State College

advertisement
State College
NEW
Y O R K STATE COLLEGE F O R TEACHERS
ESTABLISHED BY THE CLASS OF 1918
Vol. VIII No. 19
ALBANY, N. Y., MARCH 7, 1924
$3.00 per year
Two of Season's Biggest Games Played Saturday in the Gym.
FIGHT TO DETERMINE "BEST MAN" BETWEEN
POINT SYSTEM FOR HONOR "THE BOOR" TUESDAY
NIGHT IN AUDITORIUM RECOGNIZED [ANTAGONISTS ON BASKETBALL
DISTRIBUTION DRAWN UP
will a boor, a debt, and RusBY STUDENT COUNCIL sianWhat
music do to a woman? Now the
COURT-RECORD CROWD EXPECTED AT BATTLE
Radical C h a n g e Planned For
Office H o l d e r s
A point system has been drawn up
by the Student Council after investigation of similar systems in other
colleges. The purpose of this system
is to insure better management of all
public offices, to prevent social activities interfering' with scholastic activities and to give more people a
chance to hold office
A tentative point system has boon
devised under which each office has
been rated in accordance with the
amount of honor and responsibility
involved. Offices arc divided into two
main groups. Major offices are those
which are given six points or more.
Minor offices are those given less than
six points. One person may hold one
major office or two minor offices.
The following plan drawn up by
the Student Council has the sanction
of Dr. Brubacher:
Classes
President (except Senior)
Senior Class President
Vice-President (except Junior)
Junior Class Vice-President
Secretaiw
Treasurer
Reporter
Cheer Leader
Song Leader
Student Association
President
Vice-President
Secretary
Cheer Leader
Song Leader
Dramatic & Art Association
President
Secretary
Treasurer
Member
Music Association
President
Secretary
Treasurer
Member
The Pedagoeue
Editor-in-chief
Business Manager „
Literary Editor
Photograph Editor
Art Editor
Joke Editor
Subscription Manager
Ass't Subscription Manager
Advertising Manager
Ass't
"
Manager
The Quarterly
Editor-in-chief
Ass't Editor
Business Manager
Advertising Manager
(Continued on Page Two)
secret is out, there is to be real Russian music at the performance of
"The Boor" directed by Mrs. Raymer
to be presented March 11. Throe Interest Centered Ahout Anticipated Event of State's Basketball Season
S. C. T. stars are to be in this Dracame off the floor of battle last week trailing a G<
' ] to 22 score.
matic Class exhibit; Helen Orr as But State
during the last week of practice, State's hoop shooters have taken a
Helena Ivanovna Papov, Edward
new
lease
on
life
and
tomorrow
night
will
fight
their
"battle
of the ages"
Vines as Grigori Stepanovitch Smirwith the speedy St. Stephen's college quintet from Anandale-On-Hudson.
nov, and Margaret Eaton as Luka,
Undoubtedly the game tomorrow night will draw the largest crowd of
Why there arc even guns in the
play, but no one need get exciteci the season. The friendly rivalry between the two colleges is at temper
because they don't go oil'. All out! | heat, State's rooters demanding an equalization of this season's basketball
Find out what happens to this per-! intercourse, and the down-state col 'ego followers cheering their men on to
plexed wouman.
' another victory over State.
*! State put up one of its best battles
of the year at Anandale a few weeks
! ago, but lost out on the score in the
last few minutes of play. Coach Weg; ner has cast aside his pessimistic out-'
I look for this one game, at least, anil
is ready for victory.
With Captain Juckett back in the
fold,
things are taking on a slightly
"Yes," State College gym at 2:30 on Saturday, and we'll need a piano new aspect
for State, and tomorrow
and half the gym." Thus Russell Sage plans to invade the precincts of night's contest
should prove a fitting
State for the big game to be played oil' at 3:00 on March 8.
climax to the 1924 court season.
In view of the fact that this will be the first game ever staged at State
Colgate
used
a number of freshbetween the girls' varsity and an opposing college team, it behooves the
student body en masse to support the team actively. Dot Deita of G. A. A. men and varsity substitutes in last
but the Purple
week's
tilt
with
State,
will lead the cheers and Louise Welsh the songs.
and Gold jerseyed ball tossers were
Miss Johnson, the varsity coach an-0
unable to keep time with Bill Reid's
nounces the following line-up as probable: Heinemann and Craddock, for- TIME OLD ANTAGONISTS excellent machine. Caton and Gainor
wards; Liebock, center; Wright and TO BATTLE IN ASSEMBLY both were ofl! form and they failed
to contribute their usually expected
Belding, guards.
ON BOK PEACE PLAN
support to the Carrolan-Hornung forAll the team and the subs are unISSUE
ward
combination. Gainor very selder strict rules this week in anticipadom got the "tap-off" from the lanky
tion of March 18. For this game
Fine Speakers On Both Sides
Stone of Colgate, and consequently
should have much to do in determinState had little chance to work any
of the Question
ing State's place among college teams.
of its scoring plays.
Backed by the accumulated data of
After the game, the State varsity
will entertain at tea in the Green two weeks' strenuous research and
By far the outstanding performer
room, the Russell Sage team and the armed with briefs, facts and figures, for State was Hornung. He put up
officials of the game. Dean Pierce the supporters of the honor of the one of the best exhibitions of basketand Dr. Croasdale will pour. The sophomores and freshmen class are ball Hamilton ians have seen this seageneral arrangements are under un- today to fight it out in assembly.
son, taking into consideration, of
der the direction of Muriel Daggett,
The question of the annual debate course, the odds which were against
'24.
classic this year is "Resolved, that him. Sports writers, who "covered"
the United States should adopt the the game, all gave Hornung considerable mention for his agressiveness,
Bok Peace Plan."
The negative side, which is upheld which is shown by his scoring of four
by the Class of '26, is headed by Miss field baskets, despite the fact he was
Mary Flannigan as first speaker. She guarded by "Dick" Wasserman,
will be followed by Kenneth Mac- ranked as a leading guard in Eastern
Farland and Miss Isabelle M. Plude. collegiate basketballdom.
Miss Leishman is alternate.
Carrolan exhibited a good brand of
Kent Pease will represent the men
Cantata, Lullaby, Violin and Banjos of the freshmen class on the affirma- basketball for State, although he was
not quite up to his usual form. MurTo Feature. Edna Shafer and
tive side, and the debate will be phy made his debut with Coach WegEdward Vines Soloists
opened by Miss Ruth Colburn. Miss
ner's
charges and played a fairly
Zimmcrmann will be the second afSTUDENT TAX ADMISSION
firmative speaker. Miss Fay is alter- good came at forward. Shirley and
The annual college concert in which nate.
Davies also helped to check the Colall the musical organizations of the
It is understood that Professor gate rampage when they were called
college will take part, will be held Hutchison, Hastings and Hidley will upon. Captain Juckett played for a
in Chancelor's Hal promptly at 8:15 judge the debate.
few minutes, but was handicapped by
Friday night, March 7. The assisting
his sore hand.
artist will be Dr. Thompson's sister, TEMPORARY COUNCIL MEMBER
"Bugs" Livermore, left forward,
Miss Helen Thompson, of New York.
APPOINTED BY FRESHMEN
was the individual star for Colgate,
This is the first time in four years
that Miss Thompson has played at a
Georgiana Maar, '27, has been ap- making a total of seventeen points
State College concert. She will play pointed by Class President Corn- from eight field and one foul goals.
two groups of piano solos.
stock to fill the vacancy in the posi- During tho little while Jack Dolan,
The women's chorus, which now tion of freshman representative on
numbers 110 members, will sing three the G. A. A. Council. On Thursday, Albany boy on the Maroon team,
groups of songs. The first will be March C, a person will be elected as played, he swelled tho score by eight
permanent freshman member.
(Continued on Page Two)
points.
FIRST INTERCOLLEGIATE GIRLS' GAME
EVER PLAYED BY STATE TO BE STAGED
VS. RUSSELL SAGE COLLEGE TO-MORROW
SPRING CONCERT TO-NIGHT
IN CHANCELLORS HALL
AT EIGHT O'CLOCK
I'uge Two
STATE
State (HalUyt Bfouig
"The retentive capacity of the student never is accurately indicated by
the written examination," said -Professor F. N. Freeman, of the University of Chicago. "One student may
stay up all night to fill his head with
a jumble of dissociated facts without over understanding their meaning. In the examination room the
next day he will record his vast
knowledge with the same facility as
the superior student who has mastered his subject. The first type may
forget his facts within a week, yet
he is given the same grade as his
more intelligent classmate."
A plan of scientific measurement
of intelligence, to replace the examination system, was suggested.
Vol VIII
March 7, 1924
No. 19
Published weekly during the college
year by the Student Body of the New
York State College for Teachers at
Albany, New York.
The subscription rate is three dollars per year. Advertising rates may
be had on application to the business
manager.
(Articles, manuscripts, etc., must
be in the hands of the editors before
Monday of the week of publication.)
Editor-in-Chief
Dorothy V. Bennit, '24
Managing Editor
Mildred Kuhn. '24
Buiinesi Manager
Dorothy Jones, '24
Subicription Manager
Ruth Ellis, '24
Atiiitant Business Managers
Hildegarcle Liebich, '24
Lois More, '25
Associate Editors
Kathleen Furman, '25
Florence Plainer, '25
Margaret Demarest, '25
Reporters
Helen Elliott, '26
Margaret Benjamin, '26
Joyce Persons, '26
Harry Godfrey, '26
Jerome Walker, '25
RIGHTEOUS INDIGNATION
State College students as a whole
do not do any original thinking which
Is put to any practical use as war as
tlie college is concerned. This premise from direct observation.
The News has, during the year,
asked, nay, implored student ideas
and student opinion of all phases of
college life. Only once did it obtain
any material satisfaction in the form
of articles on the honor system. Apparently ideas and opinions died with
the honor system. It seems rather
dishonorable for stdonts to gossip detrimentally about the college institutions instead of stating their criticism where it would help bring about
reform or at least acquaint the student body with existing problem.-,.
The News is not in a position to demand opinions but feels that it is justified in critisizing a student body so
lax, so negligent, so obviously asleep
as the one it tries to interest.
DEAN METZLER~TAKES
ISSUE WITH EDITORIAL
Dean William H. Metzler this week
look issue with The State College
News regarding an editorial which
appeared two weeks ago in that paper. The editorial entitled "In Protest" attracted wide-spread discussion
among both students and faculty.
Referring to the clause, "the consensus of opinion is that the grades
are not fair," the Dean said: "This
implies wholesale criticism of the faculty. In one or more cases with one
or two professors this remark might
be justified but, as it now is, it is far
too sweeping, too far-fetched.
A
part-truth has been taken for the
whole truth."
"A most forceful argument in favor of abolishing final examinations,"
Dean Metzler read from the editorial.
Argument with whom?" he asked
.smilingly. "The abolition of final examinations is not practicable," ho
concluded.
_____
MORE AGAINST
EXAMINATIONS
Criticism of examinations as unsound, unscientific and generally
meaningless was voiced by a number
of speakers at the recent convention
of the National Education Association at Chicago. Ratings in traditional tests "have no fixed relation to
mental capacity or intellectual ability," they maintained.
COLLEGE
NEWS,
DR. BRUBACHER AND
DEAN PIERCE ATTEND
CHICAGO CONVENTION
OF EDUCATORS
Dr. Brubacher and Miss Pierce represented State College at Chicago,
where, during the past two weeks, a
series of the most important educational meetings of the year were held.
Dr. Brubacher attended the meetings of the American Association of
Teachers colleges, at which the principal discussion centered about a definition of standards of teachers colleges, including such questions as the
ratio of faculty to students, the number of hours constituting an efficient
teaching schedule. The main question taken up by the meetings of the
College Teacher's Association was
that of job analysis, a study of not
only the mechanics, but also the art
of teaching. The cost of education
with refutations of government and
popular arguments for reduction unci
limitation was very seriously considered by the Department of Superintendents of the National Association
of education.
The principal Chicago meeting Miss
Pierce attended was that of the Association of Deans of Women.
NEWMAN BRIDGE AND MA
JONG PARTY SUCCESSFUL
MARCH
7,
1924
POINT SYSTEM FOR HONOR
(Continued from page 1)
The News
Editor-in-chief
Managing Editor
Business Manager
Ass't Business Manager
Subscription Manager
Ass't Subscription Manager
Associate Editor
Reporter
Finance Board
Secretary
Member
Clubs (except Newman)
President
G. A. A. (Women's Athletics)
President
Vice-President
Secretary
Treasurer
Representative
Basketball Manager
Cheer Leader
Class Captains (except Junior)
Junior Class Captain
Varsity Captain
Varsity Manager
Athletic Council (Men's Athletics)
Secretary
Member
Class Athletic Manager
Varsity Captain
Varsity Manager
Newman Club
President
Vice-President
Secretary
Treasurer
Reporter
Quarterly Representative
Council Member
Y. W. C A.
President
VicoPrcsident
Secretary
Treasurer
Undergraduate Representative
Ass't.
"
"
Committee Chairman
SPRING CONCERT TO-NIGHT
(Continued from page 1.)
Professor Kirtland Wins First Prize
college songs, representative of the
And Has Fine Time
college sings. The second will be a
FIFTEEN DOLLARS FOR DORM group of Swedish folk songs, and the
Bridge and Ma Jong are popular. third a cantata, "The Slave's Dream."
Newman club recognizing this popu- The words of this cantata are by
larity opened its house to'the students Longfellow; the music is by H. A.
in order that they might enjoy a few Mathews, of Philadelphia. The solos
moments in their company Saturday in this cantata will be sung by Thyra
afternoon between 2 and 5 o'clock. Bcvier, '26. The college orchestra
The admission was thirty-five cents will play two groups of selections.
per person, and if a mathematician There will be two soloists, Edna
wishes to work he might figure how Shafor, "24, and Edward Vines. '24.
many wore there. Newmanitos are Miss Shafer will sing three American
quite elated. Fifteen dollars were songs, and Mr. Vines will sing two
cleared for the Dormitory Fund. Pro- Irish ballads. Miss Shafor and Miss
fessor Kirtland was among those Zelma Gorman, '26, will sing two
present and seemed to bo having a duets.
very enjoyable time.
Tickets for the concert will be fifty
cents. Students will be admitted on
PLANS FOR SPANISH
presentation of their student tax
.
CARNIVAL. MAY 9 tickets.
At a meeting of Spanish Club held
CALENDAR
Wednesday, February 27, Professor
Friday. March 7
Stinard gave an illustrated talk on
his trip to Cuba, showing about thir- Political Science Club—Room 201—
4:10 P.M.
ty-five slides made from pictures
which he took on the island. At the Music Ass'n. Concert—Chancellor's
Hall—8:15 P.M.
business meeting which preceded the
lecture, plans were discussed for the
Saturday, March 8
Spanish Carnival, which will take Basket Ball—Russel Sage vs. S t a t e place May 9.
College Gvm—3:00 P.M.
Basket Ball—St. Stephens vs. S t a t e YWCA VESPERS
College Gym—8:00 P.M.
Y.W.C.A. held vesper service in
Monday. March 10
the rotunda, Sunday, March 2. Dean
Metzler was the speaker. Ho based Math Club—Room 201—4:30 P.M.
his address on the words, "Lot him
Tuesday, March 11
deny himself, and take up his cross, Y.W.C.A.—Auditorium—3:00 P. M.
and follow me," and showed the dif- Advanced Dramatics Play—Auditorference between self-denial and deium—8:15 P.M.
nial of self, and between burdenWednesday, March 12
bearing and cross-bearing. - Special
music was furnished by the men's Spanish Club, Room B—4:10 P.M.
quartette. The leader of the meeting
Thursday, March 13
was Elizabeth Bonder, 27. A social Music Club—Auditorium—4:30 P.M.
hour followed the service,
JUNIORS SCORE OVER THE
SENIORS IN HOT DEBATE
ON SOVIET RECOGNITION
Greenblath and Nagle Make Fine
Speeches For Opposite Sides
2 TO 1 VOTE FOR JUNIORS
Maintaining that it would be inexpedient for the United States government to recognize the Russian Soviet
—a government which is "incompatible with the idea of sound government and generally recognized principles of International law, the Junior class debating team was given a
two to one decision by the judges
over the seniors last Friday morning.
The debate marked the first interclass affair of its kind at State college for several years, and it was the
first of two inter-class debates scheduled for this year. The freshmen
and sophomores are the principles in
the next discussion on the Bok Peace
plan.
Margery Bayless opened the discussion for the seniors, upholding the
affirmative on the question of Jius^
sian recognition. She asserted that
the Soviet is worthy of recognition,
since the government has endured
since 1917.
Muriel Weber, first
speaker for the negative, declared
that recognition would not aid the
people of Russia, and that it was not
an economic expedient or necessity.
Drawing a contrast between the
status of Russia and Germany during
the World war in respect to the
United States, and the present treatment of these .two nations by the
American government, Betty Nagle
attempted to prove for the affirmative
that the Department of State must
take cognizance of the Soviet, if the
United States is to bo just. The second speaker for the negative, Florence Greenblath, painted a vivid picture of the military rule in Russia
and the submission of the plebiscite
to this domination of the "iron hand."
Annie Olson outlined the history
of the recognition of Turkey, Mexico
and various countries of Northern
Africa by the United States, pointing
out that in each of the cases the
United States government did not
countenance illegal practices, such as
brutality and piracy, by her acts of
recognition.
Gertrude Olds came
through for the negative with proof
of charges that Russia has spread
propoganda against the United States,
that she has repudiated her debts and
that her international attitude violates the ideals governing inter-state
relations.
The judges were Professor Walker,
Acting Professor Hidley and Coach
Wegner. Two voted for the negative
and one for the affirmative.
JUNIOR PEDAGOGUE BOARD
TO BE CHOSEN MARCH 14
The ever-original class of '24 has
decreed that the 1925 Pedagogue
Board shall be chosen early so that
it may have experience with the 1924
Board. Consequently, the following
nominations were made Friday, February 29, Editor-in-Chief, Alice Daly,
Hormione Brabb, Mildred Hammersloy, and Ruth»Moorc; Business Manager—Dorothea Dietz, Lyle Roberts,
and Jerome Walker. Ejections will
be held March 14, and only those
who have paid their Student t a x and
class dues will bo eligible to vote.
PROFESSOR KIRTLAND
MOVES AHEAD OF TIME
Professor Kirtland has moved his
photography study from the Administration building to Professor Wooaard's lecture room, Room 260 in the
Science Building, where ho intends to
devote considerable attention to this
work.
i
STATE COLLEGE
GYM FROLIC S U P P L I E D
E N O U G H M E N TO GO
A R O U N D FOR O N C E
" A n d I h a d t h e jolliest t i m e , even
t h o u g h I h a d t o pay f o r m y m a n " —
t h u s w a s c h a r a c t e r i z e d G.A.A.'s novel
frolic of F e b r u a r y 21). B y v i r t u e of
t h e r e q u i r e m e n t t h a t each girl bring
a p s e u d o - m a n , it w a s discovered t h a t
t w o middies m a y c o m p r i s e a sailor,
a n d t h a t a f t e r all, clothes do make
the m a n .
Of c o u r s e , t h e g r a n d march w a s
led by B r u b i e a n d Dean Pierce a t the
head of t h e f a c u l t y g r o u p . T h e loading c o n s p i r a t o r , L a u r m a Shaffer int r o d u c e d as p a r t n e r s f o r a s q u a r e
d a n c e , B r u b i e and D e a n F i e r c e , alias
Wiles a n d Wenzel, Prof. Kirtland and
Miss
Futterer,
impersonated
by
G r e e n a w a y a n d O ' C o n n o r s , Dr. Croasdale a n d Prof. W o o d w a r d , by Lorian
and S m i t h , a n d Miss Wallace, and
Dr. H a s t i n g s , by Tuell a n d Wright,
all m a d e typical boys.
Dr. B r u b a c h e r , in a w a r d i n g t h e
prizes said, in s u b s t a n c e , t h a t it gave
him g r e a t p l e a s u r e to be t h e r e . The
a w a r d s left D o t T a y l o r and Dot
H e i g h t with a half a b a r of soap each
in token of t h e g e n u i n e n e s s of the
a r t i s t r y of t h e i r Mexican costumes, to
" B i l l y " H e i n e m a n n a n d Emily Holding, one half a lemon on a c c o u n t of
the g e n e r a l uselessness of their fair
costumes.
Upon challenge by Dean Pierce, the
men u n d e r B r u b i e allowed the women
to win a g a m e of volley ball. T h e
e n s u i n g V i r g i n i a Reel ended in a
series of r o u n d dances which lasted
with i n t e r r u p t i o n s for business meeting and d i s t r i b u t i o n of r e f r e s h m e n t s
by Bee P i e r c e until Dr. Croasdale
signalled with t h e aid of a cane,
F r o s h lid, and h e r watch that the
time had come to keep u p the good
time by c h e e r i n g a n d singing.
Dr.
C r o a s d a l e , Miss J o h n s o n , Miss Wallace, a n d Miss H o p p e r appreciatively
viewed t h e a n t i c s of t h e i r doubles and
friends of t h e f a c u l t y .
EDNA SHAFER CHARMS
MUSIC CLUB
B o o m B t u r n e d into a m a g n a t e ,
figuratively s p e a k i n g , on T h u r s d a y ,
F e b r u a r y 2S, when Music Club held
its m e e t i n g t h e r e . P e o p l e from all
directions (locked to h e a r t h e delightful p r o g r a m given by E d n a Shafer,
'24.
Miss S h a f e r w a s accompanied
by Dr. T h o m p s o n . T h e p r o g r a m included:
1 — ( a ) T h e Swan Bends Low to
the Lily
( b ) A Maid Sings Light and a
Maid Sings Low
( c ) S w e e t h e a r t Mine
—MacDowell
2 — ( a ) S o n g of the Open
( b ) T h e Little S t a r
— F r a n k La Forge
3—Sundown
—Woodman
4—Wash Day
— Stratton
5—Benediction
—Coombs
N E W S , MARCH
7,
1924
WHY STYLES CHANGE
On T h u r s d a y e v e n i n g F e b r u a r y 2 8 ,
Professor E r s k i n e b e c a m e a n h o n o r a r y m e m b e r of K a p p a D e l t a R h o . T h e
f r a t e r n i t y h e a r t i l y welcomes h i m into
its b r o t h e r h o o d .
Delta c h a p t e r of K a p p a D e l t a Rho
e n t e r t a i n e d S t a t e ' s b a s k e t ball t e a m
while on t h e C o l g a t e t r i p .
Psi G a m m a a n n o u n c e s t h e m a r r i a g e
of Madeleine H a r t w o l l , ' 2 0 , to Mr.
Robert L a n e of M o n t c l a i r , N e w J e r sey, on F e b r u a r y 2 4 , L!)24.
Psi G a m m a received t h e a n n o u n c e ment of t h e b i r t h of a son, H e n d r i c k
Charles, to M r s . C r a c e M e a d e V a n
Ness.
Adalinc S o h n s , ' 2 0 , w a s a w e e k e n d
guest a t t h e Psi G a m m a . H o u s e .
Psi G a m m a Alumnae' A s s o c i a t i o n is
to hold a b a n q u e t in N e w Y o r k , Sat-'
u n l a y , March 7. R u t h Ellis will a t tend t h e b a n q u e t a s a d e l e g a t e f r o m
the active s o r o r i t y .
The s e n i o r a n d j u n i o r classes in
Home Kconomics with Miss Cillett,
Miss Keim, a n d Miss F i l l i n g h a m , visited t h e T r o y e v e n i n g school on Wednesday, F e b r u a r y 2 7 .
Miss Gillett a n d Miss Dotfs J o h n son w e r e " A t H o m e " i n f o r m a l l y a t
the Home M a n a g e m e n t house on
Wednesday of this week.
Miss Gillett is e n t e r t a i n i n g with
each Homo M a n a g e r once a m o n t h .
G. A. A. DRAWS UP NKVV CONSTITUTION TO GOVERN
AWARD OF LETTERS
Impossible F o r L e t t e r s tn be W o n
Before J u n i o r Year
The business m e e t i n g of G A A , held
a t the F r o l i c of F e b r u a r y 2 9 , m a d e
history in the a n n a l s of w o m e n a t h letics a t S t a t e college.
A radically
revised c o n s t i t u t i o n w a s u n a n i m o u s l y
adopted. This c o n s t i t u t i o n s t a t e s a n d
crystallizes into concise f o r m m a n y
of the ide-ils of t h e o r g a n i z a t i o n ,
heretofore taken for granted or b u t
vaguely r e p r e s e n t e d .
Tin; n e w constitution is l a r g e l y t h e w o r k of a
committee of Muriel D a g g e t t , ' 2 4 ,
Hilda Liebeck, ' 2 4 , and M a r y O ' H a r e ,
'25.
U n d e r this c o n s t i t u t i o n which g o e s
into effect n e x t year, a much n e e d e d
method of chocking up on t h e p o i n t s
won is devised. T h e m e m b e r s h i p of
the council is e x t e n d e d t o i n c l u d e t h e
officers of G A A . T h e chief i n n o v a tion is t h e i n t r o d u c t i o n of iron clad
rules m a k i n g it impossible f o r block
letters to be w o n before t h e j u n i o r
year. This c h a n g e places t h e G A A ' s
" S " on a h i g h e r p l a n e , b e c a u s e of
heightened difficulty of a t t a i n m e n t
and on a p a r with t h e a w a r d s of
other i n s t i t u t i o n s .
T I M E : The Present.
The
S C B N E : A m a r k e t place.
s t a g e boars a m a r k e d r e s e m b l a n c e t o
t h e office of Prof. Sales in Milne
High.
In o n e c o r n e r is a pile of
" H i n t s F o r T e a c h e r s . " N e a r this is
w h a t a t first seems to be a r o g u e ' s
g a l l e r y . A s t h e scene b r i g h t e n s , t h e
p i c t u r e s of this take on a familiar
a p p e a r a n c e ; t h e y show t h e m i g h t y
m e m b e r s of t h e class of ' 2 4 . It is
P r o f e s s o r S a y l e s ' office.
^n
Page Three
m
CANTERBURY (E<S9b^i^
DANO^^I^ATE
Is t h e r e a n y t h i n g cjtiite l l k 4 , A & n >
t e r b u r y Club f o r m a k i n g College I i f e / Z v
enjoyable?
Canterbury
held
i t s • ?/">>
monthly meeting for F e b r u a r y Thurs• hfj*
day evening, the 28th, at St. A n d r e w ' s C h u r c h . I t had been p l a n n e d
to have D r . T h o m p s o n speak b u t a s
this was n o t possible t h e club held
a business m e e t i n g a t which t h e n e w
constitution was b r o u g h t up. Rev.
Mr, F i n d l a y m a d e s u g g e s t i o n s f o r t h e
i m p r o v e m e n t s of C a n t e r b u r y which
w e r e received a n d considered. " B u s i n e s s " h a v i n g been discussed t h e m e m bers t u r n e d for a good time. " E a t s , "
always a c c e p t a b l e m a d e a r a p i d a p p e a r a n c e . P e o p l e seem to h a v e " b i g
a p p e t i t e s a f t e r hard w o r k a n d t h i s
crowd lived up to t h e slogan, b u t
t h e n , t h e e a t s wore good.
Dancing,
w i t h o u t which no p a r t y would bo
c o m p l e t e , ended t h e evening. W a t c h
for C a n t e r b u r y ' s n e x t m e e t i n g .
( A s t h e c u r t a i n rises P R O F E S S O R
S A Y L E S is discovered s i t t i n g a t h i s
desk. Ho is g l a n c i n g over s a m p l e s of
his l a t e s t supply of w a r e s . Ho a r r a n g e s t h e m a t t r a c t i v e l y m a r k i n g on
each its price, n o w and then p a u s i n g
to m u m b l e i n c o h e r e n t c o m m e n t s . )
A CUSTOMER enter;. He wears
glasses. In one hand is a g u i d e t o
the E d u c a t i o n Building. In t h e o t h e r
a N e w York Central time-table. E v i dently, he is the. principal of S o m e place High School.
PROF. SAYLES:
( r u b b i n g his
h a n d s ) " W h a t can f do f o r y o u , s i r ? "
SPORTTNGTGOODS
C U S T O M E R : " H a v e yon .any nice
fresh schoolteachers on h a n d ? "
RADIO
S U P P L Y - O p e n Evening
i have
S A Y L E S : " Y e s , plenty.
j u s t been a r r a n g i n g t h e m for t h e W e s t 1616
145 C E N T R A L AVE,
s p r i n g sale.
J u s t w h a t would you
like, sir. We have all the s t a n d a r d
lines. Spanish'.' F r e n c h E n g l i s h ? O r ,
p e r h a p s , s o m e t h i n g in o u r Latin line
would suit y o u r fancy. T h e matheNEWS DEALER
m a t i c s b r a n d is especially fine this
Cigars, Candy a n d Stationery
year."
Developing & P r i n t i n g C a m e r a F i l m s
Electric S u p p l i e s
C U S T O M E R : " Y e s , show me o n e
,,aib
nday
of t h o s e . "
p
?
205 CENTRAL AVE.
Per"
S A Y L E S : " C e r t a i n l y ! " ( H e calls
Miss T w e n t y - f o u r . J She comes in e x p e c t a n t l y , h e r h e a r t joyous.
Compliments
of
C U S T O M E R : ( L o o k i n g with evid e n t d i s f a v o r on h e r bobbed h a i r )
E r — o r — a h . ( H e notices t h a t s h e
w e a r s t h e m long.) " E r , it's l a t e . P e r haps some other day. Er, goodbye."
H e t u r n s to go.
MISS T W F N T Y - F O U U :
(tearing
a t h e r shingled locks) " A n d it's c o m e
UP-TOWN JEWELER
to t h i s ! " ( H e r face b r i g h t e n s . Shi;
g r a b s s o m e t h i n g f r o m her pocket,
171 CENTRAL AVENUE
whips it a b o u t h e r head. ( T h e b o b
Below Robin Street
d i s a p p e a r s like m a g i c ; t h e n e t h a s
d o n e its w o r k . )
Easter Cards a n d Gifts c a n be
obtained at
Albany Auto Supply Co., Inc.
John J. Conkey
COLLEGE CANDY SHOP
C. P. LOWRY
BASEBALL HERALDED AS BIG
SPORT OF YEAR
WASHINGTON GIFT SHOP
" T h e best athletic s p o r t of this collage y e a r is g o i n g to bo b a s e b a l l , "
Coach W e g n e r d e c l a r e s . T h e coach
s a y s t h a t S t a t e h a s a n a b u n d a n c e of
e x p e r i e n c e d m a t e r i a l for this s p o r t .
T h e b a t t e r y c a n d i d a t e s t r y o u t held
r e c e n t l y w a s e n c o u r a g i n g , he said.
P r a c t i c e is to s t a r t as soon as t h e
s n o w is off t h e g r o u n d . B e f o r e t h a t
t i m e , h o w e v e r , t h e r e m a y be i n d o o r
practice.
244 WASHINGTON AVE.
P h o n e W e s t 1338-W
II. B . H A R B I N G E R
Cotrell & Leonard
Albany, N. Y.
Caps---Gowns—Hoods
FOR ALL DEGREES
Special Rates to Students
Sea Foods
RESTAURANT
IDEAL RESTAURANT
GEORGE F. HAMP, Prop.
H. R. KIMBALL, Prop.
SPECIAL DINNERS40
and50 Cents
A LA CARTE SERVICE
MEAL TICKETS
206 Washington Ave.
4 doors above Lark St.
ALWAYS
OPEN
Telephone
West 3464
Regular Dinner 40c.—11 a. m. to 3 p . m.
Supper 40c.— 5 p. m. to 8 p . m
Special C h i c k e n D i n n e r S u n d a y s , 60c, 12 M. t o 8 P. M .
P h o n e West 4472
208 WASHINGTON AVENUE
ALBANY, N. Y.
6 DOORS ABOVE LARK STREET
S T A T E COLLEGE N E W S , MARCH
Page Four
SOPH. MEN PILE UP THREE
POINTS OVER SENIORS
Carrying off a scoro of 17 against
the 14 points of the seniors, the sophomores immerged victorious from the
inter-class game of February 27.
Pollock opened the scoring by locating the basket for the seniors, but
even playing brought the score up to
4—4 at the end of a ten minute
play.
Shooting by Donnley and
Sage for '26 and Sherley and Cassavant for '24 ran the count up to a
tie of 8—8 at the finish of the first
half.
The second period was opened by
Pollock only to be followed by Kershaw again tying the score. From
then on the sophomores kept the lead,
the seniors being several points to the
bad until the final whistle revealed
a score of 17—14 with '26 on the top.
This victory R'ives the sophomores
the lead in the inter-class series by
one game.
The line-up:
Sophomores
Seniors
Sage
r.f.
Pollock
Kershaw
l.f.
Cassavant
Donnley
c.
Beaver
Cantwell
r.g.
Hayes
Briggs
l.g.
Sherley
Final Score: Sophomores, 17; Seniors 14. Score-keeper, Werner.
Time-keeper, Cole. Referee, Juckctt.
OMICRON NU GIVES PARTY
TO H. E. FRESHMEN
Home Economics freshmen were
ushered out of bare halls into a most
artistically decorated, "homey" looking room on Wednesday, February
27.
The soft glow from the pink
candles cast a magic spell of enchantment over the orchid and pink arrangements of the room. This was
the rare treat Omicron Nu Rave to
the Home Economics freshmen so
that they might know what Omicron
Nu was all about.
Miss Steele, Faculty member of
Omicron Nu, first gave the freshmen
an idea of the origin of Omicron Nu.
Later Miss Fillingham enumerated
the qualifications for membership,
and the work the Omicron Nu Alumnae were doing.
Professor Gillett, head of the Home
Economics department, attended the
party.
Professor Walker read a number
of French Canadian poems. Mr. Candlyn rendered a few musical selections and Helen Moore, President of
the Home Economics Club, gave some
vocal numbers. Eleanor Giffin played
the piano while everyone sang College songs.
Refreshments ended a most enjoyable time, and the Omicron Nu party
will always remain a delightful memory to the H. E. freshmen of '24.
7, 1 9 2 4
RETURN GAME SPELLS
DEFEAT FOR FRESHMEN
The Sophs staged a spectacular
HEADQUARTERS FOR
comeback when they defeated the
COMPLETE SPORT EQUIPMENT
freshmen team on March 7. Tnis
contest was judged to be the most
Albany, N. Y.
exciting of this season as at the end 39-43 State Street
of the first half the score was 7—4
in favor of '27, while at the end of
the game it read 15—8 for '26. Rainor '26, played an amazingly steady
and accurate game while Smith, '26,
although fouling heavily, caged most Whipped Cream or Marshmallow Served Here
of the baskets.
YOUR CHOICE
Miss Johnson in commenting on the
game stated, "The freshmen teams
TRY
A
TEDDY
BEAR OR JUNIOR SPECIAL
show remarkable promise.
They
HOME MADE CANDIES A SPECIALTY
played a better game than formerly."
The '26 team showed need for more CANDY, SODA, STATIONERY and SCHOOL SUPPLIES—HAIR NETS
practice together and more care
about fouling. The line-up.
BOX CANDY FROM 39 CENTS A POUND UP
Sophomore*
Freshmen
297
CENTRAL
AVENUE
PHONE WEST 3959
Tuell
r.f.
Swettman
Smith
l.f.
Du Bois
Raynor
c.
Tompkins
G. W i l e y & Bro.
Leeming
r.g.
Falle
V
Milmine
"
Moar
Dealers in All Kinds of
Wright
l.g.
Enipie
Our Moore's Pent
Fresh a n d Salt M e a t
Fit Your Hand
and Poultry
FRESHMEN MEN OUT OF
E make it a point
348 State Street, Corner Lark
LUCK IN SCRIMMAGE
to find out what
Telephones 544 and 543
The ball guided by Graham of '25
particular kind of point
found its way through the net in the
suits
best
your
individual
IF YOU
Junior-Freshmen game of February
hand.
29, and started the score mounting
COOPERATE
in the juniors' direction.
O'Brien
me PEN CORNER. ^ | / ? >
WITH THE
and Loko for the freshmen made telling shots which were Quickly off-set
by Graham, Landon, and Roberts,
lifting the total at the end of the
ESTABLISHED• 1887
-J^'
,f
first half to 10—5 with the upperW e will s u p p l y all y o u r
CORNER-HUDSON AVE.*"" SO.PEARL.
clafsmen ahead.
College N e e d s
The second half marked some good
pass work on the part of the winners,
and the best that the frosh could do
was to pile up five more points while
'25 succeeded in getting 11 to their
394-396 BROADWAY
fALBANY, N. Y.
credit making the final 21—10.
Albany Hardware & Iron Co.
I
KETCHUMS AND SNYDER
^r ^ S f f f f i P — t
W
r
ALBANY PRINT SHOP, Inc.
The line-up:
Juniors
Freshmen
Graham
r. f.
Jackman
Merritt
l.f.
O'Brien
Landon
c.
Lake
Roberts
r.g.
Horn
Crane
l.g.
Tobias
l.g.
Clarke
Final score: juniors, 2 1 ; freshmen,
10.
Score-keeper, Gainor.
Timekeeper Johnson. Referee, Sage.
•26'27 GAME SWIFT BUT WILD
The '26-'27 basketball duel of February 26 was characterized by swift,
sometimes wild throws, intercepted
passes, and such excited playing that
an unusual number of fouls were
called. Tuell, '26, and Falle, '27,
being the worst offenders. Tuell, '26,
played a brilliant game but the accurate shooting of the freshmen forwards won the contest. The enthusiastic support of '27 aided the freshmen.
Miss Hopper and "Billie"
Heinemann refereed. The line-up:
Sophomores
Freshmen
Tuell
r.f.
Swettman
Pierce
l.f.
Du Bois
Milmine
c,
Tompkins
Shaffer
"
Hartman
Leeming
r.g.
Falle
Wright
l.g.
Empie
Score: Frosh 23—Sophs, 15.
Special Attention Given Work
for Student Societies
. PRINTERS
OF
THE
Central Avenue's Leading Confectionery
and Ice Cream Parlor
PURE WHIPPED CREAM SERVED ON SPECIALS
NO EXTRA CHARGE
All prices of box chocolates fresh from the factory
at 39 cents pound box and up
299 CENTRAL AVENUE
STATE
1
After Every Meal
WRKUYS
Chew your food
well, then u s e
WRIGLEY'S to
aid digestion.
It a l s o k e e p s
the teeth clean,
breath s w e e t ,
appetite keen.
COLLEGE
NEWS
FRANK H. EVORY & CO.
General Printers
36-38 Beaver Street
ALBANY, N. Y.
91 Steps East of Pearl Street
Yum Yum Bakery
FRENCH PASTRIES
CAKES LIKE MOTHER MAKES
235 Central Ave.
Thm Crmat American
Swtmtat
State College
Cafeteria
Luncheon or dinner 12:00—l:0O
STAHLER'S
Phone W 869 J
"CO-OP"
m
Quality
LAST £UT !KOT LEAST
SILKS
The Gateway Press
And Dreas Goods At
HEWITTS SILK SHOP
Over Kresges 5 and
10c. Stores
15-17 No. Pearl Si.
QUALITY "PRINTERS
A1 YOUR ELBOW—WEST
336 Central Avenue
2037
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