
ALUMNI BUSY
What will you be doing ten years
Youi now—or twenty-five, or forty.
>r even fifty? President Brubachcr
has recently sent to all who have ever
been members of regular classes al
State College, cards asking for their
resent occupations. The returns are
•low coming in, and (hey disclose the
fact that, although
about ninety per
•cut are teacher1;, former State Col'egians are holding positions of all
kinds. A large number have graduated from their earlier degree of B. S.,
>r B. A., to that of Mrs., and they
• tatc this fact In many different ways.
,'iving their occupation as " Homenakcr, " Housewife." " Housekeeper.''
'At Home," "Caring for Home," and
the like. Among the others are lawyers, doctors, clergymen, merchants,
•md managers of tea-rooms, and a few
rankly slate that they arc " doing
nothing," or "just resting."
COMSTOCK IN POLITICS
President of the freshman class of
State College last year and a justice
-if the peace this year, is the record
>f William J. Comstock, cx-'27.
Comstock was recently appointed a
ustice in the town of Bethlehem. He
's the youngest police justice '•! the
Capitol District, having come just over
the minimum age for the office, twentymc years. This year he is teaching
ix grades in a district school at
Bethlehem center, just outside of
Albany. He will return to Slate in
the fall. Comstock says he is dc-
AROUND THE COLLEGE
Pauhnc George, '23, spent the weekjnd at Kappa Delta house.
The engagement of Helen Guldi, '21,
.o William G. Beal, has been announced.
Louise. Austin,.'25, of Kappa Delta
loiisc spent the week-end at her home
n Patterson,
Catherine Russcl, '24, visited Kappa
Delta house last week,
Ruth Hopkins, '26, and Helen Rex,
27, spent last week-end in New York,
Emily Hull ot Katonali, visited Ella
Jhace, '25, over the week-end.
A fire in the Science building about
.'our o'clock Tuesday afternoon did
' light damage.
The marriage of Vera Nolan of
North Tarrytown, to Harold P. Smith
jf Wisconsin, has been announced.
Miss Nolan, '23, of State, was a former
Alitor o. the News. At present the
.otiple are residing in Roxbury, Massa.•husetts.
A meeting of the Home Economics
Club will be held Wednesday, February II, at four o'clock in Room 161.
oevcral matters or importance to all
will be considered at this time. The
business meeting will be followed by a
talk of unusual interest.
Miss Martha Mauley of Syracuse
University, spent the week end at
Alpha Delta Omicron house, as a
guest of Ethel Bisland, '25.
Gamma Kappa Phi welcomes back
Helen Quackenbush, '26, who will reuime her studies this semester after
absence due to illness.
Emily S. Belding, '24, is visiting her
brother Larry Belding, in Chicago,
Illinois.
Miss Anna Randolph Keini, assistant professor of Home Economics
and president of the eastern district of
the State Home Economics association, will preside over a meeting of
that body to be held soon at the
college.
•Mrs. If. Cowcll of Peak-skill, was
a guest of Louise Ward, '26, at Page
Hall, over the week-end.
Miss Caroline Ferris, '28, and Miss
Anne Eagan, *28, of Page Hall are
recovering from their recent illness.
Miss Lcola Sharkley, '28, was the
guest of Edna Kcmpe, Clinton Corners, over the mid-year recess.
Miss Leah Cohen, '28, was the guesl
of Consuolo Van Orsdcll, '28, of Htid-lon, over the mid-year recess.
The eastern district of the State
Home Economics Association will
bold a meeting at Slate College, Saturday a.ternoon, February 7, Miss
Thompson and Miss Fillingham are
hostesses for the occasion.
Miss Steele, district, chairman of
the Student Club committee, will hold
conferences with representatives of
.Tome Economics Clubs from institutions which arc planning to organize
these clubs. Plans will be discussed
nid ideas exchanged.
Dorothy Taylor, '25. Jessie Wayman, 2.i, Grace Root, '25, and Mary
Barber, '26, make up the new family
which has moved into the Home
Management House for the month
)f February.
Another example of Slate's overcrowded conditions may be found in
the Home Economics departnienl
where in one class there are twentyseven people in a room which scats
11 teen.
lighted with teaching and believes
" we have picked the right profession "
"The Judge" sits on the (own
hoard but he has yet to try his first
case or solemnize his first marriage.
There will be a meeting of the Psi
Gamma Alumnae Association, Saturday, February 7, at which the regular
clccticin of officers will be held. The
association will then attend the Eastern Branch Alumni supper. The Psi
GammaAlumnae Association has just
published the January issue of its
quarterly, copies of which have been
sent to all its members. In addition
i list of members and their addresses
has been published,
Edward E. Shcrlcy, '24, now principal of the school at Argyle, was In re
.'or Prom and the alumni game.
Lewis Davies, '24, principal of the
'xbool at Berlin, was here fur I In:
week-end. Francis Reidy, '24, w.iilso here.
Ruth Ellis, '24, and Elizabelh
Strmip, '24 were up for Prom.
State College students and faculty
were among those who attended the
address of Brigadier Lord Thomson,
member of the British Labor Cabinet,
lanuary 27, at the Ten Eyck. Manv
who were not at the dinner listened
!o the address following it. Among
those who had reservations were Miss
Anna Randolph Ktiiii, assistant processor of Home Economics; T. Fredrick H. Candlyn, of the music faculty;
Miss Eunice Pcrinc. instructor in fine
Ttsi Kenneth MacFarland, '26; Dorothea Deitz. '25; Gertrude Olds. '25.
The Home Economics Club will
conduct its annual initiation party
today.
Mrs. Isaac LaGrangc, Jr., of New
York, a former student at State Col'cge. recently entertained c'assmates
•t bridge, iirlud'ng Miss MarjorD Wilbur, of Huntington, Long Island; Miss
Margaret Skinner, of New York and
Miss Florence Le Compete of Freeport, Long Island.
The second quarterly issue for tin's
year of the Gamma Gazette, official
"rgan of Gamma Chapter of Kappa
Delta Rho, was published this week
An edition of 125 copies was mailed
to chapter alumni, active and honorary
members, the national officers and
ither chapters, The editorial staff
this year is Harry S. Godfrey, '26,
=enior editor; Marion D, Landon, '26.
••managing editor: Edwin Van Kleeck,
'27. junior editor.
Formation of a special class in
•larliamcnlary procedure and debate
was considered by Dean Metzlcr and
"•residents and vice-presidents of col'ege organizations at a meeting last
week in his office.
The athletic council will act soon
HI recommendations of Coach Baker
'>f names of football m u lo be
awarded the varsity S for work this
season.
Harry Rude, '26, recently elected
manager of baseball is completing an
"ight game schedule for the Irani
\ New York trip is being sought.
( The Psi Gamma Alumnae assoria'ion will have its quarterly meeting
tomorrow'afternoon at the sorority
'•oiise. Officers will be elected. Miss
N'orinc B. Keating will preside.
Miss Helen E. Goldsmith, president
'if the graduate chapter of Alpha Ep-iloii Phi. has appointed the following
"ommiitec to perfect plans for a limch'on and bridge party to he given Stm'ay; Miss Helen Bcrnheimcr. Miss
Rose Breslati, and Miss Sophia Cohen.
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, FEBRUARY 6, 1025
Page Thro*
Girls' Varsity Wins
Against Alumnae
The annual Alumnae-Varsity game
of January 31, offered the first opportunity for State to view the girls' varsity in action. That the game was
closely contested is shown hy the f'ma
score of 18-16 in favor of the varsity.
Despite the fact that close guarding
and brilliant shooting featured the
match, the game was slow, due to the
constant shifting of positions on the
varsity.
The alumnae played a hctler organized game than is usual. Hilda Licbech, '24, crack pivot of last season's
squad, usually succeeded in getting
the tip-off and passing the hall to the
forwards. Helen Walsh, '22, rolled
up all the points for the Alumnae.
. Margaret Hutchins, captain of (he
varsity, shufllcd her players in an attempt to try out possihlc combinations
for the coming combat with Russell
Sage. This constant change in lineup
which kept down the varsity's score,
is shown by the lineup.
ALUMNAE
STATIC
Walker, H.
r. f.
Crr.ddock
Walsh, H.
I. f.
Hoy I
Leibich, H.
c.
Tompkins
George, P.
r, g.
Empie
1. g.
Maar
Axclrod, R.
Summary:
Score at half time:
State. 1-1; Alumnae, 12. Substitutes,
Alumnae—Johnson
for
Axelrod.
Slate—Moore for Tompkins, Daly for
Moore. Tuell for Moyt, Wright for
Maar, Hutchins for Empie, Ealle for
Wright, Conch lor Ealle. Referee,
Johnston. Scorekccper, Horsey. Time
of quarters, seven minutes.
Russell Sage College of Troy has
duly challenged Slate's women's varsity to a basketball game. Manager
Janctta Wright, 26. announces March
7 as the date set. The match will be
played on ll'c Troy door.
Remembering last year's victory and
State's defeat in '22, the game this
year should be of particular interest.
In view of past experience, the student body is planning a wholesale
invasion of the rival college on the
staled day, Saturday, March 7.
Winning the West
Irrigation by electrically driven pumps has made
hundreds of thousands of acres of desert land in the
Intermountain West blossom like the rose.
For a few cents a month per acre, electricity—the giant
worker—brings the life-giving water from distant lakes
and rivers to rainless valleys, producing rich harvests
of fruits and vegetables, cereals and forage.
The General Electric Company provides for agriculture little motors that clothe
farm chores and great ones
that operate mammoth
pumps t o i r r i g a t e vast
stretches of arid valleys.
What electricity is doing for the farmer is only a
counterpart of what it is doing for Industry, Transportation, City and Country life or any of the professions. It is a tool ready for your use and which, wisely
used, will make the impossible of today an accomplished
fact tomorrow.
'28 TO PLAY R. P. I. FRESHMEN
The freshman men's basketball
team, which lost a close game to the
If you are interested in
How electricity does th se things is important to the
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute yearlearning more about what
student in a technical school—but what electricity can
electricity is doing, write
lings at Troy Friday night, will play
for Reprint No. AR391 cona return game either February 1.1 at
do is important to every college man or woman, no
taining a complete set of
State, or March 21, at Troy. The
matter what their life's work may be.
these advertisements.
score of the game Friday was 22 to 1')
The contest was closely played
throughout, the freshmen's work showing a marked improvement over the
game with Waterford High school.
At half time the Engineers' cubs were
leading, 14 to 8, and in the sr-oml
half, each team scored eight points
The Purple and Cold freshmen were
S C H E N 2 C T A D V,
YORK
C O M P A N Y.
ELECTRIC
slow in finding the basket in the open- G E N E R A L
ing period and the opponents ran up
a lead which they maintained to the
final whistle. Nephew was high man notes have tried to bring out some
for the freshmen with eight points. nf the more vital points in the varied
Kuc/.yiiski, Coff, Crillin, and Dobris -lory of almost a century, and to bring
also played.
into light farts of which any college j
could boast. The college's record in
STORY OF STATE ENDS
394-396 Broadway, Albany, N. Y.
the Civil War, related in a former
The News' small contribution lo the
number,
is
excelled
only
by
that
in
observance of Slate College's eightieth
PRINTING
Special Attention Given
birthday ends in next week's issue with Hie World War. described in the last Printers of State College
the publication of the final chapter in chapter These and similar anecdotes i
Society Work
N
ncwa
J
" The Story of State." These brief should be familiar lo students.
I
GENERAL EL
MILLS ART PRESS
f i | * FOB*'
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, FEBttt/AK* JpttSfr
G. A. A. Frolic Frid iy
SENIORS T O H O P I N GYM
Committees are already actively enVaudeville! Anything from tragedy
in making this year's senior hop,
to slapstick farce may be included gaged
scheduled for February 21, in the gymunder that heading, State has had nasium, one of the most successful
plays, concerts, and bazaars. G. A. A. lances of years. The following comis betting a precedent. On Friday mittee chairmen vouch for a hoppy
evening, March 27. there will be pre- " hop," with formal dress to give a
semblance of dignity to undignified
sented a program of vaudeville, record- •ieuiors:
General chairman. Mary
shattering and astounding, under the Driscoll; music, Anne Evans; refreshauspices of the Girls' Athletic Asso- ments, Gertrude Coleman; programs,
Alice Boughton; chaperons and invitaciation of State.
The rcsponsonsibility for this affair tions, Ruth Wcmple; decorations,
Catherine
Woodward. All seniors
lies with Lorcna Shaffer, '26, general
chairman. Several committees are who have paid their class dues are
eligible
to
attend
this function.
assisting her in arranging for the
event: Stunts, Bertha Zajan, '27;
INTERESTING STATISTICS
lighting, Dorothy Hoyt, '25; house.
Gcorgianna Maar, 27; stage set, Mary
Opponents of State College for
Flannigan, '26; costumes, Dorothy Teachers' basketball team have scored
Taylor, '25; stage manager, Marion 116 points in the live home games to
Schracclcr, '25; music, Beulah Eckcr- late this season, while the Purple and
son, '25; dancing, Ruth McNutt, '27; Gold has run up 118 in the same conproperties, Jeanette Waldbillig, '28; gests, a tabulation shows.
State
ushers, Beatrice Wright, '28; pub- Iroppcd its first two games here to
licity, Marian Chcscbrough, '26; pro- Union and to Brooklyn Law, and won
gram, Helen Elliott, '26.
the next three from St. Michael's and
Jamaica Teachers and the Alumni.
I he tally shows:
State, 15; Union. 33.
ATHLETIC WORK COMMENDState. 23; Brooklyn, 40.
ABLE
State. 23; St. Michael's, 16.
The work of the varsity basketball
State, 32; Jamaica, 11.
team this season has been gratifying
State, 25; Alumni, 16.
to the college. At the present time
the team has played eight games, and REV. DUNNEY T O ADDRESS
has: won three of them. Five or the
CLUB
games have been played ill Albany,
The next regular meeting of the
and in its home court the Purple and
Gold stands with three wins against Newman Club will be held February
II, in room 211, at four o'clock, not
two losses,
Admittedly, this is a good record on February 4 as was hitherto anIt compares very favorably with that nounced. Rev. Joseph A. Duniicy
of the last two years. It has brought will deliver a lecture on religion, at
a revival of confidence both from the that date. Matters of importance
college and from the general sports concerning the religious and social
world. With four more games to play activities of the club will be brought
the team should bring in two, possibly up by Mary Driscoll, club president.
three, more victories.
The team has met reverses. Since
READS AT GLOVERSVILLE
the St. Michael's game Johnson has
Miss Agnes Futlercr was in Glovbeen kept from the squad by illness.
In the three weeks before the end of Tsville last week-end, where she gave
the season the varsity has a right to ti reading of " Quality Street " before
expect every support from the college. the usual interested audience which
Cheering should be better than it was her appearance calls forth. The proat the Alumni game. Attendance ceeds of the reading arc to be donated
should be better. The team practices to the dormitory fund.
faithfully, its schedule has been well
chosen and it works hard in all its
MATH CLUB DISCUSSES
games. Its support from the student
EXAMS
body should not lag.
" Coming events cast their shadows
before," but past events cast their
Breathes there a girl with soul so
diadow over Math Club meeting
dead
Thursday, February 5. A paper on
She never to herself hath said,
'Correcting Examination Papers"
I'll go today to buy my " Pcd,"
was read by Ella May Greeunway.
And when its pages I have read,
'26 and one on " What the Tests Do
I'll put it in a libraree
Not Test," by Isabellc Winnc. The
To benefit postcriticc.
rest of the period was given over to
a discussion of these papers.
CALENDAR
Friday, February 6
8:15 P. M. College Concert—Chancellor's Hall.
Saturday, February 7
Eastern Branch Alumni Dinner—
Cafeteria.
8:00 P. M. Lecture—Dramatic and
Art Association—Auditorium.
Tuesday, February 10
3:00 P. M. Y. W. C. A.—Auditorium.
4:00 P. M. Political Science Club.
4:00 P. M. Home Economics Club
—Room 160.
Wednesday, February 11
4:00 P. M. Spanish Club—Room
103.
N E W S BOARD PARTY
Social intercourse is necessary to the
welfare of every organization. With
.bis in mind, the News Board is planning an informal winter party to be
held at the home of Louise Gunn.
tobogganing, stunts, and refreshments
will afford diversions from the moic
lerioUs intents of the board. The date
is as vet undecided.
WMGUYS
softer every meal /
A pleasant
and a g r e e a b l e
sweet and a
1-o-s-i-t-n-ji
benefit as
well.
Good l o r
teeth, breath
and d i g e s t i o n .
M a k e s the
next
cigar
taste better.
M. and M. Maistelmbn
Successor! to
H. E. STAHLER
Central Avenue's Leading Confectionery and Ice Cream Parlor
BEST SODAS and SUNDAES
IN THE CITY 10 cents
Try Me Out
ECONOMY STORE 215 CENTRAL AV.
Dress Goods Trimmings
Hemstitching and PI. atmg
OPEN EVENINGS
PINE H l d S PhMRNIACY
" • he Family Store"
1116 Madison Ave., Cor. Allen
Phone West 156
N. W. Brings and M.T.Stone, Prop.
Compliments
of
College Candy Shop
'Sealed in
its Purity
Package
COTRELL & LEONARD
Albany, N, Y.
Caps—Gowns—Hoods
I'OR ALL DEGREES
iEZZEZSZZ ,
SPORTING
COLLEGE BARBER SHOP
CONRAD HEYES, Prop.
Drop i n between Classes
Radio Supplies
GOODS
Open Evenings
ALBANY AUTO SUPPLY, INC.
West 1616
145 Central Avenue
82 ROBIN S T R E E T
KIMBALL'S
RESTAURANT
H. R. KIMBALL, Prop.
SPECIAL DINNERS
40and50cents
A LA CARTE SERVICE
MEAL TICKETS SUNDAY CHICKEN DINNER 60c
206 Washington Ave.
Telephone
4 doors above 1 ark St.
West 3464
Q U A L I T Y SILKS
State College
Cafeteria
W E A R W h L L CREPE SATINS in
all the new Fall colors. 40 inch 269 yd
W E A R W E 1 L FLAT CREPES in all
the new Fall colors 40 inch 225 yd
I hi'8c two fahiics arc unmatchable in value
fo" the price. ' I he wumetl culms in new Full
Luncheon or dinner 11:15— 1:30 OWSSHMVIO?' Hewelt's Silk Shop
Siure
Quality Store
219 C E N T R A L AVENUE
Ladies' and Children's
Ready-to-Wear
Clothing
16-17 NORTH PEARL
LAST 'BUT dHQT LEAS!
The Gateway Press
QUALITY PRINTERS
AT YOUH, ELBOW- WEST 2037
336 Central Avenue
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