State College News STATE COLLEGE WELCOMES THE CLASS OF 1925

advertisement
State College News
NEW
YORK
STATE
ESTAIII.ISHKD
VOL.
VI. No. 1
COLLEGE FOR
BY THE CLASS OK
TEACHERS
1918
ALBANY, N. Y., SEPTEMBER 20,
1921
$3.00 PER YEAR
STATE COLLEGE WELCOMES THE CLASS OF 1925
CHANGES IN T H E STATE
COLLEGE FACULTY
Edward LeRoy Long, Instructor
in Physics since September, 1918,
has resigned to become principal
of the Schuylcrville, N. Y. schools.
Mr, Low* graduated from the State
College with the class of 1917, receiving the B, S, degree, Immediately after graduation he accepted
appointment as assistant principal
of the Saugerties High School.
After one year of work in Saugerties he was invited to join the Slate
College faculty as 'instructor of
Physics. Mr. Long lias taken an
active part in the general life u:
the institution and during the greater part of his work here as an instructor was,ft member of the Athletic Council, lie received the
master's degree from the college
in June, 1921.
Miss Marion Card, 'instructor in
Physical Education since 1917, has
resigned to become supervisor of
Physical Education in the Albany
High School. Miss Card is a
Dr. Frank Pierpont Graves
graduate of the Sargcant School of
Physical
Education, Before coming
THE NEW
to State College she was engaged
COMMISSIONER
in social welfare work in Montreal,
O F E D U C A T I O N Canada. Her work in the college
has been very successful. , She has
The Board of Regents of the left many friends among the students and faculty, whose best
University of the Stale of New
York has appointed, as successor wishes will attend her in her workto John Huston , F'inlcy, Commis- in the Albany High School.
sioner of Education and President
Miss Bessie Maud Harris, who
of tlie University, Frank Pierpont has been instructor in Household
Graves. Dr. Graves has been Dean
Economics during the past two
of tlie School of Education in the years, has resigned her position in
University of Pennsylvania since State College to take up graduate
191.3 and in that capacity developed work in Columbia University. Miss
a department of education that was Harris came to State College from
strong
and
favorably
known
a long and successful career as
throughout the United States and supervisor of Household Economics
Europe, lie therefore comes to in the city of Ncvvbnrgh, She had
the State Department of Education charge of the practice teaching
well fitted for bis task.
while here and came in intimate
Dr. Graves was born in New contact with the public schools of
York City, lie received his B, A. Albany in that capacity. She redcgrUe from Columbia University sides in Middlctown, Conn., and is
in. 1890', M.A. in 1891, Ph.D. in 1912. a graduate of one of the ConnectiHis early work was in the depart- cut State Normal Schools and from
ment of Classic Languages, He was Teachers College, Columbia Unian instructor and later an assistant versity.
professor of Greek in Tufts ColAssistant Professor Eva Wilson
lege and later became professor of
has resigned her position in the
Classical Philology in the same in- faculty
of the Household Economstitution. In 189(i he became Presi- ics department.
Miss Wilson came
dent of the University of Wyom- to the college soon
after the opening and in 1898 President of the ing of the Household
University of Washington, which department in 1912, SheEconomics
was the
position he held until 1903. From first instructor and later assistant
Continued on page 4
professor, having charge of the
courses in Dietetics, Microbiology
D E A N PIERCE AT
and Nutrition. An important conBRIDGEWATER
tribution made by her during her
work here was the organization of
CONFERENCE
the College Practice House. This
was pioneer work and the success
At the Fourth Annual Confer- of Miss Wilson's work is demonence of State Normal Schools held
strated by the fact that practice
at Bridgcwater. Mass., on Septem- houses have since then been organber 6, 7, 8, 9, Dean Pierce gave an ized at many colleges, including Coraddress on " Student Welfare in nell University. Miss Wilson will enState Normal Schools," She spoke ter Columbia University to take up
on Wednesday evening, September work for an advanced degree. She
7, and was the only speaker of that
Continued on page 4
session.
GENERAL NOTICE TO
ALL STUDENTS
1. Entrance examinations for students who have made arrangeuienls
in advance will be held in Room
250 at 2 p. m., Monday, September
19.
2. Registration will occur on
Tuesday and Wednesday, September 20 and 21.
3. Freshmen will be expected to
register on Tuesday, September 20,
from 9 to 12 and from 2 to 5 o'clock,
in the College Gymnasium,
Freshmen whose entrance credentials have been approved will go at
once to the College Gymnasium,
Freshmen whose entrance credentials have not been approved will
first see the Dean.
Freshmen will note special directions concerning registration on
the Class Bulletin Board,
4. Sophomores, juniors and seniors who filed trial schedule sheets
in May, 1921, vvill follow directions
to be found on the Class Bulletin
Board.
5. Students who are resuming
work after an absence of one or
more semesters, students seeking
advanced standing from other institutions, graduate and special
students will register with the Dean.
6. Class cards will be presented
by students to tlie instructors at the
first meeting of each class.
All laboratory fees must be paid
at the Business Office before instruction begins,
7. Instruction will begin as .scheduled in the catalog at 8:10 a. m, on
Thursday, September 22. Attendance wall be reckoned from that
date except in cases where students
are permitted by the Dean to register after that date or to change
schedule.
8. The first Student Assembly
will be held in the Auditorium on
Friday, September 23, at 11:35 a. m.
Attendance is required of all students,
New students should note the
Friday schedule of classes as posted
on the Bulletin Board.
Seats in the Auditorium will be
assigned to all students -before Fridav, September 30,
9. Changes in the schedule, except for extraordinary reasons, will
not be permitted after Monday,
October 3. No changes in schedules filed in May, 1921, will he made
on registration days except as directed by the Dean.
FACULTY ACTIVITIES
The first faculty meeting of the
year was held in the President's
office Monday afternoon, September
19th. A full attendance was present, including Dr. Douglass, who
spent the summer in botanical research in the Rocky Mountains,
and Miss Anna R, Keim of the department of Household Economics.
Continued on page 4
STATE COLLEGE
CALENDAR
TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 20
Registration Day.
WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 21
Registration Day.
THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 22
Instruction begins.
FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 23
8:00-11:00 p. m.
Faculty reception to freshmen
and juniors in gymnasium.
SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 24
p. m.
Junior-freshmen sing.
Hazel A. Rowley
T H E FIRST S T U D E N T
ASSEMBLY
The students of State College
are to lie congratulated on their
good fortune in having the new
commissioner,
Frank
Pierpont
Graves, as the speaker at the first
student assembly of the new college year. Coming from the University of Pennsylvania and having
held the presidency of the University of Idaho and also of the University of Washington, and having been instructor and professor
in Tufts College, Commissioner
Graves understands student problems and will speak with authority
on all matters of education. His
address on Friday morning will be
in the nature of an introduction
both as Commissioner of Education
and as President of the Board of
Trustees of the College. The State
College students may not know
that the Commissioner of Education
is ex-officio President oMhe Board
of Trustees of the State College for
Teachers. He, therefore, comes to
us as our own and we arc glad to
welcome him. It is extremely desirable that every student be in his,
or her seat promptly at 11:35 in order that Dr. Graves- may have the.
necessary time for this important
opening address of the year.
Page Two
Vol. VI
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, SEPTEMBER 20, 1921
September 20
No, 1
Published weekly, during the college year, uy the s t u d e n t Body of
the INCW * o r k State college for
T e a c h e r s , at Albany, iNew -X-prk;
T h e subscription rate is three dollars per year.
A d v e r t i s i n g rates
liiay be had on application to the
business m a n a g e r .
Editor-in-Chief,
Louise D, P e r s o n s , '22
M a n a g i n g Editor,
H o p e Ji, P e r s o n s , '22
Business Manager,
Alice O'Connor, '22
Subscription Manager,
E t h e l lltiyck, '22
A s s i s t a n t Btisiiiess M a n a g e r s ,
Grace Fox, '23
E d i t h S a n d e r s , '23
Associate E d i t o r s ,
R o b e r t MaeJ'arlane, '2i
Eira Williams, 16
D o r i s liutier, '23
Reporters
V e r a Nolan, '23
D o r o t h y lieiinit,''24
D o r o t h y D a n g r e t n o u d , '23
lege g o s s i p " , yourself.
She will
nudge you when a m e m b e r of the
faculty is approaching or, she will
play tennis with you, If you have
a spell of " T h e
H o m e Again
Blues " she will dash it all to pieces
with her smile.
Every entering
class looks forward to the time
when they will h a v e ' a sister class,
and you can j u s t count on '23 to
be the best sister class e v e r
Caroline Berberick is chairman
of the Junior Sister C o m m i t t e e .
Gladys l l a y n c r , Erva Littell, K a t h arine Bet/., and 'Grace F o x are also
on the committee. T h e s e girls will
wear their green and white '2.1 buttons and green and white head
b a n d s the first few days of college.
A n y freshman can ask any of these
green and white girls a n y t h i n g and
find out all. about it, If you have
trouble finding y o u r j u n i o r sister,
t h e committee will locate her for
you in two seconds.
'23.
MYRA FAUCETT
W o r d has been received from
G e r t r u d e Simniouds, '18, of the
d e a t h of M y r a Faticctt, '18, at her
h o m e in Corning on A u g u s t 23,
1920.
FROSH
IN MEMORIAM
Slate
presents
its
heartiest,
w a r m e s t reception to you in pleasurable anticipation of several y e a r s '
association with you, both in work
and in fun.
W e are anxious to
see you m a k e good nut only
scholastically, but socially, and are
prepared to lend you a helping hand
over such abstacles as may arise in
y o u r paths.
In addition to extending our welcome to you we also seize this opportunity to present the following
questionnaire and its friendly advice:
, 1 ^4'
Arc you m o k u s ?
Arc you a dope?
Can you step out socially?
Can you help develop State?
If you fill the bill for the last two
questions, step out high, wide and
h a n d s o m e in the h o n o r of this
school, but if you must admit the
first two questions, snap out of it
and get into the college swing. If
you arc m o k u s , college will be
mokus, for you get from it only
what you put into it.
'24.
(Contributed)
" T h e r e is no death I The, s t a r s go
down
T o rise upon some fairer s h o r e ;
And bright in Heaven's jeweled
crown
T h e y shine for e v e r m o r e . "
During the brief period since the
closing of college, State .suffered
a most severe loss. On A u g u s t 6th,
after a short illness at his home in
Tonawatula,
N. Y., Einil
Poll
passed from this to a better world.
A s a member of the class of 1921
he had taken his degree and was
ready to start on a w o r t h y and
useful career. But for s o m e purpose hidden from worldly eyes he
was called from this life.
While he was ,at college he
worked unceasingly for its interests.
In the routine of study, on the
athletic field, Emit Polt gave his
best.
lie lead the 1921 'Varsity
T e n n i s T e a m as captain and manager.
In football, basketball and
track he helped to bring honor to
his class .and his college,
Never
seeking personal glory, he worked
in his own quiet way.
FRESHMEN
lie belonged to the Physical Education Society, and was an active
T h e junior class is the sister
member
of Kappa Delta Rho F r a class of '25. O u r first p r e s e n t to
He took active part in
our sisters and b r o t h e r s is the . ternity.
g
y
m
n
a
s
i
u
m work as an assistant
Krosh Bible. Most of you freshinstructor and as an expert in apmen received y o u r Bibles by mail.
p a r a t u s work.
If a n y o n e registered late, be sure
W i t h his passing everyone who
ijmu find y o u r h a n d b o o k the first
knew him feels a loss. T h o s e who
•, day you are at college. T h e n read
were
his friends have lost a true
it from cover to cover. T h e m a p
friend and helper.
But they can
in the book will show you how to
never
fail to retain the sincere qualreach W a s h i n g t o n Park, H a r m a n u s
ity
of
that
friendship.
Bleecker Hall, or any o t h e r place
T o those whose loss is greatest,
of note. You also will find a list
"'hose grief is deepest, to his
of the rules the sophs will t r y to
father, mother, sisters and brother,
make you obey.
A l o n g with the
may the kind F a t h e r in H e a v e n
soph, penalties you will find colgive consolation and comfort.
lege traditions and college songs.
, If you w a n t to feel a t h o m e in college, become familiar with the good
CARL E. WURTHMAN
little book that is so h a n d y to carry
in your pocket.
' I n ' a l l ' probability, m o s t of you •
Carl E. W u r t h n i a n , eldest son of
freshmen have received letters from
Mr, Charles W u r t h n i a n , who has
y o u r j u n i o r sisters an J feel as
l o n g been connected with State
t]iotigh you knew them w e l l - a l - ; Collcec, died on his twenty-eighth
ready,
If you have not a sister, , birthday, J u l y 14, He had been an
don't worry,
A : junior will soon
invalid for oyer ten years as the
nonricc iipoh' you and claim you ' rnsiijt of ari, injury received while
for her own. N o w , this junior sis- I n l a y m g on, the Milne H i g h School
ter is going to be just the' best ! baseball team.
pal ever. ' After she h a s talked ! 'Mr;
Wu'rthman
had
literally
steadilv to yo.u' for a day of so, ; g r o w n up with the college, attendyou will feer like an e f f i c i e n t " col- ! ing the k i n d e r g a r t e n ahd elemen-
OUR MADE TO ORDER
GLASSES
Satitfy
M e y r o w i t z Bros.
tary grades which were connected
with the old building on Willett
street.' At the time of his injury he
was a third-year student in Millie
High School,
Facility
members
and former schoolmates, who held
tilth', in high regain!, will regret to
learn of his death,
68 North Pearl Street
GTwiley <a Bro.
KlFiri
Dealeri In All Kinds of
t>UMltan,i<
Fresh and Salt Meat
and Poultry
J. lie 111th S u m m e r s e s s i o n , which
ucbini j i n y a aiui closed August in,
iiu.j ueen especially sueccssiiu lit
many respects, i u e
enrollment,
mane up 01 college s t u d e n t s , college
graduates,
normal
scnooi
g r a d u a t e s , superintendents) principals, lugli scnooi teaciicrs and elem e n t a r y scliool teaciicrs, passed tile
cight-luindrcd mark, T h i s shows a
large increase over last y e a r s registration and is material evidence
ut the recognition tit the value 01
s u m m e r sessions lo teachers and
01 Uieir appreciation of the opportunities ottered;
Seventy-live courses were given
by t w e n t y - t w o m e m b e r s ol tlic
regular faculty and twenty-three
visiting i n s t r u c t o r s . All
classes
were well attended, and a spirit ol
earnest endeavor was constantly to
be noted.
Not every m o m e n t was taken up
with studies, t h o u g h , for when Hie
Students'
Association
had
not
planned something, there were lectures and trips put oh by some of
the d e p a r t m e n t s . S u m m e r students
enjoyed the unusual privilege of
hearing readings by Miss Fullcrer
each Friday evening. T h e Stud e n t s ' Association, with
Harold
Baldwin as c h a i r m a n , were responsible for the pleasant g a t h e r i n g s in
me gym after the readings. Carnival Night was highly approved 01
by both our s u m m e r visitors and
the regular students.
T h e W e d n e s d a y o r g a n recitals by
Mr, Candlyn, a n d the Community
Sings conducted by Dr. T h o m p s o n ,
were weekly a t t r a c t i o n s .
Excursions of all kinds, r a n g i n g from I he
local history trips to Ihc Saratoga
Battlefield, M o h a w k Trail, Indian
L a d d e r and K i n g s t o n Point outings,
kept people occupied over weekends. T h e men a t t e n d i n g s u m m e r
school were e n t e r t a i n e d during ihc
fourth week ut a s m o k e r at the
Sigma Nil Kappa H o u s e .
S w i m m i n g parties, m o v i n g pictures, u n d e r the auspices of the
Commercial
Education
Department, the interesting English meetings conducted by P r o f e s s o r Kirtland, and special lectures by Dr.
Convvcll, Professor
Stinard and
Professor Rislcy, delightfully filled
many spare m o m e n t s .
Aside from p o s t e r s and bulletinboard a n n o u n c e m e n t s the medium
t h r o u g h which e v e r y o n e learned of
the above-mentioned events and
m a n y other m a t t e r s of importance
was the s u m m e r edition of the
" State College N e w s . " T h e publication of a paper for the s u m m e r
s t u d e n t s was a feature that particularly characterized
this session.
The
venture
proved
successful
from both the reader's and staff's
viewpoint. I t is hoped that volume
T is just the b e g i n n i n g of a permanent s u m m e r paper.
JUNIOR-FRESHMAN
SING
F r e s h m e n , save a little bit of time
S a t u r d a y afternoon for the JuniorFreshmiin Sing, W a t c h the bulletin board for notice of time and
nlacc, Get yotlr State College song
books 'this week and bring them
along with you to'' t h e sing,
3 4 8 State Street, Corner Lark
Telephone S44 and 543
C. M. KRAMMER
DEALER IN
Watches, Clocks, Jewelry and Cut Glass
Repairing a tpecialty
88 Central Ave.
Albany, N. Y.
Guier's Bakery
W e B a k e t h e Beat
OUR BREAD A SPECIALTY
63 North Lake Ave.
Albany, N. Y.
Home Cooking Restaurant
(Mrs. I. A. Altheiaer
Former cook at State College Cafeteria
2 B 9 CENTRAL A V E N U E
JAMES MIX
W e are moving to
9 9 No. Pearl Street
Remember
thu New
Number
Steefel Bros.
Girls Shop
B
Q u a l i t y and M o d e r a t e P r i c e s
allllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll
SYDDUM HALL
CHANGES ADDRESS
O n S e p t e m b e r 1 S y d d u m Hall
was sold and immediate possession
was demanded by the owner. Miss
Pierce and Miss Wilson
went
h o u s e - h u n t i n g and succeeded in
renting a house directly across
from college, 1 E n g l e w o o d place.
T h e name, Syddum Hall, will be
transferred to the new house.
It
will be open to any student in college who applies in tunc to be acc o m m o d a t e d . T h e rate is $8.50 per
week for room and board.
Mrs,
H e n d e r s o n is to be t h e ; housekeeper, . and . Mrs, F r e a r
social
director.
i
STATE COLLEGE NEWS,'. SEPTEMBER 20, 1921
S T A H LEU'S
IMPRESSIONS OF
SUMMER SCHOOL
(Contributed)
Page Three
"AT
HOME"
;in the
An impression is defined as " ilia
Immediate effect produced upon tlie
HOME ECONOMICS DEPARTMENT
niititl by a sensation, passion, or
emotion; an indistinct or vajnie notion, remembrance, or belief." One
Friends, new and old, will be welcomed by students
cannot, liowevcr, have exposed
and members of the faculty of the Home Economics
himself to the Various associations
Department on registration days.
of life at State College Slimmer
Session for four summers without
Freshmen and other newcomers are especially asked
generalizing those Impressions into
to make themselves known to those who are dispensa definite, deeper significance.
What are they expecting to gain,
ing hospitality on this " Open House " occasion.
these eight hundred bits of " individualized chaos " (excuse, please,
Three to five on Tuesday and Wednesday.
Mr. Philosopher)? Is it merely a
little mental lumber to replenish a
depleted stock to use. next fall perhaps as scaffolding by eager little
builders of new mansions? Is it a
degree to lend professional pres- is the State College spirit to boost
TENNIS
tige? Or do those eyes, old with and root for victory. The scarcity
There can be no -doubt but that
ages of desire, sec a promise of
of letter men on the teams will be the W12 season of tennis will be a
I'isgah in'the distance?
noticeable, but will be partly over- record breaker. It is fast becoming
There have always been philoso- come by the fact that there is a one
most popular sports at
phers to interpret for us experience, great deal of " star" material to Stale.of the
In the past year the whole
to tell us how to adjust lo life with
lie taken from the scrub teams of
college
became
tennis fans. It is
the least, or perhaps greatest, in- last year.
most likely that this interest' will
convenience to self. " Eat, drink,
continue.
Tournaments
will be held
FOOTBALL
and be merry," says one, "Cultithis fall and in the spring, to which
vate an Indifference to everything,"
Football is coming into its proper all are eligible. Then, there will be
says another. "Sack cloth and
place at Slate College. While it
matches with nearby
ashes," says a third. Some are so is not likely thai a 'varsity eleven intercollegiate
colleges. Willi Warren Cray and
far above the ordinary, weak little will be drained this year, if the sup- John
Cassavant,
two veterans of
accidents of nature that they scorn port is sufficient class teams will be
former teams at college, the 1922
even to give advice and look with
formed. This is still a stage of de- 'Varsity should be a strong one.
satiric pity from the safe height of
velopment, but if the entire student
" Weissnletitwo " upon the dumb body gels behind the idea and
HOCKEY
show of life.
Last year's hockey season was
boosts, in the not far distant future
But none of these ofl expressed
we will have a 'regular football not very successful on account oi
philosophies will our experiences at team lo represent the college.
the mild winter. At no lime was
State College supply data for supthe ice very good, and so hockey
BASKETBALL
port of their theories. The play,
had no chance to amount to nmcii.
the work, ibe associations, the
But this coining winter, according
Basketball has always been the
ideals point a »vay through the biggest
at State, for it al- to weather prophets, will be*a cold
truths of the body, the mind, and ways hassport
one. That means lots of ice and
had
loyal
support.
Last
the heart to a vision of the year's learn set a .record in athletic lots of hockey, There are numerous
Promised
Land. We catch a
Because of its strong ol- good skaters and hockey players
glimpse of that first requisite of all history.
at college so that with sufficient
it attracted the attention of
leaching, how to live, " lo live fensive
the public. This year, however, support a good season eau he
broadly, fully, completely, on an only
realized.
one
letter
man,
Captain
"Jack
"
active responsiveness lo life at Johnson, will be at college. But
TRACK
every point."
there is a wealth of material from
Of late track seems to have fallen
last year's _ reserve team. With
ATHLETIC PROSPECTS
these men Coach Suavely hopes to from grace. Whether it will be
revived this year depends on the
At the start of another college form a strong team.
interest shown in it. There arc
year the athletic outlook seems lo
many good track men at college.
BASEBALL
be problematical. It is entirely up
It' wanted, there can be a regular
The baseball outlook is a little college track team to compete in
In the men who make the teams
whether Stale will have a recori clearer than is the case of the other intercollegiate events.
year in sports, The biggest factor sports. Several letter men will be
Now is the time lo start to supat college and will be eligible for port the learns that represent your
in favor of the optimistic side of
things is thes fact that we have a the 'Varsity. This has been a major college. At the first opportunity
coach who ' all his title means, sport for just one year, but its Cpmc out and root, or. heller yet,
.Mr. Suavely is the man who can popularity is growing. The season
if you can, come out for the teams,
train winning teams, Then there this year should be " the best yet." It is up to you.
Ice Cream and Confectionery
MUSK
299 Central Avenue
-:-
Albany, H, V.
Cotrell & Leonard
472-478 Broadway
Albany. N. Y.
WEARABLES FOR
WOMEN
Shoes
Furs
Frocks
Suitt
Tailored Hats
Luggage
FRANK 11.
KVOIIY & CO.
Printers
30 ami .'IN Hearer Street
Same Line of Merchandise with
New Additions
C O L L E G E PHARMACY
Cor. Western nnd No. Luke Aven.
Quality
SILKS
A n d Dress G o o d s A t
HEWETTS SILK S H O P
Over KrcuKi'H 5 nncl
10c. Storo
15-17 No. Pearl St.
EYRES
FLORIST
SAY IT WITH FLOWERS
TEN
FOR
FIVE CENTS
B130
TheflavorLasts!
Page Four
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, SEPTEMBER 20, 1921
and Bacteriology and Biology,
Immediately after graduation Miss
Sodon entered the hospital service
of
the United States army and was
art
located at Camp McClelland. After
the
war she became chemist in the
MUSCLE BUILDERS
laboratory of Dr. Charles G. McThe muiclci of the feet like thoie of Mullcn.of Schenectady. Since 1919
the handi heed proper exerciie to Miss Sodon has been Bacteriologist
and Dictctician in the Samaritan
develop and strengthen them.
Hospital, Troy, N, Y. She comes
Socket Fit Shoo ire flexible, allowing to her position in State College
with special fitness for the work in
absolute freedom to the foot.
Foods and Food Chemistry.
Other additions to the faculty
McAuliff & Gallahger
will include Miss Sabra Wilbur
22-24 Steeben St.
Albany, N. Y. Vought, Miss Cclia Mabelle Houghton and Miss Margaret Stuart
Williams of the State Library
school, who will give courses In
NEW COMMISSIONER
Library
Science. This is a new deContinued from page 1
partment at the college, given for
the first time, during the college
1U04 to 1900 he was a member of
the faculty of the Teachers College, year of 1921-22, The course vyill
be given in full co-operation with
Columbia-University.
Commissioner Graves has written the State Library School and seeks
to supply an insistent demand for
extensively, being the author of
articles 011 Greek Literature and high school librarians, An opporGreek Antiquities. In more recent tunity will be given for college stuyears his publications have dealt dents to complete a minor in Liwith problems of Education, lie is brary Science and thus qualify for
the author of "A History of Edu- high school positions as teachers
cation During the Middle Ages" of English or History and as superand " Great Educators of Three visor in the school library. The
new courses offered include the
Centuries." Since 1920 he has been
editor of the " Educational Review," following:
the most widely known educational
Reference Work; Library Adminjournal published in America, Com- istration; Cataloguing; Classificamissioner Graves comes to the tion and Subject Headings; SelecState Department of Education at tion of Books and Use of the
Albany at a time when problems
Library. The regular college liof great 'importance are pressing for brarian, Miss Mary Elizabeth Cobb,
solution. Especially important is and her assistant, Miss Martha Scott
the Rural School problem, This in- Stuart, will share in the work. Miss
cludes the question of Rural School Cobb will offer a course in ChildSupervision, Rural School Consoli- ren's work, covering such subjects
dation and Equalization of the Tax as Psychology of the Child's ReadBurden in Rural Communities. He ing, the History of Children's
will be aided in the solution of
Literature, a Study of Children's
these problems by the finding of a Classics, Story Telling and the LiRural
Educational
Commission brary Hour, Miss Cobb and Miss
which has been at work for more Stuart will together offer a course
than a year, but the chief problem in the Cataloging of Books, Magabefore the State will have to do zines, Indexes and Reference Matewith Educational Legislation for rials.
Rural Schools, Professor Graves
will have an opportunity to make a
great contribution to educational
FACULTY ACTIVITIES
progress in the field of Rural EduContinued from page 1
cation.
who spent the summer in extensive
Andrew S. Draper was the first. travel through England and France.
Commissioner of Education under'
The faculty took action regarding
the present education law, having matters of registration and entrance
come in in 1904 immediately after examinations, It was decided to
the consolidation of departments. hold the faculty reception to the
On Dr. Draper's death in 1913, freshman class as usual. The PresiJohn TTusten Finlcy became Com- dent appointed Miss Pierce, Miss
missioner and held that office and Gillctt, Professor Power, Miss Cobb
the presidency of the University of
and Mr. Suavely a committee of arthe State of New York from 1913 rangements for the reception which
through 1920. Commissioner Graves will be held from 8 to 11 in the
is therefore the third Commissioner college gymnasium on Friday evenin the present succession.
ing, September 23. All freshmen,
together with their junior sisters,
are cordially invited and strongly
urged to attend. The State ColCHANGES IN FACULTY
lege News hopes to see every freshman at this first social event of the
Continued from page 1 *
year. The music will be provided
is planning to take her Doctorate by Professor Thompson and Mr,
in Vocational Education for Women. Candlyn. The faculty will give a
luncheon to ComADDITIONS TO THE STATE complimentary
missioner Frank Picrpont Graves
COLLEGE FACULTY
Friday noon, September 23, imMiss Hazel Rowley becomes in- mediately after the student assemstructor in Physics in place of Ed- bly. The luncheon will be given
ward LeRoy Long, resigned. Miss in the college cafeteria, which will
Rowley is a graduate in the be closed to students from between
class of 1920. Her appointment is the hours of 12 to 1, President
a tribute to her scholarship and Brnbacher has also invited the prinalso to her great success as a cipals of the New York State Norteacher of Science. She comes to mal Schools and Assistant Comthe college directly from the War- missioner Wilev to be guests at the
luncheon.
wick High School,
Miss Florence J. Sodon, a
Both Miss Martinez, who was an
graduate of Simmonds College, be- instructor at Middlebury College
comes instructor in Dietetics, Bac- this summer and Dr. Croasdale
teriology, Microbiology and Nutri- underwent operations for appendition, succeeding to the courses Htis during the vacation. Dr.
given by Asst, Professor Wilson, Croasdale will be unable to return
At Simmonds College Miss Sodon
to ber duties at college until Sepspecialized intensively in Chemistry tember 26,
SOCKET FIT SHOES
ALBANY ART UNION
Distinctive Photography
PHOTOGRAPHS FOR GIFTS AND
REMEMBRANCE
PHOTOGRAPHS FOR REPRODUCTION AND
BUSINESS USE
Special Rates to Students
48 N o . Pearl Street
Phone Main 991
JOHN T. D. BLACKBURN
Danker
We Grow
I Our'Own
ReUil—COAL—Wholeule
"Say it with
Floweri"
Principal Office and Docks
129 Water Street
40 and 42 Mniden Lane
Tel. 998 Main
THIS SPACE BELONGS TO
HELMES BROS.. INC.
W E RESERVE THE RIGHT TO USE IT FOR
BUSINESS PURPOSES
LESTER
THE
H.
H E L M E S , PRES.
HAMILTON
PRINTING CO.
PRODUCERS O F T H E BETTER C L A S S O F
BOOKLETS, CATALOGS, PUBLICATIONS
D I R E C T BY M A I L A D V E R T I S I N G
AND
*
1*5
fRIHTtRelOF
THM BTATK COLLKOt NMWB
2 4 0 HAMILTON STREET
S. C. T. LETTERS
ALBANY, N. Y.
wins a cup. A1J those winning 60
or more points will receive S. C. T.
letters,
These numerals and letters
The New Point System
will be different from any others
you may have won in basketball or
This article is merely a gentle elsewhere, so it is up to everyone
reminder to former State collegians
to try out for this. At the end of
that last year we adopted a new
the year the girl having the most
point system by which every State points receives a cup given by the
College girl can win her S. C. T. G. A. A.
letters. Let this little bit of inThe following are the points
formation serve as a " pusher" to given
for each event:
every freshman,
Get your class
For each basketball practice atnumerals sometime, and the year
tended,
1 point.
'21 is preferable to the year '25.
Think how nice it is to be able to
For each basketball game played
wear a big purple and gold S, C. T
in, 2 points.
on your sweater and let people
For Indian Ladder hikes, 2
know yon belong to State. G. A. A, points.
now has a way by which you can
For shorter hikes, 1 point,
all earn your numerals and letters,
For each swimming party, 1
that is, if you work hard enough. point.
Last year a few girls won their letFor each skating practice, 1
ters by playing basketball, but now point.
we have a system by which witb
For each tennis practice, 1
a little perseverance, you can say: point.
" t won these at State College."
For each soccer practice, 1 point.
For each hockey practice, 1 point.
G. A. A., under the supervision of
For each athletic ' practice, 1
Miss Bennett and Miss Card,
worked out the following " point point.
For each volley ball practice, 1
system:" By coming out for different events you earn so many point.
Entrances for meet:
points, and upon gaining 40 points
First place, S points.
you win your class numerals, and
Second place, 3 points.
the girl winning the most numThird place, 1 point.
ber of points at the end of the year
Download
Related flashcards

Historical eras

16 cards

History of Japan

20 cards

Japanese inventions

16 cards

Metalworking

32 cards

Neolithic Europe

14 cards

Create Flashcards