S t a t e College News ST. STEPHEN'S GAME-SATURDAY N. Y.,

advertisement
S t a t e College News
NEW
YORK
STATE
C O L L E G E FOR T E A C H E R S
ESTABLISHED BY THE CLASS OP 1918
VOL.
VI. No, 16
ALBANY,
N. Y.,
JANUARY
16, 1922
_ $3.00
PER YEA^
ST. STEPHEN'S GAME-SATURDAY
PRIZES IN SPEAKING
P r e s i d e n t Br-ttbachcr aiwiounoes
that t w o prizes'of twenty-live d o l l a r s
each will be a w a r d e d in .May for excellence in speaking.
The "President's P r i z e ' 1 will be awarded for an
original oral ion spoken by a senior
m a n ; the " T r u s t e e s ' Prize" will be
a w a r d e d for the interpretation of a
m e m o r i z e d selection (not original)
by a fresh man girl, T h e competition for both priz.es will be held in
the A u d i t o r i u m on the evening be
fore M o v i n g - u p Day.
The rules
g o v e r n i n g I be contest are as follows:
P r e s i d e n t ' s P r i z e in O r a t o r y . —
The competition is open lo all si nior
men. A g e n e r a l subject will be a s signed by the I'resideni.
Competitors will write upon some phase of
this subject, c o n s u l t i n g Dr. T h o m p son in o r d e r to avoid m o n o t o n o u s
duplication of topic.
The o r a t i o n s
shall be a p p r o x i m a t e l y 1,20(1 w o r d s
in length. T h e y arc to be submitted
to the P r e s i d e n t not later than Saturday, April first, at noon. A reading c o m m i t t e e appointed by I be
President will seleel the four best
orations, and these orations will be
spoken on the evening of t h e conT h e four speakers will be
test.
drilled in the delivery of their orations by Dr. T h o m p s o n .
T r u s t e e s ' P r i z e in O r a l I n t e r p r e tation.— C o n t e s t a n t s will be chosen
from freshman girls in English 1 B
CALENDAR
M O N D A Y , J A N U A R Y 16
4:15 p . m.
M a t h e m a t i c s Club — R o o m 201
S p e a k e r s on
C I P H E R S and
ANECDOTES
ABOUT MATHEMATICIANS
T U E S D A Y , J A N U A R Y 17
3:00 p. m.
Y. W . C. A. M e e t i n g — A u d i t o r i u m
Leader — Ethel Huyck
W E D N E S D A Y , J A N U A R Y 184:00 p. m.
C o m m e r c i a l Club — R o o m M
E l e c t i o n of Officers
5:00 p. m.
F R I D A Y , J A N U A R Y 20
4:15 p . m.
Music A s s o c i a t i o n — R o o m B
"Indian Music"
S A T U R D A Y , J A N U A R Y 21
8:00 p . m.
St. S t e p h e n ' s G a m e — A l b a n y H i g h
Gym.
T h e wise a n d learned A e s o p , J r .
has n o t e d o u r little sheet with
commendation.
Having watched
our events a n d o b s e r v e d o u r h u m a n
qualities, h e h a s consented after
m u c h d e l i b e r a t i o n t o s h a r e his
t h o u g h t s w i t h u s in a fable each
week. W a t c h for his first s t o r y in
next w e e k ' s issue,
after the following m a n n e r : Twelve
speakers for a p r e l i m i n a r y contest
will be chosen upon the basis of (a)
class grade and ( b ) speaking at t h e
Friday meetings of the clas.i, T h e
twelve preliminary c o n t e s t a n t s will
speak before t h e college at the student assembly on Friday, April 7th.
T h e President, Dean l l o n i e r and
Dr. Hastings will select four of
these c o n t e s t a n t s to speak for the
Continued on page -I
CONFERENCE
REVIEW
J a n u a r y 5,
Japan falls in line on law of sea,
Use o'f submarines as commerce
destroyers forbidden.
J a n u a r y 6.
Chinese-japanese conference on
S h a n t u n g reaches deadlock,
J a n u a r y 7.
Chinese ask help on S h a n t u n g
clash. C a n n o t agree on railway problem.
Supreme Council of League calls
an economic and financial conference to meet at tienoa.
All Europe, including Russia and
Germany,
invited.
Cubed
Slates asked t o lake pari.
I lughes proposal of ban on gas
warfare accepti d.
I lepeiideiil
upon public opinion for in forceincut.
Piracy resolution applies to all
naval men who break war rules.
January 8.
British delegation declares conference has d o n e about all ii
can.
Balfour declares hi- delegation
has no power to rewrite some
international
laws
American
delegation desires.
Aircraft report shows difficulty
of limitation of war use without
crippling commercial use.
H a r d i n g is c o n s i d e r i n g sending a
delegate r a t h e r than an "observer" to the Genoa conference.
J a n u a r y 9.
Xaval treaty draft
covers 15
years.
10 y e a r naval holiday
remains in principle.
Continued on page 2
COME AND SING!
It has been decided to have a sing
in the student assembly on J a n u a r y
20. Everyone realizes that \vc certainly need to practise the college
s o n g s . If a little of the pep which
the students expend in foretelling
their sad fate after mid-years were
used now in singing there would be
a real sing in assembly.
There have been very few sings
this year and, as t h e s e a r e one of
the best parts of college life, college needs them. T h e y give everyone a feeling of c h e e r and good
humor.
SENIORS' FIRST DEFEAT
T h e last of the G, A. A. g a m e s
Scheduled between the seniors and
the s o p h o m o r e s was played between
their two respective teams last
W e d n e s d a y afternoon,
I he seniors
led the scoring by two field baskets
almost
immediately
after
the
whistle blew. However, the sophom o r e s soon began to score, and al
the end of the lirs-l half they led
by 8 lo -I.
T h e second half was for the most
p a r t a mere display if basketball
technique with both sides sleadil)
g a i n i n g points until the last two
m i n u t e s , when both teams burst
forth with whirl-wind vigor. Their
speed was so great thai the game
b e c a m e a continual h u m p i n g contest with each player in the other's
way. It may have been due to a
d i s a d v a n t a g e on the part of the
seniors in that one of their players
was practically ill from fatigue or
lo the fact that Billy I Iciiiemau is
again playing on the s o p h o m o r e
t e a m thai the game ended with a
score of 18- M in favor of the soph
omores,
T h e box score of the g a m e is as
follows:
l-.B.
6
II
0
0
I)
0
T.
12
0
'I
(I
(I
')
II
IN
KB.
1
E.G.
0
1
r.
n0
3
-i
E.G.
1)
0
u
0
(1
(I
0
II
0
II
II
6
1
13
n
0
o
Score al half time, S o p h o m o r e s ,
S; Seniors, 4. Referee, .Miss Bennett
Scorer, Martha Parry.
Time of
each half. Ill minutes.
AMERICA VERSUS
PHILIPPINES
( F r o m a special interview with Air.
Isidoes Sanicl)
W e often wonder just how o u r
American c u s t o m s of college life
and activity appear to a person w h o
may have been accustomed lo soi iewhat different ways of doing t h i n g s .
Many times we have lo keep on
thinking without ever having l b chance lo find out But Mr. Isidoe.-,
Sanicl, a graduate of ihe University of the Philippines, has kindly
consented to tell us what he thinks
of our life as American college students.
Mr. Sanicl, after g r a d u a t i n g from
the University of the Philippines,
came to this country and -spent
some time visiting several of the
m o r e noted universities in t h e
United Stales, such as H a r v a r d ,
Columbia, University of Michigan,
and Chicago University. Later be
came to State College lo lake up
advanced work.
Al the p r e s e n t
tiim- he is also taking a course in
Library
Science
at
the
State
Library School.
D u r i n g the time
be has spent in these American colleges he has had ample o p p o r t u n ity to note the attitude of the college g r o u p .
According to him one of the o u t s t a n d i n g features of the university
life here is the emphasis placed on
tradition, In most of the larger
colleges ii is the basis or foundation
upon
which college activity is
built.
Here at Slate tradition is
mil observed as religiously as at
other colleges.
T h e universities
in the Philippines are c o m p a r a t i v e ly new and so lack ancient t r a d i tion. But at the present lime this
is being built up after the American
plan.
American athletics are practically
the same as those on the Philippine Islands, because the latter
forms arc patterned after the former. T h e only big difference is
that the Filipinos have no Rugby
football, but in its place they substitute association football or soc'Conlinued on page 4
APOLOGIES
TO BROWNING
G r o w hold along with me
T h e worst is yet to be
T h e last two weeks for which the
first were made.
O u r crimes lie in his hand
W h o saith " E x a m s I planned
T r u t h shows the path, trust work
t r y all and rest unpaid."
Of what has he to toot
W h o s e paper's writ to suit
W h o s e mind works in the prercquired way
T o studes propose this test,
T h a t paper at its best
H o w far can that project the world
upon its way.
The
New
York
Alumni
B r a n c h will hold its a n n u a l
reunion a t t h e Aldine Club,
Fifth Avenue, N e w York, on
F e b r u a r y 25. T h e dinner at
6:30 will b e followed b y a
dance till twelve.
Bring a
friend.
Good
eats,
good
music, good speakers, g o o d
time. Tickets a r e three-fifty,
including dues. If y o u d o n o t
receive a personal notice of
this meeting and should like
t o a t t e n d it, please notify
E t h e l M. Rooney, Sayville,
L o n g Island,
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, JANUARY 16, 1922
Page Two
State college Reu>$
Vol. VI
January 16
No, 16
Published weekly, during the college year, by the Student iiody of
the New York State College for
Teachers, at Albany, New York.
The subscription rate is tiiree dollars per year. Advertising rates
may be had on application to the
business manager.
[Articles, manuscripts, etc., must
be in the hands of the Editors before Thursday of the week of publication.]
Editor-in-Chief,
Louise D. Persons, '22
Managing F.ditor,
Hope D, Persons, '22
Business Manager,
Alice O'Connor, '22
Subscription Manager,
Ethel Huyck, '22
Assistant Business Managers,
Grace Fox, '23
Edith Sanders, '23
Associate Editors,
Robert MacFarlanc, '23
Eira Williams, '23
Vera Nolan, '23
Reporters
Dorothy Bennit, '24
Doris Butler, '23
Dorothy Dangremond, '23
UNWRITTEN LAW
Do you remember, 3'ou upperclassmen and sophomores, that the
State College student body unanimously voted to dispense with
studying, knitting, writing, and so
on in chapel? 11 you don't recall
it, perhaps it would he well to remind you!
.Also the freshmen
should he interested in knowing
just wdiat happened at that time.
The following is a clipping from
a "News" of January 13, 1921:
"Another subject which was
brought up in assembly was that
a great many students study, write,
or knit during chapel. Marjorie
Potter suggested that the student
body should pass a resolution
against this practise. This suggestion was followed and hereafter
all work of every kind will be left
outside."
On the following issue of January 20, 1921, an editorial, of which
this is a part, appeared:
"I low good it seemed to have
everyone vote in favor of the
motion that was brought up in
assembly two weeks ago—namely,
that mi one should bring books,
lunches, etc., to chapel. Hut how
much better it seemed
to have this
vision reali/.ed \ r o one forgot, but
everyone came empty handed, with
nothing to do but give his best attention to what was going on."
Do you think that anyone could
truthfully write such an editorial
at the present time? Perhaps the
motion wasn't stated in so many
words, but even if it wasn't, it's
supposed to be an unwritten law
that this custom is lasting and not
one that has to be voted upon annually.
Have you been doing
YOUR best to make this a permanent thing?
WAKE UP *24
What a bunch of students we
have become. We admit it's a good
thing—with prospects of the coming two weeks before us, But when
those two weeks are over, let's get
back to being a regular college,
besides being students. Every regular college has a freshman class
at least half subdued before this
time of the year. Alas, are. the
sophomores so busy with the
science of the soul that they cannot attend to this important part
of their business? Their sister class
believes '24 can do its duty well if
it will take the energy. We most
certainly do not desire 'hair-pulling
mobs, hut we do hope to sec college traditions kept and freshman
rules obeyed. And where is the
courtesy due the seniors from the
freshmen? it is impossible now
for a senior to plow through the
mass of freshmen who stand in the
way of lockers. And are the freshmen obeying rules? Watch their
violations. Of course they should
be ashamed of not keeping Stale's
traditions, hut they must he taught
what a shame it is.
The sophomores are tlhe acknowledged preservers of college
tradition and freshman rules, and
this fact 'has always been lived up
to by other classes. Wake up, '24;
your sister, '22, calls you. Make
'22 proud of you.
A Senior.
ABOUT T H A T PRIZE
Do you want a free Pedagogue?
Why not write out that clever joke
you heard in class yesterday—the
one your favorite professor sprang
for tile first time—and baud it In
some member of the Pedagogue
hoard/
A free copy is being
offered to the student who submit;
the best joke on a member of the
faculty, Another copy will .he given as a prize for the host juke on
any student. We ask only one
thing, that these jokes be original.
No jokes re-arranged from other
college periodicals will be accepted.
This is a splendid chance for the
right person. Is that you?
EXAMS AND EDUCATION
Do you know the girl (or boy)
wlho rushes around a week before
exams, or even a day before, rattling off phrases of information us
fast as she can talk, and begging
every other person she meets to
tell her something about this or
that subject? There are quite a
number of them around State Col
lege—just watch out for them this
week! Do you ever wonder how
much tihey really dp know? .Anyone would think that to them the
chief aim and object of education
was to cram as much as possible
into one set of brains in order to
supply material for an examination.
If anything is learned that is not
asked for, it is accounted as a
product of wasted energy. What
an awful attitude this is to take
toward education
and examinations! Everything we learn is a
basis for our future ideas and progress in life; we can never know
too much. If we learned the required lessons suggested by our instructors, there would be no need
or desire to rush wildly about at
the last moment attempting to get
enough knowledge to pass an exam.
Nave you ever noticed that the
people wdio have this habitarethoi.se
whose favorite motto seems to be
"Ignorance is bliss"?
'24.
FACTS OF INTEREST
Our calendar is of peculiar interest this year. Those who wrote
the date two weeks ago noted
1-9-22. About three weeks from
now 2-2-22 will appear, and in the
last week of the shortest month
those who are writing dates will
use 2-22-22.
'ROUND THE COLLEGE
The students now taking charge
of Nome-making activities at flic
house, 151 Western Avenue,' arc
Miss Dora O'Siiaughnessy, manager, Miss Margaret Smith, and Miss
Anna Ladu, assistants
Signa Nu Kappa enjoyed an informal dance at the house last
week.
At the last meeting of -the Delta
Omega the following officers were
elected for the second semester:
President, Catherine Drtiry; vicepresident, Katherine Peltz; treasurer, Elizabeth R cuuer, corresponding secretary, Gladys Weaver;
recording
secretary,
Charlotte
Lynch; critic, Carol Traver.
Elizabeth Rentier and Charlotte
Lynch are now living at the Delta
Omega house.
'file marriage of Florence Stubbs
to Horatio D. Clark took place, on
Xew Year's eve. Miss Stuhhs was
a member of the class of twenty.
Kappa Delta held election of
officers January 9, 1922, and the
following officers were elected:
President, Louise Persons; vicepresident, .Mabel While; recording
secretary, Delia lladsell; corres-
ORGANIZATIONS
Press Club
The Press 'Club will hold its next
meeting on Wednesday, January
18, in Koom 101, at 5 p. in. You
have been to Press Club meetings
and have discovered how interest
ing they are. Come again this
week and see what awaits you.
Commercial Education Club
There will be a meeting of the
Commercial Education Club Wednesday afternoon. January IS, at
4 o'clock, in Room M. All those
who arc interested in the organization of the club are especially
urged to attend and make this
meeting a big success, for the main
business will be the election of
officers.
Mathematics Club
Good speakers 4- interesting topics = a good meeting. This (Monday) afternoon, Grace Fox and
Clara Belle Whitcombe will speakon ''Ciphers" and
"Anecdotes
about Mathematicians," Remember
the time and place, Monday, at
4:15 p. in., in Room 201.
G. A. A.
Cage Ball Game
Attention girls! Practice for cage
hall will start the week after exams
arc over. If you don't know what
cage ball is like, come out and
learn. It will be worth your while.
No particular skill is necessary, and
not a great deal nf parcticc is required, it ieat sport, and
. rs is unlimited.
the num'ber o
Games will 1 ,etd Mondays and
Wednesdays at 5 o'clock. There
will be a series of interclass games
in which each class will play each
other class twice.
One point will be given for each
practice fund two points for each
game.
The schedule will be announced
later.
ponding secretary, Marjorie Bayless; treasurer, Twybill Purdy;
critic, Castella I lees.
Marion Bitmap has accepted a
position to teach English and
French at Athens, New York, and
begins her work to-day.
At an informal party held at
Psi Gamma House, Friday evening,
January 6, Mr. and Mrs. Robert
Clubley announced the engagement
of t'heir daughter Amy S. Clubley,
•21. to William M, McLean, j'r.
.Mr. McLean is the son of William
Al. .McLean, Sr., of the linn of
Hills, McLean and llaskins, of
Bing'hamton, lie is a graduate of
Hamilton, class of 1919, and a member of Chi Psi fraternity.
Psi Gamma entertained Saturday
evening, January 7, for her faculty
members and the parents of the
.Albany girls. Among the out-of
town guests present wen Miss
j'atie Jones of Brown School, Schenectady; Amy S. Clubley, '21. Eunice
E. Meyers,' '21 ; and Alberta If
Silikworth, 21, of Albany.
Dora Garbosc, '22, had as her
guest at tlie Dramatic Plays, Carolyn Is rans of lota Chapter Epsihm
Music Association
The Music Association will meet
in Room It. on Friday, I'anuary 20,
at 4:15. A program 'of Indian
music will be given as follows:
Discussion of "Indian Music"
.Agnes S Smith
Piano Solo
Pauline Wilcox
Vocal Sob,
Marjorie Blythc
Chorus of twelve girls.
Vocal Solo
Twybill Purdy
Vocal Solo
Harriet Ritzer
SENIORS!
Caps and Gowns will not be held
after Thursday, January 19th.
INFIRMARY
FUND
Dr. Croasdale has announced
that infirmary privileges will Inavailable as soon as the tax collection is complete. Tickets may Inobtained hereafter from any member of the Finance Board,
CONFERENCE REVIEW
Continued from page I
Provision in regard to merchant
ships being armed not definitely settled.
Limitation of size of capital ships
agreed at 35,000 tons and size
of guns at 16 inch.
January 10.
British take stand opposing
Hughes on new conference.
Balfour seen to defend powers
of -the League.
No air war restrictions decided
upon.
Hughes says conference will last
15 more days.
January 11,
President considers settlement of
Shantung issue essential to
•success. Reason for postponement of Balfour's departure.
japan holds up naval treaty by
taking except to article on
zones for the Pacific fortifications.
Gas and submarine decisions
likely to be in separate treaty
from the naval limitation treaty.
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, JANUARY 16, 1922
SCHEDULE OF EXAMINATIONS, JANUARY, 1922
THE
Monday, January 23, 1922
9 a. m.
Chemistry 6A
Gonim, Ed. 3
Economics 4
Education 14
History 2
History 4
Mathematics 4
Room
260
At
101
210
250)
( Gym (
200
201
2 p. m,
Education 2
i I onic Econ. 7 . . .
Latin 1
K.00111
Gym
150
250
T u e s d a y , J a n u a r y 24
English U3 g.
Knglish 15 , .
French 6 . . . .
Government 1
Latin .1
Mathematics 5
Philosophy 1
Spanish 6
.... 100
108
202
101
100
209
211
1!
2118
10')
110
Comrn. Ed. 12.
Education 5 . .
English 9
Fine Arts 6 . . .
French 9
Latin 6
Gym
103
W e d n e s d a y , J a n u a r y 25
Education 1
Education 1
Mathematics
Mathematics
250
260
Gym
..
..
1
2
11)0
Biology 5
Comrn. Ed. 4
Com.m. Fd. 7 A
Education 8
English l i : c
English 3
English 17
Government -I
Latin 2
Mathematics 11
250
210
A
109
Mm
Gym
209
202
110
201
T h u r s d a y , January 26
Economics 1
English 1A
English 2
English 2
English 7
Music 1
Philosophy 4
250
Gym
110
Ill
100
II
209
.
In
•h 1
German 4 .
History 3 .
11 nine Econ 3. . . .
Physics 2 ..
Physics 5 .
250
M
111
211
210
201
16(
150A
151
Friday, January 27
10.
orotti,
Inglish 111 f
mgLish 16
rench 2
renc'h 3
•crman 1
reek 1
. ...
M
211
Ill
250, 26(1
Gym
108
nioiogy J .
Chemistry 3
Fine Arts 5
German 2 .
History 8 .
ind 1A.
H o m e Econ.
H o m e Econ, 15
Library Science 1
Mathematics 3
Physics 7
25(
261
208
211
200
111
158
207
100
150A
Saturday, January 28
Biology 1
Chemistry 1
Comrn. Ed
English II
" i n c Arts
French 10
German I I . . . .
History 7
I Ionic Econ. 2A
E
19..
Music 3
Physics S
260
Gym
M
211
208
207
210
200
Diniinc room
. 150
B
. 150
250
B
208
200
160
158
100
201
150
259
103
English II! d . .
English 20
H o m e Econ. 9.
Latin 4
Musk- 2b
Physical Ed. 15.
100
10
150
110
An
207
Tuesday, January 31
Chemistry 2
Comim. Ed. 7
Government 2
Greek 3
Latin A
Music 2a
250
M
202
110
Ill
And
FLEET
A L e g e n d o f 1935
By Cora Hardy Jarrett
Open tihe door of their kennels,
And whistle them forth to die,
Tlie silent old sea-mastiffs
Dark in their docks that lie.
T h e r e ' s many a seaman's bosom
Will heave with a sobbing breath
W h e n the g i a n t g r a y .sea-mastiffs
Steam out to drink their death.
So we called to (heir keepers,
And we stood and watched them
drown;
Dogged and dour and silent.
O u r (logs of the sea went down,
Died for a word ami vision,
While (the wise ones prattled of
peace,
And the keen ones sketched new
dreadnoughts
W h e n the ten y e a r s ' truce should
cease,
H e a r t s of men, ye are shifting
As the shifting s a n d that blows,
But the deep-drowned 'heart of iron
Is steadfast to wdiat it k n o w s ;
I lad still a watch to keep
Against the day of new-born fray,
Shaking the peaceful deep.
W h e n the licet went steaming seaward,
And the other fleet drew in,
T w o grim half-moons of battle
In a m o r n i n g twilight thin,
Ere ever a gun had spoken,
Men heard a seaman shout,
And—t'ho.-e gray points that prick
the wave,
Are they m a s t s and funnels, or do
we rave?
They rise, they loom—from its
resting-grave
The P h a n t o m Fleet rides out!
Up from the floor of ocean,
Gray with her ancient slime,
D r i p p i n g arose the dreadnoughts,
T h e monsters of their time,
Rolling brine from their scuppers,
Rocked by an unseen swell,
T h e y bailed the y o u n g e r squadrons,
I'oeiuan anil friend as well.
" W e bowed our heads to the ocean,
W e drank her bitter brine;
We went to our death uncoiupiered,
Mighty sihips of the line;
We had carried our lives like banners,
But gladly we laid them down,
AH for a word and a vision
And an end that Peace should
crown.
" W i l l ye m a k e of us a mocking?
Shall we have died for naught,
W h e n we veiled our heads with the
waters
A n d gave up the light unfouglit?
W e are the P h a n t o m Squadron
With the barnacles on our rails,
And when we rise to battle,
By God, ye shall turn your tails!"
M o n d a y , January 30
Chemistry 9
English IB a
Fine Arts 3
French S
H o m e Econ. 4
H o m e Econ. 17
Mathematics IB h
Mathematics S
Physics 1
Physiography 1
Spanish 9
PHANTOM
Page Three
H o m e E c o n o m i c s 18
Spanish 1
Spanish 2
Spanish 5
Music 4
Continued on page 4
161
201
101
101
B
T h e w k e ones tell of parleys
By which the light was stayed,
But ask the frightened gunners
T h a t clung to the rails and
prayed!
Courage was there, and guns to
spare,
For foes of m o r t a l breath,
But who can fight with a squadron
T h a t (has broken the doors of
death?
So one fleet faded eastward,
And one licet faded west,
And the wise ones told the story
In the words that pleased them
best;
But the seamen know—and they
tell it s o —
T h a t when men's hearts were hot.
T h e old sea-dogs the danger heard,
T h e drowned sea-mastiffs waked
and stirred,
And rose to war for the warrior's
word
And the Peace that men forgot.
(Copied from N. Y, T i m e s ,
Nov. 27, 1921.)
STAHLER
Central Avenue's Leading
Confectionery and Ice
Cream Parlor
A large line of fancy box
chocolates, booklets, favors,
etc,
"
S!
•'
'•
GREETING CAROB
Mafilttmjtmt (gift &ljiifi
2 4 4 WASHINGTON AVE,
ALBANY, N. Y.
OPEN EVENINGS
PHONE WEST 133B W
COME TO
COLLEGE CO-OP
FOR
Boofe, Supplies, College
Stationery and College Banners
Quality
SILKS
A n d Drees G o o d s At
H E W E T T S SILK S H O P
°VeriOcrrs".ore5nnd
15-17 No. Pea.1 St.
Dank er
W e Grow
Our Own
"Say it with
Flowers"
40 and 42 Mniclen Lane
"After Every Meal
TEN
FOR
• CENTS
B130
The Flavor Lasts!
Page Four
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, JANUARY 16, 1922
SCHEDULE OF EXAMINATIONS
ALBANY ART UNION
Continued from page 3
'Distinctive 'Photography
Wednesday, February 1
Biology 5
Economics S
English 6
,
English 21
German 7
History 1
H o m e Economics 5
M a t h e m a t i c s 10 . . ;
Physical Ed. 9
2G0
109
Ill
211
210
202
2S0
100
ISO
Coiinn, Ed. 8
Economics 3
English I B b
German 10
History 13
Home Economics 8
Music 2c
Physics 4
Spanish 10
A
109
Ill
210
200
160
And
150A
103
PHOTOGRAPHS FOR GIFTS AND
REMEMBRANCE
PHOTOGRAPHS FOR REPRODUCTION AND
BUSINESS USE
Special Rates to Students
Thursday, February 2
Biology 6
Cmniii. Ed. 6
Education 103
English 22
French 5
Government 9
2G0
209
103
210
101
48 No. Pearl Street
P h o n e Main 991
Conflicts
202
THIS
SPACE
BELONGS
TO
Friday, February 3
Conflicts
HELMES
A M E R I C A vs. P H I L I P P I N E S
Continued from page 1
cer. In the United States the interest in the game is more intense.
It seems to be an American characteristic to forget everything else in
the absorbing excitement of the
game.
In addition to this the
American college girl seems to
possess more enthusiain at an athletic event than do their -sisters in
the Philippines. In the latter place
no girl without American training
would think of cheering at a game.
Mr. Saniel finds the American
college professor totally different
from the old fashioned native professor of his own islands.
Our
faculty are friendly and always
ready to help in all social functions
and athletic contests. They maintain a very cordial relationship with
tlie student body. A Filipino professor would not think of doing
such things. T o Jiim it would be
beneath his dignity to mingle with
the s t u d e n t s in any way.
As a result of tin's the American
student does not seem to have the
same serious attitude toward scholastic work. Social functions play
an extremely large role in college
life. T h e thing which Mr. Saniel
points out as a s u m m a r y of the
whole subject is the fact that the
American college is the model after
which those in the Philippines arc
taken. T h e faculty is largely composed of Americans o r A m e r i c a
trained men. T h e entire w o r k i n g
plan is modelled after our own
system here in the United States.
PROPAGANDA
Dr. Charles Upson Clark spoke
in assembly Friday on " H o w P r o paganda W o r k s , " Because of his
splendid training both at h o m e and
abroad and his interesting c o s m o politan experiences, he was able to
give to the students a very entertaining and instructive lecture.
of affairs <uul returned to him. This
s o r t of thing, though seemingly insignificant, produces the desired
effect.
Distorted tales are those which
m a y m o s t easily deceive us even
wiuh pictures, as in the case of an
account of a Bulgarian atrocity
against a Grecian bishop, T h e facts
were t h a t it was a Grecian atrocity
the details of which w e r e reversed
and a u g m e n t e d by a Grecian correspondent who went so far as manufacturing
and
photographing
a
corpse of the bishop, who was nowhere near the scene of action.
A n o t h e r case of deliberate lies
was that of the I liiiigarians who
whined about the Rumanian devastation of their c o u n t r y when all over
were signs of a b u n d a n t luxury.
So steeped in the untrue stories,
heard of the Rumanians, were people in foreign countries, that even
after visible proof of their falseness
they continued to believe the lies.
Speaking of present situations
whioh give rise to p r o p a g a n d a , Dr.
Clark referred to the 'situation in
T r a n s y l v a n i a , which, by the peace
treaty, was given to
Rumania.
T h e protest of H u n g a r i a n bishops
against t h e natural d e m a n d s of the
victor was printed in an American
magazine, although it was but a
distorted form of p r o p a g a n d a .
A s an e x a m p l e of true p r o p a g a n d a
Dr. Clark told of a Rumanian boy
of his own acquaintance who suffered m u c h in obtaining an education because of the
Hungarian
strictness, and vVhosc family was
severely persecuted in lime of war
for no reason whatsoever.
Having warned us of what to look
for in the stories we hear, he concluded by saying that even when
they are authenticated by photog r a p h s we should not accept them
verbatim.
BROS.,
INC.
WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO USE IT FOR
BUSINESS PURPOSES
LESTER H. HELMES, PRES.
#•—^S&HP
G. W i l e y (EL Bro.
Dealer* in All Kinds of
Fresh and Salt Meat
and Poultry
The Cversharp is made
in a wonderful variety
of shapes, sizes, and
finishes. Our stock is
complete.
348 State Street, C o r n e r Lark
Telephone 844 and 543
BRENNER'S
«7ffe PEN CORNER,
N
.//
Exclusive
Furs, Gowns, Suits
and Wraps
ESTABLISHED - «3Q7 J j v j .
>
CORNER-HUDSON AVE."'" SO.PEARL,
S 8 N o . P e a r l St.
A l b a n y , N. Y.
$5.00 Meal Ticket for $4.50 to College Students
Ideal Restaurant
GEORGE F. H A M P , Prop
Phone, W e s t 4472
208 Washington Avenue, Albany, N. Y.
Regular Dinner 4 0 c — 1 1 a. m. t o 3 p . m .
THE
HAMILTON
Supper 40c— 5 p. m. to 8 p, m.
PRINTING
CO.
PRODUCERS OF THE BETTER CLASS OF
BOOKLETS, CATALOGS, PUBLICATIONS
AND
D I R E C T BY M A I L A D V E R T I S I N G
PRIZES IN SPEAKING
Continued from page 1
P r o p a g a n d a , a word which in
olden times was much honored and
esteemed, has finally come to mean
design in favor of or against some
plan or idea. According to Dr.
Clark, there a r e three main kinds of
propaganda, humorous, true and
distorted, all of which p r o d u c e results desirous or otherwise, with
r e g a r d s to the viewpoint.
prize in 'the final contest.
Fourmtnttte speeches will be delivered
in the preliminary contest; for the
final contest the selections chosen
shall not exceed 1,200 w o r d s in
length. T h e four speakers for the
final contest will be drilled by Miss
Futtcrcr.
T h e h u m o r o u s propaganda in the
form of funny stories he illustrated
by .the example of the Rumanian
story of the German minister whose
watch was stolen at a banquet by
the Balkan minister of finance, and
was in turn stolen by the minister
Rules G o v e r n i n g t h e Final Contest.— T h e final contest will be held
at 8 o'clock of the evening before
Moving-tip Day. T h e three j u d g e s
are to be selected by the P r e s i d e n t ;
they shall* not be m e m b e r s of the
State College faculty.
£%&
II
PRINT***
Of THB BTATm C O L L I S t NMWB
24Q HAMILTON STREET
ALBANY, N. Y.
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