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State College News
NEW YORK S T A T E COLLEGE FOR
TEACHERS
ESTABLISHED BY THE CLASS OF I9ie
VOL. VII NO. 8
ALBANY, N. Y., NOVEMBER 9,
!922
$3.00 per year
Department of Music Prer Dr. Bernard Clausen of Syra- Music Association To Pre- Dramatic and Art Council
sents Program In Assembly cuse Addresses Student Body
sent Famous Artists
Announces Program
ORCHESTRA AND CHORUSES SPEAKS ON "RELIGION AT NEW YORK TRIO TO APPEAR GERRIT BENEKER AND RUTH
DRAPER TO BE PRESENTED
TWENTY-ONE" AT REOUE5T LONDON STRING OUARTET TO
TAKE PART
The Dramatic and Art Council has
The fir.st musical program presented by the Statu College orchestra
and chorus was given in Student
Assembly on Friday, November 3rd.
The program was opened with two
selections by the college orchestra:
The first, a spirited "Military March "
by Schubert; the second, an "English
Morris Dance" by Noble. "College of
the Empire State" and "Llfctla '1 iza
J a n e " — t h e latter accompanied by
rythmic clapping — followed. As a
special treat Dr. Thompson introduced a now folk song dating buck to
the Puritans of the Vermont Hills.
The opening stanzas begin with the
characteristic lines: "There was an
old woman who had a little pig-'m-'m
-,m." The next selection on the program was a three-part number by the
woman's
chorus: consisting
of,
" There's a Meeting Here Tonight,"
" Oh, Didn't It Rain," and " Deep
River," the last of these is one of
the most beautiful negro melodies
that we have. Following the singing
of "High Above The Hudson Flowing" by the student body, the Men's
Glee Club, consisting of eight men
at preseent, gave a two-part number,
(Continued on page 4)
Newman Alumni Bazaar
OF Y. W.
Thursday afternoon, October St
the student body was given
he
opportunity of hearing Dr. Bernard
C. Clausen of Syracuse, who spoke
under the auspices of Y. W. C. A..
Dr. Clausen who, at twenty-nine is
recognized all over the country as
one of the most forceful preachers
of the day, spoke here at college on
"Religion at Twenty-one."
Dr. Clausen's talk was very
informal, beginning with his description of a strange and vivid adventure which he had experienced for a
year, when lie lived in the midst of
a tribe of natives whose problems
are forever puzzling the world, Lpon
this tribe depends the future of the
Kingdom of God. If it is converted
so is the world, otherwise ruin results.
And yet this tribe- is the eternal puzzle of all outsiders. They do not
understand the language, the customs, the music, the attitude of
the tribe members.
They cannot
offer a solution for this independent
mass, therefore they label the tribe
as fit only for eternal damnation.
This strange people which so perplexes the world is bounded on the
north by youth's courage, on tilt,
south by youth's enthusiasm, on the
east by youth's dreams, and on the
west by youth's ideals. It is called
" Twenty-one."
Extensive plans are under way
for the Newman Alumni Bazaar
which is to be held at Newman Hall,
7<lt Madison Avenue on Novembei
25 and 26. Although the affair is
to be held under the auspices of the
Alumni, donations from members of
the student-body will not only be
accepted but are earnestly solicited.
Handkerchiefs, fudge aprons, collars,
home-made candy, or any other
examples of good hand work are
what the Alumni are hoping for.
Donations may be made to Alice
Daly at college at any time.
Although Twenty-one uses much
the same language as the rest of the
world, the meaning of the words is
so cliff event that it makes a gap between Twenty-one and the rest of
civilization which is greater than that
between China and the United States
Twenty-one demands in religion
enthusiasm, not the cool sophistication and indifference of the church
and of aged people. Too obvious
piety repels rather than attracts.
Youth says that if what Jesus said is
true, then it should be more important than anything in the world, but
finding that is not to everyone,
youth questions and is not at all
CALENDAR
convinced.
Friday, November 10..
Fearlessness is another u. youth's
Chemistry Club Meeting
demands.
If a thing will not
Chemistry Department, 4:00 P. M. bear investigation at all times, it is
Spanish Club Meeting
no good. After watching religion
Room B, 4:00 P. M.
and seeing it tested, Twenty-one
reasons that if it goes wrong it is
Saturday, November 11
not sound.
Eastern Branch Alumni Meeting
Twenty-one is endowed: with inCafeteria, 6:30 P. M.
finite curiosity.
When grown-up
elders
warn against books which
Sunday, November 12
should
not
be
read,
courses which
Y. W. Vesper Service
should not be taken, because of the
Auditorium, 4:00 P. M.
danger involved which might destroy
or weaken religious faith, it promptly
Monday, November 13
reacts according to the laws of
French Club Meeting, Room 100, human nature. It hastens to taste
4:00 P. M.
the adventure of doing the forbidden
Mathematics Club Meeting,
and then it questions again. " If faith
Room 2 0 1 . 4:20 P. M.
must be taken care of by certain
favorable conditions, what good is
Tuesday, November 14
it?"
Youth does not want to bo
Y. W. C. A. Meeting,
Room B, 3:00 P. M.
(Continued on page 4)
RETURN
The State College M usic Association offers to the student body and
faculty a very excellent program of
concerts for the following year.
Altho' you will hear definitely
and fully in regard to each one of
these concerts immediately before it,
we shall give you the list now that
you may keep some of their dates in
mind throughout the year. We want
to assure the students also that the
Music Association is doing its best to
bring equally as fine talent to State
College as we did last year.
The first conceit will be a X-mas
Carol Community Sing by the
student body. Last year we had such
a X-mas coral sing when the students
entered so enthusiastically into the
spirit that it was decided to make the
event traditional. It is hold some
evening just preceding the Xmas
vacation, in the College Auditorium.
Last year practically the entire
student body attended.
The London String Quartet
makes its tour around the world
again this year and visits the United
States during the winter months.
It comes to Chancellors' Hall on January 13. As students are admitted
on student tax tickets they will not
be concerned with the price. You
may, however, tell your friends that
tickets are $1.50. This concert was,
without doubt a groat treat for State.
That both students and faculty
appreciate Chamber music is established, for we have heard about the
London string quartet ever since.
The college concert under the
direction of the Music Department of
the college will be held February 15
in Chancellor's Hall. Everyone is
interested in the progress in our own
music, and we always feel that there
is a treat in store in this varied
concert.
The New York trio brings to us
a similar type of music to that of the
London string quartet. This trio is
the best of its kind. It consists of
piano, cello, and violin. This concert will be enjoyed on March 10, in
Chancellor's Hall. The price will be
only !81.50.
Professor Lomax of Texas University, who was very entertaining last
year in his " Ballads of the Cowboy,"
will come to us again. As Professor
Lomax is a native of Texas and was
reared there, he brings first hand
material about the cowboy.
The
students will want to hear him again,
and learn more cowboy songs. Do
you remember " Roll on, little doggy,
roll on! "
planned its program for the coming
year. It has been decided to concentrate effort this year and to bring to
our college one of the finest men of
the times, Gerrifc A. Beneker, who became very well known through his
industrial war posters. Mr. Beneker
will give an illustrated lecture, which
will be an intimate account of his
work and actual experiences in industrial fields while securing models for
his posters, ft is planned to hold the
lecture at Chancellors' Hall, Nov. 28.
Miss Ruth Draper, who is wellknown as an international reader and
recognized as a brilliant arid charming speaker, will give several original
monologues in Chancellor's Hall in
January.
Besides the two plays, which are
given by the dramatic class, several
interesting art exhibits may be
brought to State College.
Ethel Cuminings, '23, will represent State College at an Intercollegiate Dramatic and Art Conference
held at Barnard College, New York
City, November 11.
FACULTY NOTES
The Faculty wishes to express its
appreciation of the music which was
given in Chapel on Friday morning,
November 3.
Professor York will speak to the
Commercial Section at the State
Teacher's Convention, which is to be
held in Syracuse during Thanksgiving week.
Miss Martinez will address the general meeting of the Modern Languages Association at Syracuse. Her
subject will be " Creating a Foreign
Atmosphere in a Spanish Class."
The teachers of Albany have
elected Dr. Brubacher as delegate to
the Annual Convention of the State
Teacher's Retirement System at
Syracuse on November 7.
Professor C. A. Hidley will speak
before the teachers of Fulton county
on Monday afternoon and evening of
November 16.
Dr. Brubacher will attend, as delegate, the inauguration of President
Charles Wesley Flint as Chancellor of
Syracuse University, November 17.
EASTERN
BRANCH
STATE
ALUMNI TO MEET AT COL
LEGE
The Eastern branch of the State
College Alumni will hold a meet
ing at the College, November 11, to
elect officers for the coming year.
The meeting will be preceded bv a
supper in the cafeteria at 6:30 in
the evening. Professor Sayles will
bo the only speaker, and he' will ro
port the results of the work of tir
Eastern Branch in the Residence Hal'
campaign. Miss dishing is genera!
chairman of this meeting, and uncle:
her direction invitations have been
sent out to all Alumni residing in
Albany, Rensselaer, Saratoga and
Schenectady,
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, NOVEMBER 9. 1922
Page Two
g>Mt
VOL. VII.
<BiiU*g* Nwua
November 9.
STUDENT COMMENT
No. 8
" regular" college student.
He
comes to a school where the words
" College Spirit" are lacking in the
vocabularies of the Upper classmen.
He does not know this, but soon finds
it out. Tho majority of the freshmen have discovered the fact already.
The Upper classmen, or so-called
Upper classmen do all in their power
to kill the " Spirit " in the frosh. It
is their duty to foster the ideas of
the freshmen and help them grow
into the stages of the reality, instead
of drowning them in an overflow of
contempt for the green freshman.
The Upper classmen of this " Institution of Learning " do not believe that
a freshman has a brain or an idea.
At least that is what Is shown by
their attitude.
School Spirit is buried in an overflow of so-called class Rivalry. Class
Rivalry should give birth to School
Spirit and not kill it. It is up to the
Upper classmen and the Sophomore.
What are you going to do about it?
BILLETS DOUX PREMONITIONS
Billets Doux are like measles —
you feel them coming on but you
can't get away from them no matter
where you go; you arc perfectly disgusted with yourself for getting them
and yet you couldn't seem to help
it. And just as measles leave be— J. J. L„ '2f>
hind them effects felt long after, so
billets doux leave behind sorely tried
hearts and disgusted mentalities that GUILD OF ORGANISTS HOLD according to Mr. Childs' original
stick with us even until mid-years.
plan. Mr. Douglas pointed out some
MEETING AT COLLEGE
of the definite reasons which have
In a very few short weeks these
Editor-in-Chief
inevitable phenomena will be upon
The guild of organists of which Dr. helped to make the restaurants famROBERT MACFAKLANE, '23
us with all the force of the history, Thompson is the Dean, met at col- ous. For example, he said that the
Managing Editor
English, matchematics and other lege Wednesday evening, November waitresses were organized into a class
VERA NOLAN, '23
equally terrifying departments. The 1. The members were quests of Dr. in which they are carefully informed
Business Manager
freshmen fear these phenomena, the Thompson on that evening and en- about the rules of waiting on table.
GRACE FOX, '23
sophomores expectantly await them, joyed refreshments in the college Each waitress is an intelligent, high
having realized their fate at the first cafeteria. Plans were made for a type of girl to whom courtesy is not
Subscription Manager
physics lecture, the juniors take them program for the work of the year. an unknown virtue. Mr. Douglas
LIRA W I L L I A M S , '23
as calmly as juniors take all things, There is to be a recital some time in said that right here was a fine opporssistant Subscription Manager
and with the senior they have become December. A definite date has not tunity for a Home Economics girl to
RUTH TEPFT, '23
" old stuff."
been set. An investigation is being enter into the field of restaurant
Assistant Business Managers
And meanwhile, what arc you made of the history of church music, management. He spoke further of
going to do about it? When you organs, organists and choirs of all the extensive plans, which are in
EDITH SAUNDERS, '23
receive your little notice, are you the different churches of the capital operation, to change the color scheme
Annie Olson, '24
going to give up all hopes and just district. A history will be written of the restaurants from a pure white
Associate Editors '23
lie down and let the rest of the col- which will be most interesting and to a buff color. More changes are
DOROTHY DANGKEMOND,
lege sweep past you, or are you which will instruct in the rise and now being made to educate the public as to the right kind of food to
DORIS BUTLER, '23
going to prove to yourself and to the development of church music.
eat. Mr. Douglas took the last few
Dorothy V. Bennit, '24
college that, it takes more' than a
minutes of his time to answer any
Reporters
billet doux to put you out of the
questions which came up,
MARGERY BAYLESS, '24
race? Are you going to rave about
HOME ECONOMICS NOTES
MILDRED KUIIN, '24
the unfairness of your profs or are
Mr. Douglas, a former member of
Miss Gillett, who in her series of
AGNES NOLAN, '24
you going to take an inventory of the State College faculty, spoke Oc- talks has taken the students with her
HELEN URR, '24 __
your own intelligence and find the tober 31 to the Home Management through the European home, conMURIEL WEIIEK, '25 ,
reason for that billet doux?
Class on Child's restaurant system in tinued her lecture, telling at this
Are you, freshmen, going to let the the United States. Mr. Douglas is week's meeting of German life. Miss
world say that you could stay in the an inspector, whose duty it is to see Gillett supplemented her talk with
A QUESTION OF COMMON SENSE college only until they gave a few that the restaurants are managed pictures and other illustrations.
During the past few years the tests and that then you had to move
<iuestion whether the "Alma Mater," out, or are you going to get out of
as we know it, has the characteristics your college course the very most by
of a real college anthem, has come taking your medicine when it comes
up for discussion at various times. to you and profit by it?
The contest has waged from one side
Billets doux do not mean that we
to another, and in the end the situa- have
failed. They do mean, however,
tion has remained unchanged. Noth- that unless
we put more ell'ort into
ing has been done.
our work, we stand a pretty good
Now the question has come up chance of making a mess of things in
again. A new song book is about to the future.
be published. Shall the Alma Mater
All of us get billets doux in time—•
be included as State's own college in a way, it's a sort of systematic dose
song? There are many reasons why of intellectual sulphur and molasses,
Willis
X'ewbride—" Did you gel seats for
it shouldn't be.
administered with the hope of bring- weigh et
the theatre, dearie?"
In the first place the average per- ing us to the place where we will
Him—" Yes, love, f got the fortyson finds it " unsingable." If he isn't realize our deficiencies and of offer- wanting?"
Gill's—" I never weighed her in the third row."
a Galli-Curci, he can't get up to the ing a starting place for correction.
top notes with a step ladder. The
" Oh, I'm so glad. The show won't
So when billets doux come out this balance, but I've always found her
extraordinary range makes it un- year in State College, let's not moan
bother lis a bit back there,"—Washpopular. And so it isn't heard very or ravd or give up — but linstoad, wanting a lol of stuff."—Judge.
ington Dirge.
much at student assemblies.
let's show the faculty we appreciate
Indignant Inez—"Bill, these here
The tune is a borrowed one. It their efforts; that we realize that
does not primarily belong to us. more of the fault lies with us than
"All that woman thinks of is old guys ihese days is fresher than
Therefore it does not stand as it does with them; and put into those lothcs."
peanut butchers, and if you wuz there
characteristic of State College. Any subjects in which we are billets
" From all appearances, I should Idda had you smack his jawer.
other college or group, of students douxed a little more conscientious
anywhere has the same right to use elfort, a little less indifference, and ay she was practically thoughtless."
Gentleman Caller—"Why, whutit as we have.
make the course in spite of the over- -I'enn State Froth.
diclec say to youse, Kid?"
At the present time " College of whelming force of a billet doux.
" I sez to Maine, my lady frien',
the Empire State " is usurping the
after the pitcher was half over, behonors as our college anthem. It is
Departing
Passenger—-"
This
is
missung every time a group of students
cause it wuz hot in there and Maine
get together. It is popular because
erable street-car service.''
she always only has car fare, and 1
it is everything that a real college
Conductor—" Why, what's the mat- sez ' Will ya have a sody pop?' And
LACK OF SCHOOL SPIRIT
song should be. It has a majestic
ter? Couldn't'you get a seat?"
swing to it that "Alma M a t e r "
wluiduya think this fresh old goof
moments, I am going to
" Sure I got a seat. But my wife sez? lie sez, 'No, thank you, Baby,
with its jerky rythm cannot equal. askForyoua few
lay aside all class preIt is expressive of the college spirit, judice. Ato student
who will not do had to stand up all the way,"—Chi- you'd better save ycr money."—Stanthe loyalty that typifies State.
so for the good of his school should cago Ledger,
ford Chaparral.
" College of the Empire State " has be forced to leave his school. I
a tune of its own written by an am ging to ask you to detach yourproduct for fuel, which is odorless
alumnus. No other group can use it. self from prejudice of all kinds, to
CHEMISTRY CLUB
It is written so that all voices can surrender your fixed ideas, and to
and smokeless.
This discovery is
At a meeting of the Chemistry especially interesting at this time.
reach it and it harmonizes well with put your treasured convictions to the
mixed voices.
test of facts, in a word, to discuss Club, Friday, November 3, Queene She pointed out to us another use of
The question is coming up whether this problem of causes of this lack Homan explained to us the attempt
garbage, which is to supply raw
we will retain " Alma Mater " or re- with an open mind.
to utilize garbage. Experiments have
ject it for " College of the Empire
When a freshman enters State he been performed which show that by materials for cardboard, paper, etc.
Stab
Ethel Meade talked about livingThis is a time for common comes with the idea of the big things
sense to rule over a foolish and mis he is to do for his college, He como3 adding creosote and coal dust to crystals which are found in prototaken tradition
with the fixed conviction of boinc a street sweepings we get a very good plasm and certain parts of the brain.
Published weekly during the college
year by the Student Body of the New
York State College for Teachers at
Albany, New York,
The subscription rate is three dollars per year. Advertising rates may
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manager;
(Articles, manuscripts, etc., must be
in the hands.of the editors before Monday of the week of publication.)
GRINS
'™"aa*li*Wi#as*«ei»«B£^
»^4m-muitmatciusiff&mmtm^
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, NOVEMBER 9, 1922
at N. Y, U. Law School, spent the
week-end ut tho Eta Phi house.
Ethel Rusk attended the foot ball
game at West Point this week-end,
Alpha Epsilon Phi welcomes as a
pledged member Ruth Louber, '25
Edward Sherley, '24 and Robert
MacFat'lane, '23, Gammas' delegates,
are attending the National Convention of K 0 P Fraternity, which is
'ROUND THE COLLEGE
Psi Gamma entertained her faculty
members at bridge Saturday afternoon, November 4.
Eunice Myers, '21, was a guest at
Psi Gamma on Saturday November 4.
Miss Ruth Bouton, of Russell Sage,
spent the week-end at Psi Gamma
house as a guest of Gwendolyn
Jones, '25.
Cora Meserve, '22, spent the week
end at the Gamma Kappa Phi house
Mr. James Cline, professor of English at Union, was a dinner guest at
Gamma Kappa Phi house Thursday
evening, November 2.
Gamma Kappa Phi extends hei
deepest sympathy to Ruth Calkins,
'25, on the loss of her aunt.
Miss Nellie Maxim, '24, enter
taincd Miss Christine Nichols, '18, at
the " Y " House Saturday.
Miss Frances Lawrence, '20, was a
guest at the " Y " House Saturday
" Y " House welcomes Miss Gladys
Reynolds, '2(i, as a house member.
The Kappa Deltas enjoyed an informal house dance last Friday night.
Professor: and Mrs. York, Dr. and
Mrs. Power, and Mrs. Stilson chaperoned. Among the alumnae present
were Sylvia Potter, '22; Marion Bur
nap, ' 2 1 ; Frances Stilson, '22; Mar
gery Potter, '21, and Louise Persons,
'22.
Helen Leary, '23, is living temporarily at the Home Economics Practice House.
Delta Omega Welcomes Dorothea
Deitz, '25, and Ruth Moore, '25, as
ORGANIZATIONS
Y. W. C. A.
Sunday, November 12 there will
be a Y. W. C. A. vesper service in the
college auditorium at 4 o'clock. At
this time a pageant will be given to
celebrate the 50th anniversary of the
student's part in the Y. W. This
pageant is entitled " The World
Student Christian Fellowship." Majorie Bayless is chairman of the committee &rranging for the presentation.
The theme concerns itself with the
efFect of the spirit of world fellowship for christian students on different nations. The characters are
played by Y. W. girls. Pearl Knipe
will lead the service. All college
students are invited.
At the regular meeting Tuesday,
November 14, in the auditorium,
there will be a discussion on the Ten
Commandments in the 20th century.
Everyone with opinions on the subject is urged to corne and voice them,
while those with no opinions are
urged to come and make them.
Dorothea Dietz, '25-, will lead the
devotions and Dorothy Dangremond,
'23, will lead the discussion.
pledge members.
Mrs. Adele Kaemmerlcnn Elmore,
'13, was a guest at the Delta Omega
house November 4,
Margaret Dawson, ex-'24, and
Louisa Barnes, ex-'24, now student
K-
•
V r7;
/
T
0
w
M
ftik
•P
H
y>4fflp
/<„
.
P
being held at Iota Chapter, Bucknell University, Lewisburg, Pa., on
November 10 and 11.
Marion Newell and Elnora Lubcrt
spent the week-end at the Chi Sigma
Thcta house.
We are glad to welcome Margaret
Lynch, '24, as a pledge member.
Helena Borsick spent the week-end
at Harvard.
I
i "- ' I
<*
Page Three
f
m - ft
O
F
P
I
S
A
asMJ'n.i
H
IPSE
D I X I T
and
G A L I L E O
There was much learning but
little real knowledge in Galileo's
time (1564-1642). Aristotle was
swallowed in bad Latin translations. Ipse dixit. No one checked
him by what seemed vulgar,
coarse experiment.
Galileo fought against the
dead hand of tradition. He did
not argue about Aristotle, but
put him to the test. Aristotle led
his readers to believe that of two
bodies the heavier will fall the
faster. Galileo simply climbed
to the top of the Leaning Tower
of Pisa and dropped two unequal weights. The "best people" were horrified; they even
refused to believe the result—
that the weights reached the
ground in equal times.
"Look at the world, and experiment, experiment," cried
Galileo.
The biggest man in the 16th
century was not Galileo in popular estimation, but Suleiman
the Magnificent, the Ottoman
Emperor, who swept through
Eastern Europe with fire and
sword and almost captured
Vienna. Where is his magnificence now?
Galileo gave us science—
established the paramount
right of experimental evidence.
Suleiman did little to help the
world.
Hardly an experiment is made
in modern science, which does
not apply Galileo's results.
When, for instance, the physicists in the Research Laboratories
of the General Electric Company
study the motions of electrons
inrarified atmospheres,or experiment to heighten the efficiency
of generators and motors, they
follow Galileo's example and
substitute facts for beliefs.
General^tElecffcric
general Office C O H I D 3 , 1 1 V Schenectady,NX
QS-637-BD
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, NOVEMBER 9, 1922
Cage Foui
DR.
BERNARD
SYRACUSE
CLAUSEN
ADDRESSES
OF MILNE
STU-
HIGH SCHOOL
DANCE
OSHER'S
HOLDS
A reception and dance for the
students of Milne High School was
given under the direction of the
(Continued from page 1)
Milne High School Students Council
in the gymnasium Saturday evening,
November 4. The music for dancforbidden, indued, it will not be ing was furnished by Charles Reilly
dictated to in negatives. Said Dr. and his confederates. Miss Rice and
Miss Cushing chaperoned.
Clausen, "We are fools if we nag.
It is our duty to translate negatives
The first business meeting of the
into affirmatives which will satisfy class of '26 was held November sixth
after History 2 lecture. President
the demands of Twenty-one."
Loller presided and discussed the
Life, not death is what youth is amount
of dues, need for class song
interested in. The religion of life and cheer leaders and a banner. An
and enthusiasm will appeal to youth appeal was made to the freshmen to
if rightly presented, but the hideous- uipport their class, and by a strong
.inity further the best interests of
ness of death, regarded too piously, "{tate College. In loyalty to this
it can not understand and will not ideal and to the class of '26, all
freshmen must attend the meeting to
respond to.
Twenty-one can find in Christ be held November thirteenth, after
History lecture, as the election of
the only answer to its demand for class song and cheer leaders will take
'fearless enthusiasm. He came to a place, and there is important business
world of negatives which he answered to bo transacted. The nominations
cd by saying, "Thou shalt love God. for song leader are Helen Becker,
Peg Flannigan and Thalia Vervir;l
Thou shalt love thy fellowmen." In for cheer leaders, Helen Rising and
Christ there is undying youth. He Veda Crissey. Class picture will be
spoke youth's language and faced taken Friday after chapel.
its problems with all the enthusiasm
of Twenty-one. In him can Twenty- DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC PRESENTS PROGRAM IN ASSEMone find the answer to all questions.
BLY.
Me belongs to youth.
(Continued from
I)
Dr. Clausen, after his talk,
"Winter Song," and Kipling's poem,
answered several questions which "The Gypsy Trail." Edward Vines
cleared vague doubts in the minds of sang the solo parts of the second
many of the students. His very number The musical program dosed
personality seemed to inspire his with the chorus' singing of " Sleep,
Sleep, Beauty Bright," a setting
listeners who left the meeting, wish- composed
by Mr. Candlyn of the
ing that they might have the good faculty for William Blake's wellfortune of hearing him again.
known poem.
DENT BODY.
It costs no more to use our Superior call and delivery service and
it saves you time. WEST 2344 Remember this number—you'll
need it when your Shoes need Repairing.
OSHER'S Shoe Repair Work*. 28 Central Av., Albany, N. Y.
GREETING
CARDS
FOR
ALL
Pfa»ljmgtmt (iMit jiijup
TELEPHONE
WEST
Florist
26 SECOND AVENUE
ALBANY, N. Y.
ALBANY, N. Y.
I 3 3 0 W
Park Lunch
Quality
SILKS
(ii) Central Ave.
A n d D r e s s G o o d s At
HEWITTS SILK SHOP
15-17 No. Pearl Si'
J. LLJDW1G, Prop.
Dinner From 11 A. M. to 3 P. M.
Oysters, Steaks, Chops and Short
Orders.
Try Our Daily Specials.
Lunches Put up to Take Home.
Ideal Food
2 0 8 WASHINGT ON A V E
6 doors above Lark St'
Supper 40c— 5 p. m. to 8 p. m.
Ideal Restaurant
Regular Dinner 4 0 c — 1 1 a. m. to 3 p. m.
SUNDAY SPECIAL:
Regular Dinner, 40c Special Chicken Dinner, 60c.
Special Rates to Students
&t?Ms^%
W
HEREVER you
are or whatever
you do, an Eversharp
pencil will serve you
well.
12 Noon lo 8 P. M.
G. Wiley & Bro.
Dealers in All Kinds of
Fresh and Salt M e a t
and Poultry
348
State Street, Corner Lark
T e l e p h o n e s 544 a n d 54 3
IF
YOU
CO-OPERATE
«W» PEN CORNER,
WITH THE
K
"CO-OP"
t5TABLI5HEO-iaa7
Central Avenue's Leading Confectionery
and Ice Cream Parlor
A large line of fancy box
chocolates, booklets,
favors, etc.
South End
2 4 4 WASHINGTON AVE.
COINER-HUDSON AVE.*»oSaPEARL.
STAHLER
BERBERICK
OCCASIONS
We will supply all your
College Needs
ALBANY PRINT SHOP, Inc.
394-396 BROADWAY
ALBANY, N. Y.
Special Attention Given Work
for Student Societies
P R I N T E R S
OF
T H E
S T A T E
C O L L E G E
N E W S
FRANK H. EVORY & CO.
General Printers
36-38 Beaver Street
ALBANY, N, Y.
WHIPPED CREAM SERVED HERE
91 Steps East of Pearl Street
Ice Cream, Sodas and Candy, Hot Chocolate, Hot Fudge
Try a "TEDDY BEAR" or "EASTERN SUNDAE"
Box Candy
Hair Nets
Peanut Butter Kisses
jfcll Sua? Jfawlttea
P. 0. Station 25
Expert Hemstitching, Buttonholes,
Bultons, all kinds of Pleating, Trimmings and Embroidery
2 6 0 Lark Street, Albany, N. Y.
PHONE MAIN 5875
Phone West 3959
State College
Cafeteria
Ketchums & Snyder
297 Central Avenue
Conserve your vision
5 Luncheon or dinner 12:00— I ;00
Have your eye* examined
Francis E. Cox
THE UPTOWN OPTOMETRIST
171 Central Avenue
Phone West 3756-J
Eyeglasses
Spectacle
The
Flavor
Lasts
LAST (BUT NOT LEAST
The Gateway Press
QUALITY 'PRINTERS
AT YOUR ELBOW—WEST
336 Central Avenue
2037
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